The East Carolinian, January 19, 1982






Education:
Hazardous To
Your Health?
Page 3
Marionettes:
Strung Out In Mendenhall
Page 5
Lady Pirates:
Win Two In
Weekend Games
I
Page 8
2foe iEafit Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 58 No. 33
Tuesday, January 19, 1982
Greenville, N.C.
!0 Pages
Nail May Veto Student Government Bill
Medical Emergency Loan Reinstated
i� t
B DIANE ANDERSON
The Student Gocrnment
Association Monday approved the
reinstatement of the medical
emergency loan, which had been
made inactive by the summer
legislature, after lengths debate
regarding the use of the funds for
abortion.
The bill is likely to be vetoed,
however, bv SGA President Lester
Nail.
When asked bv one of the
legislators why he was against the
bill. Nail commented. "1 felt like
the students were losing money. 1
felt this summer thai there wasn't
adequate means to get the money
back there was too much being
lost. I wanted the medical fund
(suspended) strictly because I am
against abortion. It is not a student
service; I think it is a student waste
of money
Mike Rogers, a junior majoring
in music therapy and minoring in
psychology, passed out leaflets by a
Pro-life organization before the
meeting which graphically described
and illustrated gory details about
abortion. In his comments to the
legislature, he expressed his feelings
towards the medical emergency loan
fund being used for such opera-
tions.
"1 don't want my money suppor-
ting this thing he said. "It really
hurts me to see my money that 1
paid as a student go for something
like this
He further explained why he came
to speak on the issue. "One of the
legislators came to me and told me
that the bill would come up today. I
think abortion is wrong he said.
"Again, like I stated, I am not try-
ing to force anyone to believe how I
believe
"It is not the university's or the
student's responsibility to fund
something like tins. I really do feel a
lot more students are against abor-
tion than people think. 1 wish the
legislature would try to form a
survey to see how many students are
for and against abortion he
stated.
The student welfare com nut tee
discussed the possibility of a survey
in the fall semester to determine the
consensus on campus about the loan
fund, but failed to carry through on
the plans.
Mitch Daub, chairman of the
committee, moved to formally
amend the bill allowing the monies
to be used for medical emergencies
excluding abortion, quoting scrip-
tures to show the immorality of such
operations. "I will get 200 people in
this room he said, that would be
opposed to abortion.
I he amendment was defeated for
several reasons, including the
possibility of legal problems. "Until
it is ruled unconstitutional by the
I S. Congress we shouldn't make
that decision argued one
legislator.
Confidentiality about the way the
monies are used posed another pro-
blem regarding the amendment. "It
doesn't have to be used for abor-
tion; it may never be used for abor-
tion. We have no way of knowing
what exactly it is being used for
said Legislator Andy Lewis.
The fund is provided by the SGA
for students in the case of a medical
emergency. The exact manner in
which the money is used is confiden-
tial between doctor and patient.
Loans are made on the recommen-
dation of a certified physician who
must use his discretion as to what
constitutes a medical emergency.
The bill passed in its original
form, without amendment or
change.
SGA President Lester Nail
ECU Students Share King's 'Dream'
By PATRICK O'NEILL
stuff Wrilrr
The 53rd anniversary of the birth of Dr. Martin
Luther King was commemorated Friday by over 200
East Carolina students, staff and faculty. Various
events wer- sponsored by the ECU student chapter of
the NAACP with the added input of many individuals
throughout the university.
srginia Carlton. president of the university NAACP
chapter, and Student Union president Ron Maxwell
worked together in laying the groundwork for organiz-
ing the program, which began at noon in subfreezing
temperatures.
'Today we're tributing Dr. Martin Luther King Jr
who led a non-violent civil rights movement throughout
America during the '60s Carlton said to the crowd of
people gathered outside the Student Supply Store.
During a short invocation, Maxwell slated his hope
"that the world might see what we believe in and the
world might see the dream he ne dreamed � that truly
we all will be free
A recording of King's famous "l Have A Dream"
speech was played during a moment of silence. Then the
participants held hands and began a march to
Mendenhall Student Center. A chorus o "Wt Shall
Overcome" was sung, reminiscent of the civil rights
marched led by Dr. King.
Variations of the song were also sung with the words,
"We shall not be moved; we shall all be free, and we
shall live in peace as well as the rock version of happy
birthday composed by Stevie Wonder in honor of King.
Student reaction seemed favorable as well as curious,
as the marchers crossed campus. "The spirit was great -
it gave me a feeling of great pride . . . being a part of the
r-w s
Marchers carry a drawing of King to Mendenhall Student Center. Pho,� BrCMp ou"L1Y
service said Community Health student Patricia Alex-
andei " I here was a great impact on the people involv-
ed
When the march ended at Mendenhall, four members
o the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity performed a block
show in tribute to King, who was an Alpha Thi Alpha
pledge. The fraternity also presented a memorial por-
trait of Dr. King as a gift to the university.
A formal program of events and speakers began at 1
p.m. in Mendenhall along with the singing of the ECU
Gospel Choir.
Rev. Ken Hammond, program director of
Mendenhall, told the audience "it's time to just stop
dreaming. When people dream they're asleep, and I
believe that if Dr. King were alive today he would tell us
that we should stop dreaming now and wake up
Hammond refered to the problems and injustices
directed at minorities today. He stressed that people
need to "be involved at all levels" in crucial events.
"We need to wake up if we're going to make the dream
a reality Hammond said. "Our eyes must be open �
we must be watching daily the things that are going on
around us
Maxwell also called for action to bring about change,
saying "all of us should be challenged to want to
emulate the things that he (Dr. King) stood for He
then told the audience that "we will never see that
dream accomplished until we as a people learn to see
that apathy is a spirit of do-nothingness in ourselves
Citing King for his non-violent approach to injustice.
Maxwell said "a war still rages today because we live in
the midst of a society which stands as a sea of affluency
and in the middle of this sea . . . stands an island of the
poor
Maxwell went on to note some of the injustices on this
"island of the poor He mentioned a system of justice
based not on guilt or innocence but "on the quality of
legal counsel one can afford.
"A man is never-free until he is economically free
he continued.
The student union president said he was angered by
the recent santions imposed by President Reagan
because of the Poland crisis while the United States is
stilt "the biggest source of trade with South Africa,
where racism and injustice take place everyday He
also mentioned that the United States "leaves thousands
of Haitian refugees in detention camps, with conditions
not fit for animals, iust because they fled a country
where men (and women) are no longer free
Maxwell felt that freedom could not come about until
many of the barriers he mentioned were removed.
"When we as a nation can open our arms, then we will
See STUDENTS, Page 3
Greenville Salutes
t
Black Leader
By PATRICK O'NEILL
M�ff Wri4rr
Activities commemorating the birthday of Martin
Luther King Jr. were widespread on Jan. 15, in-
cluding several events in Greenville.
Among the city's activities was a protest-memorial
march down Fifth Street to the office of Rebublican
Senator John East.
The march was sponsored by the Pitt County chapter
of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference
(SCLC) to honor the Nobel Peace Prize-winning ac-
tivist.
The march was also used as a means of lobbying
support to have King's birthday recognized as a na-
tional holiday.
"We want it on the calendar; it's not on the calen-
dar. We want it to be a national holiday for all
stated Jim Rouse, SCLC media director, to the group
of 65 gathered on the steps of East'sdowntown of-
fice.
George Streeter, a speaker at the rally.
See GREENVILLE, Page 3
Trustees Meet
Hear Selection Committee's Report
The East Carolina board of
trustees learned Sunday that there
are approximately 148 candidates
for the position of chancellor.
The trustees, in an executive ses-
sion following its regular meeting,
were briefed on the progress of the
Chancellor Selection Committee
which is currently choosing a suc-
cessor for Thomas Brewer.
In its first meeting since John
Howell was named acting
chancellor, the trustees voted to ap-
prove his proposal to separate the
long-range work of the university
Planning Commission from the
faculty self-study being conducted
for the Southern Association of
Colleges and Schools accreditation
visit.
Howell said he felt the new
chancellor should have some input
into the long-range plan. "If we
move forward this way we can finish
the self-study, then think later about
the plan
The board also voted to establish
an ad hoc committee which will
study and review the Planning Com-
mission documents and report its
findings to the trustees as a whole.
The report will be received only as
for informatinal purposes and will
not be an endorsement of any
recommendations, the board decid-
ed.
In other business the board:
�granted Tom Willis, former direc-
tor of the Regional Development In-
stitute, a leave of absence without
pay for an indefinite period beginn-
ing in July.
�named Clifton Moore and Roy
Flood as members of the university
Endowment Board,
�voted to name the Campus Police
station on East Fifth Street the
Howard House in honor of the
family that made the acquisition of
the house possible,
�heard a report from trustee James
Dixon that the buildings and
grounds committee had selected Lit-
tle and Associates of Charlotte to do
advanced planning for the new
classroom building.
Fire and Ice
'�� MMp
mthlv CHAI�OULiY
Residents of Fletcher Dorm huddle in 19-degree temperatures during a
fire drill.
Student Union
Now Accepting
Applications
The East Carolina Student Union
is now taking applications for its
president as well as for committee
chairmen and members.
According to current president
Ron Maxwell, the student union will
be staffed for next vear by Feb. 15.
Applications for the organiza-
tion's president will be accepted
from Jan. 18 to Jan. 29, with the
new president selected on Feb. 4.
Students can apply to be
chairmen for the Student Union
committees from Jan. 25 to Feb. 5.
These positions will be filled by Feb.
8. Anyone wanting to serve on the
committees must applv from Feb. 1
10 Feb. 12.
Applications will be taken in the
Student Union office in 234
Mendenhall.
M
I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 19, 1982
?
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
It VOW or your organization
would Ilka to have an item printed
in me announcements column
please send me announcement (as
oriel as possible) typed and
double spaced to The East Caroii
nun in care ot the news editor
There is no charge tor an
nouncements. but space is otten
limited.
The deadline tor announcement
are 5 p.m Friday lor the Tuesday
paper and 5 p m Tuesday tor the
Thursday paper
The space is available to all
campus oroaniiations and depart
men ts.
SPORTS CLUB
The first meeting of 19� for me
Sports Club Council will be held
Wed Jan 70 at p m in Memorial
Gym. Room 105 Each sports club
recognized by the Department for
intramural Recreational Services
is required to have a represen
tative in attendance This meeting
is o� utmos' importance to each
club Agenda items include
lacilifylields usage allocation,
spring schedules approval disap
provai. budget problems for cer
tam clubs and club updates
KAPPA SIGMA
The Kappa Sigma Fraternity
would like to extend an invitation
to you Tonight is the second night
of Spring Rush, with the Famous
Bunny Night Wednesday night is
the Going Greek Kappa Sigma
Style Night For more information
call 7SJ SS43
GYMNASTICS ROOM
UTILIZATION
The gymnastics room located m
Memorial Gymnasium is open to
students, faculty and staff each
MM � Thur from 6 30 P m to (
p m Members of the university
community are invited to utilize
the gymnastics equipment and ex
ercise area under the guidance of
qualified instructors during these
time periods
HANDBALLRACQUET
BALL
A challenge court system will be in
effect on court no 2 from 8 15 pm
to midnignt on Tues Thurs and
Sat mghts A blackboard has been
provided on the observation deck
level to establish challenge posi
t i o n s
BELLY DANCING
The Department of intramural
Recreational Services is offer ma a
brand new course this semester.
Belly Dancing! This ancient, ex-
otic art form will be offered Tues
day evenings from 6 30 7 30 p m
The class will be held m the Dance
Room in Memorial Gym starting
Feb 2, and will continue for 8
weeks The cost is $5 for the entire
session This is a beginners class
No experience is necessary Don't
be shy! Sign up in room 204
Memorial Gym for a fun rlas that
will help you get ready lor bikini
season For additional informa
tion. call Sue Stanley at 757 A064
NOTICE
Students who CHANGED
THEIR ADDRESSES during
registration and drop add should
go to Whichard Building. Room
100. and complete another form
The original forms were in
advertently destroyed during the
cleaning of the gym
PHI ETA SIGMA
The Freshman Honor Society
will hold a general meeting on
Tuesday. Jan 19 in room 212
Mendenhall Student Center at 5
p m AM members are urged to at
tend
ASSERTIVENESSASA
WAY OF LIFE
Learning to tell others what you
want, feel, and believe as well! as
increasing self confidence are
goals ot this class The classes will
begin February 22 March 22,
7 30 9 30PM in Brpwster B 704
BANJO
A basic introductory course m
banjo will be tauafit on Monday
evenings from 6 30 7 45PM The
classes begin February 72 and end
on April 19
BEGINNING
BALLROOM DANCING
The basics and their variations
and practice m leading and follow
mg Tnese classes beom February
19 thru April 6 at 6 00PM
CONVERSATIONAL
FRENCH
This course is designed to develop
oral sjkills for persons who wish to
travel in French speaking coun
fries and to communicate with
native speakers here and aoroao
The classes are taught on Tuesday
nights beginning February
16 Apni 77 from 7 00 � 30 PU
NAACP
There will be a N A AC P
meeting Wednesday, Jan 20 at 6
p m in Room 721 Mendenhall All
members please attend
POETRY WINNERS
The winners of the Rebel poetry
contest are First Place. Lisa
Ryan with "The Only Love
Poem Second Place. Rebecca
Hemby with "Drawing By Ronnie
C.i Grade Cne The two
Honorable Mentions went to
Debra Wiggins with "Sandra" and
Kathrme Kimberly with
"Dogwood
ALPHA KAPPA ALPHA
The Theta Alpha Chapter of
Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority inc
is once again inviting all in
terested young ladies to their Spr
mg Rush ot '82 The Rush will be
held in a three day time segment,
in order that we may get a better
idea of what you are all about The
events will be as the following
Jan 19. Tuesday at 7 p m � Ice
Cream Party at Mendenhall Cof
fee House, Casual but neat attire
Jan 20, Wednesday at 7 p m
Rush at Mendenhall Multi
Purpose Room, Semi formal at
tire Jan 21, Thursday at 7 p.m
Dinner m Multi Purpose Room
Casual but nice attire
In order to attend the dinner you
must come to the Ice Cream Party
andor Rush
LIVE LIFE
Would you like to improve your
present way of life? By getting
closer to God and knowing the
Word all things are possible You
can discover more about this as
well as about other truths that are
revealed in the simplicity ot God's
Word You can do the works that
Jesus Christ did and more (John
14,12) Come Oin us for a
fellowship meeting this Thursday
evening at t p.m at Mendenhall
Student Center m Room 242
CRIME AID
In today's widespread concern
about crime and the criminal, the
plioht ol the victim is usually
neglected You are invited to a
presentation on "Aid For The Vk
tms Of Violent and Non Violent
Crimes tonight. January 19 at 8
pm. First Presbyterian Church
ol Greenville, corner ot 14th and
Elm Streets The speaker will be
Alma Nesbitt Victims Assistance
Coordinator of the Governor's
Crime Commission The meeting
is sponsored b, the League of
Women Voters Criminal Justice
Committee
INTER VARSITY
Join a new group this semester
Come to inter Varsity Wednesday
nights at 7 30 in Room 721 in
Mendenhall This week Ralph
Messick will speak on "Why There
Is Suffering In The World "
ILO
The International Language
Organization will have a meeting
on Wednesday. Jan. 20. The
meeting will be at 7 30 p m in
BC 305 All members are en
couraged to come and all new
members are welcome
LAW SOCIETY
The ECU Law Society will hold
its regular monthly meeting on
Thursday evening, Jan 71 at 7 30
m room 771, Mendenhall Attorney
Robert R Browning will speak on
"The Role Ot A Superior Court
Judge" For further information,
contact Diane Jones at 756 6556
PSICHI
The psychology honor society,
Psi Chi, will meet Wednesday
night, Jan 70, at 7 p m in Speight
129 Mr Doug Brannon will speak
on humanistic psychology All
members are encouraged to at
tend, and guests are welcome
AO.TT.
BIG BROTHERS
There will be a meeting for all
new and old big brothers Tuesday
Jan 19 at 9 Please try to attena
since elections will take place
DEFENSE
Don t be a 98 pound weakling
and let that beach bully push you
around this spring Sign up for a
Personal Defense Course offered
by the Dept of IM Rec Services
The classes are being ottered on
Monday nights from 6 30 7 30 p m
m Memorial Gym, and from
7 30 8 30 p m in Slay Dorm The
super low cost of these classes is $5
for the entire eight week session
You can sign up m Room 204
Memorial Gym
You need no previous ex
penence to participate in these
clas;?s You will learn to detena
yourself against an attacker learn
to throw and take a punch and
protect yourself aaamst rape This
course is a fun way to increase
flexibility increase strength, and
iearn a very practical skill at the
same time For additional mfor
mation, call Sue Stanley at
757 6064
ATHLETICS?
Come join the Student Athletic
Board (SAB) this semester and
become involved with meeting the
athletes and coaches ol men and
women's basketball, men and
women's track, men and women's
tennis, men and women's swimm
ing, golf, baseball, and softball
Our first meeting will be on
Wednesday. Jan 20 at 5 p.m in
Mendenhall 212 (Reading Room)
If unable to attend, please call Kit
ty Kmane. President, 752 8549 or
Pam Holt. Advisor 757 6417 tor
more information
SGA
On Wednesday. Jan 20 at 5.30
p m the Screens and Appoint
ments Committee of the SGA will
met to screen candidates tor va
cant positions in the legislature
Five day representatives are
needed as are dorm represen
tatives from Garretf, Jarvis. Cle
ment, Fletcher, and Tyler Please
register in room 228, SGA office, at
Mendenhall before 4pm Jan 19
ADVERTISING
COMPETITION
Students from East Carolina
University Greenville. North
Carolina, have been invited to take
part m a prestigious creative
advertising competition, in which
they will vie tor top prizes of $1,000
cash and an eight week paid sum
mer internship at McCaffrey and
McCall inc , the New York adver
tismg agency which sponsors the
program
The competition, called
Creative Advertising Challenge, is
being conducted by McCaffrey
and McCall for the second year
Students who participate must
create an advertising campaign to
promote a course or department
at their school They can compete
m either a creative writing or art
direction category They are re
quired to submit a concept state
ment ot what they intend to comm
municate m their campaign, as
well as the copy or art (or two
elements of the campaign a
television commercial and
magazine advertisement Each
fntr will be ludged against all
others m its category
Deadline for entry is March I.
1982 with announcement of win
ners scheduled for April in addi
tion to the top prizes, awards Of
S7S0 lor Second Place. S5O0 for
Third Place, and up to ten 1100
Honorable Mentions will be made
m eacn category A total of up to 26
prizes are available
Entry forms and all information
needed to enter Creative Advertis
mg Challenge are available at
East Carolina University, from
Dorothy Satterfield Communica
"ton Arts Department
PHI KAPPATAU
Little Sisters There will be a
meeting Wednesday, Jan 20 at
7 45
RUGBY
There will be an organizational
meeting Wed , January 20 at 7 30
p m in Rm 102 of Memorial Gym
(basement) Topics to be discuss
ed will be the upcoming season
and more importantly the Spring
Break Tour to Nassau, Bahamas
Don't miss it!
NEWYORK
The East Carolina University
Student union Travel Committee
is ottering a fantastic spring break
alternative at an unbeatable price
six days m New York City The
trip will run from March 5 thru
March 12 The cost of the trip is as
follows Single occupancy -
$289 00, Double occupancy �
$185 00. Triple occupancy -
$159 00, Quad ocupancy $145 00
Included m the price are the
following roundtrip transporta
tion via forty six passenger buses
and hotel accommodations at the
Hotel Edison The registration
deadline is February 22 and reser
vations can be made at the Central
Ticket Office located in
Mendenhall Student Center
CONVERSATIONAL
GERMAN II
This course is designed to further
develop oral skills for persons who
wish to travel in German speaking
countries The classes will begin
on Tuesday February 16 April 27
at 7 00 8 30PM
INTERMEDIATE
BALLROOM DANCING
individuals with the vasic shills
wantma to improve Foxtrot,
Rhumba. Discp Waltz and Bop
techniques Every Friday from
F ebr uar y 19 April 30 at
8 00 9 00PM the classes will be
'aught
NCSL
There will be a meeting ol me
NC Student Legislature on Tues
day, Jan l� in Mandanhall 212 at 1
p.m All members ptease attend
ECU hosting slat conference will
be discussed
SGA SCREENINGS
There ra several positions open
n the SGA Legislature The
Screenings committee will be ac
cepting applications for positions
m the Legislature Please call or
come by the SGA Office for infor
mation and applications Appllca
tions accepted until January 26
i
BUSINESS MAJORS
School of Business e now
ivaiiable for more information
:ontact Tim Allen at 7M 5473 or
left Hales at 757 3484
ART SHOW
The Seventh Annual Art Show
will be from Jan 76 to Feb 5, 1W2
m the Greenville Museum of Art
All ECU artists are encouraged to
prepare their best work to submit
Friday, Jan 21, 19�2 to me con
ference room in the office of
Jenkins Fine Arts Center, ECU
Cash prizes, provided by the Attic
and Jeffries Beer and Wine. Co
will fange from $10 for Honorable
Mentions to $100 tor Best In Show
ARTISTS
Artists! The Seventh Annual
Rebel Art Show, sponsored by the
Attic and Jeffrey's Beer and Wine
Co . is coming up to give you an op
portunify for recognition as will as
prize money All registered ECU
tudents may enter a maximum of
wo pieces m any of the following
ategories Painting, Sculpture.
Ceramics, Drawing. Photography
Design (metal, fiber, or wook)
Graphic Art and Illustration Plan
io bring your best work on Friday
Jan 22, 19�2 to the conference
Room in Jertfcins Fine Art Center.
ECU
SKIING
There will be a meeting for all
persons Interested in skiing
Snowsnoe. W V over Spring
Break (PMYE 1000. PHYE 1IS0,
PHYE 1151 or SKI non credit) on
Tuesday. Jan 19 at 4 in Memorial
Gym 10 For further information
please contact Mrs Jo Saunders
Memorial Gym 205, 757 6000
LSAT
The Law School Admission Test
will be offered at East Carolina
University on Saturday, February
20, 182 Application blanks are to
be completed and mailed to
Educational Testing Service, Box
966 R. Princeton, NJ 08540
Registration deadline It anuary
21, !9i2 Registration postmarked
after mis date must be accom
panied by a $15 non refundable
late registration fee
OMEGA PSI PHI
Announces all men interested In
pledging Spring Line 82. formal
Smoker, Jan 24 at 8 Mendenhall
PAGEANT
North Carolina Southern Beau
y The search is on tor contestants
ages 4 22 years old. each age divi
sion limited, deadline March I.
1982 Pageant will be held April 16
and 17 For information send a
stamped address envelope to N C
SOUTHERN BEAUTY
PAGEANT, P O Box 5432.
Greensboro. N C 27403
KYF
The King's Youth Fellowship
will hold it's first meeting of me
prmj semester The date is
January 21 at the Mendenhall Stu
dent Center Room 247 Visitors are
welcome and refreshments will be
served at me conclusion of me
meeting
POETRY FORUM
The Poetry Forum win meet
Thurs . January 21 in AAenoenhan
Room 248 Please bring copien o
your poems to be cr.tiqu�,j
Everyone is invited There are nc
restrictions Anyone interested in
poetry is welcome
PHI SIGMA PI
Tau Chapter of Phi Sigma t- n�
tional Honor Fraternity win meet
at 6pm Wednesday in 132 Aus'ir
REBEL
The Rebel is now accepting iyti
missions tor the 7th Annual Ret
Art 'inow Work may be denverec
on Jan 22 between 9 arvo 4 � rtn
Conference Room m Jenkins In
eluded with each piece muV c �
$1 entry fee Any ECU Student 1
eligible to enter Prizes include $iC
lor 1st Place m each category and
$100 for Best In Show The contey
'S sponsored b� the Ain anc jet
treys Beer and Wine Co
WORSHIP
A student Episcopal se- 1
Holy Commun.on will c�
celebrated on Tuesday. Jan 19 m
the chapel of St Paul s fcr
Church, 406 Fourth Stree' "m-
block from Ga'rett Dorrr
servke will be at 5 30 p rr ��
'he Episcopal Chaplain the ��.
Bill Hadden re.pbrating
SKISNOWSHOE
Ail persons interested in sk
Snowsnoe, WV durmQ Spr
Break contact Ms jo Saunders
757 6000 Memorial G t m
uetore February 1
SOCIANTHCLUB
There will be a short mee' ,
the Sociology Anthropology c uo
on vveonesday. Jan 27 at 4 3C �
will be a short business mee1 �
Please make plans to attend The
meeting will be m Brewster D 302
am
PILOT TRAINING
OPPORTUNITIES
VIA WW
The Navy presently has Several p� nmqs lor 'tit
most excitmq and challenging Ob m the worm
NAVY PILOT. It you qualify, we will guarantee
you a seat in the most prestigious flight school
anywhere At the completion of trammq you will
fly the Navy high performance aircraft
Qualification' Ai.
�Bachelors degree
�Less than 28' 2 years old
�2020 uncorrected vision
� Excellent health
� U S Citizen
If you think y u
a Starlmr k,v it ,
years, send a l
in guality. anc: would like toearn
Ol S18.000 with S26.0O0 - m four
. r if qual'ticat on; to
NAVY PILOT PROGRAMS
1001 Navaho Dr.
Raleigh, NX. 27609
or ca!l 1-800-662-7231
THE SHOE OUTLET
(Located beside Evans Seafood)
Featuring name brand shoes at bargain prices.
Up To 75 OFF regular prices
Bass Steward-Mcf. wire Krouse About
201 W. Washington St. Withm walking distance of campus.
USED
TIRES
no.oo
inquire at
Evans Seafood
United Figure Salon's
Student Special 25 off
Call now - 7S6 2820
KEEP YOUR TAN. Get
one at United Figure
Salon.
20 O Ott lb sessions only S24
Now available to MEN ALSO.
Call for appointment � 756 2820
F0S DICKS
1890 Seafood
2311 S E.ans St Ext
1
ALL YOU CAN fcfon Tues Wed
iatspec.au i m
Mon. Night
Trout and Salad
s4.95
Tues. Night
Flounder and Salad
$5.95
Wed. Night
Fried Shrimp and Salad j;
$6.95 I
Thurs. Nighi
Steamed Shrimp
and Sala
$9.95
FOR TWO
7.95
$
st
( onlinuffll
iblc k
spirit

will i
A drai

Brian Ma

Beaut ii
It
Hi

:
Choice of shrimp,
trout, clams 01
deviled crab.
1.00
OFF COUPON
Good towards any
meal and our all you
can eat specials. NOT
good towards other
specials.
K)s) K's IXV0
st i-oni
J.A. Uniforms Shop
All types of uniforms at reasonable
prices. Lab coats, stethoscopes, shoes,
and hose. Also � used ECU nurses
uniforms. Trade-ins allowed.
Located 1710 W. 6th St.
off Memorial Drive
Near Hollowell's Drug and old hospital.






attic
' A -
SOUTH'
NO. 6
ROCK
GHTCLUB
VERANDA ROOM
Happy Hour: MonThurs. - 4:30-7:00
Fridays - 4:30-8:00 FreeTacos
ARBOR ROOM SPECIAL
Sat. Night - 5:30 'til closing
All the Prime Rib & All
the burgundy wine you can drink.
Only $9.95
Ramada Inn 264 By-Pass
TUESDAY � GL1SSON
1 2 PRICE for ECU students
WEDNESDAY
MATT "Guitar"
MURPHY
from the Blues Bros.
THURSDAY FRIDAY
STATES
SATURDAY
DIAMOND
!? PRICE for ECU students
SUNDAY
DOC HOLIDAY
PVlVl wl'h Sup' Bowl on 7 II TV1
l4MHHMMMHHMHMMMMMMHMMMyMj
i
i
?




i

TUES . 19th Pino Buffet - $2 49
Lod.cs Nite wMork Edwards
WED 20th
$2 15 -
- Salad Bor Special
All Yo Can Eat
THURS 21st - Spaghetti Special
$2.49 - All You Can Eat
FRI 22nd &
I SAT 23rd - END OF WEEK PARTY
I SUN 24rh&
MON 25rit - COUNTRY COOKING
SPECIAL - $2.99
REM
Rock & Roll
FRIDAY & SATURDAY
Baby &
The Pacifiers
EAST CAROLINA'S
PARTY CENTER
WEDNESDAY
HUMP NITE
THURSDAY
COLLEGE NITE
FRIDAY
END OF
UK. PARTY
SATURDAY
BEST IN
DANCE MUSIC
SUNDAY
LADIES' NITE
Across
Irom
U B E
It takes 12 inches
to make a hero
Dl. Sa�di:tes Saiodt -
Veajtonan Sondwtchi
Hom�mad Soups - Hcroct on tmMy booed rollt
,�-New Deli Coupon
HSIljaptwXN
THURSDAY
5050 Nile
FRIDAY
End of
the Week
Bucket Party
SUNDAY
Nickle Nite
10- E. 5th St. - 752 1361
Downtown Greenville
GOOD TIMES
Mon. (3-4p.m.) FREE
Pinball
(8 p.m.) Dart
Tournament
SATURDAY
TERRAPIN
NOWOPrN M)R
HAPPY HOUR
�'�EAST Sth STREET
�S2 1711
V
Pi
Fovoi
For rid
col





lilt I ASIC AkOl INIAN
JANUARY i. l82
PORUM
m will m��t
� Mcnovnhaii
rg copt�t ol
There are no
n�eres�td in
tA PI
gma Pi Ua
I orttl meet
32 Austin.
. opting iub
annual Rebel
oe deliverec
- �rvl 4 to t�e
enkm in
( us be a
-�?n is
de�M
ittgary ana
ontest
;1 Jef
IIP
sfvue ot
i be
an 19 in
� Episcopal
one
The
1 p m with
1 "e Rev
fai 'q
fSHOE
tested n skiing
1Q Spring
705
H CLUB
' rtg of
Club
� a' 4 � It
�sj meeting
attend The
B fwster O 302
V
ed
o
ON
u
n
per
tOLiHA'S
ENTER
E
Ik
K
IK
Students Commemorate King's Anniversary
Continued From Page 1
be able to carry forth
the spirit of freedom.
That's when America
will be America
A dramatic perfor-
mance about non-
violence was performed
by Tony Williams and
Brian Massey, followed
by a soul version of
'America the
Beautiful" by the ECU
Gospel Choir.
It took almost five
minutes for Virginia
Carlton to regain her
composure long
enough to introduce the
next speaker, Conovan
Phillips, of the Pitt
County chapter of the
Southern Christian
Leadership Con
ference, who said he
was equally moved by
the choir's perfor-
mance. "It's been years
since I've been this in-
spired said Phillips in
his opening remarks.
He gave an historical
account of the birth of
the ACLC (founded by
Dr. King in 1955) and
mentioned his ex-
periences with racism
while growing up in the
pre-civil-rights era. He
spoke of "black and
"white" water foun-
tains and not being
allowed to use rest
rooms at service sta-
tions. He told black
people not to forget the
struggles of the past
and he critized "those
of you who sit here and
get so high and mighty
and say 'I got to study
Let me tell you
something � if Dr.
Martin Luther King
and a whole lot of other
folks hadn't got out
here, you wouldn't be
able to be here
Phillips was especial-
ly critical of cuts in
social programs.
"Something is wrong
with this country to the
effect that people have
to choose between pay-
ing rent, utility bills,
and eating food he
said.
Phillips drew conclu-
sions that people will
lose out in the long run
if social injustices are
not addressed. "I've
got some news for you
and I don't care who
hears it he said. "If
my kids are gonna go
hungry because I can't
find a job and you
(Reagan) just cut off
my funds � I will
steal He went on to
say that "poverty heeds
ignorance and it also
breeds crime
Phillips stressed the
right to vote was a per-
son's strongest
weapon. "We ain't go
no economic power; we
ain't got no political
power he said. "The
only power we have is
the vote, and if you
don't exercise that then
you're a fool
Student Government
Association president
Lester Nail told about a
"Whites only" sign he
saw as a child. The sign
was in a laundromat
and Nail said he always
thught you could only
bring your "white
wash" there � until his
mother set him
straight. Nail also
recalled the day Martin
Lumer King was
murdered and how his
mother had cried.
D.D. Garrett, presi-
dent of the Pitt County
NAACP chapter, prais-
ed the work of
everyone who par-
ticipated in the day's
events. He said
"coalition building"
was visible and that
"we have to get
together not "stand
around and watch
Garrett told the au-
dience that the situa-
tion would not change
"until you begin to
make things happen
Carlton noted the ef-
forts of the Student
Government in its sup-
port of a resolution to
make Jan. 15 a national
holiday. Edna Mar-
shall, an SGA
legislator, read the
resolution to the au-
dience amid loud
cheers.
Greenville Citizens Recognize King
Higher Education: A Health Problem?
CHAPEI Hill
(CPS) � Higher educa-
tion is generally good
lor your health, though
if you're a woman it
may also turn you into
a heav) drinker, accor-
ding to a national study
of health and lifestyles
by the University of
North Carolina.
The ongoing sludy
found that bestter-
educated people tend (o
be healthier, eat better
and ingest lower levels
of harmful cholesterol.
For women, however,
alcohol consumption
seems to rise with
education level.
Nearly 10.(XX) people
in the U.S. and the
Soviet Union par-
ticipated in the study,
which the National
Heart, Lung, and
Blood Institute in the
early 1970's.
"The higher-
educated group tended
lo eat healthier diets
than the lower-
educated group says
Dr. Suanne Haynes.
an assistant
epidemiology professor
at UNC and co-author
of a research report on
the study.
"It indicates that
persons at higher
education levels are
perhaps changing their
diets more quickly in
response to recommen-
dations than is the
lower education
group
Haynes suspects the
increased drinking
among well-educated
women may be similar
to smoking patterns.
"Cigarette smoking
began mainly among
higher-educated men
she says, then "spread
to lower-educated men,
then to higher-educated
women. It looks as if
alcohol may be follow-
ing the same pattern
The study also found
that well-educsated
u omen had lower levels
of cholesterol.
Continued From Page 1
praised King as "a
great man. He was a
man who believed in
people; he believed in
all people
Streeter, an SCLC
member, recalled for
the group his good for-
tune to have once met
King. "He believed
mostly in black people,
because black people
were mostly denied the
right to be just peo-
ple
The group also
discussed the recent
budget cuts by the
Reagan administration.
Another of the
speakers, march coor-
dinator Mary Williams,
criticized East's sup-
port of the cuts and
Reagan's "increases in
military funding
The president of the
SCLC, Bennie Round
tree, became the spark
of the group by leading
chants that kept the
spirits high.
"What do you
want?" Roundtree
shouted.
� Freedom
responded the group.
"When do you want
it?"
"Now
"Many of you have
not voted, and many of
you man be affected by
the great cuts Round-
tree continued.
However, he con-
tinued, saying,
there's a payday com-
ing; there's another
election day coming,
and Senator East, you
must go
In his conclusion,
Roundtree said, "We
are tired; yes, our feet
are sore. We're losing
our voices, hut we shall
continue marching and
demonstrating until the
white and black people
across this country
wake up
No representative
from East's office was
available to meet with
! the SCLC leaders, but
j many area television
! camera units were on
the scene to cover the
event. A banquet in
honor of Dr. King was
held later in the even-
ing.
Cnmm vadaraiaauat P�
�aaaVaI itwd��n ��� �ow com-
pete (or tevorol huoered �'
Fore, ickelottfcipt. Trine
ickotonme an to km oworeee
to ituaaHti accepted into
medical icnoah a amfca� ot
et lb beginoiog ot their
topkomore roo�. Tke cholor
�kip pro��d� �or tuition, bookt.
loo tee and eeoipment, pint a
$5J0 monmiy attowanco I"
'�ttiaato ttu financial otter-
native to me high co�t a
medical adweatian
Contact:
I VU.HUI IH
PR��KSNlONS
UK Rl ITIM.
Wt�GL-l 1100 Novoho Or
Raleigh. NC 2769
mono Collect (919)755-41J4
WE SEW
LEATHER CO ATSl
SAAD'S
SHOE REPAIR
113 Grand Av�
7S4in�
e
traffic
overalls
Also
75 off
Select Items
the traffic light
pitt plaza
Pi Kappa Phi Spring Rush
January 18-January 20
Plenty of your
Favorite Beverage!
For rides & information
call: 756-3540
TV
803
Hooker
Rd.
ottl Carolina
indent legislature
NCSL
WANTS
YOU
i.
Tuesday:
Winter Warm-Up
Wednesday:
Western Night
Come out and be part
of something great!
It's time for the students who talk about
North Carolina's problems to join the
students who are doing something about
them
NCSL: An Investment For Your Future
WE MAKE A DIFFERENCE
EVERYTUESDAY NIGHT
MENDENHALL212: 7:10p.m.
Every Night �
8:30-12:00
Preparing Tomorrow's
Leaders Today







r
�fte East Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Paul Collins. ����(
Jimmy DuPree. v. ���!
Ric Browning. o,� ,� 4mw Charles Chandler. .w� fd,��
Chris Lichok. aM(W� Manner Tom Hall, � �rf��f
Alison Bartei Nti h. Steve Bachner. m��,�� M��,
Steve Moore, qmmh hmt William Yei verton, TfJ CMI
January 19, 1982
Opinion
Page 4
Foul Weather
Abandon Classes, Prevent Mishaps
Our return to classes last week
was greeted with some of the coldest
� and most miserable � weather
Greenville has ever known.
Temperatures hovered in the teens,
and every conceivable form of
precipitation was thrown at us: rain,
snow, sleet, freezing rain, etc.
The weather was so bad thai
Greenville City School officials
canceled classes on Wednesday and
Friday. They felt conditions were
too hazardous for students to make
the trip to school.
Yet officials at ECU saw fit to
cancel only 8:00 and 9:00 classes on
Friday; students were expected to
attend all other classes.
We feel the administration should
have canceled all classes on Friday
and early classes on Wednesday. We
can appreciate a reluctance on the
part of the administration to cancel
classes; it is not something that
should be done cavalierly.
But on the other hand, let's face
reality. While such weather may
have little affect up North, this is
DOONESBURY
V.
North Carolina and people just are
not used to coping with snow. How
many fender benders and cars in dit-
ches did you see last week? How
many people did you see slipping on
sidewalks or stairways?
For those students who live on
campus, reaching class is no real
problem, but nearly 6,000 students
and 900 faculty members drive to
campus each day.
To subject them to the hazards of
seldom-seen ice and snow is unfair,
especially since there was little ef-
fort expended in making sidewalks
on campus passable.
As one student put it, "They can
either be mean or stupid, but they
can't be mean and stupid In other
words, if they make us come to class
they have got to clear the sidewalks.
This may seem petty to some, but
somewhere down the line the com-
mon sense involved in decisions to
"come in out of the rain" must
override the fear of lost time in the
classroom.
GOSH r4 Z. "�5
AmJli tv cm. kfT OLfT Im
tmamm.
& xt KNom.sm tiooc
usb? to fwsomvin
XiPCt, M'ITS JUSTwr
FAIR TV M FAMIO
9&IP&. sir. rrs x�
6atATnaL tax 'mams
that make ,7 so ikresk
vbu to get back into
A H&i BRACKET'
by Garry Trudeau
ry m.nee.
"x. HOSTWBT
myouxfc-
TAXP.&
KXM3MC ACMSOR PWLLF
sutncex move the
I LATEST AtAVHSTXATlON
omciALTD xrrjRH v
� mtmmESBCtxws
� scene atthe
'mrnHusz.
HJH7
AHtAPSO.
so. wve
WVtlTFUN
TceentCH
A60JH'
Am. xxms&i-HiBecAuseor WO&WTyBt-TUECN KXFKSr KXtOASTSAW itecumtiT mUKawtfiNOT AT All rt KES&HN6 B�-ouseoF me osPAfrn MNM im $mmms to-J&.72C 4VPM OfKNTSALARi. mm JBj i
(j1 c
J3k-

ACTUAUi, MY UK
ANPZCOAPPK)6A-
ftj HAKE 00 WITH
HY GOVERNMENT
SAiAgy, but rrs
HOI fOR. US THAT
TM RESIGNING.
f
Li
I
ov?me . muHOMf �a HEBE. �
r) SJ
b-SU
IJ m.
" J fi '�i"r 4 s�
tunmsmum
H0WC0MEY0U
aaauTMe
KNOW?
IDC I
nmmvfcu
moepve
feus soiah-
NONCEVtTT
THE PRESS
couum
rajHAe
JUSTHONED
ME? I
nwas ommm
TDUSEeMBXa
W� NOT STAK-
ING FOR. DINNER.
AKYOUT ;
- Campus Forum
Delays Unnecessary?
I read the front page article in the
Thursday, Jan. 14, 1982 issue of The
East Carolinian about WZMB being
delayed again. According to the article,
this delay is due to a license or an
authorization from the FCC to broad-
cast using the STL (Studio Transmitter
Link). I am somewhat dismayed by the
article since this paperwork was com-
plete in May 1980 and the authorization
was granted in July 1980.
To satisfy my disbelief I spent the en-
tire day Monday, Jan. 18, 1982 on the
phone with the FCC in Washington,
D.C. I called the call letter desk within
the broadcast bureau
and spoke to Mrs. Davis who informed
me that call letters WGV-613 belonged
to the ECU Media Board and that they
were authorized on a construction per-
mit to transmit on 948.5 Mega Hertz. I
also spoke to Jim Durst of the FCC
who explained that all
the paper work seemed complete for
WZMB.
I then spoke to Bob Greenburg of the
STL division who
stated that the station only needed a
PTA (Program Test Authorization). He
stated that this authorization could be
obtained in 10 days by having WZMB
send a telegram stating that the station
was ready to begin programming.
Since we have verified that we do in
fact have the STL transmitter authoriza-
tion, my question is when are we going
to request a PTA? If we wait for another
STL license which we already have and
which took four months the first time,
then we are essentially just beating a
dead horse. This is nearly an $80,000
student funded project. Someone needs
to examine the WZMB public inspection
file thoroughly so that we can heat
music rather than excuses.
VAN BROWN
ECU Alumni
WZMB Petitioning Comm.
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced, or neatly printed. AH let-
ters are subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted. Letters by the
same author are limited to one each 30
days.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
CcjecijeT
WFVE DONE I Tf IvTVSS CREATE THE ULTIMATE
Hl-FASHION ITEM-OESIGNER PEOPLE
'Creation Science9 Causes School Stir
By JOSEPH OLINICK
Recently, in a heated court battle, a
federal judge ruled that an Arkansas law
requiring Biblically inspired theories of
creation be taught along side the theory of
evolution in public schools is unconstitu-
tional.
Although the ruling is a definite and
very heavy blow to the creationism move-
ment, it, by no means, has stopped the
movement. "Creation science" lobbyist
are at work with more than 15 legislatures,
book publishers and school boards across
the country.
A bill requiring that creation science be
taught along side evolution would have
tremendous implications on all levels of
education. Attesting to this fact, Judge
William Overton, who ruled on the Arkan-
sas case, stated in a Los Angeles Times Ser-
vice article that "implementation of Act
590 (the 'creation science' law) will have
serious and untold consequences for
students, particularly those planning to at-
tend college. Evolution is the cornerstone
of modern biologyAny student who is
deprived of instruction as to the prevailing
scientific thought on these tops will be
denied a significant part of scientific
education
In his ruling, Judge Overton defined
creationism as a religion and not a science,
as supporters of creationism assert.
Truly, creation science does not belong
in the classroom next to the theory of
evolution, and legislators should not give
way to conservative lobbyist and pass laws
that force creationism into the classroom.
Forcing creation science upon professors
and students would be an invasion on their
freedom. The forced teaching of creation
scieznce would compromise the academic
freedom of professors and students. After
all, there are people who do not accept the
Bible, and creation science draws heavily
from the Bible.
More importantly, creationism is in
direct conflict with modern science. In
other words, it is incorrect. It contends
that the earth is 10,000 years old. In con-
trast, modern science dates the earth as ap-
proximately 4.5 billion years old.
It seems odd that conservative fun-
damentalists would want to put creation
science, which is very much like the
Biblical account of creation, in the same
category as evolution science. The Bible is
very symbolic and open to interpretation.
On the other hand, science is very precise
and set.
So, it would seem that putting Biblical
ideas into the category of science would
belittle and defray the literary and spiritual
value of the Bible.
One theory seldom heard is that perhaps
some superior being or god initiated and
controlled evolution � if it took place at
all.
Creationism is propagated b Christian
fundamentalists who make up a small por-
tion of the population. Still, they arc
powerful. Fortunately, the American Civil
Liberties Union is fighting these groups
and, so far, has had success.
Creation science lobbyists are putting
pressure on legislators throughout the
country.
Hopefully, legislators will study the
creation science case in Arkansas and think
twice about enacting similar legislation.
Perhaps legislators might even be nice
enough to listen to their constituents in-
stead of the special interest groups and
their lobbyists. Then maybe separation of
church and state will be maintained.
Reaganomics Causes Varied Problems
By DAVID ARMSTRONG
Growing old in America is a damned
hard process, and auctioning off your life
to make a living is even harder. I have
understood those truths intellectually for a
long time, but it took a recent holiday visit
to my hometown of Harrisburg, Pa. to
drive them home to me with gut-wrenching
force.
My source for this American story is my
father, Richard E. Armstrong, aged 62.
Dad has been a blue-collar worker since he
graduated from high school in 1937 and
went straight to work in a steel mill.
Presently, he is a journeyman machinist
for a corporation that does some military
contracting. With the threat of war loom-
ing large, you would think business would
be booming, but it isn't, not for my
father's employers. So, the company lays
off its employees a week at a shot, every
several months, on a rotating basis.
When it is his turn to be laid off, my
father, who has always prided himself on
working for what he gets, collects
unemployment. He stands in line with
other working people, many of them older
white men like himself, who have seldom
had trouble finding and keeping a job.
This has a way of putting flesh on the
dismal economic reports from
Washington.
Unlike many of his co-workers, my
father did not vote for Ronald Reagan. He
and my mother, who retired as a clerk-
typist when my sister and I were grown and
mom's health turned bad, have moved
gradually, if cautiously, leftward. In recent
years, their political sympathies have
shifted from Richard Nixon to Gene Mc-
Carthy to John Anderson. Although they
are tempermental conservatives (their
musical taste runs the gamut from
Lawrence Welk to Al Hirt), my parents
favor the creation of a third party to
challenge the Democrats and Republicans
� the party of their parents.
But while they did not vote for Reagan,
my folks had hopes that supply-side
economics would turn out to be more than
an empty promise. After Reagan delivered
his first big economic chalk talk last spr-
ing, they asked me, via Ma Bell, what I
thought of the game plan. I told them I did
not think it would work. No, my mother
said, Congress probably would not go
along. When I replied that I thought Con-
gress would go along, but that
Reaganomics is inherently unworkable,
there was silence at the other end of the
line.
Now, they are frequently and fervently
critical of Reagan, convinced he is leading
us into war, and possibly a depression. My
younger sister, Barbara, and her husband
Don � both of whom did vote for Reagan
� are non-committal about his perfor-
mance so far. Don was downcast, though,
when his small insurance business failed
last year. "He blamed himself my
mother said. " 'Don we told him, 'it's
not your fault, it's the economy Don
has since landed a job with one of the cor-
porate giants that drove his firm out of
business.
While my brother-in-law begins his new
job, my father dreams of leaving his old
one. He had hoped to retire at 62, but he
hadn't enough of a nest egg to do that. He
will have to work three more years to col-
lect full (albeit shrinking) Social Security
benefits. By that time, he worries, the safe-
ty net may be shredded, and he and my
mother will be cut loose in a society that
cares very little for old people.
So work he must, at the job he has held
for nearly 20 years, in the shop where he
was once a creative and valued employee.
At 62, that is no longer the case. Manage-
ment does not respect older workers whose
productivity they believe is just about used
up. When the firm wants to get a new
machine or design a new program, the boss
no longer asks for his opinion. "Well, that
hurts he told me quietly.
To salve the wounds of work and head
off worries about life after retirement, mv
father rides a shiny new motorcycle hither
and yon. He keeps it in the shed he built
himself in the backyard, taking out the cy-
cle on crisp, clear mornings just before the
sun comes up. "It's real prettv that time of
day he says.
Mostly, my father rides on weekdays,
slipping his helmet on and going up to the
Happy Farmer restaurant, where he takes
breakfast with his pals. Thev talk sports
and politics for a while. Then he gives the
motorcycle its head for mabve half an hour
before steering the vehicle to the plant to
begin the latest of 45 years' worth of work
days. At 8:15 sharp, Richard E. Arm-
strong punches in.
St"
w,
'
� Febt
I

arc al
am
.
bca
rcH
"An
Times
to d
� Marcl
Directed
Imp
New Ck
storv at
for digil
humorcj
Johai
plays l
home h
7an's m
movie ri
stantiv
the tov
her).





NIAN
tir
I HI I l V ROl IMW
Entertainment
VX Vk
wmmmmmmmmm
Puppeteer Has
Pulled Strings
Internationally
Djwd srotiak National Marionette Theatre will be in the Hendrix Theatre thi Wednesday evening al N p.m.
From the fingertips of the inter-
national!) known puppeteer. David
Syrotiak. life flows down the
marionette strings to animate ex
qutsitely carved wooden figure. It
i all visibleall in the opena new
perspective for an ancient art form.
Theatre
The National Marionette Theatre.
sponsored by the Student Union
Special Events committee, is coming
to Hendrix Theatre on the ECL
campus this Wednesday. January
20. at S p.m. for what promises to
be a truly exciting show .
Daid Syrotiak beautiful
marionettes travel over 45.000 miles
and perform more than 200 limes
each season. The National
Marionette Theatre has toured cx-
tensively in the United State. Mex-
ico. Canada, and Europe, winning
numerous awards including the
Citation for Excellence in the Held
of adult puppetry from Union Inter-
national de la Mai i �nette. I hey
the first mcrican Mat ioncttc
pain to win this aw aid.
"In Concei i the culmination
oi David Syrotiak's mam years
study, observation, and experimen-
tation with puppetry. 'v - pr diu
lion shows .w artisi a; the peak oi
his profession. Ii is a brilliant one-
man tout -de-to; ce.
01 king in full v iew . � c au-
dience. 5y ronak pet foi ms a �ei ies ot
sharply drawn vignettes I'he scope
ranees from the comic "Da
Recital" and the poignani "Balloon
Woman to the whimsical little
man and dog "In the Pat k
In addition 10 the S p.m. perfor-
mance on January 20. Syrotiak will
conduct a workshop at 5 p.m. in
Hendrix Theatre. Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center, foi all interested I v. I
students, faculty and stafl.
Tickets foi the -how are on i a
' he Central ha. Ol:
Mendenhall Student Cenu ai J are
priced at 52 tot ECl students. S3
tor faculty and staff, and v- I
public ll tickets a: the dooi a II bv
S4.
and think
-
:
?ms
.
Kllf

tie
the
Australia's Weir Scores Again With 'GallipoW
w
By KATHY WF.tLER
. ;ed. a n
� i he past few
. � a a s i Petet
: pa - is such memora
�( wv' Ht ai f'icnii at Hanging AA
and a successful meeting u is. too.
Fan- " Weir may recall I is previous films as being u
moving, visually beautiful but actually very sin
p t egard ets. c 'stumes. and even plot. N
(niilipiili.
dded ' � Weir's usual perfection of cinematograpl
� iens�; u mood ar larae i umbers l elaborate �
b
(tailipnli, now playing a i re complex
.b rrv uslv use
I . � . � (tdllipoH rr ghi w.
I ei ii eir Meets tfc Budget
All this is icing or, an already good cake. One sen�
ai even ad Weir attempted (kiUipoii on a smal
International Films
Six Movies Give Alternatives
lie is now accepi ne
m series.
nclu classics as
11 j-
� .
mg from black . m-
a thi llei s to exotic
in t
Hendrix
.
ter.
Sundav s, w itl
COIICC
� 6 I i Howev er, on Supei
2-1 filn If 7m Blood will be
itZp.i being served a' 1:30.
rhe schedule I ng ts as 1 ivs:
� fanuary 24. Hist Mood iA in, !99) Directed
H u s
lohn Hustoi this Flannery 0' onnoi story
i youi :s i e big city to
wall obsessed with his religious
.
tgh it ' tdgei in Georgia and
� ii was hailed by critics
� me of the best ol the
did ;

ir:
A w e '
� �
Drew allcv:
most importani
Vincent C anbv
�. imph " "A bril
� ,a age humor Bet i
asterpiece, on� l
- � ilms to be released in vears
' me i't Huston's most
einal, mosi itunning movies, exhilarating, lyrical
Iv mad u d absolu
ai � g Brad D i . t. s
ton, and Amy W
� February 21. tiila i
C laudehabi
ig.
Beatty, Harrv Dean Stan-
ranee, 1975). Directed by
(n
f th
ich Secret P
beautifully
realize thai
al I rench New W ave auteurs. and an
ck,habrol makes thrillers that
are a and ambiguous moral fables in
which victims d;J predators ate intermingled.
In this film, polit idicals kidnap the American
ambassador to France during his weekly visit to an
eleeanl brothel. Bui the brothel is operated by the
ind the entire act is filmed. After a
rj hase and seige. the kidnappers
� beer manipulated by the police.
'An elegani bla al . ipi authority e York
fimes announced. "A sliming example of the right way
io direct a film wrote 4fer Dark film critic.
� Match 21. Jane is Jane forever (Germany, 1977).
Directed by Walter Bockmayer and Rolf Buhrmann:
Lsing a powerful, austere style characteristic of the
New German C inema, Bockmayer and Buhrmann tell a
story about old age, incipient madness, and the struggle
for dignity that is surprisingly whimsical and warmly
humorous.
Johanna Koenig, the celebrated German actress,
plays Johanna, an old woman recently settled into a
home for the elderly w ho is so com inced that she is Tar-
an's mate Jane that she plasters her walls with Tarzan
movie posters, wears leopard skins, eats bananas con-
stantlv and spends most i her time with the animals in
the oo (whom she sensibly prefers to the people around
her).
Her real appeal as a character is not her delusion �� .
her awareness that it is a delusion, a fact which is ot no
importance to her in view of the delusions of others and
of the satisfactions ol being cray.
"One of the most beautiful and important new (�
man films Rainer W erner Fassbinder wrote. "A si
movie, sometimes funnv. but more often decei
understandint
-aid Vincen; Canbv
It would still have been a wonderful mo-
Sutr ' : tp iiaUipofi is d fficuli if not impossible.
Yes. Da J v an as given us a screenplay for a
Aai c dealing witl the virtual slaughter of
.utra a t Gallipoli Peninsula in Asia
Mil 1915
v. d V ai I - n the main topic for consideration
a ever, foi are noi all wars essentially the
aracters and settings changed?
iiaffipofi �large .i bute to those characters � in this
i-e. lh U ' aha.
trttllipoft - a s ipt portrait of youth � us energy.
fears, oyalties and disillusionments
I � . eeyes I rchie and Frank (excellently por-
trayed by Bi Kerr and Mike Lee), we see war as young
mei 1915. and. no doubt, as many see it today.
We l ese two young athletes in their pursuit of
the g ries � vai rhey are djd as they find an
; ai .cast for their energies and saddened
discovei tl ai war's glory comes only in the form
ot bullets ai d b mbs.
Lesi yi nV (udlipoli is another one o those
tiresome. eavy foreign films. 1 musi
as en i add thai this film is not the least bit tiresome
i heaw.
� April 4. Metropolis (Germain. 1927). Directed by
Frit Lang:
Director Frit I ang i W. ihelunger. Destiny) was
given a budget unprecedented in Germain to create this
futuristic film oi a city-factory in which the working
masses are slaves of the rich masters
In expressionistic settings inspired by the skyscrapers
of New York, an allegory o totalitarianism evolves.
culminating in the revolt of the slaves.
Many of the sequences are among the most famous ii
film: the suspended garden as a decadent paradise, the
feverish visions of the son of the city ruler. Moloch the
infernal machine which controls the entire city, the
movement of masses of workers against the abstract
monumental decors
� April 18. Bahia (Brazil. 1976). Directed by Marcel
Camus:
Marcel Camus, director o the international award-
winner Black Orpheus, has once again made a film ol
astounding physical beauty. Set in the Brazilian pro-
vince o Bahia. a sensual world of bossa-nova rhythms,
handsome dancers and luxurious secside landscapes, the
story is one of classic "star-crossed lovers" involving a
sweet-talking street hustler and a beautiful young pro-
stitute. Their affair is set against a tapestry of color,
dancing sensuality and a strange combination ol
voodoo and Christianity that controls the names ii
Bahia's shanty-town slums. "A hymn to the sensual
life, full o music and song reported the Boston
Herald American.
� May 2. The River (FranceIndia. 1951). Directed by
Jean Renoir:
The artistic culmination of Renoir's "Indian period
The River focuses on three young women who are in
love with one of their cousins wounded during the war.
who decides to leave rather than having to choose one
among the three of them. Told from the point of view of
one of the girls, it is a reflection of British colonialism as
seen through the eyes of a teenager. The film is noted
for its splendid color photography, its exploitation of
telescoping for emotional and psychological resonance
(as opposed to camera shifts), and its fusion of narrative
structure with metaphysical themes. The famous French
film critic Anre Bazin wrote, " The River is The Rules of
the Game of Renoir's second period. It sits at the avant-
garde of the cinema, along with The Bicycle Thief,
Diary of A Country Priest, and everything which really
counts in the contemporary cinema
Attendance at all films is by subscription only. The
cost of a membership to attend all six films is $10.
Subscription tickets will be given out at the opening
feature. For information about subscriptions contact
Glen Brewster or Karen Blansfield at 757-6041.
If anything. Wen has created a rathei m�
throughout most o the film, n iroring the
limism of youth. lso. Wen has achieved - iual ex-
cellence in directing, so (iallipoh nevet slow
fusing.
The cinematography. ioo. is extremely well
ineing both the base and the sublime io out attention in
the proper doses. And. a m his othei film. W en hh
various kinds oi music skillfully to enhance mood ai J
tone.
sve GAl I ll'Oi I. Pa� h
GL T Rehearses
Producer Director Stephen B 1 innan has ami
that his developing theatre organization has been of-
ficially named the Greenville I it tic rheaire.
Finnan is currently rehearsing Gl Fs scs i.��
production. Neil Simon's comedv Burefood In tin
Park.
Future plans include a thud majoi production in the
See GL THEATRK. Pat 6
m
m
SingerSongwriter Brian Huskey Here Friday
Charlotte, N.C. country folk entertainer Brian Huskey will perform al the I'offehouse. located
downstairs in Mendenhall Student Center, this Friday nijjlil only at 9 p.m. Admission is S.50 at the
door. The performance is beinjt sponsored by the KIT Student Union Coffeehouse Committee.
�v.v
Si
m
1
i
1
�t





(
i I V
TravelAdventure Film
Takes Us To Timbuctoo
Two lick ei s To Timbuctoo
became a gleam in Ken Richter's eye
at a Sunday afternoon tea in New
York Cily's Explorer's Club
Now, thanks to Richier, ihe
public van get a d and brilliantly
colorful look at this wondrous land
as the Mendenhall Student Center
I i a el -d enture Film Series
presents Kenneth Richter's adven-
lure classic, Two Tickets To Tim-
hllCtOO.
The show, sot for 8 p.m January
26, is the end result ot Ken and
Shirle Richter's leaving Algiers
with a station wagon and assign-
ment to produce an educational film
in Morocco and another one in the
Congo River hasm.
Ken thought it would be cheapet
i dne then ton of photographic
equipment aeioss the Sahara than
ilv !i. ins proved to be the most
spectaculai and interesting mistake
eei made. Two Tickets To Tim-
buctoo is the storv of that trip.
I his was a safari that could be
made during only a tew short years,
hetore political unrest and wars
closed i lie Sahara trails. Some ot the
cn the Richters visited are
'Gallipoli9
( imlinued from Pajje 5
One feature of Gallipoli that is
. impressive is its treatment ol
lu period in which the movie takes
plac�. The first two decades of this
cv ur have provided a backdrop
several movies this winter, such
as Runtime and Reds.
I these two films, as in mam
� aboui "the good old days a
n sentimentality seems to
prevail at times, despite careful at-
to realism in sets and
imes.
s ich a feeling is completely ab
in (uillipoli. n eir's film, the
vicwci Jains a sense ol the reality ol
the lime of World Wai I.
' is av hieed mainly through the
i � v eii doesn't allow
I cars or the costumes t
I - -v w �men in the film lo
(Htllipttli.
ply ar ' 'cus
eln - cap-
'unhout
reachable now only by plane; recent
residents o the Zaire mission sta-
tion and travelers to Timbuctoo sav,
"The haven't changed
And who can know what goes on
in In-Guezzam, desert settlement
with a population of three when the
Richters passed through?
George Pierrot, Director ot
World Adventure Series, said, "this
is a most unusual and appealing
story. Two young people start out in
a station wagon lo make an 11,000
mile trip from Algiers across the
often roadless Sahara Desert into
the Congo and baek.
"Naturally, they have plenty ot
adventure � some of it hilarious.
It's the kind of trip most of us
dtearn about and never get a chance
to make
ECl students will be admitted by
ID and activity cards and ECU
faculty and staff by Mendenhall
membership. Public tickets are on
sale m the Central Ticket Office at a
cost of $2.50.
GL Theatre
Continued from Page 5
spring, a children's theatre pnkiiu
iion based lnc works ol
Shakespeare and a summci series o
plays
Participants are im ued to ioin an
acting class, io be taughi . an in-
iroductory course by Finnan, which
will be offered ai the Methodist Siu-
deni c en'e; on Saturday mornings
through the c ominumg 1 ducaiion
Division ot Phi c ommunilN Co!
legc. '
In addition, ol I will � n bv
vohed in local and statewide fund
raising I innan. a foi met lacuhv
mcmbei ol HI Drama
Spet h Department, is ei
"I am very excited by oui prospeets
" c e recetv ed w onderl ul
' 'iixe and supp t: in all
� ors ol ' he t u eenv ille eomnumitv
Barefoot ; The I'ark will preview
ai ihe Mcihidist S t eniet
I ebruary 22, 2 and open foi
Perl �� mances m h hi tiai v 24
rickets will tt -Uai
! '�� � -�� i.i ficket Mficv ai
Mendenhall and . Mel dis S
den I Ceiuci. St h and I lulls si reels.
Pizza xxui
BUFFET
PIZZA, SALAD, SPAGHETTI, SOUP
ALL YOU CAN EAT
MonSun. 11:30-2:00 2.69
Mon. & TueS. 4:00-8:30 2.89
C WEDNESDAY
SPAGHETTI DAY
LARGE PORTION
OF SPAGHETTI,
GARLIC BREAD 1.88
BONUS TRIP TO SALAD BAR
Hwy 2M Bypass Greenville
Nji
TarLanding Seafood
Restaurant
Popcorn
Shrimp
499
All you can eat
N. -
Special Good
Tuesday,
Wednesday
and
Thursday
This Week
Bob Hearing � Manager
Cro�� OrN StTMt ������
Ti�W�t i,t LlffM
Loc�t� on� block �om �� in
Phone 758-0327
A
i
1
STUDENT UNION
STAFFING SCHEDULE
1982-1983
1
i
1
i
LZAfLi
I
Jan. 18-29
I Feb. 4
jj Jan. 25-Feb. 5
I
Feb. 8
Feb. 1-12
Feb. 15
March 26
Application for Student Union President
Student Union President Selected
Application for Student Union
Chairpersons
Student Union Chairpersons Selected
Application for Committee Members
Student Union Staffed
Student Union Banquet
i
i
m
STU0�NT UNION
IUU1KUU UBMim
,v 3
I
ec4
�sK"
Copyright 1982
Kroger Sav on
Quantity Rights Reserved
None Sold to Dealers
OPEN Mon. thru Sat. 8 AM TO MIDNIGHT
Sun. 9 AM TO 9 PM
600 Greenville Blvd.
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Each o� these advertised items is required to be readily
available for sale m each Kroger Sav on. except as specif,
cally noted In this ad If we do run out of an item we will offer
you your choice of a comparable item when available refiec
ting the same savings or a ramcheck which will entitle you to
purchase the advertised item at the advertised price within 30
days

KROGER
FLORIDA FRESH
Orange Juice
to-Gal.
Ctn.
MADE FRESH DAILY
CHEESE OR PEPPERONI
Pizza
ALL VARIETIES
SERVE 'N SAVE
ASSORTED VARIETY
Fox Pizzas
3 $
PKgs.
Vaseline
Intensive
Care
INTENSIVE CARE
Lotion
Luncheon
Meats
?119
COLGATE INSTANT
Shave
Cream
BAGGED
Chips & Snacks
rmsc�iffi100l
COSMITICS A
FHAOBAMCIS
Off
SUOQ
foisc'
WJWttji!
16�,
B
mak � i

r
I
rt
hhoi
hrir �
B
relic'
the H alt fi
!IE
��
WE
-
iki���,1
i
t
4
has
new
vinq
ner
Break)
T
Loc(
PI
Op
Oper
Mon
t
s





XWK.
1
3
i
$
I
I
I
zas
LCARMIOC A&QQT GxcC&c TmcT Haho a)m
6i Vavw A)oms
i III I l� K
WHAT A�� VOU TAKING
sJoT MOCH,MAaJm. I'fA
TAKING A CICHT LOAP
7t) 6fcl,O0 vP AVCAGC i
I
Bad Sci Fi
Frankenstein Series Haunts Hollywood
B JOHWUU KR
suit W ritf
HOI SEOFFRA Wit STEIiS
(1944)
rom Thomas Edison to And) Warhol, film
uv have been fascinated with Frankenstein,
Man Shelley's ISIS novel. Considered a classic
science fiction as well as a masterpiece ol
got hie honor. Shelley's story dealt with the
�nes of man dating to create life and imitate
a. and with man's inhumanity to man.
While such weight) matters have rarely found
es into the innumerable Frankenstein
nude since Edison's 1910 epic, the storv
s been a treasure-trove of eerie ideas tor
- ol fright films.
most famous of these is the series made
the hevdav of Hollywood by Universal
s thai included episodes ranging from the
Frankenstein !93!). to the ridiculous,
ot and ostello Meet Frankenstein (1948).
the worst of the series was House oj
inkenstein i 1944).
Bv 1942 the Frankenstein formula had worn
so for the fifth inning studio execs sent in a
mster, resulting in Frankenstein Meets
the Holt Man. Bv 1944. even that idea was not
enough to ensure box office success. So for the
sixth in the series they came up with Frankenstein
Meets the Wolf Man Meets Dracula Meets the
Mad Doctor Meets the Hunchback. That title
was too long however, so the producers named it
House of Frankenstein.
(Before he set up "house the Monster had
always been played by stars: Boris Karloff in the
first three movies, then I on Chaney, then Bela
I ugosi. By 1944 though, the role was so rotten
no one of any import wanted it � the part finally
went to Glenn Strange, an unknown actor in B
m estei us.)
The storyline centered on the sinister schemes
of Dr. Ciustar Niemann (Karloff), professional
mad scientist. As the film opens, he and his hun-
chback assistant are in jail, incarcerated for their
unholy experiments. Freed when a thunderstorm
damages the jail, they take their show on the
road, soon meeting up with the Monster
(Strange) and the Wolf Man (Chaney). who are
found freee-dned in the ruins of the castle where
the) were last seen during the climax of the
previous tilm, and Count Dracula (John C'ar-
radine). who is uncovered while on exhibit in
(hamher of Horrors
1 he Count does the evil doctor's bidding for a
while, until he stays out in the sun too long which
turns him into bare bones. This blessed event
leaves the plot free to focus on the other creepy
characters: Dr. Niemann, busy kidnapping his
old enemies and preparing to mix up their brains;
the hunchback and the Wolf Man, involved in a
biarre love triangle with a pretty young gypsy
gut(Elena Verdugo); and the title character, who
has little to do since he's been lying dormant
through most of the movie.
Eventually, the werewolf and the woman kill
each other. The nasty hunchback gets his Hist
deserts, and Franky final)) gets into the action.
energized bv 100,(XK) megavolts and carries
Karloff into a bog. The (finally) End.
About the only thing that can be said in
defense of House of Frankenstein is that it is bet
ter than Has I Teenage Frankenstein (1957),
Frankenstein Meets the Space Monster (1965).
Jesse James Meets Frankenstein's Daughter
(196M oi Frankenstein on Campus (1969).
A new series was begun in 1957 by England's
Hammer studios with Peter Cushing starring as
Dr. Frankenstein, which proves that Marv
Shelley's creation is indestructible. Or, as Alan
C. Frank put it in his book Hormr Movies:
"Frankenstein now lives on in the more than
capable hands of Peter Cushing and in the
monster that Karloff made. He will undoubted!)
survive long at ter his campus capers, teenage
duels and monster fights have been forgotten
100�o Nylon Pile
AlI colors
lnsulatcd backing
Large and small
sizes available
TRUCKLOAD
Carpet Sale
WARM FLOORS
0X6 FT. AREA SIZE ONLY
$
12
00
s.
KIMERY'S USED FURNITURE
2808 East 10th St.
ECOND CHANCE
RIGGAN
SHOE
SHOP
DOWNTOWN
GREENVILLE
TWOOOOBS FROM
COX FLORIST
111 W 4th S�
SHOE REPAIR
mTTHE
VERY BEST
75S-0204
1
JOLLY'S
PAWN SHOP
Large inventory of new and
used merchandise
We Hove Layaway
iny items ot value for collateral
. � ens contioential
WE BUY GOLD AND SILVER
AC BOSS THf R l E W Corner ol N Gr (-en & M 33
� til 'S9 Mon Fr. 9 'o S - Sat S to 4
I
IX�C
20C
IlISINCI IN mi�$TlINQ
I
IXK a
TEL 756 6200
SUITE C
PITT PLAZA SHOPPING CENTER
European Trained Hair Stylists
WE PAY IMMEDIATE CASH
FOR:
CLASS RINGS
WEDDING BANDS
DIAMONDS
ALL.GOLD & SILVER
SILVER COINS
CHINA & CRYSTAL
FINE WATCHES
&RING
of EV SALES co "�e.
��� �! PHONE 752-3866
l�6oipifOH�$iO�l�l PIRMAMINI �����"
ROOMMATE
WANTED
Male or female. Close to cam
pus � modern conveniences.
Completely furnished. $76 per
month, pius utilities. Call
752-4935
1
AND HIS ALL-STAR BAND
ROCK 93ATTIC HEART FUND
CONCERT
HARBIN HIGHLANDER CENTER, INC
Coin-Operated
Laundr
and Dry Cleaners
( leant si laundry in town!
Color TV. and Video Games
Across from Highway Patrol
Station on 10th St.
Hours fi a.m10 p.m.
7 days a week
i
7th
ANNUAL
� la
ART
SHOW
Co'l ariead : �'� �� '� � ' �
your new hairstyle
free Consultation
756 6200
S3
Carolina
o Grill
All ECU students are eligible.
Work must be delivered on Jan. 22, 1982, bet
ween 9:00 and 4:00 to the Conference Room in
Jenkins, accompanied by $1.00 entry fee per
piece.
Categories: Painting, Sculpture, Ceramics,
Drawing, Photography,
Design, and Graphic Art and Illustration.
Prizes: $50.00 1 st Place in each category and
$100.00 Best-ln-Show.
Sponsored by the Attic and Jeffreys Beer and Wine, Co
WITH
LAMBDA CHI
ALPHA
500 Elizabeth St.
Call for Rides or Info at 752-5325
has now reopened under
new management � ser-
ving breakfast and din-
ner.
Breakfast served any time.
Take out or dine in.
Located on corner of 9th &
Dickenson
Phone 752-1188
Open 6 A.M. 'til 3:00 p.m.
n
Ope
Mon. Sun
We ain't kidding this time
Carolina Recording Artists
Nicky Harris
Band
Performing Wed. at the
Casablanca Happy Hour.


TUES JAN. 19AXA REVOLVING
BOOTH
WED JAN. 20REFRESHMENTS
will be served
FROM 9:00-UNTIL ALL THREE NIGHTS
r





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
JANUARY 14, 1982
Defeated Both JMU, Campbell
Lady Bucs Were Happy Hosts
Zooming In On Odom
Photographer Gary Patterson moved in close for these
pictures of ECU basketball coach Dave Odom during
the team's 58-49 loss to UNC-W last Thursday. Follow-
ing the game Odom referred to his team's showing as
"the worst physical performance in my three years
here Patterson's photography makes evident the
frustration, yet hope, that the third-year coach felt.
By JIMMY DuPREE
Maaagtaa ratitor
The first annual East Carolina-
Duke Doubleheader proved suc-
cessful for one host � not so suc-
cessful for the other.
ECU's Lady Pirates claimed a
pair of victories in the event, down-
ing Campbell University 65-46 Fri-
day and James Madison 90-60
Saturday. Meanwhile, Minges Col-
iseum was not so kind to the Blue
Devils as they dropped their Friday
contest with Madison 76-75 then re-
bounded for an 83-64 romp over
Campbell.
With top scorers Mary Denkler
and Sam Jones leading the way,
ECU had little difficulty handling
Division II power Campbell. The
Lady Pirates built to an 11 point
lead on a Jones drive inside with
4:18 remaining in the first half.
The Lady Pirates continued their
attack in the second frame, quickly
building a 50-30 advantage on a
Loletha Harrison bucket inside on a
pass from Fran Hooks with less
than seven minutes elapsed. A
Lillion Barnes 18-foot jumper with
7:17 remaining gave ECU a 24 point
edge � their biggest of the game.
Two field goals each by Sharon
Williams and Cindy Biggerstaff
helped the visitors cut the margin to
19 at the buzzer.
Jones, who missed her first start
of the season for arriving late for
pre-game meal, came on to fire in 10
of 20 from the field and two out of
three from the line for 22 points,
dished off five assists and lead all re-
bounders with 15. Denkler poured
in 18 points, with Hooks con-
tributing five assists.
The Camels' Rhonda Mueller
contributed 12 points, with Sharon
Williams adding 10.
Things were a little different
against Madison, as the Duchess'
Deana Meadows gave them the lead
2-0 with a drive two minutes into the
game. From that point on, the Lady
Pirates fought slowly to a 17 point
lead with :39 till halftime.
The two teams fought evenly
through the first six minutes of the
final stanza with ECU maintaining a
15 point advantage, but Jones led a
Lady Pirate flurry as they forged a
i point lead with 9:33 on the clock.
Jones continued her offensive
barrage, tallying 23 points on eight
of 15 field goal attempts and seven
of eight from the line. She also
handed off nine assists and grabbed
seven rebounds.
Hooks bested her career-high
point total with 15 on the night and
gave out six assists. Denkler and
freshman Darlene Chaney con-
tributed 14 points each, with
Loraine Foster adding 12. Denkler
led the Lady Pirates with nine re-
bounds.
Sue Manelski paced Madison with
16 points, while Meadows added 15
and freshman Beth Hamilton
pumped in 11 while pulling down
nine rebounds.
The Lady Pirates begin a three-
game road trip against Georgia
Tech, Wake Forest and Ap-
palachian State before returning to
Minges Feb. 3 to face East Ten-
nessee State.
In Duke's opening loss to
Madison, the Devils' Kim Matthews
led the way with 18 points and 10 re-
bounds, while Jennifer Chesnut
posted 13 points, Claire Rose 12 and
Candy Mikels 10.
Meadows led JMU with 20,
followed by Hamilton with 17, Bet-
sy Blose with 16 and Manelski's 13.
Against Campbell, Duke's Stacy
Hurd came alive with 24 points, as
Maura Hertzog swished 12, Margo
Walsh 11 and Matthews 10.
The Camels were led by Sharon
Williams with 18 points, Cindy Big
gerstaff's 14 and Jean Lamson's 11
The Lady Pirates' schedule,
tough all season long, does not get
any easier in February. ECU takes
on a pair of nationally ranked teams
early next month.
One of the ranked clubs, arch-
rival N.C. State, will come to
Greenville on February 7. On Feb.
11 the Lady Pirates travel nor-
thward to face powerful Old Domi-
nion.
Later in the month, during the
weekend of Feb. 20-21, the first an-
nual Lady Pirate Classic will be
played in Greenville.
Photo By CHAP GUHLEY
Ptwto By MP jlOAN
Sam Jones (left) and Fran Hooks (right) both starred over
the weekend for the Ladv Pirates.
Fast Spider Start Makes Tarrant A Fixture
TWO DEVELOPMENTS took
place within the FCAC-South
yesterda) (Monday). The foremost
of the two involves league-leader
Richmond.
I he Spiders are 1-0 in the con-
ference and 11-4 overall under
Coach Dick Tarrant. who took over
on an interim basis when Lou Goetz
stepped down from the position.
Yesterda Richmond announced
that Far ran; has been signed on as
the Spiders' head man on a perma-
nent basis. Terms at the contract
were not announced, though The
Richmond Times-Dispatch reported
it to be a four-year pact for about
$30,000 annually.
Included among Richmond's 11
victories have been upsets of Wake
Forest, South Carolina and James
Madison.
"We arc extremely proud o the
job which Dick has done said
Richmond Athletic Director Chuck
Boone. "He and Ins staff and his
squad represent the University of
Richmond very well
I HI OTHER development
yesterdaj was George Mason's
escaping the league cellar via an
89-79 win over Navy.
Carlos Yates paced the Patriot at-
tack with 19 points. John Niehoff
added 15 and center Andre Gaddy
13.
Mason jumped to a big 43-25
halftime lead and never gave up that
advantage. A key late in the game,
when the Midshipmen were making
a run, was the fact that three Navy
starters fouled out.
THL ONLY OTHER league
game over the past seven days
resulted in James Madison moving
into sole possession of second place
with a 54-44 win over William and
Mary.
The Dukes did so on Saturday
behind Linton Townes' 21 points
and six rebounds. JMU is now 3-1 in
the conference, one-half game
ahead of East Carolina, and 11-3
overall.
The Dukes outdid the Indians by
a large margin in field goal ac-
curacy, James Madison connecting
on 52.5 percent and William and
Mary just 40.4 percent. JMU also
finished with a wide 31-22 advan-
tage in rebounds.
�"�0�0 '�
ECAC-South Report
Richmond Gives Tarrant Vote Of Confidence
RECAP� DePaul Downs Old Dominion
� AHEAD� ECU vs. AC. State; JMU vs. ODL
THE BIGGIE last week among
non-conferece games featured Old
Dominion hosting fifth-ranked
DePaul. The Blue Demons came in-
to the sold-out Norfolk Scope look-
ing to avenge last year's defeat at
the handsof the Monarchs.
Revenge was just what Ray
Meyer's club got, rolling to a 70-60
win that was not as close as the score
indicated.
The Blue Demons jumped to a
44-24 lead early in the second half
and survived a late ODU rally. The
Monarchs closed the gap to six, at
66-60, with 43 seconds remaining
before losing.
All-America candidate Terry
Cummings led DePaul with 18
points and 15 rebounds. Charlie
Smith tallied 16 points for ODU.
A big key in the game was
shooting. DePaul put in 49 percent
of its shots. ODU, meanwhile, con-
nected on but 38 percent.
THE BIG SHOWDOWN that
many league observers have been
waited for looms ahead this week.
James Madison and Old Dominion,
the two pre-season favorites, go at it
in Harrisonburg, Va home of the
Dukes.
That game takes place on
Wednesday. It marks the beginning
of the conference campaign for the
Monarchs, who are 7-5 overall.
On the same night league-leader
Richmond travels to William and
Mary, where the Indians are always
tough. The Indians are currently in
last place in the league and need a
win badly if they hope to keep their
regular season title hopes alive.
The only other conference game
falls on Saturday, when Old Domi-
nion travels to William and Mary.
ECU'S PIRATES may not have
'Comedy Of Errors' Lead Bucs
To Doom In Loss To UNC-W
Bv CHARLES CHANDLER
sports Idiiur
It may have been cold and snowy
on the outside last Fhhrsday, but it
a as even colder inside of Minges
Coliseum.
Fast Carolina suffered through its
worst game of the season, shooting
ofifv 32 percent from the field and
committing 22 turnovers, in falling
to rival UNC -Wilmington, 58-49.
Both teams started slow, the two
scoring onlv 19 points between them
during the game's first 13 minutes.
ECl had the lead early but gave it
up when Seahawk guard Edward
I millions connected on a jumper
with 6:38 left in the opening half to
i Mil
Pnoto Bv GARY PATTERSON
UNC-W's Frankie Dickens
Scored 10 Points Thursday
put his team ahead, 11-10. The
Pirates were never able to recapture
the lead.
The Seahawks led 20-15 at the
half. The first period was not kind
at all to the Bucs, who managed to
connect on only six of 28 field goal
tries, which translates to a mere 21.4
percent.
A big 12-0 run by the Seahawks
during, a four-minute span early in
the second half sealed the Pirates'
doom. That run gave UNC-W a
40-22 lead.
The Bucs narrowed the lead io
nine on several occasions, but their
own mistakes kept them from cut-
ting any deeper into that lead. Dur-
ing a two-minute span late in the
game the Pirates came up with three
steals that turned into fast break op-
portunities. Still, the Pirates were
not able to turn any of the breaks in-
to any points.
The Pirates' poor shooting on the
night was countered by Wilm-
ington's 62.5 percent accuracy.
Center Leon Nickelson led the
way for Wilmington with 14 points,
eight rebounds and five blocked
shots. Forward Carlos Kelly added
12 points and guard Frankie
Dickens ten points.
Forward Morris Hargrove was
the only Pirate finishing in double
figures, scoring 13 points. The Bucs'
other starting forward, Charles
Green, contributed nine points,
seven rebounds, three blocked shots
and five steals.
ECU coach Dave Odom termed
his team's sub-par showing "the
worst physical performance of a
team since I've been here
"It was nothing short of a com-
edy of errors he added. "Nothing
went right. I can't think of anyone
that played anything close to their
ability level
Wilmington coach Mel Gibson
was overjoyed with his club's per-
formance, despite the Seahawks' 25
turnovers.
"We made a lot of mistakes
Gibson said. "They made a lot of
mistakes too. But I'd like to think
that our defense had something to
do with their offensive problems.
This was a very big win for us, put-
ting us two games above .500
The win was Wilmington's fifth
in six games and increased the club's
record to 8-6. The Pirates fell to 6-7.
ECU is back in action this
Wednesday, traveling to Raleigh to
face Campbell University. The club
is back in the capital city on Satur-
day for a matchup with I2th-ranked
N.C. State.
I M -� II .MIMaTON Itt)
Killy 6 0-2 12. William I J 7, NKkdv.Hi 4 -7 I.
DVkcm 4 2-4 10. Tobin I 1-2 J. Ttmm,m� 2 12 5. �
Ptudlme 00-0 0. Sal�iiu0-6. PomrO0-O. McMillan
12 I.S. Prudhoc 0 0-0 0
Ml i�lt
Hiiryrovc 3 J- 13. Cmm J 1-4 9. Gibum 2 CM) 4.
Sk I aurin I W 1. Byka OM Oftcfcrfct 0 CM) 0. ti� I M 5.
MI ! McN�irl4Mjtm�-4 7. Peartrcr 2 1-25.
Mallnmc-UNC-W X.W 15. Fouled �I ���
IcclmKal�None. A� !$�.
Battling Under The Boards
The scene above will no doubt be replayed this Thursday
when ECU travels to Raleigh to face Campbell. In the
Pirates' early-season win over the Camels, ECU forwards AI
Mack (left) and Morris Hargrove (33) battle Camel center
Tony Britto. (Photo By Gary Patterson)
any conference games this week, but
the club does have the most deman-
ding non-conference contest to play.
Coach Dave Odom's squad will
travel to Raleigh to face nationallv
ranked N.C. State on Saturday. The
Wolfpack is coming off a tough
week in which the club lost badly to
top-ranked North Carolina, then
fought to a comeback win over a
strong Wake Forest team.
Women '$
Team Breaks
Four Records
BTHOMVBRAMK
Nlnfl Wnlrr
In their 86-62 victory over Navy,
the Lady Pirates broke four varsitv
and one freshman record while the
ECU men dropped a disappointing
meet to the Midsluppmen.
The women trimmed the 400
medley relay by lour seconds with a
4:08.11 time. Nan George broke the
500 and 100 free-style varsitv
records. She was a member of the
400 medley relay and the 400
freestyle relay. Varsity records were
set in those events as well.
"Nancy James had a real good
meet, especially her new freshman
record in the 100 freest vie and her
contribution on the 400 freestyle
team said ECU Coach Ray Scarf.
First-year ECU assistant Molly
Deloier thought, "We looked the
best we have all yeai as a whole
In addition to the varsity records
broken, four national qualifying
times were established bv the
women.
The absence of the divers again
destroyed the ECU men's chances
for victory. Rick Kobe, second-year
assistant of ECU, believed the
16-poini loss in divine events was a
big blow.
Kobe also believed if the men,
who fell 79-34, had" not lost their
first relay, by only two tenths of one
second, the Pirates would have been
See MEN, Page 10
I L, i' " 1t m 1 J
It rlm Vuve
M ?.( Mil ill si MIIM.st Ml H iltmi . . la �"� Mad ECl at N Siaic
(raw Kr �Til(l.rrill did iVmiii.Mi Ik i i Mar)
Richmond 1 0I t 4Sun . Jin 24
Jamr Madivn 1II )
la�i an Jin. MB-7I (. itffl :
(ki Domw- 4
GfHTfC Mason t Nav 0-1J -MiitJii 25
Uitlurn and M 0 4luqucrii.c a' Old DomiAMM 1 jrcomutf a1 Sav v
THIS WEEK'S s IHIII 1 1V Inutileunlfrrmr liimi 1 s WlUk sHIl 1 Is
��l .Jin 20i m Doottmos H. v Ml 51
1 1 n i amphcll m RalnithIM �. . � I ! 4V
Radlord ji (jcorpe Mawmlamo Maetaofi 76, lwii Siau 48
X - Old IV'iimii.m a! lam MiJiM'nlame Martimi - inn- and Mar 44
X RututiMid ai William and Mar)DePaul J�, OUI DuMMMOfl (0
1 afayene ai SjKn.hm.md 75. Kadi ' M George Mason ilanin C rtsiian
S�l .Jin UGeorge Mason W. a. 79
EDITOR
sports quest
mainder t
piled by fh
the semesit
The fod
quizzes is tj
and see it
believe.
Answer
below
1. In wi
LeagU'
I eaeu-
2. o I
bav
0
3. True a
((range H
4 In 19"
cf Stai i
which M
5. Which
for the !n
Da Hi
b I a
single ime
7. Tri
all-time
Harlem Gl
j
number
stars �
them
o
Suit!
Spoj
Pan
Spo
Dre)
A grci
Vel
� gi
LS
Sha
�X grc
SVO
V if'
Jac
A gr
Jacl
A erj
la
Jad
X �l
Skil
A grl
Lu
A g
w
A gj
SpJ
A g
Al
Cci
?





s
ks
ds
L
i s i. AROI IMAN IANUARY IV. I9K2
Ho w Many A CC Nets ?
EDITOR'S NOTE: This begins a series oj
sports questionares that wilt appeal toi ' '
mainder oj the semester. The questions are com
piled by The East Carolinian sports stall I ater in
the semester there mux by a sports quiz eontesi
The locus in this, ihe firsi ol otu spoils
quizzes is football a basketball. 1cm youi wits
and see it you are as hie a spoils expen as you
believe
Answers to the questions appeal upside down
below
1 In what year did the American Kootball
league merge with ihe National Football
1 eague.? Was it in 1968, 1969, 01 1970?
2 O.J Simpson stands as one ol tht greatest
backs io evei pla in the Ml Do sou know
O I 's full name'
3 line or false. Colorado played in the 197"
Oiange Bowl came.
4 In W Heisman F"roph winner Inn Pluul
of Stanford was the number one draft pick ol
w hich Ml team
5 Which college football leam hoids the record
tor the longest winning streak? Is ii leas, None
Hame. Alabama, Southern Cal oi Oklahoma?
t Has dn leam ever scored over 2(X) points m a
single intercollegiate football game?
Iiueor False. Wilt Chamberlain, iIn MBA's
all-nme leading scorer, once played : i
Harlem Globetrotters.
8 The New lersej Nets rostei mchul
number of tor met Atlantic . oasi .
stars. How many ex-ACC players are Nt. -? N;i i
i hem.
5 DAYS
OF SALE
Januar 19-Januarv 23
g ip ol
Suits25o 50�?o
A group ol
Sport Coats2 50�7o
A gnnip of
Pants 251
Sport Shirts50?o
A group of
Dress Shirts33 oti
A group ol
Velours50
A i;roup of
LS Knits33�7o f,
A troup Of
Shoes50
group of
Sweaters50
A group of
Jackets50 , n
A iiroup ol
Jackets33
group �
Leather
Jackets50 �
A group ol
Ski Vests33
A group ol
Luggage50
A group ol
Wool Hats50 �
A group of
Sport Vests50 on
A group ol
All Weather
Coats25 50
At all of our fine stores
�Pftnani
MEISIS WEAR
Downtown Greenville- Monday Saturdav � 3�'� � 10
Carotma East Mall - Monday Fnday 10 00 to � 00
Saturday ,0 00 to � 00
Tarrytown Mall - Rocky Mounl - Mon Fri 10 00 to t 00
Saturday 10 00 to 00
Sports
Quiz
their theme song "Sweet Georgia Brown ' I rue
of false. The Globetrotters also once recorded a
song that is a real favorite ol beach musiv lovers
todav.
11. How many limes was Hill Kusscll named ihe
N1osl Valuable Playei in the NBA'
12. Everyone is familial with 7-4 supei stai Ralph
9 Basketball announcer Billv Packer is a formei Sampson of Virginia. Sampson took a long nine
college player. What team did Packer used to play in deciding to become a Cavalier, though an
on? you name the othei three schools thai Sampson
10 Ihe Hailem Globetrotters are famous foi considered attending?
Aaswevs
t.i I rtui.ui put' -lojjsqojf) aqi toj paAeid 'sesifb)) v itka loittnl
ruioii' iiio 'A.tnuio Suuapisiuo nj3JKi siq jajje ojd paujnj oijw 'uiejdquieq aruj
uopq lf�u inq "fuuri n uo p.pn.sp uos(.1uips Ul OUUc 0 3JOs sill q
PUB V '33SS3UU3J 'UOUlUp 0 (JJSJ3AIUH piHJJ0qillll )
:96l '1961 'SS6I ll1 pjewc oij i now ;i vmm icaq ijs j Bigjoary 9151 taqoiao "O "s� 9
VAN M 1� ll 3M' S,?NN llSSI1M ll!8 II sins omin.o-
�)U q.tB.iq -UO.1 Up IfllW pjO.ldJ Hl spjoi) BlUOlJKS() s
irptdod i.sv v vvou si ipiipv tsjpg r( uirsi (pui'irui 1 n won) siouiBj lioi � )
pjo.ioj a.iuo sj3uoJuqoj�") .iij 1 miii 1 01 imp cup q punoj isjij dip m pajrops sew " p
v.miuinji s.suoji 'j.i.iunou oi
icpidod mpouc si ajaqj ipeo:) sjh isojoj Mjeis oiijo 01 iso qnp 3ip qgnoip woa .iurjo
isjt;v ik nBqi.isjseq 333o3 paXcjd J33B i( m 01 mow pur nm ui diqsuoidutBq.i :
(isH() isuiuii os;ii ptiB (ruioir 11 r �iqi now opBJO0 38JBqj3 vo "�"njj
JOM.O 'K � ONV1 wqio 3qj puBj.jB, �uosduijS
1 Bq oi 1 j 1 - tpqi p.iBd 1101111 U3 suiBf Bqiu3j(j tjjauijoj si it3.iinj "i z
puB 3ii� iMqiV 'siuri! )J3ng :ui)ii JO 3djqj mim u3 ioj
M ?qi qnw wo.u .ur sjbis 3 X3 i I s uotiBjado 111 uaaq pBq nslB3" Bqjoo
0l in si.nni'w ,iii i.iip' 'oz.61 l" patoui 1 j pirn , i
prUj,l 3qj .Tuiuiot ajojsq fSs 8S6I l" sj:i
FOR SALE
A A l K M AN MINI . Ml ul ,i I
( . , , .1. 11' ' . 1
pi .1 I C .111
MAT Eft BE Ol DON I �
ii. in heatt'd 11. ri hui
.i.i.i' ii .it. in 14 mil 1 Buy �
pi. '� ! quality pi.
ii. ated a.ii ii. 0 wai
r ant y (of .
i .1 a� a
Cail David loi apt
tit J
DAN i'dsi tmllhidi '
Genera
1 . Itel .
II
nova .1. �
f.nl : ,11 .1'
-
� t r,
mu . � � �
FOR RENT
i .� 11 �-
-
jmpus Phoni rsi
FEMALE I
-
7i6 IS
TWO HOOMI
� �
HOC- ��� �� � A
' . -
-
a Fel
' - �
( 11 m.
I I- MAI t HOOVfA 1 t
I ig.liy.il HP'S jCOl Hum
1 ampul t ui .ui ii Ml n
11 no 16V5
ROOMMATI M IDEO I n
u , Ap tOO a month on.
� , withing dll�.nj
unipui lJ
I, 'i A .1 I' . ' 111 1
(in rsj
a Ml. 0 !� 1 �

' I ,md un .
O 70 V
'

HELP
WANTED
� W � p . 11 0 .
- - day
D. 1. 11
PERSONAL

1-
IONA1 T t 1
-
H Aill
. 3�i
l OS I VtU 0Ai Alult WlMl
Bi a ,ind t�i�ith and whi'i.
tail Wi anna uiacti (olia' with ol
iq II luuiid 01 s � 11 pitasi. � rf 11
- �
NOTARY HUBLIC Call Amy a'
� 1
ASHE VILLI mut r. dno le
A Ii. . f � b 5 ConlaC Ann
� 1
aw 1 CLASSES Mi � d mt dia
1 . , j Materc oioi
. rti the Greenville
m ol Ait Rryistration inn
j.ii ?J Hiqivtiat'on lei
K'h, Sttolai
t)( Pitl Community
.
I'I NBA l I WaCHINI
I � 1 , 'h. Gonq
y . I I
M Mil b I'nprf Va'l
in jo Crt.in �� n
& TUBES 1. ' WE VLES
1 . .i; p. 1 vonabied
� � on done
. d urn
- � 0 b'
'
NNf U rhefr up1
rioutd be a
, moiiii madi in heden
OOPS' Should ha ItiK hi-d on lo d
. . . � ime Love
N E E I � � � ' I R S I r 0 m
, 778 ITIJ
P , we lound
n;nd The
.�a 1 plena
� -
H t.
.ooali�
. Appoint
and
Can
.
igtor.
ITS WAR!
BOOM! BOOM! BOOM!
To introduce vou to our mouth watering style of pizza, we're mak-
ing two incredible offers With this coupon save $1 00 on a
medium or $2 00 "on a large Godfather's Piza
What's holdin' va9 The doors are open now'
Godfather s Pizza
$100
JLOFF
Medium
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Greenville Boulevard Phone 75b-00
Offer ex ire
� MtX HHOaBK 0�C MMW9MK 3� �MMMIrKK3Me@MrCa�
NEW YEAR'S SPECIAL
the body shoppe
"TOTAL FITNESS FOR TODAY'S WOMAN'
$1Q95
1 mo. membership � � z (reg. $24)
$4995
3 mo. membership �
(reg. $60)
The
Kappa Sigma
Fraternity
invites you to
Rush
700th Fast lOthSt.
Beside Darryl's 1907
I uesday � kappa Sig's
Famous Playbo
Bunn Nite
ednesda � d(in� Greek
Kappa Sig Style
I hursda
Formal Rush
Starts at 8:30
for more info, call:
752-5543
WESTERN SIZZLIN'
"The Family Steak House
9 9
EXERCISE CLASSES WHICH INCLUDE
AEROBICS �EQUIPMENT �SAUNAS
Bring in this ad and add an extra
week to your membership.
1530 E. 14th St Call or come by
758-7564 for a free visit.
The
Ebony Herald
needs an
advertising
salesperson.
Base salary and commission.
Experience helpful, but not necessary
Apply with Media Board Secretary.
MONDAY� $199
CHOPPED STEAK �
TUESDAY � 1 99
BEEF TIPS �
WEDNESDAY� $189
CUBED STEAK �
THURSDAY� $169
STEAK SANDWICH �
FRIDAY � $Q79
U.S.D.A. RIB EYE �
SATURDAY � $099
BARBEQUE RIBS A
SUNDAY � $199
STEAK ON A STICK �
,3, Famous Salad Bar
B Free Tea with ECU ID.
M AH meals are complete including baked potato or French fries & Texas
m toast.
T�k� Out Service
7903 E. 10th St. Hour; i �.m1�p.m.
7S1-217J MThur�.
24 Bypass � 7S4-O040 M a.mn p.m. FrtSon.
� � ii i m ii i mi j � w i m � ii � iiin i � iiwiiiM m Jimnwi nmi�iim





10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 19, 1982
Men Swimmers Fall,
Women Are Victors
Continued From P. 8
a lot closer.
There were some
bright spots in the loss
to Navy. One, the
freshman medley relay
record was broken.
Two, Gregor Wray
barely missed the
freshman 200 butterfly
record. Lastly, Joakin
Svensson swam very
well, Kobe said.
As a team, the ECU
men improved on their
times. "We keep im-
proving and that is
pleasing explained
Coach Scharf. "We're
a young team and it will
take time, but we will
be back
Assistant Kobe pro-
claimed, "We're tired
now but once we get
rested we are going to
be tough
The ECU men have
to get tough quick
because ECU entertains
UNC-Chapel Hill
Thursday in a double
dual meet.
After that, UNC,
N.C. State and Va.
Tech invade the ECU
Natatorium on Mon-
day. These opponents!
will prove to be a very
formidable for the
Pirates.
The ECU men will
enter the home series
with a record of 3-3,
while the Lady Pirates
will have a respectable
3-1 record to their
backing.
Lady Tracksters Bring
Home Trio Of Thirds
The last Carolina
women's track team
came back to Green-
111 c from last
weekend's Virginia
lech Invitational with
three third-places and
one fifth place finish.
The 600 meter rela
team of Arnetta Kelly,
Anne Hartman, Liz
(iraham and Carolyn
Moore posted a 1:20.9
time for a third-place
finish.
Eve Brennan, in the
1500 meters, and
Moore, in the 300
meters, also capped
third place in their
respective events. Bren-
nan came in at 5:02.1.
while Moore finished at
43.2.
Anne Nartman took
fifth place in the 400
meters with a time of
64.5.
The Last Carolinian
Win
i'i, twHtpm
i'i, r I92i
Published every Tuesday and
Thursday during trie academic
year and every Wednesday dur
mg the summer
The East Carolinian is the o
ticial newspaper ot Eas'
Carolina Universi'y. owed.
operated and published tor and
hy the students ot East Carolina
University
Subscription Hat i!0 yearly
The East Carolinian ottices
are located in the Old South
Building on the campus of ECU.
Greenville, NC
POSTMASTER Send addreu
chanqes �o The East Carolinian
Old South Building, ECU Green
ville NC ?7�34
Telephone 7�7 tM. 4M7. MO
Application to mail at second
class postage rates is pending at
Greenville, North Carolina
PLAZA
DENS
GREENVILLE'S NEWEST BANQUET
AND PARTY FACILITY
Ir'ORMERLY BALLENTINE S BUFFET
PITT PLAZA. GREENVILLE)
Winter & Spring
� FORMALS
�� MEETINGS
�� BANQUETS
COMPLETE FOOD SERVICE AVAILABLE
WECIAUZJNGIH OUTSIDE CATERING
Call BOB SAUTER
355-2361 OR 756-0842
OStr.Mr ST I K ATKIN. MPI r HUkIM,
-come join us-
every Sunday
SSrRBat
BUFFET
11:30-230
Mile Relay Team
Sets New ECU Mark
The East Carolina
track team ventured to
a warmer climate over
the weekend and came
back home from the
Florida Invitational
with a new school
record in the mile relay
and renewed con-
fidence.
"We did quite well
said Pirate coach Bill
Carson. "We're
especially pleased with
the school record. We
should be even better
by February 12 (the
Millrose Wanamaker
Invitational). We have
enough talent overall
right now to have a
moderately successful
year
The mile relay team
of Carlton Frazier,
Terry Ford, Keith
Clarke and Tim Cephus
posted a record time of
3:15.5 to finish second
in the Florida event.
The previous record in
the relay was a 3:15.7,
recorded at Ohio State
last season.
Clarke did well on
his own in addition to
contributing to the
relay record. He finish-
ed second in the 400
meter dash, turning in a
time of 49.17. ECU's
Terry Ford finished
fourth in the same
event, at 49.36.
Clint Harris, who
doubles as a defensive
back during football
season, finished fifth in
the 55 meter event with
a 6.44 clocking.
The Pirates travel
northward this week,
taking on VMI Friday.
The VMI mile relay
team has built up quite
a reputation, recording
a time of 3:12.8 at East
Tennessee State.
Attention
Nursing &
Allied Health Students
The SGA transit has ex-
panded its routes to include
the ECU medical school &
health affairs library.
MonFri.
Departures
Mendenhall 1:10
3:10
5:10
7:10
9:10
Arrivals
ECU Medical
Complex 1:20
3:20
5:20
7:20
9:20
oooooocx
for men and women
Come by or call TODAY and set
up an appointment for a free workout.
1002 EVANS STREET
GREENVILLE. N.C.
OLYMPIC lAMMlS
�COED HOURS �FEMALE HOURS
AND DUMKLLS �SAUNA,
SHOWERS. AND LOCKfRS
WHMUJOOl �DKT PLANS
Stretching Exercise Classes
M-W-F 10:00 & 11:00 T-Th. 5:00 & 6:00
Aerobics and Dancercize Classes
M-W-Th. 3:00-4:00
Features Included: Male & Female
Instructors � Nautilus Machines
(12 of the most sophisticated exercise machines made).
Special Student Rates
Group rates for 5 or more students.
OU per student.
AT NAUTILUS FITNESS IS OUR SPECIALTY
January Clearance
All Timberlond Boots
& Casual Shoes
12 PRICE
All Insulated Jackets
& Vests by Browning & Duxbak
13 OFF
La. selection of Men's
& Ladies' Warm-Ups
12 PRICE
All Ski Clothing by
Aspen & Pacific Trail
12 PRICE
Out of Season? Yes
75�c
and Reduced
Ooff
Ladies' tennis shorts & tops
by Court Cosuolf Adidos and More
ALL SALES FINAL!
H. L HODGES
BOND'S
SPORTING GOODS
$
ADVERTISEO
ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is required to be readily available for sale
I below the advertised price in each A4P Store except as specifically noted
in this ad
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT JAN. 23, AT A&P IN GREENVILLE, N.C.
ITEllS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS
OR WHOLESALERS
703 Greenville Blvd.
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Greenville N. C.
NOW SAVE MORE THAN BEFORE
WITH SUPER SAVER COUPONS!
at or
'J
smg
A&P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
Whole Boneless
Rib Eyes
9-12 lb.
avg.
lb.
A&P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
Bone
In
(Steak lb58) D.
U.S.D.A. INSPECTED
Fresh
rresn lb j
Baking Hens
4 lb. to 7 lb.
Avg. Wt.
A&P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
Boneless
Beef Stew
4 lbs. or
more
KRAFT�SAVE 54�
repeat Groce
Savings y
lb.
I
I I
SEALTEST
Parkay Margarine
2 1
mYk pkgs.
Ice Cream
89
(Save 80)
2 gal.
ctn.
1
LIQUID�SAVE 10
Purex Bleach
gal.
jug-
69'
Coca-Cola
Mello Yello
Tab
Sprite
Orange Crush
Grape Crush
2
1
Litre
Plastic
Bottle
09
each
�"�"��( P Mm SUPE� SAVER COUPON �� S
mm mm �� aaqi�-L -MM������������
ANN PAGE GRANULATED oawc!
Pure Cane
Sugar
A1
lb.
LIMIT ONE WITH ADDfTtONAL 7.50 ORDER Da9
GOOO THRU SAT JAN. 23 AT A&P IN GREENVILLE, N.C.
5
50
89
SAVE
50�
I
I
I
I

�"�liRB SUPER SAVER COUPON
rA J GRADE "A" NORTHCMOLNUT
A&P White
Large Egg
dozen
only
39
UMTT ONE WITH ADDITIONAL 7.50 ORDER
GOOD THRU SAT, JAN. 23 AT A&P IN GREEN VILLE. N.C.
AV
ELECTRA PERK � REGULAR � AUTO DRIP
Maxwell House
Coffee bag
UMTT ONE WITH ADDITIONAL 7.50 ORDER
GOOD THRU SAT, JAN. 23 AT A&P M GREENVILLE, N.C.
SAVE
40
I
I
I
I
I
607 J
SAVE1
30
606
WASHINGTON STATE
AEFARrV
FANCY
Red or Golden
Delicious Apples
FLORIDA RED OR WHITE
Grapefruit
W bag
GOLDEN YELLOW RIPE
Dole Bananas
31
t
Offt
� .MHr'flMMpH �
���� , jjjv-





Title
The East Carolinian, January 19, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 19, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.171
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy