The East Carolinian, November 24, 1981






�he 5EaHt Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 58 No. 27
Tuesday, November 24,1981
Greenville,N.C .
10 Pages
NAACP Appropriation
Draws SGA Debate
Photo By JIM WOLTJEN
( titling the ribbon at the new bed tower: (from left) FXL medical school dean Dr. William I. I.aupus. hospital
hoard chairman Dr. O. Henry I eslie, and chief o, medical staff Dr. R. William Mcionnell.
New Bed Tower Opens
H IOM H M I
Put County Memorial Hospital
held a ribbon-cutting ceremon and
open house for its nev west bed
lowei at 2 p.m. Sunday. The S5.5
a i was funded through
the ECU S hool ol Medicine.
When staffed, the 138-bed addi-
will increase the facility's bed
capacity, to 5 56. With the
73,000 square-loot wing, the
hospital now covers 12 acres.
l)i illiam 1 aupus, dean of the
medical school, said "a ground
swell of feeling ingrained in all
eastern North Carolinians" that the
area needed better health care was
partly responsible for the expan-
sion. He also credited the state
government and former chancellor
I eo Jenkins for the "evolution" of
ECU and the medical school.
The complex now has 870
employees and will need at least 86
more nurses to staff the facility, ac-
cording to hospital officials. The 20
off-premises beds for ambulators
patients are now being phased out.
The "snowflake-designed" tower
has a nursing station at the "hub"
of each floorT The eight hallways on
each floor lead to six rooms.
The first floor will be lived foi
surgical sub-specialties, such as or
thopedics. The second floor has
been allocated to pediatrics, and the
top floor to other medical services.
Approximately 80 people attend-
ed the open house, including
numerous public officials from the
eastern North Carolina area.
By DIANE ANDERSON
-il�nl Sr� Mll�r
The Student Government
Association, after an hour and
forty-five minute debate, Monday
voted to reconsider a bill which they
approved in a previous meeting ap-
propriating $815 to the L( I
chapter of the NAACP.
The controversy over the bill
stems from Article IV, Section 4h ol
the group's constitution which
states, "The Political Action Com
mittee shall seek to increase registra
tion and voting; encourage and pro-
mote voter education; anil work tor
the enactment of municipal, state
and federal legislation designed to
improve the educational, political
and economic status of minority
groups The NAACP is a non
partisan organization.
The SCiA appropriations commit-
tee's funding guidelines state that
"No partisan political or social ac-
tion organization shall K funded
Over 20 supporters of th
NAACP wcti present at the meeting
including Virginia c arlton, presi
dent o the 1(1 chapter. In hei
comments to the legislature, Carlton
expressed contusion about the
reconsideration of the bill.
"It seems thai 1 have been hearing
so many different things; I am vast-
ly contused she said. "One fact is
about three weeks ago or maybe
even a month ago the appropria-
tions committee appropriated
within that committee a large
amount of money . . . for educa-
tional use. 1 do not understand what
the problem is.
"NAACP, 1 feel, is being
stereotyped because it is NAACP. I
have to agree with one of the
legislators that if NAACP, if that
word wasn't there, there would not
be a problem here she continued.
"It clearly states in their constitu-
tion 'social, political " pointed out
Legislator Chuck Blake.
The legislature decided t vote I
secret ballot, and in a 17-14 decision
moved to reconsidei the bill. It was
then sent back to the appropriations
committee to be reanalyzed and
reintroduced to the legislature at a
latei time.
�ter the meeting, C arlton i
mented, "From what 1 have been
told the reason we did not get out
moncv is because in our constitution
the words social and political ap
pear. Wc are going to amend our
national constitution so that the new
constitution is focused on E I .
soIeK here at our campus
Carlton explained how the money
in the bill would be used. The
organization has already held a
membership drive and a convention
here in Greenville. They are current-
ly sponsoring a turkey raffle and a
project called Operation Santa
Claus to benefit the mental health
center.
I he group will hold a celebration
to honor Martin l.uther King in
lanuarv. a convention in February
and another membership drive in
March. "Within these months we
have meetings and workshops she
said.
In other business, it was announc-
ed that there are still two openings
for representatives from Tyler and
Belk dorms. 1 he last day to file for
these positions is December 1, and
residents of these dorms interested
should contact the SGA office at
Mendenhall Student Center.
The SGA financial statement in-
dicated that .is of Nov. 23 the
legislature has appropriated
S40.246.40 to various campus
organizations. Bills signed but not
posted to the record are $15,(XX)
h� X l . $9,800 for the School
ol Music, an $800 loan to the Sign
I anguage Club, $500 for the J.V.
Cheerleaders and $815 to the
NAACP.
Financial Aid Delayed
By I KM GRW
M r.l. i
1 he . nplainis
udciiU this sc;neioi about
)l financial aid
� hai i he -v stem
little
Robert M.
B u director ol student
department did
ike checks
to the students before the
he semeslei. He said
lid was late in coming
ii . - rej illations
; det al -� nernmeni late

Aid Department
usual - . ocessing applica-
ii Febt uat I his re; ills in 75
80 percent ol the applications be
mg processed and completed by the
beginning of the semester.
Boudrcaux says tins year it wav two
three week- before a school pay-
nl was even made, putting the
department behind by about six
months. Revisions had to be made
on mam applications due to errors
on ihe patt of applicants, and accor-
ding to Boudrcaux, these revisions
usually delay the process by another
i w o weeks.
There have also been a few stu-
dent complaints received pertaining
to the attitude o Boudrcaux when
students wanted to know why then
checks were not iead. Boudreaux
stated he did not wish to be harsh to
anyone and that he understands
how the students feel about the
situation he iust wants them to
understand his position also.
"here are approximately 7,(XX)
students receiving some type ol
financial assistance at hast
Carolina. Boudreaux said he did not
have the time to explain to every stu-
dent why his Of her check was not
going to be on tune. "Instead of be-
ing able to work, we were busy ex-
plaining to students the problem
he explained. There was nothing else
that the office staff could do except
to work continously to speed up the
process, according to Boudreaux.
This process may not have gone
as fast as it did had it not been for
systems analyst Mrs. Freda Pollard.
She developed a new packaging pro-
gram started in mid-May that
allows the staff to process financial
aid applications much more swiftly.
Boudreaux commented on Mrs,
Pollards' work by saying, "She did
an excellent job getting this done in
so short a time
According to Boudreaux. the
program is only "60 to 65 percent
efficient" nght now. He says that ii
usually lakes about two years to
complete!) change over to a new
system. Ihe processing until now
had been done by hand. Boudreaux
said that they still had to finish 35 to
37 percent of the applications by
hand because students did not fill in
complete information.
1 he largest problem with process-
ing was the Basic Educational Op-
portunities Grant, the director said.
Approximately 32(X) students at
ECU receive tins grant, according to
Boudreaux. The BEOG was late in
processing because the information
that was required to make a school
payment schedule was sent late by
the government to the Financial Aid
Department. The department can-
not decide on who receives the
BF.OG until the government lets
them know where to draw the line
on financial need
Boudreaux said everyone should
apply for the Basic Educational Op-
portunities Grant 1 he van! is has
ed on need and a ?! ap
plications received. 1 In government
decides how much moncv is to be
sent to E I foi grants md w hai
percentage ol the applicants will
receive the grant.
When Boudreaux was asked it
ECU's lands were cut this year, he
responded, "We are receiving more
moncv this year, possibly $200,000
more. Next year, hall ol the
students (receiving grants based on
financial need) will gel half o what
they got this year When asked it
the Work Study Program had been
cut back, lie said that it had not even
been considered to be cut m Con-
gress.
There are still main applications
pending because the applicants have
not finished then applications oi did
not return their Student Eligibility
Report (SIR) to the Financial Aid
Department. Boudreaux said
Pollard's new program should keep
problems such as the current one
from happening again.
Photo By DAVE WILLIAMS
"Long-Haired t ountry Hoy" at ECl
The Charlie Daniels concert Friday night was a sell-out. See The East
Carolinian review on page 5.
Friday Ref
Futrell
Photo By GARY PATTERSON
Bag lunches are off limits at Mendenhall's Faculty and Staff Dining Room.
Bagged Lunches Prohibited
By EMMA DAMS
si�(f Writrr
The Faculty and Staff Dining
Room located in Mendenhall Stu-
dent (enter has recently been the
subject of a small controversy. The
issue of whether or not bag lunches
should be allowed in the dining
facilities has been challenged by
several staff members.
The dispute began when one staff
member gave part of the lunch she
had bought to another staff member
who had carried in her lunch. Ac-
cording to these women, who asked
not to be identified, a man working
in the lunchroom told them that
splitting lunches was not permitted.
An argument followed in which one
of the women claims the man accus-
ed her of stealing.
"There was never any notice
stating we couldn't split lunches or
bring our own lunches said the
first women.
"Many members of the staff have
husbands or wives who can't eat the
food in the (Faculty and Staff) din-
ing room. This rule means they
can't eat together the second
woman stated.
Jim Mayo, manager of the dining
room, claimed the reason for the
no-bag lunches rule was the table
cloths and flowers in the room.
"There wouldn't be enough if we let
everyone who brought their lunches
from home eat in here Mayo said.
There has always been a $1.75
minimum purchase for anyone
eating in the room, according to
Mayo.
However, the women who
registered the complaint said that
they had been bringing their lunches
into the room for "a long time
Mayo said that he had received
many letters of complaint about the
rule. "There's nothing that can be
done he added.
By MIKE HUGHES
Sliff Wrii.r
In the November 17 issue of The
East Carolinian, ECU Board o
Trustees Chairman Ashley Futrell
was quoted as claiming that UNC
President William Friday would
name an interim chancellor to
replace Thomas Brewer by January
1, 1982.
However, in an interview Mon-
day, Friday denied having ever plac-
ed that date limitation on the ap-
pointment.
Friday said that the appointment
of an interim chancellor is depen-
dent upon what he and Brewer
decide on as an effective date for
Brewer's leave of absence.
"I have not had the opportunity
to turn full attention to this subject
for the last few days Friday said.
Friday did comfirm that two or
three persons are under strong con-
sideration for the permanent post,
but he would not reveal any names.
Likewise, he would not speculate on
the interim position.
Earlier reports indicated that
John Howell, a professor of
political science at ECU, will be the
acting chancellor.
However. Howell, who was vice-
chancellor for academic affairs
under Chancellor Feo Jenkins, said
Monday that he would rather not
speculate on the subject since he has
heard no official word from the
chancellor selection committee Ol
from Friday.
Futrell, who is also chairman for
the search committee, said that the
board has received between 50 and
75 nominations for the permanent
post. Furthermore, between 25 and
50 nominees have already applied.
"There are several good applica-
tions in Futrell affirmed.
However, he too would not com-
ment on any specific applicants.
Futrell added that a copy of the
15-point listing of criteria has been
sent to each of the nominees. That
list was released November 17 and
will be used in screening applicants
for the chancellor's position.
The search committee has propos-
ed December 15 as the deadline for
reviewing applications.
At an SCiA meeting November
16, Futrell did speculate on the
choice for the permanent
chancellor. He said that the ECU
Board of Governors has set high
standards for the applicants.
However, Futrell admitted that the
standards are intended as goals
rather than prerequisites.
Brewer, ECU's chancellor since
1978 was at a meeting Monday and
could not be reached for comment.
His-official resignation takes effect
June 30. 1982.
ECU Senior Dies
An ECU senior, Douglas William
Pinder, died Saturday at his home.
No cause of death was immediately
known.
Pinder was a native of Norfolk,
Va. and had been a Greenville resi-
dent for the past three years. Pinder
was president of the Phi Alpha
Theta Honorary History Society
and had received the Richard Cecil
Todd Phi Alpha Theta scholarship.
He was also a member of the
Mother Church, the First Church of
Christ, Scientist, Boston, Mass.
His funeral service is scheduled to
be conducted Tuesday at 9 a.m. and
a graveside service will be held at 10
a.m. Wednesday at Lakeview
Cemetery, Hamilton, Va.
Surviving him are his parents Mr.
and Mrs. Percy Alfred Pinder of
Greenville; two brothers, Daniel A.
and Richard Reed, both of
Hamilton, Va. and a sister, Mrs.
Steven Howell of Hampton, Va.





THE EAST CAROM MAN
NOVEMBER 24, 1981
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
it you or your organua'ion
would like io nave an iem printed
id the announcements i olumn
please sriHI the announc ement (as
brief as possible) typed and
double spaced 10 Ttie F tis' Caroli
man in care ol the news editor
Tnrr is no charqe tor an
nouncerrtertiV Dot span' IS oltefl
limited
Ttie deadline tor announcement
are s p n Friday tor Hie Tuesday
oape� anil s p m Toesday for In
Thursday paper
Ttin spa e is available lo an
� umpim oroaniiaii v l id depart
� � -s
BANKING AND
FINANCE
Beta tsappa Alpha in banking
i � � Fraternity will meel
.� �. p m m Mendenball, room ??i
A' ���-�� .i Dei Mr Paoi
t . � . Wheai Firsl
SeturiiiesM state
� , � v. � tai kr's Af
itums and 'ir an lual dues ol
I ,� Ih �. ���. ft I IK
let est i' poi s ms ,i
attend
ECGC BAKE OFF
. v �� , eating again! Tins
� s ,4 inn i oui so meal' In
� i.
FCGC wilt I � annual
�� : , rurkey will
iS
� ' � meal m
n '� ' s'
lyith tin t �' .
�� l!KS �'
, � I t I i
� ; � .
N . :j r ' ie
PRC
P R C Society meeting on
November 24 al 8 p m m
Mendenhall. room ??1
HOME EC
Phi Upsilon Omicron iHome
Economics Honor Society I and me
Student Dietetic Association m
vites you to have a cup ol collee
and see all the baked goods and
cratts we will be selling a' our
Christmas Bazaar It will be held
on Monday. Dec 7 Irom 10 a m i
p m in the Home Ei s vai'Lao
dtngham Room Please plan to
Stop by
POETRY CONTEST
Ti'i REBEL is conducting a
poeti v oniesl II s open lo all i of
rent ECU students Firs' prite is
V80 Second prize � SSB there are
two honorable mentions "I SIO
Prill money is provided by the At
and lellrie's Beer and Wine Co
Students who wish to enter should
SUbmil three to live typed poems
to me REBEL 01 Media Board ol
n 'he pobiicat'on budding
Contestants should include a over
with their name, address nd
number Ibe deadline is
N vembei 10 Winners will be
publ shed Ine REBEl ALl en
,r � w ,n be i unsidei ed lor
publii ' � R! HE L AH sub
s are pi let 'ed by, u S
, , , � ir � i.nss aoi will
� ' 'Ol .1
f . ' � ' �
� , RCBF L H ' .r TS1 ftSOJ
i Ru tirit Cfii ii Poetry Edit i
ii ' SHIP
P.E. MAJORS
Ail students who plan to declare
physical education as a maior dur
mg the spring semes'er or who m
lend �' student teach during the
spring semester should report to
Minges Coliseum at 10 a m on
Wednesday. Dec 9 lor a motor and
physical litness test Satislactory
perlormance on this lest is re
quired as a prerequisite lor ol
licia' admittance to the physical
education maior program More
detailed intorma'ion covering the
test is available by calling
757 644?
SLC
The ECU Sign Language Club
will hold its regular bimonthly
covered dish supper and meeting
on Sunday at Hie Mendenhall Slu
dent Center Mull' Purpose Room.
Ttie supper will begin at 6 P m
wi'o a short business meeting and
i aptioiHd tilm lo follow
Toe meal aod meeting are open
to any interested student, laculty
member, or a member ol the com
munity Vou do not need to know
Sign Language' to aiiend. but
students who are taking sign
language classes or who have
taken them m the past are en
couraged to attend The purpose ol
Ibe SLC is to allow sign langugaae
students and bearing impaired
S luden t s and community
members lo six ialize and develop
communication sk.Ms
We o-ix- l�i see you Ihere
SGA
l tiii r are still openings lor sr.A
representatives Irom Beik and
Tyli- D'irms Applications should
be submitted a' Hie SGA olln t
f iiing deadline is 4 p m .
r( ember I
MEN WANTED!
The ECU Men's Glee Club is cur
renlly recruiting men lor the Spr
mg Semester The Glee Club wot
be touring North Carolina in
January with a number ol other
appearances scheduled
throughout the semester If you
would like to join this line chorus.
or only wish to inquire abou'
luture membership please contact
Ed Glenn, Director at the School ol
Music. 7S7 A33I or at 753 l�5 The
Men's Glee Club is open to all men
tampuswide and oilers one hour
credit per semester The Glee
Club rehearses at 13 00 M W F
Anyone interested in joininq the
Glee Club next semester Should
contact Mr Glenn as soon as
possible in order to be eligible lor
the Sprmo tour
CERAMICSGUILO
The Eighth Annual Ceramics
Guild r�'iibiiion and Sale of func
tionat poitery and ctay sculptural
lorms will be held December 3 and
4 (Thursday and Friday) Irom 9
am til 5 p m This year's location
is 'he Mam Entrance Lobby m the
Leo W Jenkins F me Arts Buildmo
on East Filth St All prot eeds
bcnelii the Ceramic Guild's pro
grams lor lecturers, workshops
and symposiums All work is
oricnnal ami hand made id this
event winch has become an Easi
Carolina Community holiday
tradition
Further information is available
from Ms Linda LeMar. President
�r cnarles Cl�mhcrta�n. Faculty
Advisor. ECU Art School 7S7 666S
8 17 mornings
ACROSS
1 Waterway
6 Ofemonies
111nvent
12 Smoothed
14 Sun god
15 Odea
17 Antic
18 Haill
20 Talk Idly
22 Pigeon pea
23 Reject
25 Packs away
27 Tellurium
symbol
28 Growing out
of
30 Built
32 Chief god of
Memphis
34 Love god
35 More pleas-
ing
38 Towers
41 Italian river
42 TV fare
44 Malay canoe
45 Number
47 Lowest point
49 The sun
50 Norse god
52 Lawful
54 Compass pt.
55 Sea nymph
57 Chooses
59 Spools
60 Paper units
DOWN
1 Cowardly
2 Diphthong
3 Short sleep
4 Above and
touching
5 Ogles
6 Renovate
7 Roman num-
eral
8 Spread hay
9 Geraint's wife
10 Sober
11 Desire
13 Apportioned
16 Partner
19 Russian
stockade
21 Pitchers
24 Aquatic
mammal
26 Large ladle
29 Consumed
31 Despots
33 Harbingers
35 Neck
36 Marvel
37 Impolite
39 Perches
40 Vendit'ons
CROSS
WORD
PUZZLE
FROM COLLEGE
PRESS SERVICE
Turkey Farmer
Gobbles Profits
43 African river
46 European
land
48 Death rattle
51 Born
53 Meadow
56 Negative pre-
fix
58 Centimeter
(abbr )
�2i45 1�7���1
11ii
141517
11W4623
23is�Jr
7m31
34
35M
41�t44
45Wu11.40
50T�54
551:
�r�
Answer On Page 3
World's Fair Troubles Students
KNOXVII 1 E ,
TENN. (CPS)
Students at the I niver-
sii of rennessec arc
worried iluii the WS2
World's Fail about to
viari next lo the campus
ill drive their rents up,
make i he ca in pus
grounds unsafe, and
create a carnival-like
atmosphere that could
disrupt elasswoi k.
Despite a d -
ministrator's cannons.
"students worrj about
(the el feel of)
thousands of people
wandering around the
campus says Ed In-
gle, student govern
men! president. " I he
worry about noise.
crime, and fireworks
every night
Commuting students
also anticipate trat tic
and parking problems
at the fair site, a
70-aerc snip adjacent
1 UT's downtown
knowille campus.
"An a muse men i
park is being built over
six of our commutci
parking lots Engle
notes.
Students' foremost
concern. Ingle sas, is
housing. Some 4(MM)
students live in the
"walk-on" Fort
Sanders area, where
some tear landlords
will raise rents, write
short leases, and force
students inn so ihey can
reni space for more
money lo fairgoers.
"We will have
landlords who will try
lo make the most oi the
World's lair sas
Dr. Howard Aldman.
UT's v ice-chancelloi
tor studeni affairs. 'll
any students feel that
the have been thus
abused, we certainly
want to hear from
them
Roih the studeni af-
fairs office and the city
( liamber of Commerce
have opened housing
offices to try lo prevent
rent gouging.
So far, the problem
seems not lo have been
w i d e s p r ea d . W hiIe
"some" students have
complained of landlord
pressure, "no set ions
case has thus far been
encountered by this of-
fice Aldman says.
Aldman adds the
university's system for
assigning on-campus
housing insures thai
cominumu students get
lop pt lontv.
Assurances of a nine'
campus are hanlei lo
get from ol licials o' ihe
fair, winch will run
continuously from May
1 to Oct. 31 next year.
Instead, officials lell
students of the number
ol jobs the fair will
open for them. UT's
financial aids office has
distributed "about
KM)" employment ap-
plications in I he last
month, and will pool
them for fair organizers
and subsidiary
businesses.
"We expect the fair
to create about 2(MK)
jobs for students In-
gle says, "but the
whole cult in al educa-
tion we're receiving
with visitors from all
over the world � we
see thai as a definite ad-
vantage
University and city
officials, however, are
looking forward lo
more material
benefits
"1 know says
Aldman, "in the long
run, the lair will help
the university and the
Knoxville area. We
have a valley here thai
was rapidly
deteriorating being
cleaned up
The university also
expects to inherit a new
traffic system, as well
as five "permanent
structures" surroun-
ding a seven-acre lake,
and a park.
"This we plan lo re-
develop into studeni
housing Aldman
says.
"We've pulled every
political due bill we
could, lo get the fail
here says Steve I and.
Knoxville Chamber of
Commerce director for
lodging services, "and
we've put up over $25
million in private finan-
cing for it
1 and expects the eiiy
will receive S2 2 5
million for interstate
highway im-
provements, and will
"revitalize that 70-acre
slum next to the univcr-
siiy.
"If you're hosting a
party for 11 million
people he observes,
"you're inclined to
clean up your house.
1 and predicts the
Ian will add S500
million io i he local
economy.
GIY1NG
Sitting down to a
succulent Thanksgiving
turkey is no big deal for
William C. Bates, who
eats turkey 365 days a
year.
"I eat turkey one
meal every day,
sometimes twice a
day said the
Alabama turkey
farmer. "We fix it so
many different ways. I
eat turkey every day of
my life
The jovial Bates
operates Bates Turkey
Farm, a thriving
business that has been
in his family more than
50 years.
The farm literally
hatched in June, 1923,
when his great aunt,
Mamie Bates, gave his
father nine turkey eggs
for a wedding present.
Located 5 miles east
of Fort Deposit in
Lowndes County, the
Bates farm is one of the
few large turkey pro-
ducers in (he southeast.
Bates said he raises
60.000 of the white
birds at a time and their
gobbling racket turns
into a roar as they mill
around under pecan
trees near a small lake
Bates and Eddie Per
due, who has worked
on the farm since 1948
when he was 11 years
ago, made their annual
trip to the state capitol
in Montgomery this
year with a live
Thanksgiving turkev
and a frozen bird.
Their presentation of
the froen turkey to
Gov. Fob James mark
ed the 32nd year the
Bates farm has provid-
ed an Alabama gover-
nor with the main
course for Thanksgiv
ing dinner.
Clyde, the 44-pound
show turkey that calm
ly allowed James lo
stroke his neck, will
escape the turkey plat-
ter this year as a reward
for his good behavior
Bates said President
Reagan invited him to
make the traditional
turkey presentation to
him in Washington, but
he relinquished the
honor to the president
of the National Turkev
Federation. Bales said
he worked "real hard"
for Reagan's election
The Fast Carolinian
V I4W.N.1 I I �
��
PuMI'S't' cvrry Turvlv �
1'u'VMy lurt'iq Ihe acarjcrrtii
�i.r ,v�l every W-ci"�'ScMv 'ur
mq llir u"liTicr
Trtr Es' Carolinian s ihe 1
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RE!
THE FAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 24, 1981
Iranian College Students Suffering Attacks
DENVER, Colo. (CPS) - About
30 Iranian students just settling
down to watch a movie at a
Metropolitan State College
classroom in Denver when a mob of
shouting, club-swinging coun-
trymen burst into the room. They
set upon the movie-goers with canes
and ax handles. Fighting back, the
movie-goers managed to drive the
attackers out of the building just as
the police arrived. About a half-
dozen people were injured before
the melee was subdued.
But the September incident in
Denver among Iranian students �
whose short history on American
campuses has been punctuated fre-
quently by controversy and elastics
� was jus! one of main often-
violent confrontations on campuses
this fall around the United States
And as the cycle oi protest and
violence continues, increasing
numbers of Iranian students ar
ereportedly falling deeply into debt
and becoming dejected over the pro-
spect of returning home, where
many have already lost family
members. Iranian student observers
say an increasing number of Ira-
nians are suffering nervous
breakdowns under a strain exacer-
bated by the Reagan administra-
tion's unwillingness to grant them
political asylum.
The cycle of confrontation bet-
ween pro-and anti-Khomeini groups
would set up booths side-by-side on
campus and then start shouting at
each other
filings soon turned violent, Stan-
ton says. "One (Iranian) group
would jump someone in a parking
lot, then the other group would
strike hack. They travel in groups
here now for their own self-
protection
A major brawl erupted in
September at the University of Iowa
when eight or nine Khomeini sup-
porters objected to the posting of an
anti-lranian-goernment poster and
physically attacked other members
of an Iranian student group.
Security forces at the University
of Oregon were recently forced to
break up a fist fight between com-
peting Iranian organizations who set
up pro- and anti-Khomeini
literature booths on the campus
mall.
At Central State in Oklahoma, an
Iranian student attacked three coun-
trymen with "a sharp object ac-
cording to police, in a dispute over
anti-Khomeini literature. A similiar
brawl at the University of Kansas,
which included the hurling of
"ashtrays, coffee pots and chairs
may result in the deportation of two
Iranians.
"I haven't heard of any alterca-
tions recently on a major scale
demurs Patricia Biddinger, who
looks after Iranian student affairs
for the National Association of
Foreign Student Affairs. She has
not done a campus-by-campus
survey of intra-lranian strife,
however.
The 50,000-some Iranians who
Valuable Manuscripts Housed
In Joyner Library Collection
have remained here have not been
immune to the turmoil of their
homeland. "There is certainly ten-
sion everywhere between Iranian
students Biddinger observes. "It
reflects all the different pesuasions
in Iran itself
It also reflects some of the
violence in Iran, as pro-Khomeini
students here have resisted what
Biddinger sees as a pronounced shift
in sentiment against the Islamic
government among their classmates.
In turn, pro-Khomeini students
have stepped up their attacks on
government opponents. Perhaps the
most violent confrontation was the
Metro State affair in which the pro-
Khomeini demonstrators stormed
the anti-Khomeini Iranian Cultural
Club's screening of a film about
Kurdistan � the rebellious Iranian
province at war with Tehran.
"There were a lot of children in
the room says Kamal, a member
of the Iranian Cultural Club.
"(The pro-Khomeini students)
want everyone to follow the govern-
Mf
ment's policy says a member ot
the Metro State Moslem Student
Society, which also opposes the
Khomeini regime.
The member insists on anonymi-
ty, out of a fear shared by anti-
government Iranian students that
pro-Khomeini students are spies in
the pay of the Ayatollah's regime.
I've heard personally that they've
reported names of students not on
their side he says. "As a result,
many sudents can't receive money
from home, and their families are
also in danger
"One of my best friends here in
Denver returned to Iran about six
months ago Kamal says, "and she
was executed
"It's a real catch-22 says Bid-
dinger. "They can't get money from
home, yet they don't hold jobs here
because their status as foreign
students legally prevents it. Thus
many of them feel they have no
economic choice except to return to
Iran. Yet they're afraid they'll be
killed if they go back
Biddinger says an increasing
number of students have applied for
political asylum here. Yet she
reports "practically all the applica-
tions � some 300 to 400 � have
been rejected by State Department
officials for no apparent reason.
Biddinger believes the cnaotic
situation in Iran has affected the
academic performances of Iranians
in America. "They've always had
an extroardinarily good record here
academically, yet ail the trauma of
recent times has certainly, inevitably
affected their studies. Some just
can't function at all anymore.
We've had a number of nervous
breakdowns
"They're suffering, there's no
question about she laments.
"And 1 don't have an answer to it
B WILLIAM A. SHIRKS
The relation oi the press to the
people ol a tree government is one
oi "courageous championship,
! oval d e v o t i o n and eternal
vigilance says a letter written in
104 bv Dr. James Yadkin Joyner,
legendary public educator.
Joyner. who instituted sweeping
educational reforms during the ad-
ministration oi North Carolina's
"education governor Charles B.
Aycock, also saw the role oi
newspapers as an indispensable tool
� education.
He wrote, "the clean well-edited
paper, coming into thousands of
homes, does the work of a multitude
ol teachers in supplementing the
formal work of the school, and in
broadening and setting nee the
minds and hearts of men
This letter among others contain-
ing rich original source material foi
scholars and researchers, now lies in
the repository of the fast Carolina
Manuscript Collection in the J.Y.
Joyner I ibrary ol I iasi c aroiina
University.
it is among more than 2.(XX) let-
ters, speeches, reports, business
records, clippings and other
materials donated to the ECU col-
lection bv William T. Joyner Jr
Walton K. Joyner, both of Raleigh,
and Mrs. Walter P. Sprunt, Mem-
phis. Tenn members oi the Joyner
family.
Historical!) lames Y. Joyner
(1862-1954) helped organize the first
graded school in Winston (1884),
practiced law in Goldsboro
(1886-1889) and then became
superintendent of Goldsboro
schools. He became head oi the
English Department and dean of the
State Normal and Industrial Schoo
t
in Greensboro, now the University
oi North Carolina at Greensboro, in
1892.
From 1902 until 1919, he served
as State Superintendent of Public
Instruction, which included the
Aycock administration. In 1909 he
became the first Southerner elected
president of the National Education
Association.
Joyner's letter relating the press
to public education was written July
14. 1904. to a friend, J.B. Sherrill of
C oncord. Excerps include:
"The relation of the Press to
public education is the relation of
the Press to the freedom, the safety,
the prosperity and the happiness of
our people, for no truth is more
clearl) demonstrated by all the
history, oi human civilization that
the truth that these are bound up in
the education and the general in-
telligence oi the great masses of the
people of a free government. The
relation oi the Press to these is
known of all men
"It is one of courageous cham-
pionship, loyal devotion and eternal
vigilance. It must follow, therefore,
as the night the day, that this should
be its logical relation to education as
the foundation of all these others.
"It would be an evil day for the
good people oi this commonwealth,
if the Press ol the state should ever
assume any other attitude toward
the enlightenment of the people of
the state
Joyner added that "no class of
people will be more benefited by
the diffusion of intelligence among
all the people than the editors
"An ignorant people is never a
leading people he said. "The
Press is not only dependent upon an
intelligent, reading people for
subscribers and financial support.
but it is also dependent upon readers
and the avAue of intelligence for
the promotion of every other in-
terest for which it stands, for how
shall men believe and be convinced
unless they first hear and read
The J.Y. Joyner papers are
among additional acquisitions of
the East Carolina Manuscript Col-
lection since last April, according to
director Donald R. L.ennon. During
the seven months period, 14 new
collections of papers were acquired
i
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2Jt?e East (Earnlmtan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Paul Collins, wmcm
Jimmy Dupree, Mmm so
Ric Browning, ����rfvr��,�, Charles Chandler, �� emm
CHRIS LlCHOK, Business Manafrr TOM HALL, ewi Editor
Alison Bartel, pnwu�.� mm Steve Bachner, EnurtammtM�&�
Steve Moore, omwm m� Karen Wendt, &��
November 24, 1981
Opinion
Page 4
Circus Time II
Student Legislature At It Again
Have you ever been bored on a
Monday evening � nothing to do
and desperate for entertainment?
Well, next time boredom stirkes, we
suggest you venture over to
Mendenhall Student Center and
catch the latest episode of Student
Governors.
It plays each Monday at 5 p.m. in
room 248 of the student center and
is filled with more excitement than
The Perils of Pauline, more twists
and turns than your favorite soap
opera and more mystery than Col-
umbo, McCloud and McMillan and
Wife combined.
Student Governors, also known
as the SGA, is one of East
Carolina's longest running and
most endurable hits. And yester-
day's meeting � or episode as it
may be � is a prime example of ex-
actly why the SGA is ECU's
favorite comedy.
The legislature debated Monday
whether or not to reconsider a bill
giving the NAACP $815. The merits
of the bill are not important; the
issue here is the manner in which the
legislators conducted themlselves.
In a two-hour debate, the
legislature managed to avoid
touching upon any of the important
issues and instead wasted the time
"clarifying" what had already been
clarified five times. Members spoke
out of turn, interrupted one
another, walked around the room
and generally conducted themselves
like a pack of baboons.
The legislature then decided to
vote by secret ballot. After all that
rigmarole, the legislators might
have had the deceny to stand by
their votes.
The ultimate irony, however, is
that the SGA voted to put its deci-
sion off until next week. So
remember to tune in next week.
Same dingbat time. Same dingbat
channel.
Thanksgiving
Reflections
Charlie Brown has a special each
year on CBS; Macy's in New York
and J.L. Hudson in Detroit have
gala parades; it was, until recent
years, the unofficial opening of the
Christmas shopping season; it
means two extra days without
classes in late November.
Thanksgiving has become one of
the most confused holidays in ex-
istance. Rather than evolving into
the celebration of unity and
understanding which was its basis,
Thanksgiving has become little
more than an extra day on the
calender for most people to relax.
It is the one holiday which the
United States does not share with
any other nation; the one day
citizens of this country should be
thankful for the settlers who fought
the elements and established a new-
nation.
So Thursday, for just a brief mo-
ment, pause between commercial
breaks of the parades or football
games and be thankful for the
freedom which every citizen of the
United States enjoys.
HERE

THERE
�.�� � �fiE � tO � ' - � ' � -j3b
3
4
C
Of
Envelopes Keep Reporter Talking
By ART BUCHWALD
A Japanese newspaperman came into
my office the other day. bowed deeply,
and said, "Forgive me for this awkward
intrusion, but I am doing a story for a
newspaper in Tokyo about Richard Allen
and the Nancy Reagan interview
"Ah so I said, "I would be most
honored to answer any of your questions
"What do you personally think of this
situation?"
"1 would -prefer not to comment on it I
replied, "until the Justice Department
finishes its investigation
He smiled and gave me a white envelope
containing $100 in cash.
"Ah so I said, smiling back. "But I
cannot accept a bribe fc granting you an
interview
"It is not a bribe he said indignantly.
"It is a tradition in my country to give a
small gift of appreciation when someone
grants an interview
"Why didn't you say that in the first
place?" 1 said. I called in my secretary and
told her to put the envelope in the safe.
"Do you feel he continued, "that so-
meone in high position in office should ac-
cept a gift from a newspaperman for ar-
ranging an interview with the First lady of
the land?"
"Mr. Allen expected nothing but he has
great respect for your traditions and would
do anything not to insult you. When Mr.
Reagan took office the first thing he said
to his foreign policy advisers was, 'Under
no conditions do I want anyone in my ad-
ministration to offend the Japanese
The newspaperman smiled and handed
me another white envelope. He looked at
his notes. "What do you think Mr. Allen
intended to do with the $1,000?"
"He says he intended to give it to chari-
ty
" Why didn't he?"
"Because he forgot about it. You must
understand, Mr. Allen is the President's
National Security Adviser and he forget
very easily. One day he says a certain coun-
try is a threat to the United States and then
he forgets all about it
"Am I taking up too much of your
time?" he asked.
"Heck no I said. "Not as long as you
keep passing over white envelopes
"Mrs. Reagan knew nothing about the
arrangement?"
"Mrs. Reagan doesn't even remember
being interviewed by the Japanese
magazine
"That means she must be very unhappv
with Mr. Allen?"
"Well, she's not working on a needle-
point pillow for him for Christmas this
year
The Japanese newspaperman was
writing furiously.
"I don't want to offend you I said,
"but you forgot to give me another white
envelope
"Ah so he said. "A thousand par-
dons
"It's okay. But we Americans aren't us-
ed to answering questions for nothing
"One final question. Is it your opinion
that Secretary of State Al Haig is happ
unhappy about the way things are going
for MrAllen?"
"He looked very disturbed the last time
I saw him on television and I couldn't tell
whether it was because of Mr. Allen or
Nicaragua
The Tokyo newspaperman handed me
my last envelope.
As soon as he left 1 called Tom Bcokvw
and said, "The next time you want me to
do the 'Today' show it's going to cost you
10 big ones
"But that's checkbook journalism he
cried.
"Ah. so
(e) 1981, I.os Angeles Times Syndicate
- Campus Forum
Major A ttractions Chairman Responds To Concert Criticism
After reading yuour coverage of the
concert of Nov. 7, 1981, I felt that I
must reply to some of the charges made.
The show did start late, run late and one
of the support acts did not appear;
however, the show did go on, and the
headline act did appear so the concert
did happen. I regret that these things
happened, and could we the committee
have forseen them, they would not have
had the chance. I do though feel that we
the committee acted in good faith and
tried to do the job we volunteered for.
Yes, I said volunteered � none of us are
paid, we do what we do as a service to
East Carolina.
It seems that everyone is very quick to
criticize but not so quick to volunteer
their own time to become one of us and
help try to solves these problems they so
quickly point out. To quote an old line
� "If you are not a part of the solution,
you are a part of the problem
Criticism, if done properly, can be
helpful, but criticism by the uninformed
only serves to inflame others through a
distortion of facts however uninten-
tional that distortion may be.
There are several of these distortions
that 1 would like to point out now. Paul
Collins says in his editorial that Jim
Rouse is an unproven promoter. If he
had taken the time to read the news story
on the front page of that same edition,
he would have found that we based our
decision on Rouse's very successful pro-
motion of the Bar-Kays Concert last
summer. This was a very smooth-
running concert that had no business or
technical problems to speak of.
I also would like to rcsond to one
charge from Mr. Da Vinci Metcalf in
which he questioned why the student
body's money could not be spent for
better concerts. First of all there is none
of the student body's money involved in
this or any other concet unless it is in the
form of a loan.
Yes, that is the truth, of all those
dollars that we all pay under the title
"other fees the Student Union Major
Attractions Committee gets none, not a
single penny. As far as the quality of
groups, we are doing the best that is
possible due to our limitations of facility
acoustics, facility size, lack of funds and
apparent lack of interest.
I do not feel that this column is the ap-
propriate place for only two individuals
to banter charges and countercharges. If
anyone had been interested enough to
check, they would have found that I
have office hours in Mendenhall Student
Center on Monday through Friday from
5:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.
I will be more than glad to explain our
functions and processes to anyone who
cares enough to call or come by. I feel I
can more accurately answer any ques-
tions there than in the limited space of
this column.
My biggest concern through all of this
is that in an issue that was considered
important enough to merit nearlv a third
of the front page, almost a full quarter
page editorial and a lengthy letter in this
column, I was not even contacted to ask
my opinions on the matter or to evaluate
it.
In closing, I thank you for the use of
this column to express these points and
to ask concerned people to come by and
talk to me in person or attend one of our
meetings.
JERRY DILSAVER
Chairman, Major Att. Comm.
Braxton's Peaked
A point to be considered
If a man seeks greatness then let him
forget greatness and seek truth.
In truth he will find greatness. Certain
prominent students need to adhere to
this. A man does not become a great
leader through imagery. He does it
through daring risks at his own public
image for the benefit of the people he is
representing. The student does not give a
man, an office, a secretary, and $700 a
year to try to look good. The vice presi-
dent position is there for a reason Mr.
Braxton It is easy to cancel emergency
loan fund, medical or otherwise, but is it
easy to come up with a better plan and
hope it better serves the students? This is
an example of Example number two Mr.
Lippet. Mr. Sune pointed this out.
As for example number one, Mr. Lip-
pet, the Congressional staff of Mr.
Jones has confirmed the report to The
East Carolinian. How much more proof
do you want that the students were
misrepresented?
Mr. Lippet I agree with you on one
thing Mr. Braxton's plilosophical and
political ideas are not very sound. I'd
sure hate to see him look after the
welfare of the students here at ECU as
our president.
When one is in the public eye, Mr.
Lippet, they must undergo scrutiny. Mr.
Braxton knows this. Where is Mr. Brax-
ton's proofin the United States we
have freedom of speech too, you know.
Mr. Sune, in addition to bringing
some mighty fine concerts in here at
ECU, you sure did the student body a
justice. We need to know about the peo-
ple who are supposed to be looking out
for us. If they aren't doing it, lets get rid
of them.
Mr. Braxton, your political future at
ECU seems to have peeked. Please don't
embarass yourself and ECU by running
for president. The black people respect
Martin Luther Kingpattern yourself
more after him.
With the new administration we need
a worker to help make changes, not so-
meone trying to look good politically.
T. Dean
Business
Tired Of Inequality?
This letter is in response to Thursday's
letter to all students on campus who are
tired of inequality. I would personally
like to address the same group of
students.
I would like to say that this school is
probably one of the most equal oppor-
tunity schools I've ever been exposed to.
Why should the majority of students
always rule every aspect of campus life
as the writer of Thursday's letter wishes?
I think it's great that this campus could
support such things as the East Carolina
Gay Community, and as for the black
homecoming queen, everyone on this
campus had the opportunity to vote.
Tough if you don't relish the fact that
she won.
If it was up to the writer of Thurs-
day's letter slavery would be an in thing,
and homosexuals would be chained and
exported to a far away island, possibly
the island of Lesbos.
I suggest that the students of this
author's persuasion tht have "spines
and moral fiber" give us, the "morally
diseased a complete definition of
"equality Thank you, and God Bless
America & ECU.
SARAH A. LYNN
NE1LAG. HINGORANI
Pirate Feature
I would like to express my dislike of
the front page of the Nov. 10 issue of
The East Carolinian. Kim Cloud, East
Carolina's Homecoming Queen, (not
pirate queen) should have been featured
in a article telling the readers a little bit
more about her. This is only my first
year at East Carolina, but I thought the
university newspaper would have
recognized the homecoming queen bet-
ter than they did. Maybe she's a little too
dark for the staff of The East Caroli-
nian!
Along with other members of the stu-
dent body, I thought it was disgusting to
see the homecoming queen's picture in
the appear alongside the picture of a
float that read "EAT ME
What college newspaper besides The
East Carolinian would put that picture
of the float with the "EAT ME" sign on
the front page. Is the newspaper trying
to impress Playboy magazine or
something?
The photographer could have chosen
another photo of Miss Cloud to go in the
newspaper so the students could see why
she was crowned Miss East Carolina!
The whole ordeal shows again that pre
judice still exists strongly. It's a shame
that the black race is always the target!
WARREN D. JOHNSON
Political Science
EDITOR'S NOTE: The official title of
the homecoming court winner is "East
Carolina University Homecoming
Pirate
'Golden Fleece'
I would like to present my own
"Golden Fleece Award" this year to all
our prestigious sorority "women" who
live along Fifth Street across from cam-
pus. I admit that the first time I saw a
sorority house yard rolled I thought it
appropriate, but 1 was a freshman then.
Through the years it has become more
and more ridiculous.
If nothing else, you would think they
would add some variety by using colored
toliet paper instead of boring white all
the time (though this may be an indica-
tion of where the toliet paper was ac-
quired). Anyway, I never have seen any
harm in it. As a matter of fact, it is pro-
bably a much more docile form of van-
dalism than something else they could
think up.
That is, I never saw any harm until
now. For the past week, as I have walk-
ed to class everyday across the field in
front of Jarvis Dorm, I have spent most
of the time picking up stray toliet paper
strewn across the field.
I can't think of any more likely place
for it to have come from than those
aforementioned residences of scholarly
organizations. So, girls, all 1 am asking
is, if you're going to litter each other's
yards and leave the trash there for two
weeks, at least do us "uncivilized" peo-
ple a favor and keep it to yourselves!
Thank you!
ANN SHIRLEY
Senior, Computer Science
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced, or neatly printed.
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Ml
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THl l:AST t AROUNIAN
Entertainment
N()VtMBlR24, 1981 Page 5
D.B. Cooper:
Embarrassing
'Crash' Trash
Bv PAl'l.l'OI 11
� Ull"f In I Hirl
You can't judge a book by its
covei oi a movie by its title for that
mattei And D.B. Cooper had bet-
tei hope that you can't judge a man
b the movie they make about his
It was 10 years ago that Cooper
hijacked a 727 and then parachuted
into the Cascade Mountains in
Washington with a $200,000 ransom
strapped to his chest. Excep! for a
wad oi soggj $20 bills thai an eight
year-old bov stumbled upon last
year, no chic about the hijacker or
the money has been found. Cooper
Che name is an alias) became an ins-
Ik hero, and the legend sur-
nding him has burgeoned in the
le since his rhanksgiving Eve
jum
course Hollywood, which
has always known a good thing,
decided to wish, in on oV D.B 's rep
The result is The Pursuit of D.B
now showing at the Buc-
Pu
M.
i)led as a high-
a-minute flick with
racters, a few
bellylaughs and even a Deep Mean-
ing. What it more closely resembles,
however, is a dirty Dukes of Haz-
zard.
All (he elements are there,
especially the obligatory chase
scenes. In fact. Pursuit is one long
chase scene with sex, violence and
foul language thrown in.
Robert DuVall plavs an insurance
claims adjuster, also known as the
Pursuer. Treat Williams plavs Jim-
my Meade. alias D.B. Cooper, also
known as the Pursuee, DuVall pur-
sues Williams through a sawmill,
down a ner, up a mountain and
across a desert.
All this is made more dramatic by
the fact that the DuVall character
used to be an army sergeant, and
Williams was an enlisted man he us-
ed to kick around. In case you miss-
ed the significance, this means that
Cooper is out to prove himself to
the sergeant, and sarge has got to
maintain his macho image
throughout the chase or be
destroyed.
But let no one sav our boys don't
See D.B Page 7
Treat Williams as the folk hero D.B. Cooper in a scene from the new film now playing at the Buccaneer Theatres.
Treva 'Floors' JJ's Crowd With Or a fie Music
BARl N FBFRT
siaft Xrt!pf
�us crow of 1 i dav night revelers welcomed
Sp ntaine And "he Grafics to Greenville in the
jbul performance at J.Js Music Hall.
New Vae Sensation no trace of disap-
could be detected as the dance floor trembled
il c's powerfully pleasing mixture of 60's
: rock new wave standards.
. Spontaine's robustly mature vocals
kie DeShannon's "Every Time That
ou Vs aik in the Room Herman's Hermits' "I'm In-
m and Tommy James and the
II hink We're Alone Now received more
ample support from guitarist Doug Baker
(doubling on keyboards), bassist Dwight Mabe and
drummer Garry Collins.
The band steamed back and forth for three sets bet-
ween these new-breathing classics and straightforward,
ringing covers of Tom Petty's "I Need To Know
Carolyne Mas' "Stillsane and a number of Elvis
Costello and Nick Lowe favorites. The dance floor
crowd, ranging from leathers and wraparound
sunglasses to leopard miniskirts and corduroy,blazers,
responded to the happy mixture of sound with inspired
improvisational combinations of jitterbug and pogo.
The Grafics even pulled off 'I'm a Believer" (yes, the
old Monkees hit) in graceful, blast-ahead rock si vie.
Between songs, Spontaine cajoled the bar crowd to
"come on up and dance with perfect Joplinesque

toughness, breaking into the wide dimpled smile that re-
mained on her gentle face as the band kicked up the next
tune and she belted out the Police's "Born In the Fif-
ties
Born in the Fifties herself, Spontaine's music is ob-
viously deeply influenced by the sounds ol the Sixties.
Backstage, two fans are trying to pigeonhole her big,
emotion-packed voice. "Grace Slick one insists. "No.
no, Joplin. Definitely Joplin says the other.
Spontaine grins, "I did do a full-fledged Jams act on
Halloween at out home base, a club called Fridays in
Greensboro. The band dressed up as dead rock stars �
Dwight was Jimi Hendrix, Doug did a Buddy Holly,
and Garry, Jim Morrison. We knocked out "Born in
the Fifties" as "Dead in the Sixties she recalls with
relish. "I even did "Mercedes Benz" a eappella
The Grafics were born about 18 months ago when
Collins spotted Spontaine soloing on acoustic guitar in a
local Greensboro club. With Baker and Mabe rounding
out the lineup, the band quickly won a loval Greensboro
following for their brand of modern hard pop and
began louring North Carolina and cutting demo tapes
with Arrogance's Don Dixon producing.
A four-song demo eased past competition o hun-
dreds of other tapes by unsigned bands and single,
"Hands Off My Heart culled top honors in a contest
sponsored by D.I.V. ("Do-It-Yourself), a new
California-based national trade magazine devoted total-
ly to "new music from up and coming bands and
musical adventures
"Hands Off My Heart" first caught local attention
on WQDR-Raleigh's "Premieres but the band had
been so wrapped up in nonstop touring that thev
weren't even aware they were on the air waves.
"They played it? Great enthused Spontaine, tugg-
ing up the sagging crew socks that neatly complemented
the navy-blue double-breasted minidress and worn
sneakers. ("I'm into the Sixties look") A friend in
Raleigh. Eddie Horst, wrote "Hands Off M Heart"
especially foi Spontaine in 19 and the demo tape
(which also included "S'H Vous Plait a tune Spon-
taine co-wrote with Chris Stanley of New York's DBs)
apparently packed enough commercial wallop to land
"Hands Off on D.I.Ys recently released compilation
album of the cream of the contest entries.
The D.I.Y. "Han-O-Disc made by a new record
pressing process that produces a virtually warp-tree
disc, features ten excellent songs representing a wide
range of the new "underground" music happening
across America. The Grafics hope the white virgin vinyl
Han-O-Disc version of "Hands (fl My Heart with an
infectious pop hook and Spontaine's riveting vocals,
ee 'GRAFIC Paje 7
Wheels Still Rolling
Bv JOHN WFMTR
�taff W nler
Wheels rolled up to the Attic again or.
November 20, bringing with them their us
blend of oldie and original high-energy rock
Conversing with the five-man combo before their
show began provided an excellent insight into the
lifestyle oi these traveling troubadors of modem
times
see WHEELS, Page 7
Southern Comfort
CDB Fans Had 'Devilish' Fun
PHOTO BY GARY PATTERSON
N.c
's own Charlie Daniels playing to a stupefied crowd in sold-out Minges Coliseum on Friday night.
By KAREN WENDT
Mk Kiilliir
"Ladies and gentlemen of the great state of North
Carolina � we'll be happy to play you some more
music were the words of Charlie Daniels at the begin-
ning of his second encore at "An Evening with the
Charlie Daniels Band" Friday night. And they did not
disappoint us.
The concert began with Daniels traditional
"Tennessee Waltz and ended with a medley of
religious hymns.
Overall the energy level was high both on the side of
the audience and on the part of the band. Breaks bet-
ween songs were spent with abandoned cheers and the
mopping of brows, respectively. Perhaps the greatest
audience responses were with two songs, "In America"
and "The Devil Went Down To Georgia both of
which brought the crowds to their feet.
The concert was well worth it's $7 and $9 admission
charges and though the concert was more predictable
than it should have been, it was enjoyable to even the
most demanding fan.
Indeed the only gripe I could find with the jncert
was the fact that the encores (something that should be
an honor or at least an unpredictable surprise) were so
blatently staged in advance. Take for instance the dog-
gers from the Grand Old Opry. They did not even ap-
pear until the second encore. Do you mean to tell me
that they carry around those six people and their
costumes just in case they have an encore? Come now.
And the second encore was just as predictable, this time
using the doggers as backup singers.
Daniels admitted that they plan on two encores
"Yeah, we used to do three, but we decided to cut it
down to two because it takes a little time off the set
A whole host of CDB tunes were well performed at
the concert including, "The legend of Wooley
Swamp "Sweet Home Alabama "Nobodv Never
Said That You Weren't A Partyin' Gal "Dont'cha
know I'm Just a Lonesome Bov From Dixie and
"Kansas City
Greenvile was also treated to a preview to CDB's new
album, "Windows" and heard performed for the first
time "Window On The World
Several other selections were also played from the
new album, and it seemed that the new cuts were slower
than the music that is traditionally attributed lo Daniels.
One song in particular, "The Universal Hand" sounded
more like a chant than a "rollicking" song as Daniels
has described some of his music.
Though the other cuts from the new album were not
as slow, they certainly did not seem to have the tempo of
"Devil" or "America
The Band members seemed to be having as good a
time as the audience, at times squirting water at each
other; and backstage one man was hit with a total of
three pies in honor o his birthday. And when band-
member "Taz DiGregono was thrown a hat during the
concert he put it on sideways and was called kiddingly
"Boxcar Taz" by guitarist Thomas Crane.
The concert was almost the epitome of southern rock
and roll, from the music to the crowd. A Rebel Flag had
to be taken from one viewer and Southern Comfort bot-
tles were strewn on the floor after the crowd had left.
Cowboy hats were abundant on both the members of
the band and in the crowd. The positive energy emmited
from both the crowd and the band were some of the
most enjoyable things there. The music itself was not
denyied an important part in the activities either.
Overall it was a concert that should not have been
missed by any supporter of southern rock and roll. And
an awful lot of those supporters were there.
r





6 THE fcAST CAROLINIANNOVEMBER 24, 1981
" The Big
Apple"
NEW YORK,
NEW YORK
Photo By DAVID WILLIAMS
Daniels plays his first encore to a capacity cnmdjn Minges Coliseum on Friday night. jeere�ie� on page 5.
Simon Play Is Next Project
Producing and direc-
ting Tennesee
William's The ('loss
Menagerie, the initial
production of Stephen
B. Finnan's developing
hi lie theatre organiza-
tion, proved lo be an
exhausting, yet satisfy-
ing, creative ex-
perience. "Doing
theatre from scratch,
without a technical sup-
port staff, my problems
were many and varied
� negotiating for the
use of a space, design-
ing and executing a
period set, installing
lighting equipment and
creating a lighting
design, coordinating
period costumes and
props, handling com-
ZN
UTTLF SISTERS
p
TUBMOf. Z4 �3000
IFiALkEG
I CASE
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752-02S&
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plete promotional
responsibilities and, ot
course, casting and
directing the actors.
However, audiences
were large and en-
thusiastic; critical com-
ment, in general, very
positive. We were able
to recoup our expenses
and even show a small
profit! Thus, feeling
rather encouraged b
Greenville's response, I
am presently involved
in pre-production work
for our group's second
offering Neil Simon's
riotous contemporary
comedy Barefoot In
The fork.
Hare foot In The
'ark is scheduled to
open at the Methodist
Student Center on
February 24. Auditions
for this production are
being held on Friday,
December 4:00 ai 7:?0
p.m. and Saturday,
December 5 at 2:00
p.m. at the Methodist
Student Center. All
roles, with the excep-
tions of Paul and the
Mother, are open;
everyone is welcome to
participate. For further
information, please call
Mr. Finnan at
757-3546.
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��
ow
'ING
ING
INEY,
,V
b935
A
L�A.M(OG A BOOT CoLLCGeTHeHPjAM
6V Pvip AJoegis
TH� Poem's Ccrcros
SHOULD eOVJCR
purvJNiO GUT, I
sov�� ieL strict peoftel
Ira ?�� Rolling Again
( ontinued From P. 5
I he gi oup, con-
sisting of talented 1 odd
ashbui n (lead
guitar), Gar) I yon
(bass), Scotty rhomas
(drums), David Sim-
mons (lead ocals, per-
cussion) and l)a id
H a r pei (keyboards),
describe their special
sound variously as
"funk punk rock"
and ' 'coniempoi ary
1 1 rock The per-
form mam originals,
plus covei music from
sii eh groups as
Journe. the 1 ubes,
and I o er Boj.
Theii originals are
(hopefully) soon to be
the subject of an
album, their first.
heels is on the road
now, but before long
ihe will enter into a
recording studio and
exit immortalized in
vinyl, thai is, it monev
and the machinations
of record company ex-
ecutives permit.
Producing an album
is an arduous endeavor,
of which making the
music is almost a minor
factor, compared with
ming up with the
cash and convincing a
label to take on a new
group. But Wheels is
deie r mined to b e
albumized, and will
produce the record
themselves if necessarv.
At tet the album is
released Wheels will
resume touring, this
time playing only their
own material, 10 pro-
mote the record.
1 he original music is
written mostly b
guitarist Wash burn.
with lyrics main!) sup-
plied b singer Sim-
mons, lach member
contributes to the crea-
tion of Wheels unique,
intense yet not over-
pow e r i ng, sou nd.
"Thank God, there are
no kind of egos with
the band, so everybody
can put in his iwo cents
worth s a s o n e
Wheeler. "We sort of
all write the songs
together" says another.
Life On Road?
What about life on
the road? When asked,
choruses oi
"�demanding "a real
pain in the and
"anxieties, anxieties"
are heard. Yet the
members stress that
they've enjoyed work-
ing with Wheels more
than an other band
they've been with. lhe
explain the trials o'
touring thusly: "It's a
lot of dues to pay, but
it's the only way to suc-
ceed in this business.
You nisi hae lo keep
on playing until you
develop a following
Based in Charlotte,
Wheels will roll from
Virginia to Georgia.
1 hey try to perform no
more than 3 or 4 nights
a week: "If we play
more than 3 or 4 times,
it lessens our spontanei-
t. out energy level A
shame, because that
energetic intensity is the
group's hallmark,
breathing new life into
mainstream rock and
roll.
Any more comments
for the press, guys?
"Tell the ones with
all the coke to come up
to the front of the
stage
"Buy our album
"Yeah, please con-
tribute to the Save The
Wheels Fund
D.B. Disappointing
Continued From P. 5
play fair. After DuVall
chases Williams over
hill and dale the two
switch roles, and
Williams gets his
chance to chase DuVall
� in an airplane no
less. In one of the sillier
scenes ever committed
to celluloid, Williams
puts the wheel of his
plane through the roof
of DuVall's ear. The
Duke boys would be
envious.
Fspeeially since they
never get to utter a dir-
ty word or entertain an
unchaste thought. Not
so, however, for the
characters in Pursuit.
The movie is ripe with
such repartee as,
"What're you doin'
here, you greasy
chicken dick?"
The film treats sex in
the same gratuitous
manner. Kathryn Har-
r o 1 d . who plays
Williams' wife, is in-
troduced with a shot
that gives us all a peek
down her blouse. This
scene is merely childish,
but the one where she
straddles Williams as
he drives their pickup
truck down the
highway itasteless.
It's a shame that
such talented actors as
Williams and DuVall
should be tied to this
tired, cliched vehicle.
Williams makes a
valiant effort to break
through the script's
mediocrity, but DuVall
merely acts embarassed
and delivers his lines
with a golly-gee-whiz
goofiness.
No one knows if the
real D.B. Cooper is
alive or dead. But if
he's alive, he might be
getting ready to sue,
and if he's dead, he's
probably turning in his
grave.
ABORTIONS UP TO
12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
ABORTIONS FROM 13 la
WEEKS
AT FURTHER EXPENSE
S18S.00 Pregnancy Test. Birth
Control and Problem
Pregnancy Counseling For fuf
ther information call 833 0535
(Toll Free Number
800 221 2568) between 9AM
and 5PM Weekdays
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
917 West Morgan St
Raleigh. N.C
QUALITY
MART
3000 EAST 10th ST.
OPEN 6:00 A.M12:00 P.M.
COLD BEVERAGES
CIGARETTES
ICE
2 LITRE SOFT DRINKS
$1.19
10
ECU
Student
Discount
on
glasses
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Let us make you an appointment
with the doctor of your choice.
752-1446
OPTICIANS
ornct HOVt
turn imrm
MOM �W
Kinston,
Goldsboro &
in Greenville at
Parkview
Commons
'Grafic' Exhibit
Continued From P. 5
will garner ihe band the
airplay needed to get
the record out on a ma-
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Well, I hope so too.
They've certainly got
the show and the
showmanship
(S p o n t a i n e' s voice
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you can actually
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the commercial poten-
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in the national spotlight
for their deep-rooted,
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sneakers or your black
velvet pumps and get
ready for a treat.
Pizza inn
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PIZZA, SALAD, SPAGHETTI, SOUP
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MonSun.
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SPAGHETTI DAY
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sJ
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499
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Spec i a I Good Phon 7527j
Tuesday,
Wednesday
and
Thursday
This Week
Bob Hearing � Manager
Cross Green Street Bridge
Take led at lit Light
Located one block down on lett.
i Ml I ASI C AKOl IM AN
NOVIMBLk 24. I9HI
Let $!? �aut (Earolmtan
write home for you every
Tues. and Thurs.
Every Tuesday and Thursday you can read the most
informative stories about the news events of the day
at ECU and in Greenville the best sports coverage,
and interesting features about the people, places and
things surrounding youso can your parents. For $25
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Serving the campus community since 1925, the East
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
NOVEMBER 24, 1981
Vafe 8
Audit Reveals ECU Athletic Deficit
The East Carolina University
athletic department received some
rather adverse, and unwanted,
publicity last Thursday when it was
announced that an audit by the
State Auditor's Office revealed that
the department lias been operating
with a deficit since 1979.
The audit revealed that the ECU
athletic department lost more than
$750,000 over the last three years
and currently is $400,000 in the
hole.
"We arc gravely concerned over
ihe rapid deterioration of the finan-
cial condition o this fund and
believe that appropriate action is
needed bv ihe board of trustees to
correct this deficit trend the audit
saidWe believe the primary cause
for (Ins condition is the lack of
budgetary and fiscal controls exer-
cised by management
The ECU athletic department's
recent deficit followed a $351,173
surplus as of July 1, 1978. The
department lost $77,778 in the fiscal
year ending in June, 1979, $394,866
in 1980 and $283,589 in 1981, accor-
ding to last Thursday's audit.
As of June 30, 1981 the depart-
ment faced a deficit of $404,982.
The most damaging losses last
year came in football and basket-
ball, the two sports that the univer-
sity looks upon as its chief revenue
producers. Football expenditures of
$928,505 were not compensated for
by gate receipts and guarantees
totalling $616,866, making for a dif-
ference of $309,639.
The athletic department spent
$214,175 on the men's basketball
program last year, yet brought in
only $52,454, a difference of
$161,721.
The deficits in football and
basketball were offset somewhat by
a number of contribuiers, including
the ECU Educational Foundation
(Pirate Club) and $414,397 in stu-
dent fees.
The cause for the current
$400,000 is basically four-fold, said
ECU Chancellor Thomas B.
Brewer.
The fourth-year chancellor cited:
�Spending over budget, especially
in football in 1978 and 1979.
�The Pirate Club missing its
fund-raising goal by $140,000 last
year.
�Title IX. Over $100,000 was
spent to upgrade women's athletic
in response to the bill's requiremnts
that prohibit sexual discrimination.
�The 1978 Independence Bowl,
which turned out to be less than
financially profittable for the
school, even though officials bHieve
it did uprgrade the image of the pro-
gram.
Brewer refused to term the cur-
rent ECU situation as "critical
saying that it was just a period being
experienced by a growing athletic
department.
"From my own point of view this
is not a problem of major
magnitude he said. "We feel that
we have very solid leadership in the
department of athletics and the
situation will be stabilized
Brewer cited a two-fold method
for eliminating the deficit.
"As long as we are dependent on
day-of-game sales Brewer said,
"the university will be hurting. The
students are paying their fair share.
The continued growth of this
university's athletic department will
be dependent on season ticket sales
and the continued support of the
Pirate club
Brewer said that "rampant infla-
tion" was a factor that the athletic
department would have to deal
more successfully with in the future
than it has in the past.
"Nowadays, you have to increase
your budget 10 to 15 percent each
year just to stay where already are
he said. "It has been a problem for
us trying to find that kind of
revenue
ECU Athletic Director Ken Karr
concurred with Brewer's solution to
the problem � secure more season
ticket sales and gain increased pro-
duction from the Pirate Club.
"Obviously this has been a verv
difficult thing to do, or we would
not have fallen short for the number
of years we have Karr admitted.
"I think this thing will take time,
but those two areas are the ultimate
solutions to our problem
Brewer and Karr also agreed on a
pair of other ideas that might help
the program. Both said that a public
fund-raising campaign in Eastern
North Carolina is a possibility for
the future.
See ATHLETICS, Page 9
Australia's Davies
Sinks Scrappy Bucs
Junior College transfer Charles
(�reen lets her flv in game with
Australians Mondav night.
B CHARLES CHANDLER
"If ever one man has beaten a
team, it was tonight
ECU head basketball coach Dave
Odom hit the perfect note with this
statement following his team's 72-71
loss to the Australian national team
in an exhitibion game Monday night
in Minges Coliseum.
Odom was referring to the in-
credible shooting performance of
Australia's Ian Davies, who con-
nected on 16 of 28 field goals �
most from beyond 20 feet � and
-line of nine field goal attempts en
route to a 41-point performance.
Davies tallied 29 o his game-high
point total in the second half alone.
The red-hot forward almost single-
handidly brought about the loss to a
determined ECU squad.
"We had our chances Odom
said. "We showed the will to come
back and I'm proud of that. But
Davies definitely hurt us. And I was
always taught that long shots won't
beat you
Davies performance overshadow-
ed a strong performance by the
ECU forward tandem of Charles
Green and Morris Hargrove. Green
tallied 16 points, ten of which came
in the game's late, crucial stages.
Hargrove led the team with both
his 23 points and nine rebounds.
The pesky Pirates jumped to a
quick lead in the first half, which
reached a peak of ten points at 30-20
with 4:26 remaining before intermis-
sion.
The Australians managed to cut
the lead to 34-28 by halftime and
wasted little time in the second half
erasing the Buc advantage
altogether.
A 9-2 spurt over the first two
minutes of the second period gave
the Australians their first lead, at
37-36.
The Australians' lead reached a
game-high peak of eight points, at
53-45. when Davies canned one of
his patented bombs with 10:01 re-
maining. The bucket left Davies
with 18 points over a ten-minute
span.
Eight straight points by the
Pirates over the next minute and a
half evened the score, though.
Davies then came through with
four consecutive free throws to give
his team a lead that would be
seriously threatened but not over-
come.
Junior Pirate forward Charles
Green came through with clutch
buckets time and again during the
game's final five minutes to get his
club in the contest.
A ten-foot jumper by Green with
43 seconds remaining brought the
Pirates to within a single point of
the visitors, at 72-71.
A missed free throw attempt at
the front end of a one-and-one
situation by Australia guard Les
Riddle with nine seconds remaining
was rebounded by the Pirates, giv-
ing the locals the opportunity pull
off a successful comeback.
Freshman guard Bruce Peartree
rushed the ball downcourt and tried
what could have been a game-
winning layup. Peartree's shot roll-
ed off the rim, as did follow at-
tempts by forwards Green and Mor-
ris Hargrove just before the final
horn sounded.
The Pirates begin their regular
season this Saturday night in Minges
Coliseumhosting Ohio University.
Tip-off time is 7:30.
At SIRAIIA 172)
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Bv GARY PATTERSON
Sophomore forward Morris Hargrove rams one home in a one-point loss
to the Australians in Minges Coliseum Monday night. This dunk was
only two of his 23 points on the evening.
ECU's Lady Pirates Running For Gold
B WILLIAM YELVERTON
si.ijn. Spurt t ihtor
I ady Pirate basketball coach
Cathy Andruzzi's goals for the
1981-82 season are simple: "We
want to do the best we can do � be
the bes! club possible, on and off
the court she says.
East Carolina opens the season at
3 p.m. Sunday against the Moun-
taineers of Appalachian State in
Minges Coliseum.
Andruzzi, entering her fourth
season as head coach, has turned
East Carolina into a national con-
tender. Her team vaulted into the
lop twenty last season, finishing the
year with a 23-7 record and an at-
large bid to the regionals.
Gone from that group are all-
everything performer Kathy Riley,
Marcia Girven, I.ydia Rountree and
Laurie Sikes � now an assistant
coach.
But her young team has "come
along a tremendous amount in the
preseason, Andruzzi says. "We're
made big improvements; our
defense has become tougher. We've
been strict on fundamentals because
we have a new set of principles for
our newcomers and veterans. We
have a whole new squad
And that squad will count on
senior guard-forward Sam Jones,
forward Mary Denkler and guard
Lillion Barnes for leadership. Jones,
"a "real player who makes things
S7
P)uio By GARY PAITERSON
Mary Denkler (35) and Sam Jones (2D "set" to begin another season of
Lady Pirate basketball Sunday against Appalachian. The two will be
counted on for leadership from the young team this season.
happen says Andruzzi, averaged
14.7 points and 5.3 rebounds last
season after transferring from
Louisburg Junior College. Denkler
chipped in 14 points per game and
added 6.8 rebounds as she improved
steadily each game. "She played
with (Marcia) Gervin for two
years notes Andruzzi "so it's up
to her now
Barnes, Andruzzi says, could be
the heart and soul of East Carolina
this season. "She had done a
tremendous job she said, "and
has improved drastically Barnes is
coming off of a shoulder operation
in August and refuses to let it
hamper her preparation for Sun-
day's game.
"She wouldn't let you know it if
she was hurt or not Andruzzi
says. "She is going to give 100 per-
cent all the time
After the completion of last
season, Andruzzi faced the task of
replacing the heart of her team. So
she came up with a banner
recruiting crop, including two high
school All-Americans, center
Darlene Chaney and point guard
Loraine Foster, another freshman
"sleeper 6-0 forward Laura
Regal, and the most valuable player
of the national junior college cham-
pionship team, 5-8 forward Loletha
Harrison. Another AII-VAIAW per-
former from Division III Randolph-
Macon, forward Ginger Noce
transferred.
Chaney, 6-2, was most valuable
player at the annual Virginia high
school all-star gameShe scored 20
points and claimed 14 rebounds to
solidify her standing as the best pro-
spect in the state. She was also a
member of the Converse All-
American team. "She's young
says Andruzzi, "but is learning the
system. She's making very big
strides
Point guard Foster was another
state high school ail-star most
valuable player. "Loraine has been
"We want to be the best club possible, on and off
the court, academically and athletically. Our girls
have worked very, very hard. We want a
consistent group on the court. The ones who are
the most responsible and consistent on and off the
court will play the most. '
-Cathy Andruzzi
doing a tremendous job Andruzzi
says. "She's the Isiah Thomas of
basketball, as well call her The
Spartanburg, S.C native was all-
state and the leading scorer in nor-
thern South Carolina last season
with a 23.2 average. She also holds
the South Carolina state prep record
in the 100 meters, winning the event
three times at the state track meet.
The "sleeper" according to
recruiters could be 6-0 forward
Regal of Granger, Ind who averag-
ed almost 15 points and 15 rebounds
for Gray High School. She, too,
"has got to get used to the system
insists Andruzzi.
Harrison led Louisburg to the na-
tional junior college crown last
season, averaing 10.4 points and
over nine rebounds per game while
considered to be the team's best
defensive player. Andruzzi describes
the 5-8 forward as "very intense �
on and off the the court
The "hard-working" Noce'
transferred from Randolph-Macon
with all-regional honors, averaging
15 points, nine rebounds and three
assists per contest while playing
three different positions.
Andruzzi says she has "no idea"
who will start against Appalachian
State Sunday, but stresses that "the
people who will start will be the
hardgst-working, most responsible
and most dedicated
"We want to be the best club
possible Andruzzi says, "on and
off the court, academically and
athletically. Our girls live worked
very, very hard. We want a consis-
tent group on the court. The ones
who are the most responsible and
consistent on and off the court will
play the most.
"Playing for East Carolina is a
privilege. You earn your opportuni-
ty to play, and you earn your oppor-
tunity to start
Andruzzi says her team doesn't
let rankings bother them. "Ranking
don't mean much now she says.
"Your overall performance is what
counts. We have a great deal of in-
centive, having done so well last
year. But they want their own ideni-
ty � they want to bring a winner to
East Carolina. It's going to take us a
little while to group
With the likes of N.C. State,
North Carolina, South Carolina and
Virginia coming to Minges Col-
iseum, plus other tough road con-
tests, Andruzzi see this season as.a
challenge � not only to her team
but to herself. "I demand a great
deal from our players. We expect a
Lady Pirate coach Cathy Andruzzi
leads charge in last season's action.
preat deal, not only in athletics but
from academics, too. We put a great
deal of responsibility on their
shoulders. It will be a challenge to
be consistent and patient as possi-
ble. We have to bring the best
teaching atmosphere here possible.
After all, we are teachers
Andruzzi says that the preseason
has "been a very, very tiresome lime
for us
But she quickly adds, "Very en-
joyable, though
Swii
Fan
At
By THOP
ECU
coach Ra
home pie.
Pirates spl
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though,
thai Jenj
Nancy J;
McH
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break the
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FOI
WATE06EI
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Fare Well
AtODU
B THOMAS BRAMF
stall �nlrr
ECU swimming
coach Ray Scharf came
home pleased after his
Pirates split a dual meet
at Old Dominion t his
though, was the fact
that Jennifei layes,
Nancy James, Moria
McHugh and Nan
George teamed to
break the school record
,11 the 400-freesiyle
relay. George broke
another school record
in the 500 freestyle
event and had two na-
tional cuts, laves had a
national cut time in the
100-meter backstroke.
the Pirate men mov-
ed their record to 2-1
past weekend,
defeating the Monarchs
but falling to
Maryland.
The women's team
lost 60-52 to the I ad)
Monarchs. A bright
spot for the ladies,
with I lie split. For the
weekend, K ein
Richards won three
events individually
while Scott Fagle and
Stan Williams won two
events, respectfully.
The 400-meter relax
team won both days
with good tunes.
East Carolina travels
io UNC-Wilmington
this Samrdav lor a 1:30
meet. Both the men and
the women will com-
pete.
IHt l AST C AROI INI AN NOVtMBFR 24, 1981
9
Be
on the
Lookout
A thirties Face A Deficit
Continued From Page 8
Both also said that a television ap-
pearance by the East Carolina foot-
ball team next season would almost
balance the budget. Royalties from
such telecasts usually run over
$200,000.
The current fiscal year, which
ends June 30, 1982, has not been a
kind one as of yet to the ECU
athletic department. Gate receipts at
home football games have fallen
under what was projected.
�'I was very disappointed Karr
said of the fan support during the
recently-completed football season.
"We brought a team in here like
Miami (Fla.) and got very disap-
pointing local support. We've got
our faithful few, but we've got to
expand on those numbers
ECU's athletic budget for 1981-82
is $2,185,818, according to Clifton
G. Moore, vice chancellor for
business affairs. Moore said that the
department would most likely have
another deficit this year.
The current deficit that the
athletic department faces is one that
has caused deep concern within the
department, according to Assistant
Athletic Director for Business At-
fairs Earline l.eggett.
"If you care you have to be con-
cerned said Leggett. "I've been
here for 19 years, and I love it. We
have come such a long ways and
now things are looking a little bad.
That doesn't mean that we will not
continue to grow, though. I am con-
fident that we will. But, yes, the
situation we now face does worry
me very much
Also concerned is Ashley Futrell,
chairman of the board of trustees.
"Of course, this is an unfortunate
thing said Futrell. "We have to
overcome it, though. There's too
much at stake not to come out of it
good. We definitely have to begin
an all-out effort. We've got to do
everything we possiWty can to
remedy this situation as soon as
possible
Futrell blamed the situation par-
tially on the fact that the ECU foot-
balf team has had two consecutive
losing seasons, 4-7 in 1980 and 5-6
this year.
"When you have a losing team
for two years, you lose fans he
said. "If we had won eight games
each year, we wouldn't be in this
position
The East Carolinian is publishing a special
basketball tabloid on December 1. All the info
on both the men and women Pirates. Specials
include a lock at the ECAC-Scuth and an in-
depth, personal lock at Cathv Andruzzi, the
force behind the Lady Pirates' success. Be en
the lookout. Hitting the newsstands on
December 1.
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Rebel Prose and Poetry Contests
Sponsored by Budweiser and the
Attic Cash belore Christmas
Deadline November 30 Great
chance to be published.
Cl OSET POETS br.nq the Rebel
voui veise. three io live poems
0, bttc" o. wn.se It vou wt ite
well, ludqes' eyes, you could
wtUl nil with the S80 lust pme
The deadline .s Novembe. 30. so
don ' diiav P'Ck up you. pens and
;a I wi itinq today
EXCELLENT TYPIST w.ll do
turn research and thesis pape.s
articles lor publication and dissei
tatmns Reasonable tales Call
757 1378
FOUND LADIES watch on In
tramurai soccer lield Ca
752 9657 to ciaim .1
KIM ALBIN out senual notions
are not contused We know what
we ie doinq �do you' Siq Eps
FRESHMEN WOMEN contused
'i-Miial notions 24 hr counselinq
at Ihe Siq Ep house
DEAR MR Fatiques You knrck
ed on my door And I real! was at
home But i couldn't get
downstairs Cause I was on th.
phone So conn back aqa �'�
qtv me a ciianci- CaiiM i it' pi
Affectionately from O'Ba' Happy
Thanksgiving Foot, Susan Sam
my. Vicky! '� '�
dying to qei in youi pants
JOOY - WISHING you a spec .a'
bnthdav with Thundei Buns a'
Twiiqht and the contents ol youi
hoi ii case W.sh I were there' In
stead I ollei a belated invitation Io
dmnei - the place is voui
choice-to .etuin youi kindness
RSVP' Bully
ORACULA THANKS lor Ihe
talks, the ndes, the map and
especially Saturday night Youi
luend always and loievei. M and
Ms with nuts
CIRCLE K EBS. I.u.ts Owen
Jane and my Mmnowesl room
male Joy Satu.dav was ihc
daiquiri es' I love ' ya n Jean
ON THE l.lth day belore
Thanksgiving, one al'e.noon bout
3 one ca wash, two tilths ol
vodka one qua. t ol O J . lou.
piece o botiies. nine diunken pen
pie one toy i.de. one blown up
tubber one moon.ng. two tesui
rections and a btother I'm
thanklui to be I
PLEDGE S OF Alpha Omicion P.
Fuday the 20th was youi big n.qhi
and you looked so pi etty all di ess
rd m wh.tr' Thanks loi the sonqs
now you n halt way through By
the way this bud s Io. you
JTG OF PKP thanks loi � bos'
R B evei tee! massages and sn"
uses loi the second limt i� a i "w '
Enioy T giving bieak PLW
stAw WATtlM: Mir vh�i �
�tekr�il w) � �� �" �"�" 1' u
L�,a n mm r ,l)r� mlr
I ,iUi took �i Hi.ixc pictara inii
I didn't �� I" ��'�' " I �'
Bo.l.tMll ������"��
msutrd. ��! ���' tmM ' "� hul "k'v
Vaa -err. ifirr ill. � nuesl in m m�n
���. v.mrlimrN I ihink ��u �re irMitg
In n.rrupi me. �snli In drink ill ilw
time. II ��� ��ur Mtm I" t�i drunk ��
loo in Ihe illrrn.mn. N�N mine nil H
� your Mi� Vm dnnk Binirdi Prr-
n- . I �i�ir.l In dnnk imil.in
Hint. Wui "� �"� �� ����' '
, oul.in i ��s inyihinn And ih.n.r
(rukm' hurps.
Aunl Pr �ly l bomh Ibil i.�k -ure
rro�cd more thin mt nmr ikn nghi
Bui nu lilted I" check up �n nw. mil I
ipprnulr
COMPLETE AUTO REPAIR SHOP
(FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC)
FULL AND SELF-SERVICE GAS AT
QUALITY PRICES
ROAD AND WRECKER SERVICE
10
DISCOUNT
ON REPAIRS
WECU I.D.
PILOT TRAINING
OPPORTUNITIES
FLY NAVY
The Navy presently has several openings tor tne
most exciting and challenging job in the world -
NAVY PILOT. If you qualify, we will quarantee
you a seat in the most prestigious flight school
anywhere. At the completion of training you will
fly the Navy's high performance aircraft
Qualifications are:
� Bachelors degree
� Less than 28"years old
� 2020 urtcorrected vision
� Excellent health
� U.S. Citizen
If you thank you can qualify, and would like to
earn a starting salary of S18,000 with $28,000 n
four years, send a letter of qualifications to
NAVY PILOT PROGRAMS
001 Navaho Dr.
Raleigh, N. C. 27609
or call 1-800 662 7231
CAMPUS VISIT SCHEDULED
FOR 1 3 DECEMBER
apprrtiair it
i
i
i
MONOGRAMS
UNLIMITED
Get Your Swearers & Shirts
Ready for the Fall.
Co-Ed Outlet
Located next to Plitt Theatre
Mori. Sat. 10 9 Call 335 2424
I
f
but
WMkdayt
11:30-11:00
Fri. A S�t.
11:30-12:00
300 E. 10th St.
758 6121
The Best Pizza in Town! (Honest)
Post Service!
The Philosophy Cluh Meeting set
for Tuesday, November 24th
(Topic: The Immortalist) has been
postponed until a later date. There
will be no meeting on this date.
Because of the confusion there has
been, the active members will
receive additional information later.
Also, please be on the lookout for
future notices.
Game
Machines
Drive Up
Window For
To Go Orders
$2.79
$2.69
PIZZA m SPAGHETTI BUFFET
Mon. & Tues. 5:30 8:00
Mon. thru Fri. 11:30 2:00
Wed. - All you can cot Spaghetti 5:30-3:00 $2.69
Thurs.�Lasagna�One Reg. Price�Second One
SI.00
IIIIIIIIIIIIIIII1111111
ECU
STUDENTS
EVERY TUESDAY
IS COLLEGE NIGHT
with VALID I.D.
$1.00
104E.REDBANKSRD.
754-4000
qoIdgiv
CQHtt tnuc aUtH
BUNCH
SALE
The construction work in our store has been
completed and we are moving all bocks
from Wright Auditorium back to the main
store.
We have a "bunch of bocks" that have been
taking up much needed space and we want
to move them out as we move back in. Many
subject categories are represented in this
group of discontinued titles and old edi-
tions.
Each book on sale is priced 25 cents. Come
on in and buy a "bunch This sale will con-
tinue as long as our supply of books lasts.
No refunds can be given. Shop early for the
best selection.
Morehead Plaza
Greenville
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
Wright Building
Owned and Operated by East Carolina University
t






The Inter-Fraternity Council would like to thank the following
sponsors of the 2nd Annual Pig Cook-Off Tournament:
Attic
Boyd's
Briley's Store
Crow's Nest
Carolina East Cleaners
Carraway Oil Co. (Exxon)
Coffman's
Camelot Inn
Coke
Domino's Pizza
Deli Kitchen
Elbo Room
Famous Pizza
The Flower Basket
Heart's Delight
Home Builders
Hendrix-Barn Hill
Happy Store
Jack's Steak House
Keel Peanuts
Lil-Ann's Boutique
of Finer Hairstyling
Larry's Carpetland
Overton's
Partial proceeds go
to charity.
Papa Katz
Pepsi
Peaches
Parkers
Phelps Chevrolet
Robinson Tower
Subway
Tree House
Tar Landing Seafood
UBE
Venter's
� IHB





Title
The East Carolinian, November 24, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 24, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.165
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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