The East Carolinian, November 10, 1981






�he lEaHt (Earnliman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 58 No. 23
Effectiveness
Survey Ready
B DIANE ANDERSON
Mundane lectures? Unfair pro-
fessors?
During the week of Nov. 16
through 21, students will have a
chance to express satisfaction or
dissatisfaction with their instruc-
tors.
"Every student in every class will
hae an opportunity to give their
opinion of the instruction in that
class explained Robert M. Ussery,
director of institutional research.
His office developed the student
survey along with the Faculty Senate
Committee for teaching effec-
ts eness.
Questionnaires will be distributed
during every class with an enroll-
ment of more than 5 students. It will
take approximately 15 minutes to
complete.
Participation is voluntary, and
students may remain anonymous.
The instructors have been requested
to leave the classroom while
students complete the survey.
Dr. Phil Adler, chairman of the
committee for Teaching Effec-
tiveness, encouraged students "not
to get exasperated" with the ques-
tionnaires since they will have to fill
one out in every class.
"We encourage them to take it in
the spirit given, that is a serious ef-
fort to find out what is going on in
the classroom, to help the teachers
find out where their strengths and
weaknesses lie said Adler.
The results of the survey will be
confidential to the faculty and will
be available sometime in January.
Individual instructors can then put
the information to use in their
teaching methods.
Selected items from the survey
will also be used to choose those in-
structors worthy of receiving alumni
awards presented annually for
teaching excellence.
This particular survey will not be
used for administrative personnel
decisions. "It was the agreement
between the committee and ad-
ministration that personnel deci-
sions would not be done until a part
of the faculty handbook, appendix
C, (Personal Policy), was approved
by the faculty senate. It is running
behind schedule said Adler. "This
survey will not be for personnel
things but solely for self-
improvement
Dr. Adler also explained that
these surveys "presumably will be
done within regular intervals, pro-
bably no more frequently than once
annually, maybe every third
semester
According to Chancellor Brewer,
this program is part of the universi-
ty's "continuing steps to provide a
comprehensive program to promote
improvements in teaching and ad-
ministrative processes
Paint the Town Purple And Gold: Homecoming 1981
Photo By GARY PATTERSON
Saturday's festivities were marked by the crowning of East Carolina's
Homecoming Pirate, Kim Cloud (left). Sigma Tau Gamma gave the
traditional parade an Animal House touch with their
"Deathmobile(top right) and the crowd cheered the football team to
victorv over East Tennessee State (below). The Delta Zetas and Clement
Dorm took top honors for decorations. The Sigma Vis won first place
for their float, with Beta Theta Pi and the Lambda (his taking second
and third places. Cam Sloan and Jackie McClav were the runners
the Homecoming Pirate contest.
ce
rid
3
Delayed Concert Incites Controversy
r . i�,� �i,j n&t ;� n nl ih� maioi attractions C(
B TOM HALL
Of three bands slated to appear at
Saturday's homecoming concert,
one was late and another did not ap-
pear at all.
ken Hammond, Student Union
program director, said he received a
call Saturday afternoon from the
concert promoter and was told that
the bus carrying SOS, one of the
scheduled bands, had broken down
outside of Atlanta.
According to Hammond, two
signs were posted outside Minges
Coliseum notifying the audience
that the band would not appear and
an announcement was made to the
crowd that refunds would be given
at the coliseum's ticket window.
Hammond said Monday that he
had been receiving calls all day from
people who attending the concert
demanding refunds.
"I regret the fact that the show
was late in starting but it did hap-
pen Hammond said. He said he
sympathized with the t who waited
until midnight to see the musical
group Slave, but emphasized that
the show did take place. "A number
of people are asking for refunds
because they feel they did not get
their money's worth Hammond
added. "We would have given
everyone a full refund if Slave had
not appeared
Slave did not arrive at Minges un-
til 10:30 p.m. and did not start play-
ing until 12 a.m. the program direc-
tor said. CD. and Company, a male
fashion show, began their act
"around 8:35 or 8:40" and were
followed by the band Brief En-
counter at 10 p.m according to,
Hammond.
The East Carolina Student Union
received a percentage of the gate
receipts from Jim Rouse of T P and
B Productions. Rouse approached
the Major Attractions Committee
this fall about a concert on the
Saturday night of ECU's homecom-
ing week, Hammond said. The com-
mittee already had a "bird in the
hand" with the Nov. 20 Charlie
Daniels concert, so Rouse was given
control of the concert's promotion.
Hammond said Rouse's Bar-Kays
concert in Minges last June had
been a "very successful endeavor
Hammond's office received a
message that SOS would not per-
form at 7 p.m. Saturday, according
to the promoter. Rouse arrived at
the box office at 7:30 p.m. after col-
ic ting concert tickets and money
from outlets throughout Pitt Coun-
ty. He then got the confirmation
that Slave was running late and SOS
would not appear.
Rouse, who is taking legal action
against both bands, said everyone
holding ticket stubs from the Satur-
day's show would receive a 50 per-
cent discount on his next concert.
"It's just one of those things
Rouse said. "I've built a good rela-
tionship with the students of ECU
and the black community. I am not
going to run away fron. any pro-
blems
Da Vinci Metcalf, an ECU
graduate student who attended the
concert, received a refund but said
Monday he was still angry about the
performances.
"I've been here three years, and
I've never been so ticked off in m
life Metcalf said. He said Brief
Encounter "looked like something
left over from Halloween" and
described them as a black punk rock
group. After CD. and Company
performed, Metcalf said disco
records were played over the sound
system and a local disk jockey spoke
to the crowd "to keep everyone
pacified
"The crowd started yelling
obscenities Metcalf added. "1 felt
like throwing tomatoes. 1 gave up
and left in disgust at 10:30
However. Hammond commented
that the crowd, which numbered ap-
proximately 2,000, was "probablv
the most well-behaved crowd I've
ever seen at any concert in the nine
years I've been here
"I am hoping that the credibility
of the major attractions committee
is not tarnished hv this Hammond
said. Rouse stressed that the Major
Attractions Committee and dean
Rudolph Alexander "had nothing
to do with the bad thing that hap-
pened that night
"I've been doing shows all my
life Rouse said. "There arc
segments in the community that
don't receive live entertainment �
that's the black community
Metcalf said he felt that students
do not have enough imput into the
concerts that come to ECU. "We
need to have a campuswide survey
to see what the students actually
want. Instead of getting three
bands, maybe we could get one
good one
Contract Bids For
Med School Rigged
More than $1 million dollars in
restitution will be paid by Watson
Electric for its role in bid rigging in
connection with the East Carolina
Medical Education Facility.
Eight other electrical contracting
companies wre also indicted on
charges of rigging bids on the state
building contract.
"These indictments are the result
of an eight-month investigation into
bid rigging in the electrical contrac-
ting industry State Attorney
General Rufus L. Edminsten said.
The indictments returned Mon-
day charged the nine companies
with conspiring to ensure Watson
submitted the low id for the ECU
contract. Ten officials from eight of
the companies were also indicted.
As a part of the plea bargain Wat-
son has also agreed to cooperate
with the state in a continuing in-
vestigation, according to Ed-
minsten.
In addition to the conspiracy in-
dictments, Watson Electrical of
Wilson and Richard and Associates
of Carrollton, Ga. werealso in-
dicted on felony false pretense
charges.
Watson Electric is currently
finishing work on the ECU drama
building, according to Cliff Moore,
vice chancellor for business affairs.
ECU attorney David Stevens said
that he has been assured by the at-
tornev general's ofice that work on
the medical school complex would
continue despite the indictments.
Due to an error in the bid bond
the Watson bid was not opened and
the contract was awarded tothe se
cond low bidder, Richards and
Associates.
The indictments also named T.L.
Watson Jr the board chairman of
Watson Electric and company presi-
dent William E. Boyette.
Richards and Associates officials
who were indicted were Roy
Richards, the president, and
William A. Williamson, the
manager of the company's electrical
division.
Conspiracy indictments were also
returned against:
1 M it it ii ii i
i ii ii ii lifn
I II II II II II I
I II 11 11 II II I
I II II II II II I
I
NCSU Enforces
Grade Requirements
:
- " 'T��PRR��f - �"�V.� � m
�Bryant-Durham Electric Co. Inc.
of Durham and its president, Robert
S. Shackleford.
�Bryant Electric Co. Inc. of High
Point and George F. Saunders, a
vice president.
�Cooper Electrical Construction
Co. of Greensboro and company
President J.E. Cooper.
� Darden Electric Co. Inc. of
Goldsboro and Tommy Lancaster, a
vice president.
�Eicon Corp. of Hendersonville.
� Industrotech Constructors Inc. of
Despite the conspiracy indictments involving bid rigging, officials have
assured that work on the medical school complex will continue.
knowledge in July, when the Justice
department raided Watson's Wilson
headquarters and seized records.
Affidavits filed with a search war-
rant said an informant working for
the company toid investigators com-
pany officials were allegedly
destroying or altering company
� lnausiroiecn lwioiiuhw ������ � � - -
Atlanta and William H. Howell, a records on contracts the company
vice president. had recieved"
�Starr Electric Co. Inc of At the time, Andrew A. Vanore
Greensboro and compnay Presdint Jr a senior deputy attorney general
said the seizure represented a
broadening in scope of a state in-
vestigation into bid rigging con-
tracts.
John W. Starr.
The states investigation into elec-
trical contractors became public
Correction
A story in Thursday's paper
inaccurately reported that Vice
Chancellor Elmer Meyer and his
black roommate attended
Howard University. Meyer at-
tended George Washington
University and his roommate
went to Howard. They lived at
the International Student
House, which is independent of
any university.
By MIKE HUGHES
M�ff Wrilcr
Students at North Carolina State
University may soon have to meet
higher standards to graduate.
The Faculty Senate at N.C. State
recently proposed changes in that
school's requirements for gradua-
tion. The Senate also called for a
change in State's academic suspen-
sion regulations.
Since 1974, State has had no
grade-point average requirement for
graduation. Students at State must,
under current policy, earn a
minimum grade of "C" in all of
their required courses. However, 12
hours of "D's" are permitted.
The Faculty Senate's proposal
called for the reinstatement of a 2.0
GPA requirement, on a four-point
scale, for graduation. A majority of
State's faculty members who were
present at a forum held October 21
agreed with the proposed grade-
point requirement.
However, a few university faculty
members expressed their opinions
that a minimum GPA requirement
would cause many students to avoid
challenging courses, because the
students would become extremely
grade-conscious.
A report issued by the Senate's
academic policy committee supports
the raise in graduation re-
quirements, stating that students
who graduate with low GPA's have
difficulty finding jobs.
The report also says that many
qualified students are, in effect,
shut out from admission at N.C.
State, because other students with
C
: VCfC
Caj
sTf-
low grade-point averages are allow-
ed to remain at the school.
Since 1978, the annual average
number of N.C. State students
graduating with a grade-point
average below 2.0 has been about
170 out of 2.489 or 6.8 percent, the
report said.
Last year, 133 students at State
graduated with less than a "C"
average overall.
Also proposed by the Senate is a
graduated suspension scale. Like
that at ECU, this scale would re-
quire students to earn a certain GPA
after taking an established number
of semester hours.
After the first retention period,
completion of at least 28 hours,
students would be required to ob-
tain a 1.25 average. The GPA re-
quirement would increase by two-
tenths of a point per year.
According to the Technician,
N.C. State's student newspaper, the
new system would affect more than
twice the number of students
See FACULTY, Page 2
On The Inside
Announcements2
Opinions
Campus Forum4
Entertainment5
Sports8
Classifieds 9
I

f






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 10, 1981

Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
If you or your organization
would like to nave an item printed
in the announcements column
please send the announcement (as
brief as possible) typed and
double spaced to The East Caroli
man in care of the news editor
There is no charge tor an
nouncements. but space is often
limited
The deadline tor announcement
are 5pm Friday for the Tuesdsay
paper and S p m Tuesday tor the
Thrusdasy paper
The space is available to all
campus organizations and depart
ments
ACT
The Ameruan College Testing
lACT) will be offered at East
Carolina University on Saturday,
December 12. W81 Application
blanks are to be completed and
mailed to ACT Registration, p O
Box 414 , lowa City, lowa 52340
Registration deadline is
November 13. 1981 Applications
may be obtained from the ECU
Testing Center Speight Building
Room 105
CIRCLE K
Circle K would like 'o ihank Pol
l� Brewer for the use of her apart
ment this past weekend Please
remember to sell your telephone
book covers for the Donny
I assitef special tund The meeting
will be tonight at 6 30 room 221 at
Mendenhall Student Center Don't
i ge' 10 read the continuing Or
I le K atia m Thusdav's paper'
LAW
ECU i-aw Society will have a
lat meeting on Thursday
rung at 7 30, room 221,
Mendenhall Guest speaker will be
Elizabeth Warren a local at
tomey Bring a friend Further in
� � ation call D-ane Jones
�c 6S56
COOP
The Co op Office located .n 313
Rawi currently tins ,0b openings
tor Sp ing Semester 82 with the
g agencies Interested
students are crged to apply today !
General Accounting Office.
. 'U'nia Beach VA � Business
� on with 2 9 GPA's or aoove
who have completed approximate
� nours duniorsi should apply
P�A GreenvHle NC - Corn
puter Science n-iajors Aih 2 9
or above snouid app'�
Burroughs Cororation - Com
putei Si ience and Account,ng ma
P i � ment may be n
C ��� �'�� NC. Atlanta GA or
B r'Oughs Corporate
a ��s-os Student ma req
; � � � � specific a I I
mi � �� � us
� �, Administration
B I i more MD Computer
� i-o Ma 'h Mat ors
R- � let a , ch coming to cam
ntervtcw stuoents earl.
NCSL
The North Carolina Student
Legislature will meet Tuesday
NOv 10 m room 212 Mendenhall
All members please attend
TRAVEL COMMITTEE
The Student union Travel Com
mittee is now accepting applica
lions for membership All persons
interested in loinmg can pick up
an application at the Student
Union office room 234 Mendenhall
Student Center
KDP
The second meeting ot Kappa
Delta Pi will be held at Pepp. s
Pizza Den on Wednesday Nov 11
at 6 30 pm Our speaker lor the
evening will be Mr John Everette,
Director of Federal Proiects m
Beaufort County Schools His topic
will be Teacher Evaluation "
This should prove to be a very wor
thwhile meeting Please make
your reservations with Mrs Ellen
Cheng - SP 231
Recently we have sent out an
important newsletter regarding
our mailing list if you have not
received or would !ke to cont.nue
receiving your newslet'er. please
contact Mrs Ellen Cheng SP 231
PHYE 1000
Make up 's tor Incompletes
awarded spring or summer 1981
will be given Thursday Nov 12 at
Mmges Coliseum on the following
schedule 5pm Room 142 Con
cepts and Activity Written Ex
animations � 30 p m . Mmges
Pool Swim Test and
Drownprootmg Test
BIOLOGY CLUB
The ECU B'Ology Ctub held the
drawing tor the Calvm Klein jeans
on Oct 26 Dr Charles Bland
chairperson ot the Biology Dept
drew Glenn Olmstead s ticket dur
ing the meeting Congratulation.
to the winner ano the Biology Club
thanks ail ot those who supported
us
BASKETBALL
Th s year the Greenville
Recreation ana Parks Depart
ment will be booking .Is own
Basketball Oft't als tor the Adult
Basketball League Anyone m
teresteo in officiating Baske'baii
shi-uia contact me at 752 4137, ext
248. or come D, my ofdee at Elm
St Gym Also to ensure that we
maintain the good quality of our
official an,one mtereted in of
ficiatmg in our Leagues will be re
quired to attend a series of
There wiil be a to'ai ot s� cin.es
directed by Howard Pier
each wil be held on Tuesday nqhts
beginning Ncv 10 a' p m at the
Elm St Gym For lurfhei
mation you ma. call me a � . �
t.ce
STUDENT ATHLETIC
BOARD
D'rectors meeting Tuesday Nov
10, 5 p m in Pam Hoi l OH
unable 'o to attend call Kitty at
752 8549 Also the SAB welcomes
anyone interested in hepmg out
wih basketball this seas
come to the rnee'mg Monoa, N
9 at 5 30 Mmges Room Ml 143
ALPHARHO
Who looks the best in a bikini?
The pledges ot Kappa Sigma
would like to know along with the
rest ECU The date ot this contest
will be on November 21. 1981 at
Pappa Katz Three Grand prizes
consisting of cash and prizes total
mg almost 1400 will be awarded
to the winners Keep looking for
more details Alpha Rho is on the
go' C J Veteran s Day is your
day. enioy it!
SURF CLUB
Meeting Wednesdays Nov II.
18 Dec 2 and 9 Room 221
Mendenhall at 7 p m All members
are urged to attend Be there!
PPHA
The Preprofessional Health
Alliance iPPHA) will have a
meeting this Thursday Nov 12
This meetmq will be held at 6 p m
at The Afro American Cultural
Center All members and any
other mtersted parties are urged
to attend
UNIVERSITYCLUB
The East Carolina University
Club will be holding its silent auc
tion and wine and cheese party on
Nov IS from 5 to 7 m The Gray Art
Gallery There will be 33 items
auctioned off to benefit the Leo
Jenkins Scholarship Fund Facjt
ty and staff are invited to call
756 4271 for reservations
FCA
The Fellowship of Christian
Athletes will meet Tuesday night
at 9 45 m the basement ot Belk
Dorm Everyone interested is m
vited tc come and join the tun
CORSO
There will be a CORSO meeting
on Thursday. Nov 12 at 5 30 in
room 221 ot Menoenhall Student
Center All Corrections and Social
Work maiors ana intended maioi s
are urged to attend
FOUND
Calculator m the General Col
leqe office durmq Change Ot MaiOr
week May (laim item by properly
identifying Come Or the General
College office Brewster A 101
SCIENCE MAJORS
On Monday. Nov 16 American
Chemical Society Student Affiliate
will meet at 7pm in Flanagan
202 All members and interested
persons are urged to attend
PARKING AUTHORITY
reenville Parking Author i
ty will meet at 9 15 a m at City
Hall on Wednesday Nov 11
UTILITIES
The Board of Commissioners of
the Greenville Utilities Commis
SiOn will meet in reau'ar session at
7 30 p m TuesdayV Nov 10 in the
board room of the U'
Buildmo
RECEPTION
The Greenville Woman's Club
will sponsor its annual reception
and program for international
students and faculty of ECU from
4 until 6pm Nov II at th
Woman's Club A program of films
and music will be presented and
refreshments will be served
IPETUMODU
"The Traditional Pottery of
ipetumodu with Winnie Owens will
be presented on Saturday. Nov 14
m the Jenkins Fine Arts Center
auditorio i at ECU There will be
a slide presentation lecture and
short film that includes footage
photographed by Owens in the
village of Ipetumodu
Winnie Owens is a black artist
from Washington, D C who
works m traditional Nigerian pot
tery branching from Ipetumodu
Everyone is encouraged to at
tend this presntation
ONA
The Organization for Native
Americans will have a meeting
tonight (Nov 10) at 5 30 p m The
meeting will be in the CSO Depart
ment (back parti of Whichara
Building Everyone is invited to
attend
PROSE CONTEST
The Rebel. Jeffrey's Wine and
Beer Co . and 1 he Attic are spon
soring a Prose Contest Fiction.
Drama. Mystery Typed entries
may be submitted to the Media
Board or Rebel offices by Nov 30
Cash prizes of $125 S75 $25 and
$10 First, second third and two
honorarians respectively will be
awarded before Christmas
NAACP
N A A C P meeting will be held
Nov. 3. at 6 p m m the multipur
pose room m Mendenhall Guests
wil be Dean Elmer Meyer of Stu
dent Lite, Mr D D Garrett Presi
dent ot Pitt County NAACP.
ana Mrs Willie tAae Carney. Vice
President of Pitt County
NAACP Everyone please at
tend!
CEREBRAL PALSY
The United Cerebral Palsy is go
mg to have a square dance and
auction out at the Carolina Opry
House, Tuesday, Nov 10. between
the hours of 7 p m 11pm for the
benefit of the UCP Center of
Greenville Come and join us if
you don't know how to square
dance, we'll teach you' Jerry
Powell, caller The Ambush Band
will be playing from II pm on
Donation $1 00 at the door
GAY
Yes it's once again time for
another E C.G.C meeting But the
old humdrum ot business at hand,
reading the minutes, and general
ly being very official needs a rest
What could be more appropriate to
take its place than a social gather
ing That's right bring your
favorite beverage and a friend
Tuesday Nov 10. to 953 E 10th at
7 30 Munchies will be provided
See ya there'
PEP BAND
The ECU Athletic Department is
in the process ot assembling a Pep
Band tor all men and women's
basketball games Those of you
who are interested, please contact
Pam Holt at 757 6417
REGISTERS
SGA Freshman Registers have
arrived You may pick one up m
Room 228 of Mendenhall Student
Center
HARASSMENT
The ECU Committee on the
status of women will present a
symposium "Sexual Harass
ment Assault On Dignity on
Wednesday. Nov 11. at Room 244
Mendenhall Keynote speakers
are Dr Kenneth Wilson. Professor
ot Sociology. ECU, and innovator
of research on sexual harassment
on college campuses and Maxme
Brown, Personnel and Industrial
Liaison Greensboro For schedul
ed and more information contact
Mary Ann Rose at 757 6804
MINORITY LAW
The UNC Law School invites
undergraduate minority students
to participate m a Law School In
formation Day on Nov 20 1981
The day long comterence will te
held at the UNC Law School m
Chapel Hill and is open to any
minority person who is thinking
about attending law school
Registration forms are available
in the Career Planning and Place
ment Office, Bloxton House
SIGMA BIG BROTHER
There will be an informal
meeting ot all Sigma Sioma Sigma
Big Brothers on Thursday, Nov 12
at 6 at the house All brothers
please be present Any questions
can Kathy at ;s; ?jit
The East Carolinian
V' wii- I I u"7'u i iHitmu'tt i
��' i 92s
Published every Tuesday and
Thursday during the academn
year and every Wednesday dur
mg the summer
The East Carolinian is the of
i newspaper of East
Carolina University, owned.
operated and published for and
by the students of East Carolina
University
Subscription Rate $20 yearly
The East Carolinian offices
are located in the Old South
Building on the campus, of ECU
Greenville, N C
POSTMASTER Send address
changes to The East Carolinian.
Old South Building. ECU Green
ville. NC 27834
Telephone 757 636. 6367, 6309
Application to mail at second
class postage rates is pending at
Greenville. North Carolina
Housing Financial Problems Solved
B MIKE HUGHES
Slid V. rurr
Although North
Carolina law forbids
the financing of college
dormitories with state
funds, at least two of
the state's universities
have proposed alter-
native methods of bat-
tling housing problems.
Both the University
of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill and North
Carolina State Univer-
sity have 500-bed
residence halls in dif-
ferent stages of con-
struction.
At UNC, the Board
of Trustees recently ap-
proved an architectural
firm and a site for a
new dormitory on that
campus. The Trustees
approved the plan last
spring, and, according
to Vice Chancellor for
Student Affairs Donald
Boulton, the tentative
date of completion in
1985.
NC State's new
residence hall is already
under construction. It
is scheduled to be com-
pleted around the
beginning of the
academic vear
1983-1984.
State's dormitory,
which was originally
proposed to house only
athletes, will now house
all students, since the
Wolf pack Club, the
university's athletic
department fund-
raising organization,
was unable to finance
the residence hall.
The new building at
Slate will cost an
estimated $5.5 million,
according to George
W o r s1e y, vice
chancellor for business
and finance. The con-
tract for the new
residence hall at Chapel
Hill has not yet been
signed.
The construction of
the dormitory at UNC
will be financed by a
bond, the cost of which
will be funded by in-
creases in rent of bet-
ween $50 and $60 for
other residence hall
rooms.
The new building at
State will also be fund-
ed through revenue
bonds
Students Protest Restriction
AMHERST, Mass
(CPS) - The Tableaux
was from a decade ago:
a large student con-
tingent presents a list of
demands and com-
plaints to a university
administration, the ad-
ministration says no,
and the students storm
and occupy the ad-
ministration building.
But it all happened
again at the University
of Massachusetts-
Amherst in late Oc-
tober, though the issue
was more intimate. The
protest this time was
against a new ad-
ministration ban on co-
ed bathrooms in U.
Mass. dorms.
"Separate sex
bathrooms are required
by state law insists
administration
spokesman David
Lyon, "even in co-ed
dorms. We're simply
obeying the law
It's really a pro-
blem protests Steve
Semple, associate news
editor of U.Mass' stu-
dent newspaper.
"Some of our co-ed
dorms are 22-story
towers. If they enforce
the separate sex restric-
tion, some students will
have to walk from one
end of the dorm to the
other just to go to the
john, and a lot of the
hallways and stairs are
littered with trash and
broken bottles
The controversy ac-
tually goes much
deeper than mere plum-
bing priorities, protest
organizer Harvey
Ashman observed
before the October 20
building occupation.
"The restroom issue is
basically just a sym-
bolic one
"What we really
want is more general
student imput into the
university decision-
making process. All
we're asking for is
simply to have a say in
what's going on
DID YOU KNOW THERE
ARE ONLY THREE MORE
YEARS UNTIL 1984? DO YOU
CARE? HOW MANY SHOPP
ING DAYS ARE THERE UN
TIL CHRISTMAS? FIND THE
ANSWERS TO THESE ANO
OTHER THRILLING QUES
TIONS IN UPCOMING EDI
TIONS OF THE EAST
CAROLINIAN
Faculty Discuss
Grade A verages
Continued from Page I
suspended under
State's current policy,
under which students
are suspended if they
fail to pass at least 50
percent of their attemp-
ted semester hours.
Although State's Ac-
ting Chancellor Nash
Winstead has the
authority to make the
final decision on both
matters, he has asked
the faculty to decide on
the graduation require-
ment proposal this fall
and on the proposed
suspension policy in the
spring of 1982.
Winstead also said that
he encourages student
involvement on the
discussion of these
issues.
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And Over 700 Different New And
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sponsored by
Typed entries submitted to
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THE EASTAROl INIAN
NOVtMBI R 10, 1981
International Students Dinner Scheduled By ISO
MATHEN
&
SAFARI
Ni.fr Writer
East Carolina's In-
ternational Students
Organization has an-
nounced its Interna-
tional Students Dinner
scheduled for Friday
Nov. 13 at 6:30 p.m. in
the Mendenhall multi-
purpose room. Two
hundred people are ex-
pected to enjoy the in-
ternational meals,
dances and other
various entertainments
that will be offered.
1 ast year, the event
was attended by ap-
Writing
For Rebel
Awarding
A prose contest is be-
ing sponsored by The
Rebel, the ECU
literary-art magazine,
Jeffrey's Beer and
Wine Co. and The At-
tic. Fiction and non-
fiction works will be ac-
cepted.
Entries must be
tvped and may be left
in the Media Board or
The Rebel offices. The
deadline for the contest
is Nov. 30.
The cash prizes �
$125, $75, and $25 �
are for first, second,
and third prizes respec-
tively. Two honorary
mentions will also be
chosen, with the win-
ners receiving $10 each.
The cash prizes will
be awarded before
Christmas break. All
submissions will be for-
warded to The Rebel
for consideration to be
published. According
to one Rebel staff
member, this is an ex-
cellent chance to be
published and earn ex-
tra cash.
proximately 160 people
representing a cross
section of the universi-
ty's population.
"We were pleased
about it. Our guests
told us that they too
were pleased. They
gave us a positive feed-
back says Mahmuad
Muzaffari, the vice-
president for the ISO.
John Eldem, the
organizations presi-
dent, was not available
for comment.
Three weeks ago, of-
ficials were hurriedly
elected. Those elections
made John Eldem,
Photo By GARY PATTERSON
mnhcr Great Game it Ficklen Stadium
U says the U.
2
IIDIYC
�V
Gordon t.n
MwrvE
GOT A DATE
NOV. 19th:
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to give up cigarettes
for a day Give it a
try You might find
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THE GREAT AMERICAN
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it s-ys 'the VA&uaiamiks up ;
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(U� TO t0)rOftS�VlCt-j
a;s?n. mosr vfr�AMS. '
MtSSASi'W"11 surviving
jj�yKvsS�0uS�5 Of j
iAvmiuNS
mH X-CtmechmtmI
VA
Sik3
Contact nearest v ottce
Check your phone book) or
i iocil veterans group
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(Turkey), Mahmoud
Seyed-Muzaffari
(Iran), and Jamal
Ghraizi (Lebanon), the
president, vice presi-
dent and secretary
respectively. Tom Freij
(Lebanon) was elected
treasurer.
At the same meeting,
plans were proposed
and approved and an
admission fee was
declared. Sub-
committees have been
extablished to handle
the preparation details.
"We want the at-
mosphere and the
quality of the food to
be superior to that of a
regular foreign food
restaurant says
Muzaffari.
The students living at
the international house
have taken the event as
a family project �
posters have been
designed and posted at
various public places,
and the menu has been
out-lined to represent
far away lands � Zim-
babwe, China,
Guyana, Iran,
Lebanon, Turkey,
Japan, England, the
United States and
possibly others.
"This dinner must
not be confused with
the Wednesday, (Nov.)
1 llh International Din-
ner which will be spon-
sored by the minority
arts committee. That
will be an entirely dif-
ferent thing says
Seyed Muzaffari.
The Minority Arts
Committee has a
scheduled international
dinner this Wednesday,
a day before the inter-
national students din-
ner. Volunteer students
will prepare dishes of
various nationalities.
Sixty people are ex-
pected to attend.
Seyed-Muzaf fari
says of the apparent
conflict, "We hope this
is not intentional. In
fact, the only thing that
disturbs us is the use of
the word
'international We
think it will not be fair
to the students
He explained that
people may be deceived
by the price difference
without realizing what
goes into the food to
make it authentic. The
Minority Arts Commit-
tee dinner will cost
$1.50; the International
Students Dinner will
cost $3.50.
"We want the food
to be as good as it
would be at home. We
must use the right
spices and the right
food-stuff. I plan to
remember how it used
to be on the dinner
table at home said
one cook, with a faint
dreamy smile.
A Bamboo dance,
Lebanese dance and a
Turkish dance will be
performed after dinner.
ATTIC
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t





@ttr �a0t (Eoralfnfati
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Paul Collins, m�cm
Jimmy DuPREE. itmtmearn
Chuck Foster. ��. mim Charles Chandler, w E6,��
Chris Lichok. ��,��� m��� Tom Hall, ���,�,
Alison Bartel, n�nt�ii w0.�rr Steve Bachner. ���,�, mm
Steve Moore, ctnw ���" Karen Wendt, so mm
November 10, 1981
Opinion
Page 4
Homecoming
Promotion Causes Concert's Failure
Homecoming week was fast ap-
proaching, and the Student Union
Major Attractions Committee had
not booked a concert for Saturday
night. As a result, there was con-
siderable pressure on the committee
to book a concert � any concert.
As any East Carolina student
should know by now though, book-
ing concerts is a tricky business that
requires time, skill and more than a
little luck.
Consequently the situation seem-
ed impossible for the folks from
Major Attractions. But then, like
pennies from heaven, our heroes
happened onto a concert that seem-
ed too good to be true.
James Rouse of T P and B Pro-
ductions offered the committee the
chance to stage a no-lose concert.
His company would book and pay
for the acts � Slave, SOS and Brief
Encounter � while ECU would
provide the facility � Minges Col-
iseum. In return, Rouse would give
Major Attractions a percentage of
the gross.
But then ECU's heaven-sent
homecoming concert turned into a
nightmare. SOS never showed, and
headline act Slave did not make an
appearance until midnight.
Understandably, more than a few of
the 2,000 fans who attended were
less than satisfied. "I felt like
throwing tomatoes said a
DOONESBURY
disgruntled Da Vinci Metcalf. "I
gave up and left in disgust at
10:30
Rouse did post signs saying that
SOS would not appear and gave
about $460 worth of refunds to
ticketholders who did not want to
go into the concert. For those who
did attend, he offered a 50 percent
discount on tickets to the next con-
cert he promotes.
But what about the fans who did
attend, were disappointed but did
not receive any refund?
Legally, Rouse was no' required to
give any refunds since the headline
act performed.
Ethically, however, we would
argue that Rouse should have given
refunds to any displeased patrons.
He did not produce what he promis-
ed; it's that simple.
We would also hope that the
members of the Major Attractions
Committee have learned a valuable
lesson. Rouse is an unproven pro-
motor without an established
reputation, and the result of the
concert proved out that giving him
free rein to promote it was a
mistake.
The committee had nothing to
lose financially, but sometimes the
loss of a reputation can be more
costly than losing any amount of
money.
by Garry Trudeau
ANt HERE'S 0Uk WBATHErXMh VifTH TODAY'S
TBRROMSM FORECAST "
I
Warehouse Sale At The Pentagon
ByARTBlCHWALD
King Naban of New Gurdy stepped out
of the helicopter on the White House lawn
and shook hands with the President of the
United States. Four cannons fired off a
21-gun salute.
"Thank you, Mr. President, for that
wonderful salute. What kind of cannons
are they?"
The President looked to his military
aide. "A hundred and five millimeters,
sir the aide whispered.
"Would you like one?" the President
asked the King.
"I'd rather have 200 ground-to-ground
missile launchers � if it's all the same to
you the King said.
"I'll talk to Cap Weinberger about it.
Will you join me while we play your na-
tional anthem?"
"Just a minute. 1 want to write down the
namt of the U.S. Marine helicopter I just
flew in on. We could use some of those
"We don't have too many in stock now,
your highness
"We'll take what you've got, and you
can send us the rest later
"Couldn't we wait until the welcoming
ceremonies are completed?"
"Of course. Forgive me
"Nancy and I are honored you would
take time out of your busy schedule to visit
us
"It's my pleasure. I was only saying to
the Queen last week how much I was look-
ing forward to coming to Washington and
meeting the man who singlehandedly won
the AW ACS battle for Saudi Arabia
"It was really nothing, your highness.
The Saudis are our friends, and if anyone
deserved AWACs, they did
"How much do they cost?"
"They're not for sale, your highness.
We just made a special exception in the
case of the Saudis, because they've kept
the price of oil down in OPEC
"Then how come they raised it two
dollars a barrel, and cut back production
the day after you persuaded the Senate to
give them the AWACS?"
"I'm sorry. I have to come to attention.
They're playing the 'Star-Spangled Ban-
ner "
"That's no excuse. We're your friends
too. But if we don't get AWACS, my peo-
ple will think we're being treated as a third-
rate power
"The AWACS is overrated, your
highness
"Then how come you made such a big
deal of it in Congress?"
"It was a question of pride with the
Saudis. Had we refused to sell them, they
would have lost face in the Arab world
"And you don't believe it's a question
of face with my government if you refuse
to sell them to me?"
"Your highness, if we sell AWACS to
every country, the Saudis will decide
they're not worth much, and then we'll
have to give them something else that
nobody in the Middle East has
"You always liked the King of Saudi
Arabia more than you liked me
"That isn't true, your highness. Didn't
we give you 50 F-4 fighter planes on your
last visit?"
"Every Banana Republic in South
America has F-4 fighter planes
"Why don't we talk about it at the State
Dinner we're giving for you tonight
"I'd rather eat in my room if you're not
going to give me AWACS.
"But Nancy has invited 110 people and
she had to borrow china from the Hilton
Hotel. Look, I wasn't supposed lo men-
tion it until tomorrow when we met with
Al Haig, but how would you like a Stealth
bomber for vour Air Force?"
"Can it do more things than an
AWACS?"
"It makes an AWACS look like a
Mediterranean Fruit Fly
"If it's so good how come you didn't
give it to the Saudis?"
"Because they didn't ask for it
Columnists Open To Criticism
By CHARLES M. SUNE
When a man assumes a public
trust, he should consider
himself as public property.
� Thomas Jefferson
Indeed, the decision to enter public life
� even on the student level, means one
subjects himself to public criticism. Life is
hell, and the world is a horrible place to
live. My fan club letters in recent issues of
The East Carolinian, though I am sure
unintentionally, indicate that confusion
exists about my purpose as a columnist.
Additionally, several writers make futile
attempts to discredit me and thereby dilute
the validity of my arguments. It appears,
classmates, that some clarifications are in
-Campus Forum
Student Short-Changed By 'Strip Show9
The homecoming 1981 concert was
such a disgrace to the East Carolina Stu-
dent Union Major Attractions Commit-
tee that I thought the public should be
made aware of the poor quality and
shoddy nature of the performance.
Overall, I thought that the concert
suffered from a lack of forethought and
planning. 1 expected a little more than 1
got for my $7. The fact that the ticket
office refused me a refund even after
they had knowledge that SOS, one of the
groups scheduled to appear, did not
come, was intolerable. The two groups
that did appear, however, were not
worth the time that I took to see them.
The male modeling troupe's (CD. and
Company) performance on stage
amounted to nothing more than a strip
show.
A group of males and females strut-
ting around on stage modeling cheap
clothes and underwear reflects poorly
upon the caliber of the East Carolina
Major Attraction Committee's planning
and the quality of the concerts at this
university. The group Slave finally ap-
peared at 12 midnight, four hours after
the concert was scheduled to begin. A
performance such as the one that I per-
sonally witnessed on the night of Nov. 7,
was a slap in the face and a disgrace to
the East Carolina student body. I would
like to pose a Final question to the East
Carolina Major Attractions Committee:
why docs East Carolina have to settle for
such a low caliber of concert? Why can't
the student body's money be spent for
better attractions such as the Doobie
Brothers, Chicago or Earth, Wind, and
Fire? I invite a response to this letter
from the East Carolina University Ma-
jor Attractions Committee.
DA VINCI METCALF
Graduate Student
Hunger Coalition
I very much appreciate Kim Albin's
thoughtful article concerning the work
of the ECU Hunger Coalition. As a par-
ticipant in some of the activities, I want
to explain what the effort meant to me.
Ms. Albin pointed out my very feel-
ings about the remoteness to most of us
of the issues of world hunger. The ex-
posure we get consists of Mom's com-
ment about starving children on the
other side of the world and countless
photographs we've seen of skinny kids
with lost faces. These are difficult, if not
impossible, for us to relate to.
We hoped that our fellow students
would take note when they saw their
peers standing in the street, making
fools of themselves in a skit for
something they believed in. Many did
take note. The negative comments were
few. By contrasting the lives of students
with those who were, only by chance,
born to less favorable circumstances we
tried to bring the issue of hunger home.
As a working student, struggling to
get through, I often complain of needs
and wants unmet. But I never have to
wonder if I will eat. Our needs are many
and varied but far from the basic needs
of survival many are faced with. And it
is naive to believe that the millions of
starving people could do better if they
just tried a little harder. We needn't feel
guilty for being lucky, nor should we be
smug about it. Let's share.
The Hunger Coalition has contributed
materially in the past to help alleviate
starvation, but in order to do more, peo-
ple must first be made aware of the pro-
blems. This has been the point of our
educational drive. When people begin to
view the whole world as our community,
then, as a group we will stop hunger.
ELIZABETH EDGERTON
Senior, Business
Bloomers And Corsets
In reference to the letter about the wet
tee-shirt contest in Tuesday's edition of
The East Carolinian, the girls on our floor
feel that the photograph was in good taste
and did display a form of beautiful art.
You say nudity is beautiful. Why does it
make it cheaper it it is in a wet tee-shirt?
We ask you, are we still in a time of
bloomers and corsets? We are sure you
have seen worse exposure on this campus
during the summer months! In closing we
would like to say that we admire our friend
for having the guts to show what she's got,
and if it's boobs, then more power to her!
EDITOR'S NOTE: The above letter was
signed by numerous residents of the
seventh floor of White dorm.
Depression
Are you depressed? Let me guess. You
are depressed because
� You don't have a date to homecoming
� You can't fit into your Levi's
� You flunked an accounting test
� There's a new zit on your forehead and
you feel like a "unicorn"
� All of the above
Well before you get suicidal � look
around you. Take note of all the
students in wheelchairs who have taken
that extra challenge. They have over-
come all of these "problems" and have
accepted what life has to offer. To all of
you students in wheelchairs � Thank
you!
JENNY BOGGS
Senior, Industrial Technology
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view.
order:
�Lesson one � the basics: 1 am an
editorial columnist, my columns appear on
the editorial page and because my name
appears above the column, it should be
understood that the opinions expressed
therein are my opinions.
Obviously, this does not give me a free
hand to libel at will. Like any journalist, I
verify facts. 1 make no claim that my opi-
nions are the gospel, simply, they arc my
opinions for anyone to accept or reject.
�Lesson two � the columnist as a public
figure: As a columnist, I am susceptible to
public criticism. Unlike some, I have no
fear of anyone who desires to access my
public record as a columnist, Major At-
tractions chairman, Student Union presi-
dent, Media Board chairman or student
legislator. Like anyone who dares to
become involved, my record is one of suc-
cess and failure, however, it i� important
to remember that my recci . column was
not a discussion of my failures but a
discussion of the failures of another public
figure � Marvin Braxton. My detractors
seem to be confused on this point. Their
letters deU more with a misrepresentation
of my public record than with the column I
wrote.
Considering that one letter writer, Joe
Fink, was a member of Braxton's spring
election staff no one should be surprised.
My column, throughout all of this, re-
mains unrefuted.
I have no fear of those who disagree
with my conclusions. In fact, I welcome
arguments from those who can rebut my
conclusions. The strength of my argument
will be found only after I find and remove
the weakness.
�Lesson three � my purpose: my involve-
ment in campus activities has been con-
siderable to say the least. I would be the
first to admit my extented stay at this
resort needs to come to a conclusion. Con-
trary to one line of thought, my involve-
ment better qualifies me as a political col-
umnist. As long as I have the ability to
reason, I will continue to express my opi-
nions. My purpose, therefore, will be to
"call them as 1 sec them" and hopefully to
leave this place better than I found it. You
see, even after all of my years of involve-
ment I still have not given up hope: I'm the
eternal optimist.
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THE FAST CAROLINIAN
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Entertainment
NOVEMBER 10. 1981
Page 5
Genius Fuller
Scheduled For
Next Tuesday
'Firs! Poet Of Technology'
Originated Geodesic Dome
Buckminister Fuller, noted ar-
chitect, scientist, artist and inen-
tor, will return to East Carolina
University Nov. 17 to speak in Hcn-
drix Theatre as part of the 1981-82
Student Center Lecture Series.
Fuller, who has been called "the
first poet of technology" and "the
I eonardo da Vinci of our times is
credited as originator of the
geodesic dome.
His other creations have ranged
from apartment houses made of in-
dustrial weight alloys to vertical
waterless toilets. He is also widely
known for his ideas on education,
art and energy.
Fuller's career at Harvard Univer-
sity ended when he skipped his
freshman mid-term exams. He later
joined the Nay and was sent to the
Naai Academy to study logistics,
ballistics and navigation.
It was then he realized that the
world was rapidly moving from
"the wire to the wireless, the track
to the trackless, the visible to the in-
visible, where more and more could
be done with less and less to quote
Fuller.
Before turning to the building in-
dustry where most of his innovative
ideas were developed, Fuller ex-
perienced several personal
tragedies�the death of a daughter,
a period as an alcoholic, a brush
with suicide and the death of his
wife.
His major breakthrough�the
geodesic dome�came during his
search for a shelter that was cheap,
transportable and versatile. He was
struggling to develop a new tool�a
geometry of energy, using spheres as
idealized models of energy fields.
Crowding the spheres as close
together as possible around a central
sphere, he realized that instead of
forming a bigger sphere, they made
a 14-faced polyhedron - the shape of
his now-familiar dome.
Tickets for Buckminister Fuller's
ECU lecture are available from the
Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall
Student Center, telephone 757-6611,
ext. 266. Public tickets are $5 each.
Southern 'Rocker' Charlie Daniels Comes To Minges November 20
The ECU Student Union Major Attractions Committee will present The $9 for the general public. Tickets ma be purchased at the Central Ticket
Charlie Daniels Band in concert on Friday. November 20 at 9 p.m. in Office located in Mendenhall Student Center and all area ticket outlets;
Minges Coliseum. Advance tickets are now on sale at $7 for students and Apple Records in Greenville and both Record Bar locations.
Duvall Steps Out Of Character, Into Stardom
By SUZANNE DALEY
The New ork T imc.
M: YORK. � In September, Robert Duvall drove
680 miles across Eastern Texas looking for someone
with iust the right accent to read his next script into a
rape recorder.
"I did it out of respect for the people of East Texas
he saw "And also, well" � he seems embarassed to
say it � "1 want to do the best 1 can
That kind of preparation for a role has been a
hallmark of Duvall's in the more than 30 movies and 60
plays he has performed in. But until recently � with the
noteworthy exception of his starring role on Broadway
as Teach in David Mamet's American Buffalo � he
usually had small parts or supporting roles.
He was the man who leved the smell of napalm in the
morning � Lt. Col. Kilgore in Apocalypse Now, the
ruthless corporate executive in Network and the self-
righteous doctor seduced by Hot Lips Houlihan in
MASH. He was Tom Hagen. the Mafia consiglieri, in
The Godfather and Dr. Watson in The Seven Percent
Solution.
But now, at 50, Duvall has emerged as a lead player.
I ast year he starred in The Great Santini. Though the
film didn't make much money, at least in part because
of a distribution deal that sold it to the airlines before it
had even opened in New York, Duvall's performance as
Lt. Col. Bull Meecham, an ace pilot who treats his fami-
ly like Marines, won him a third Oscar nomination �
his first for a leading role.
In his latest movie. True Confessions (opening next
week at Greenville's Plitt Theatre), he shares top billing
with Robert DeNiro. The film is a murder mystery set in
1947. Duvall plays Tom Spellacy, a Los Angeles detec-
Cinema
tive. DeNiro is his brother, Desmond, an ambitious
monsignor wheeling and dealing to build up the church
coffers. As Tom Spellacy relentlessly tracks the
murderer, he keeps turning up criminal evidence poin-
ting to his brother's shady business associates.
Duvall will also have leading roles in his next two
films. In The Pursuit of D.B. Cooper (scheduled to
open here on Nov. 13), he plays an insurance detective
on the trail of a hijacker (Treat Williams.) The film is a
fictional account of what happened to the man known
as D.B. Cooper, who jumped from a jetliner in 1971
with $200,000 ransom and was never caught. And in
Tender Mercies, the part he is now preparing for, he will
play a down-and-out country and western singer.
It's hard to find a bad review of Duvall's work. His
attention to detail, coupled with his ability to bring to
his roles what one critic has called "a past has won
him about as much critical acclaim as any actor could
hope for. But only now is Duvall approaching star
status.
Why? One reason is that he has never hesitated to
change his appearance. While other actors often refuse
to disguise themselves, Duvall is hardly recognizable
from one part to the next. He shaved his head when he
played in Wait Lntil Dark on Broadway. He wore an
eyepatch for The Eagle Has Ianded ancfa mustache for
The Seven Percent Solution.
It hasn't been easy for the public to match his name to
his face. Also, his roles have varied so much that he
hasn't really established a trademark. And, until recent-
ly, Duvall hasn't paid much attention to the business
side of being an actor. He has chosen parts because they
appealed to him with little concern about the commer-
cial potential of a film.
"1 used to pick a part because I liked it says Duvall,
sitting in the kitchen of the West Side co-op he bought
two months ago. "I guess that's the passive, lazy side.
Maybe I should have been more careful
Now, Duvall is taking a more aggressive tack. "I'm
looking for a good script, and at the director he says.
"Money too, not that it's that important but I .
want to have to work all the time
Toward that end, he hired his brother two years ago
to be his manager. "1 can trust him Duvall sayv
See DUVALL, Page 6
A merican European
Print Exhibit Planned
A special exhibition and sale of Original Graphic Art
will be presented on Tuesday, Nov. 17, 1981 at
Mendenhall Student Center from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Marson Graphics of Baltimore, Md. specializes in ex-
hibiting for sale a distinguished collection of original et-
chings, woodcuts, lithographs, and serigraphs. Featured
will be works by Chagall, Daumier, Fantin-Latour,
Maillol, Rouault, and Whistler. A fine selection of
works by noted contemporary artists such as Baskin,
Coughlin, O'Connor, Kaczmarek. and Eggers will also
be included in the collection.
The collection is affordably priced with prints beginn-
ing at 55. A representative will be present to answer
questions about the work, the artists, and the various
graphic techniques employed. The prints are shown in
open portfolios in an informal atmosphere and ihe
public is invited to browse through the collection.
He Plays It Tonight
Bogart & Grail Quest On Tap
'Casablanca' Leads Into Full Week Of Campus Film Fare
In the famous finai scene from the 1943 classic, Claude Rains (dark uniform) helps Paul Henreid, Bogart and
lngrid Bergman out of a jam. The film will be shown tonight at ft p.m. in the Hendrix Theatre. Tomorrow-
evening beginning at 7 p.m a "Quest for the Grail" double feature will be shown with Robert Bresson's
"Lancelot of the Lake" and send-up "Monty Python and the Holy Grail
The Student Union Films Committee has a
superlative lineup of films scheduled for this week
beginning with the classic 1943 Academy Award winner
for Best Picture, Casablanca. The film, postponed from
an earlier date, will be shown one time only tonight at 8
p.m. in Mendenhall Student Center's Hendrix Theatre.
Tomorrow evening, November 11, a "Quest for the
Grail" double feature includes the best in medieval
adaptation and paiody with Robert Bresson's masterful
Lancelot of the Take showing at 7 p.m. followed by the
cult classic Monty Python and the Holy Grail at 9 p.m.
Both films will be shown in the Hendrix Theatre.
As always, admission to the movies is by student ID
and activity cards or MSC membership.
Casablanca is one of the most memorable of all film
experiences, lt has over the years taken on the status of
a true Hollywood legend. All the elements of the pro-
duction, story, cast, photography, direction and music
are woven together to create a motion picture monu-
ment.
The plot concerns wartime refugees gathering in
Morocco to obtain scarce exit visas to Lisbon and cer-
tain freedom. The encounters between the diverse
characters, particularly Bogart and lngrid Bergman, are
interpreted with an extraordinary flair.
The final airport sequence is an event not to be
forgotten.
Nominated for eight Academy Awards, the film went
on to win three for Best Picture, Best Director and Best
Screenplay.
Lancelot of the Lake is Robert Bresson's dream pro-
ject, a film that he wanted to make for over twenty
years.
lt has the breadth of vision and distillation of style
that marks the comprehensive late masterpiece of a
great artist.
Set in the last days of the quest for the Holy Grail, it
describes the spiritual pall that falls over King Arthur's
knights as they are overtaken by the failure of their mis-
sion.
Bresson's masterly color photography depicts the
bright surfaces of pageantry surrounded by dark.
treacherous forests and the twilight tones of a dying age.
Horses, armor, and pennants take on an almost
mystical force.
The jousting tournament, reduced to its essentials by
dramatic editing, has been called "one of the most ex-
citing action sequences in the history of cinema
(Jonathan Rosenbaum, Film Comment). The film won
the 1974 International Critics Prize at the Cannes Film
Festival:
"A film to see again and again. � Penelope Gillian,
The Sew Yorker.
Call it what you will, Monty Python and the Holy
Grail sets the cinema back 900 years and "makes Ben
Hur look like an epic
Here's what the critics have to say about the Python
crew's most successful film:
"As funny as a movie can get. " � Richard Schickel.
Time.
"It's a dazzling blitzkrieg of some of the most ex-
cruciatingly funny visual gags. There is so much
sublimely outrageous visual humor you could watch the
movie silent. " � Joseph Gelmis, Sewsday.
"Recklessly funny and sometimes a matter of comic
genius, a triumph of errancv and muddle. " � Penelope
Gilliatt, The New Yorker.
This spoof of the King Arthur legend stars the entire
Monty Python ensemble: Graham Chapman, John
Cleese, Terry Gilliam, Eric Idle, Terry Jones, and
Michael Palin.

f
r





rm east -Koi im s
NOW MBl R 10, 1981
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Duvall Pursues Legendary D.B. Cooper In Latest Film Endeavor
Robert Duvall poses with co-stars kaihrn Han-old and I real Cooper opening Friday ai (,reenille Buccaneer Theatres.
Williams on Ihe set of his new film, "I'he Pursuit of D.B.
Duvall Sheds Some Old Make-Up
lb.
CUT � FRENCH STYLE
Stokely
Green Beans
Continued From P. 5
" nd besides, if I have
to give somebody 10
perceni. wh not give it
to rm brother?"
I ack Du all, a
rginia-based lawyer,
pushing for lead roles
� i his brother's
hi to approve the
irs of his movies,
a common demand of
mar stars but
something Duvall got
onl) for the first time
with fender Mercies.
"His career had
evolved to v tiere there
is no point in playing
secondary roles lack
Duvall savs. Now
we're looking at
scripts, at directors, at
the people producing
the film and at the cast,
too. We're looking at
the overall package
with a more careful
eye. We vant an artistic
success but we also
want it to have some
commercial potential
Duvall has not paid
much attention to
creating the image of a
star. He doesn't give
man) interviews. He
doesn't go to "in"
places. He doesn't like
tiding in limousines.
Even his new home,
though it has a 25-foot
living room ceiling,
carved paneling and
stained-glass windows,
is modest bv star stan-
dards. It isn't a pen-
thouse and it isn't on a
fashionable street.
There isn't even a door-
man.
Duvall is not elo-
quent. He often
answers questions with
a yes or a no. And he
seems to have a hard
time sitting still. But he
is polite and earnest in
a gruff sort ot way. He
often paces the floor,
abruptly throwing open
the door ol his
refrigerator, first offer-
ing a visitor something
to drink, then cheese
and later yogurt.
He says he doesn't
care that he hasn't
achieved the kind of
super-stardom a Robert
Redford or a Al Pacino
has. "I don't feel star-
dom has eluded me or
anything Duvall savs
with a shrug. "I've
been well-known for a
while and 1 get parts
Over the veais, thread between them, wasn't offered to him,
Duvall has played such If there is one, it is that Duvall dismisses nice-
an enormous range of usually his characters guy parts like the male
roles that it is difficult have a tough streak in
to find anv sort ol them Although it See DRF.AM, Page 7
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'He's A Dream To Work With'
Continued From P. 6
lead in Kramer vs.
Kramer.
"That's soap
opera he says. "1
guess most of my parts
have been complex,
contradictory. They
mostly have a hard side
to them, the more in-
teresting side
Yet in some cases the
parts turned out to pro-
duce an even tougher
image than Duvall
would have liked.
Several scenes that
would have made his
characters seem more
compassionate were
lost in the editing
rooms. In Apocalypse
Sow, for instance, Lt.
Col Kilgore was sup-
posed to rescue a Viet-
namese baby, but the
scene was cut. In The
Creal Santini, there
was supposed to be a
scene in which Bull
Meechum brings his
daughter flowers, but
that too, was cut.
Making sure that
Duvall doesn't become
typecast as a bad guy is
one of the things Jack
Duvall is looking out
for. "If you want to
know something, 1
think he's played
enough bad guys
Jack Duvall says. "If
that label gets attached,
you don't have as much
choice or movement in
parts. Tender Mercies
will be different there.
It's a kind of pastoral
role
When Duvall was ap-
proached to play Tom
Spellacy in True Con-
fessions, he wasn't anx-
ious to do it. But he
had worked with Ulu
Grosbard, the film's
director, before � in
the first Broadwax pro-
duction of American
Buffalo � and he ad-
mired him. "I took it
because of Ulu
Duvall says. "He lets
an actor alone. He can
handle someone im-
provising. You've got
to wing it in acting.
Things happen that
can't be present. I'm an
actor vho can im-
provise. A director who
can allow that to hap-
pen a little, that is
good
Grosbard says of
Duvall: "He's a dream
actor to work with. He
locks into the
character. He acts in-
tuitively and spon-
taneously
To prepare for this
role, Duvall "hung
out" with Los Angeles
detectives. He went to
the scene of a murder
and stoou over the
body taking the notes
that a policeman would
take. He watched a lie
detector test being ad-
ministered, and he even
went on a stakeout.
D ua 11 says he
doesn't like talking
about acting: "Maybe
on a date, you know, if
you feel a little ner-
vous, then you talk
about acting he says.
But asked about his
technique, he says he
spends a lot of time just
thinking about a part.
"You ruminate about
the part. But it's always
you, if it isn't bad ac-
ting, it's always you. I
think of what I would
be like if 1 was in the ar-
my or whatever. If this
had happened to me.
"A script is just
words on a page.
There's an expression
like 'a pound of
behavior is worth a ton
of ideas' or something
like that. An actor
takes those ideas and
lifts them off a page
and transforms them
into behavior. My life
is geared toward
behavior. I need to
make something hap-
pen at that moment. I
want to see people
thinking on film, think-
ing thoughts on film. A
balance between real
life and movie life
Duvall was born in
San Diego, the second
of three brothers. His
father was a career
Navy man, and as a
result his family moved
around a lot, finality
settling in Virginia.
Duvall decided to act
when he was attending
Principia College in Il-
linois. "My parents
really helped me
decide he says. "I
was floundering and
they thought it was a
good idea
After college, he
came to New York and
studied two years at the
Neighborhood
Playhouse. His first big
break came, he says,
when he landed the role
of Eddie Carbone in an
off-Broadway produc-
tion of Arthur Miller's
1 View From the
Bridge. He made his
movie debut in 1963 as
Boo Bradley in To Kill
a Mockingbird.
In 1964, he married
Barbara Benjamin, a
former Jackie Gleason
Away We Go girl, and
raised two step-
daughters. But the cou-
ple split up several
years ago, and the
divorce became final
recently. "Someone
asked me the other day
what the hardest part
o' this business was
he says. "It's getting
your personal life
together
In the next few weeks
Duvall will start work
on Tender Mercies, to
be directed by Bruce
Beresford (Breaker
Morant). Already
Duvall is sporting a
scruffy-looking beard
and his hair is long and
straggly.
"I reality can't grow
much of a beard he
says, pointing out the
bare patches. "But it's
better than sticking the
fake stuff on
ABORTIONS UP TO
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(Toll F ree Number
100 231 2568j between 9AM
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HEALTH
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�I7 West Morgan St
Raleigh. N C
HELP WHEN YOU NEEB IT M08T.
The Fleming Center has been here for women
of all ages since 1974, offering understanding
and help to anyone faced witr an unplanned
pregnancy day or night. Services include:
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Weekday & Saturday Abortion Appts.
Evening Birth Control Hours
CALL 781-5550 DAY OR NIGHT
The Fleming Center
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A





A
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
NOVEMBER 10. IV8I
Page 8
Pirates Rip ETSU To Even Record
66 Points Mark Highest Total
Since Coach 's Playing Days
By WILLIAM YELVERTON
vstMini Spocu Milor
There's no place quite like home,
as East Carolina coach Ed Emory
and his Pirates discovered after
thrashing the Buccaneers of East
Tennessee State, 66-23, before a
Homecoming crowd of 21,342.
The 66 points marked the highest
point total for an ECU team in 22
vears.
The Pirates scored 38 first-half
points to guarantee the victory, in-
cluding 17 in the first quarter and 21
more in the second before finishing
the contest with 14 each in the final
two periods.
The win evened the Pirate's
record at 5-5 this season, and with a
victory over William and Mary next
week in Greenville, the club will
have its first winning season under
Emory.
"East Tennesse is a much better
team than they showed today
Emory said following the game.
"This game just goes to show what
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specialty teams can do to you when
they breakdown.
"Our defense just got the ball in
good field position he continued.
"They (ETS) coughed it up a lot; we
got the ball in great field position,
and we scored
The coach went on to add that the
team seemed to become closer after
published reports said there was
much dissention on the squad. "If
adversity makes us score 66 points
he quipped, "maybe we need some
more next week
The kicking game proved to the
Buccaneers' downfall. After taking
the opening kickoff and driving to
their 42 before stalling, punter Phil
Wilso couldn't handle a bad snap
from center and was dropped for a
loss of 13 yards, giving the Pirates
excellent field position.
Running back Leon Lawson
blasted through the right side of the
Pirate line for a gain of 11 yards on
East Carolina's premiere play from
scrimmage, putting the ball on the
Buccaneer 10.
However, the drive stalled after
quarterback Carlton Nelson fumbl-
ed out of bounds, so placekicker
Chuck Bushbeck came on to kick a
23-yard field goal and give the
Pirates a 3-0 lead after four minutes
of play.
East Tennessee State reteived the
kickoff and drove to their 42 again,
only to have quarterback Walt
Bowlin's pass intercepted by Clint
Harris, who returned it 20 yards to
the Buccaneer 32.
Lawson then gained 20 yards on
an option right, putting the ball on
the 10 yard line. He then ran around
right end for an 11-yard score, giv-
ing the Pirates a 10-0 lead after
Bushbeck's extra point � only one
of a school record nine on the after-
noon.
Lawson's score marked the first
time in three weeks that the Pirates
have crossed the goal line.
After a Buccaneer drive stalled at
their 33. Wilson went back to punt
and again fumbled the snap from
center, giving the Pirates a first and
The Way It Was
Things did not exactly go well for the East Tennessee State
football team Saturday during a 66-23 loss to ECU. The Buc-
caneers suffered from numerous erros, like this fumble
which was recovered by Pirate defensive back Freddie Jones
(30). (Photo By Dave Williams)
10. However, on the next play,
Nelson fumbled and the Buccaneers
recovered.
Marvin Elliot highlighted an
agressive defensive stand by in-
tercepting a Bowlin pass, putting the
ball on the ETS 10. On the next
play, Nelson saw an opening in the
left corner of the endzone but
fumbled out of bounds.
After freshman fullback Scott
Lewis picked up one yard, Lawson
bolted in from one yard out for his
second touchdown of the afternoon.
Bushbeck s extra point put the
Pirates up, 17-0.
East Tennessee State bounced
back, however, after the Pirates
elected to punt on third and six �
hoping to take advantage of a
30-mile-per-hour wind � but runn-
ing back Jerry Butler caught the ball
on the run and rambled 55 yards for
a touchdown, cutting the score to
17-7.
East Carolina retaliated,
however, and upped their lead to
24-7 after punter Wilson fumbled
another snap from center, giving the
Pirates a first and 10 on the Buc-
caneer nine-yard line. Senior runn-
ing back Harld Blue then scored on
a quick pitch right on third and
goal.
The Pirates iced the contest after
stopping East Tennessee State on
four downs. After a punt, Villanova
transfer Milt Corsey gained three
yards on an option play, putting the
ball on the East Carolina 49.
Nelson then spotted fleet-footed
split end Ricky Nichols alone in the
secondarv for a 49-vard bomb for a
38-7 ECU lead.
Second, third and fourth-string
players continued the East Carolina
assault in the second half.
Highlights included a 46-yard run
for a touchdown by quarterback
Kevin Ingram, a Corsey two-yard
score and a Jimmy Walden 93-yard
kickoff return that pleased Emory.
"I was glad to see Jimmy get that
touchdown he remarked. "I've
said all along that we've got one of
the best kicing schemes in the eoun-
try
Fullback Marvin Cobb ended the
East Carolina scoring by bolting 37
yards for a touchdown late in the
fourth quarter.
"The people we counted on just
didn't come through said a puzzl-
ed Buccaneer coach Jack Carlisle.
"Our kicking game killed us. We
were banged up when we came into
the game, and we got more banged
up as the game went on
The Pirates, who finished the
game with 421 yard's in total of-
fense, host the Indians of William
and Mary next Saturday afternoon
in Ficklen Stadium.
Kickoff time is 1:30.
Emory,
Pirates
Savor A
Big Win
By WILLIAM YELVERTON
vvtolam Sports l.dilor
Homecoming, with its color
and pagentry, is always a special
event. But words can't describe
how special this year's
Homecoming was for coach Ed
Emory and his East Carolina
Pirates.
East Carolina, coming off
disappointing defeats to Miami
and West Virginia, had just
beaten East Tennessee State,
66-23. And Emory sat in his of-
fice, smiling because the 66
points were the most scored by a
Pirate team in 22 years.
The highest total? Well, the
year was 1959, and East Carolina
had beaten Newport News Ap-
prentice, 74-0.
One of the team's captains?
None other than Ed Emory.
"Jack Boone was coaching
then, and I think James Speight
scored the first five times he
touched the ball he noted.
Boone and Speight are now in the
ECU Hall of Fame.
The Pirates had cast aside
reports of dissention and
disrespect for their coach made
by former split end Larry
O'Roark and played football.
Big-time football.
The Pirate coach was obvious-
ly still bothered by those accusa-
tions. "I thought the adversity
made us closer he stresses.
"The seniors all felt like it was a
positive affect. Nine-for-nine felt
it helped the team stay together.
I'm sorry it happened
He then paused, looking down
at his hands. "I've been coaching
for 22 years he says, "and it is
the only negative activity in those
22 years. But people know what I
stand for.
"We want to forget it. People
who write football must realize
Smith Hopes Soccer Program
Soon Able To Create Revenue
ECU linebacker Mike Grant (49), shown here sacking
East Tennessee State quarterback Walt Bowlin, and his
Pirate teammates had things pretty .nuch their way in a
66-23 romp over ETSU this past Saturday. The im-
pressive Homecoming victory was dedicated to a
number of ECU supporters, including two players, who
are striken with cancer. (Photo By Gary Patterson)
that things like this will happen.
"If people only knew how
much respect he (O'Roark) was
given. 1 gave him as much respect
as 1 would my own son. You just
have to do the best you can when
you've got someone else's son. I
know � I've got four of them.
"We have 153 players on our
squad he continued, "so
something must be going good
The Pirate coach then looked
on the lighter side. "We have
almost been trouble-free here.
And if adversity makes us score
66 points he laughed, "we need
some more next week
Emory then turned his
thoughts to the Buccaneers of
East Tennessee State and admit-
ted he was unsure of how his
team would perform. "I was ner-
vous last night he said. "I
couldn't sleep. The kids played
hard, and their (ETS) kicking
game got us ahead.
"I admire coach Carlisle and
his kids. My heart goes out for
them. I have been on the other
end of the stick, too.
"We didn't play a devastating
football game he added. "It
just mushroomed
Emory was then asked whether
his team watched the ABC sports
special on kicker Chuck
Bushbeck and his fight against
Hodgkin's Disease, a form of
cancer. "No he said, "but I'll
tell you this. We have another kid
on our team who's fighting
cancer: Chris Durand. He has
bone cancer, but it's in remission.
He's here today. He's lost all his
hair, all his weight.
"Today's game was dedicated
to five people with cancer he
added, "all related to the ECU
football family: Kevin Harold, a
13-year-old whose father works
for ECU, Harold Battle, a
13-year-old whose father also
works for ECU, Chris (Durand),
Chuck (Bushbeck), Janet Over-
ton, a faithful Pirate fan and to
the father of Donald and Ronald
Reid of Farmville
He added that autographed
game balls will be given to each.
"They are such great fans he
says.
"If you ever see me down he
adds slowly, "just kick me in the
butt because their (the cancer pa-
tients) battle is a whole lot
tougher than our's
Yes, Saturday was a very
special Homecoming indeed.
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
Only days after his Pirates finish-
ed with a 7-9-1 season, breaking a
host of school records along the
way, ECU soccer coach Brad Smith
relaxed in his compact office in
Minges Coliseum last Thursday and
spoke candidly about the club's
future.
Smith, in his fifth year at the helm
of the school's soccer program,
spoke of big things for the future
and said that this season had been
another one of advancement for his
team.
"Every year I've been here we've
taken one giant step toward what we
need he said. "This year it was
playing in Ficklen Stadium. Heck,
10 years ago that was just a dream
The Pirates drew approximately
1,000 fans into Ficklen for a
nightime match with nationally-
ranked N.C. State. The club lost the
match but Smith says it may have
won in the long run.
"We definitely got our foot in the
door this year he said. "1 can see
where we are headed in the right
direction. But it's going to take a lot
more than me sitting in my office
talking about it
The ECU soccer budget is well
below that of arch-rivals 'ike Old
Dominion, N.C. State, Duke and
William & Mary. Smith says the
club must find ways in the future to
generate revenue.
"More or less that's wucre our
future is Smith said. "We've got
to be able to help fund ourselves. 1
think we showed that one night in
Ficklen that we can do it
Smith said he would like to set up
home matches on a regular basis at a
location where general admission
could be charged. Playing the mat-
ches at a reasonable time for the
paying customer also would be im-
portant.
"We're playing with the idea
now he explained. "I'm not say-
ing the site has to be Ficklen
Stadium. But we've got to find a
place where we can play at night
without interfering with people who
work during the day and kids that
A
"It's great to support a win-
ner. But it does take money to
be a winner. To be a winner
you've got to go first class all
the way. What we're doing
here at East Carolina is taking
what we've got and making
gradual moves toward first
class
� Brad Smith
go to school. Playing at three of
four (o'clock) in the afternoon just
does not do that
"What we'd really like Smith
continued, "would be a regular
Wednesday night thing. That way it
would be accessible to most of the
people that would be interested. If
we do it like that on a regular basis
not only will the crowd increase as
we go along, but the potential for a
crowd increase
Smith's feels his ideas for creating
revenue are the only way out for a
program that is not yet ready to
spend the dollars needed to make it
big. He added, though, that the
Pirates as they are now have the
capabilities to play with the big
names.
"I feel that we can already com-
pete with those people he said.
"We're not going to win every time,
probably not half the time. But we
can compete with them and pro-
bably pull off a few upsets. My only
hope is that we can stay close
enough to them so that when the
. people at East Carolina decide they
want a big-time kind of program,
it'll only take about two years to get
there
Smith said he realizes that money
is his number one obstacle. On the
other hand, he feels the program
can gradually make its way to where
it wants to be, even if the revenues
are not swift in surfacing.
"It's great to support a winner
he said. "But it does take money to
be a winner. To be a winner you've
got to go first class all the way.
What we're doing here at East
Carolina is taking what we've got
and making gradual moves toward
first class
Smith related his situation back to
one that the entire ECU athletic
department faces, the expectations
of fans to defeat more extravagant
and established programs. He also
spoke with admiration for the job
that former ECU football coach Pat
Dye did during the late 1970's, when
his gridders were able to upset
several Atlantic Coast Conference
teams and made it to a post-season
bowl game in 1978.
"We may have gotten spoiled
when Pat was here Smith said.
"But, let's face it, what Pat did here
is what each of the coaches here
wants and needs to do � beat the
school with more money. You have
to work your butts off to do it, but
when it's done it's a great feeling
Smith got to experience such a
feeling late this season when his club
downed Old Dominion, 3-2. The
Monarchs had been ranked number
five nationally during the pre-
season.
"That has to be one of the biggest
thrills ever for us he said. "But
that's just the beginning. We've got
to take that and work even harder
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IHF tASTC AROl INIAN
NOVFMBf k 10, 1981
Classifieds

4

FOR SALE
- rtEOs loae st p' tees
N and SC on tine wwood
iterbeds and accessories Com
� beds -Aith is yoat a�ianiv
as low as i7 D i'livery
Call David lor motf tn
� rsi mo
Kl sf A Ftii( i guitar with
case and a' at
�so 380S
FOR RENT
MMATE WANTED U shjif
I Sud'oom house one touth rint
� rth utilities three lour ths
m . mpus Call '�8 '690
QMS tO rent 3 blocks ttom
Female room m a ' I i
,i, it Aa'kinq dis t an c i to
' a n (flopping s' pei pef
I � � - paid Can i2 MS
. . i ABLE Method
tahiiq applied
.
Pi, aM
PERSONAL
,n on cam
oi oldei wanted to do general
housec teanmq Prefer students
�ho have families withm 100 miles
ot Greenville or who have well
established references in Green
vide aiea Call HI 404 late night
oi early moi ning
RIDE WANTED to New York Ci
Thanksqivmq Will share e�
penses Can drive Call now
7W �B4�
NOTARY PUBLIC Convenient
and ine�pensive Call Amy at
7V 1734
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST with
tilteen years experience wants
typinq to do at home Reasonable
a'i s Call 6 3660
HEAVY METAL - lead quitanst.
hot vocalist needed tor heavy
metal band Group experience and
seriousnes a must Call Larry
l 756 9951 Or Paul (746 341 1 )
PART TIME Make SSOO per 1000
mailinq our circulars Also share
m profits For information ap
plication send self addressed
damped envelope Global Wealth
Enterprise Bo� 230 Lawrence
Ks 6604
THE KID ives that s you Mr
Boyetti-i The weekend was great
I do plan to have many more
Don I even think I didn I know you
a . �. i because you definitely
a, i , Lowe Bles P S Mar in the
ho po
LEIGH A My AOPi Why a Siq Ep
Pledge? Forget him, I $till love
you Always, your ex
WELL. IT took some caOiin but
I finally chose B T
FREE YOUNG FEMALE
Guinea Pig Large wooden box
provided Call 7M-OW4 alter $�
AND THEN ZiOdy � "Tn
ioke's on me because I was meant
to be an Alpha Xil Guess who?
A M . C.B MR. � Well done
N J
WANTED! RESPONSIBLE, en
thusiastic person to manage a
smnall campus photography
business Must own Jsmm camera
and have 3 years experience
Make �S 10 per hour Requires
working some weekend nights
Have tun with your hobby' Send
resume to Campus Camera, Box
B33 Cairboro NC 2710
MRS DOUGIE MISS DEPRESS
E D I know that you girls want me
bad When I am ready I will say
double meat in your ear Then
we will see what I will lie on w B
or can you aflord it Remember �t
m.nu� 30 equals � Changed
numbers
PART TIME make S50C per 1000
mailing our circulars Also share
in profits For information'ap
plication, send sell laddressed
stamped envelope Global Wealth
Enterprises Box 230. Lawrence.
Ks 6045
WANTED FEMALE roommate
with excessive amounts ol body
hair, especially chest and
underarms Call William at
7 s 7 ���
ANGEL CONDOM HEAD next
year let's dress up as a dog I'M
lust ftt you go as you are Go cock
a leg I Jack O Lantern head
HOMECOMING IS lots ol dates,
very many lates Boats lor floats,
tots to smokes The boys are back
in town and we showed them The
Legend is still around Lots ol
folks to hug and squeeze and some
that will let you between their
knees The band was great and
rocked all night, oh my God here
comes the morning light Alumni
thanks, it was all lor you. The
Brothers and Plagues ol Phi Kap
pa Tau.
Third Floor Attic is Lots of folks
thats loves to take What s that
smell? Oh. what the hell Doctor
Doctoi help my head Here take
a snill ol this and thai girl to bed
Hey. theie is a wasp in my room
fly robin lly F M receives no
static when he smiles
McSmiles A duty balhioom and
Red Eye lounge My lord it looks
like a hospital halloway Look out
lor the wall Telephones constant
ly, he's not here, can I take a
message lots ol ferret's on the
pi owl my T V is qone but where
when and how?
Cyn Hope you enioyed dinner on
Friday niqht I was so nervous
you gave me a friqht The band
was great they rocked and we
rolled See you lor lunch like you
were told Siqned your waiter
RIDE wanted to NEW YORK lor
Thanksqivmq and or Christmas
Will share enpenses and drivinq
Call 758 6686 Ask loi Gieqq
STAFF WATUSI Man you 1UH
were into�icatmqiy diunk Satur
day niqhl Some of youi great con
vcrsalion has been firmly im
planted in my warped mind I will
continue to remember it and wr ite
a book called Staff Watusians
Hire is a preview lor youi friends
and mine Man is it hard to
see Boy. Sunkist soda qoes
good with Seaqiam 7 What s
takinq Paul so lonq in the DZ
house Maybe I should qo r. ,m�
him from those damsels ol
distress Man was she biq
You know wha cheese does to
you I wish the ground hadn t
hrt me in the leg Stay tuned next
time lot the second part of the
ser les
BIG AL Have you lost youi fancy
lor Durham boys Is Scott a true
blonde Bud s the drink and I
nevei was the qame We found out
you have done it all Who qot the
real peck from SP
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l Ar iqh'
nc r'Sji Call
FOR an occa
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i

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BUFFET
PIZZA, SALAD, SPAGHETTI, SOUP
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Pis'
Pl�D6�.

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5Z?M7
7i�S MOV. O ,
ADM. W. 7f
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presents
1st Annual All-Campus
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Divisions
im
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Dale
lues Nov. 10
rues V. 17
lues Nov. 24
rues Dec. 1
Chug
Sorority Girls Competition
Campus Guys Competition
Campus Girls Competition
Fraternity Guys Competition
Items ana Prices
Effective thru Sat
Nov 14 1981
rionvrlahl 1981
Kroger Sav on
Quantity Rights Reserved
None Soid To Dealers
k�A
Finals � Tuesday, December 8th
Sorority Girls vs. Campus Girls
Campus Guys vs. Fraternity Guys
Entry Fee is ONLY $5.00 per team!
No Limit on teams per organization!
FOUR MEMBERS PER TEAM
TROPHIES and CASH MONEY for each weekly winner!
Division Winners: $25.00 per team & individual
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Final Winner: $100.00 per team & plaque for each
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Fall means
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V7S4-
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16






d�j
10 THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 10, 1981
'o -f
&&JQOP
Winter Rush
ECU Defeats Madison
with
By
mm
M�fl V ntrr
s
"This meet showed a
lot of bright spots but
there is a lot of work to
be done
ECU swimming
coach Ray Scharf was,
as always, optimistic
following his team's
62-51 opening match
victory over james
Madison lat Friday.
"We swam well
said Scharf. "James
Madison was a much
more formidable oppo-
nent than I expected.
Three Pirates came
away double winners in
the victory. Doug
Nieman, Stan Williams
and Kevin Richards
each pulled a double in
the competition.
ECU goes back into
action on Friday,
traveling to Norfolk for
a tri-meet with Old
Dominion and
Maryland.
The ECU women's
swim team opens its
season on Friday
against Old Dominion.
The action gets under-
way at 3:30 p.m. at the
ODU natatorium.
"Sigma Nu
91
New Pirates Defeat Old, 74-56
The East Carolina
women's basketball
team overcame the aura
of past legends last Fri-
day night, defeating a
group of former I ady
Pirate stars by a 74-56
margin.
Junior forward Mary
Denkler led the way for
the Lady Bucs with 17
points in this, the first,
ECU Alumni Classic.
Senior Sam Jones
followed with 16.
The current ECU
squad overcame a 14-8
deficit to take a 45-30
halftime lead and the
eventual win over the
former Pirates.
The alumni team was
paced by April Ross' 11
points. The school's
all-time leading scorer,
Rosie Thompson,
followed with nine.
Broderick Award win-
ner Kathy Riley also
added nine points.
Three members of
the 1981-82 Lady
Pirates joined Denkler
and Jones in double
figures. Senior guard
Lillian Barnes poured
in ten points, as did a
pair of first-year
players, point guard
Loraine Foster and
center Darlene Chaney.
Clemson Tigers On D In Win
One touchdown by
third-ranked Clemson
in its defensive
showdown with ninth-
ranked North Carolina
was enough to maintain
the undefeated Tigers'
Atlantic Coast Con-
ference lead.
Maryland now looms
as Clemson's only
obstacle to a perfect
league record.
A ruthless defense
keved Clemson. now
9-6, to a 10-8 victory
Saturdav that spoiled
North Carolina's
homecoming before a
record crowd, scouts
from eight bowls and a
regional television au-
dience.
In other games
Saturdav involving
ACC teams, sixth-
ranked Penn State
downed North
Carolina State 22-15;
Duke thrashed Wake
Forest 31-10; Notre
Dame crushed Georgia
Tech 35-3; and
Maryland fell to Tulane
14-7. Virginia was idle.
This week Clemson
hosts Maryland, 3-5;
Duke. 5-4. hosts North
Carolina State, 4-5;
Georgia Tech, 1-8,
RIGGAH
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entertains Navy; North
Carolina, 7-2, travels to
Virginia, 1-7; and
Wake Forest, 3-7,
journeys to Richmond.
The Tigers plaved so
well defensively in
building a 7-5 halftime
lead coach Danny Ford
said he didn't expect
North Carolina to score
in the second half.
But the Tigers allow-
ed the Tar Heels a field
goal in each half on 22
and 26-yard kicks by
Brooks Barwick.
Clemson squelched
three fourth-quarter
North Carolina drives
to preserve the win.
Danny Barlow blocked
a punt by Clemson's
Dale Hatcher late in the
first half for a safety
and North Carolina's
other points.
Clemson's scoring
came on a 7-yard run
by Jeff McCall and a
39-yard field goal by
Donald lgwebuike.
Normally soft-
spoken North Carolina
coach Dick Crum
shrugged off questions
about his team's bowl
chances.
"To hell with those
guys (the scouts) said
Crum. "This business
of bowls, they are only
interested in you if you
win, anyway
"We're out to win
ball games (one at a
time)
Kiffin took the
blame for the
Wolfpack's fourth con
secutive loss.
Plaza Shell
410 Oreenvillt Blvd.
Phon�7S4-3023
Mrs.
Men-Sat. 7 16
m. It-it
A Complete Auto Repair Shop
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Full and Self Service Gas at Competitive
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Discounts On Repairs With I.D. ll
"The Active Fraternity"
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�Homecoming Float Winners
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Come Meet the Brothers Who
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Tuesday, Nov.10
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Title
The East Carolinian, November 10, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 10, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.161
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Permalink
https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/57439
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