The East Carolinian, October 13, 1981






�be
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 57 No. 15
Tuesday, October 13,1981
GrteaviNe. N.C.
10 Pages
Unity Stressed
SGA Holds First Meeting
By DIANE ANDERSON
vMsijni Nr��s r dtt�r
I he SGA held its first meeting o
the 1981-82 school year yesterday at
5:00 p.m.
After a moment o( silence, Mar-
vin Braxton. StiA vice president,
called the meeting to order. The
first ordei ol business was the
sweating into office of the newly
elected legislators.
As the executive officers and
faculty advisors and administrators
were introduced to the legislature,
the) spoke to the importance o re-
maining united.
I esier Nail, SGA president, said.
"1 encourage you to talk to each
other in here and out oi here. Know
what is going on in each others
minds and work together
Braxton also encouraged the
legislators to maintain a "theme of
unity for the next year
Gary Williams, a second year
veteran of the SGA, was elected bv
an overwhelming majority as the
speaker of the legislature for
1981-82. In his nomination speech,
he expressed a desire to restructure
the bylaws, "especially in the com-
mittee areas
There are still eight openings for
day student and dormitory represen-
taties. Tyler and Belk dorms need
two representatives, Fletcher and
l! instead need one, and there are
two openings for day student
representatives.
Interested students can file in the
SGA office between 8 a.m. and 5
p.m Monday through Friday,
before October 26. Appointments
will then be made through inter-
views bv the screenings and appoint-
ments committee.
Russell Overman presented a bill
which now requires all appropria-
tion requests to be into the commit-
tee by November 2.
The run-offs elections that were
announced last week because of
candidates who came within one
vote of each other will not be held
due to the bylaws which state that a
run-off can only be held in the case
of a tie vote.
The official winners, therefore, in
these elections are Becky Strine,
freshman class president, Cindy
Heines for junior class president,
and Tracy Gray and Barry Peele as
representatives for Aycock dorm.
There will, however, be a run-off
election for the representatives in
Jones dorm, due to the fact that one
of the candidates was left off of the
first ballot. The election will be held
on October 14 in Jones. The can-
didates are Danny White, Mitchell
Haber, and Keith Johnson.
Throughout the meeting, an inter-
preter sat in the front of the room
and clearly mouthed everything that SGA Vice President Lester Nail recognized in yesterday's first meeting of the ear the legislators who have
was said for the benefit of the hear- previously worked in the SGA. Nail, along with other administrators and executive council members, encouraged
ing impaired. the new legislature to work together and remain united.
rkoo Br GABY FATTfJBO
Chancellor Search Committee Selected
B TOM HALT
Se�� fdiior
The chairman oi the ECU Board of Trustees an-
nounced Monday the appointment of a 15-member
committee to choose the university's next chancellor.
shley B Futrell said the Chancellor Selection Com-
mittee's firs! meeting will be October 20 in the Willis
Building. A public hearing will be held at 9:30 a.m and
the committee will meet with UNC system president
William Friday that afternoon to begin the search for a
replacement for Thomas B. Brewer.
" t the public meeting, people can express anything
they think is wrong with ECU Futrell said. "I'd like
for them to say what kind of chancellor they'd like to
have
Futrell added that faculty and student input is en-
couraged. Anyone wishing to speak should contact Dr.
Joseph Boyette, the executive secretary of the commit-
tee, at the Willis Building. Futrell suggested that written
summaries be prepared o any statements made for the
permanent records of the committee.
The trustees chairman said the committee had receiv-
ed "a bunch" of nominations for an interim chancellor
until the position can be permanently filled, including
vice chancellor for academic affairs Dr. Robert Maier,
Dr. William Byrd of the physics department. Dr.
Douglas Jones of the School of Education, Dr. Charles
Rob of the medical school and Dr. James Bearden of
the School of Business. Dr. John Howell of the
academic affairs office and the political science depart-
ment is also a leading candidate, Futrell said.
When asked when he thought the interim chancellor
would be named, Futrell said he had asked Friday the
same question four times. The UNC president told
Futrell that an interim chancellor would be named as
soon as Brewer was placed elsewhere, but Friday did not
give him any information as to where the chancellor
would be placed.
Futrell added that he believes Brewer will begin his
leave of absence before the interim chancellor is
selected.
"I'm sure the new chancellor will stress academic ex-
cellence and be an athletic supporter Futrell said.
Responding to the rumor that former U.S. senator
and ECU alumnus Robert Morgan was the leading can-
didate for the chancellor's post, Futrell said, "He's
been nominated. Anyone can nominate anyone else
The search committee is now advertising through
academic journals for candidates to fill the post. As for
any requirements such as a doctoral degree being needed
to qualify for the chancellor's position, Futrell said he
didn't think the chancellor even had to be a college
graduate. The deadline for applications is December 15,
according to the chairman.
Futrell will act as chairman of the committee and
Boyette will serve in a non-voting position.
Faculty members on the committee are Dr. Robert
Brame, professor of the School of Medicine; Dr. Clin-
ton Downing, associate professor of the School of
Education; Dr. Robert Hursey, associate professor of
mathematics; Dr. Rosina Lao, chairwoman of the
Department ol Psychology, and Dr. Thomas Johnson,
chairman ol the Faculty Senate.
Trustees rhomas Bennett, Dr. John Bndgers, Ralph
Kmsev Jr John Minges II. and Troy Pate are also on
the committee.
Alumni members are Oerald Arnold, a judge in the
N.C. Court ol ppeals; Carolyn Fulghum, associate
dean and director ol residence life; and Phillip Dixon,
president ol the EC! Mumni Association.
E I students are represented on the committee by
SGA president I estei Nail.
The comm II meet once a week after October 20
and probably twice a week after December 15, Futrell
said after making the announcement.
Futrell. Bndgers, Minges, Pate and Fulghum served
on the 1977-1978 search committee that recommended
Brewer for the position vacated by Leo W. Jenkins.
Brewer's resignation is effective June 30, 1982.
Moral Majority Reaffirmed
Falwell Speaks In Raleigh
Reverend Jerry Falwell, Moral Majority leader
By MIKE HUGHES
SUN Wriltr
"Nowhere do we believe that we
can impose our philosophy on so-
meone else's lifestyle
At a recent press conference in
Raleigh, Moral Majority leader
Jerry Falwell reaffirmed several of
his organization's stands on today's
moral and political issues. Falwell
stated early in the conference that
the Moral Majority believes in
"decency, morality and the fami-
ly"
Falwel emphasized that the New
Right, a fast growing political
movement for which he is the
spokesman, does believe in the con-
stitutional separation of church and
state. He explained that he concen-
trates his message on encouraging
members of different religious
backgrounds to actively participate
in moral issues.
"Abortion today is the issue �
the civil rights issue of the 1980s �
and it is not going to go away he
said. "From here on out, if you are
going to run for dog catcher you
had better do right on that issue
Falwell said that some members
of the "old conservative move-
ment" have not endorsed the views
of the New Right. He cited Sen.
Barry Goldwater, R-Ariz as an ex-
ample. Goldwater is reluctant to
give up his position at the forefront
of the old conservative movement,
Falwell said.
However, Goldwater's criticisms
of the faction are not indicative of
the Reagan administration's at-
titude, according to Falwell. "We
do believe the president's commit-
ment is real he said. "We believe
a majority of the Senate and
perhaps a majorioty of the House is
there to work with us
Falwell cited some problems con-
sistently facing conservatives in the
past. "Conservatives have always
had the tendency of shooting their
own wounded he said. "We can't
agree on everything, so we won't do
anything together
However, Falwell says that this
practice has changed. "As a matter
of fact, it has changed so rapidly in
the last five years that it has
frightened everybody he said. The
reason why we have so many people
screaming bloody murder is that
we've put together a coalition � the
largest such coalition numerically
ever put together
According to Falwell, the attacks
and criticisms of the New Right by
leading government and non-
government liberals has worked to
the organization's advantage.
"Norman Lear and George
McGovern, more than any two per-
sons, have helped the Moral Majori-
ty become the force it is Falwell
said.
Falwell said he chose Lear, pro-
ducer of television shows such as
Maude and Mary Hartman, Mary
Hartman, because Lear's shows
caused the formation of a coalition
for better television. "Here is
America standing up, saying, 'Hey.
we don't want a cesspool in our liv-
ing rooms "Falwell said.
"George McGovern is
See FALWELL, Page 3
NAACP Convention
Held In Greenville
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Mill Wrilrr
"I've spent half my life fightin'
for things other people take for
granted. Tell them where we came
from
These were the words of Ben-
jamin Hooks, national president of
the NAACP, spoken during his
keynote address to the annual state
convention of the association in
Greenville last weekend.
"We're on our way to freedom
land and there ain't nobody gonna
turn us around Hooks told the au-
dience in a comment directed
toward Ronald Reagan, budget
director David Stockman and Sen.
Jesse Helms. "The NAACP was
here when Reagan was elected�
we'll be here when he's gone
Commenting further on past civil
rights victories for blacks, Hooks
said, "Remember how we got here
tonight. There were folks who walk-
ed in the streets, got bloody and
beat� that's how we got here
The standing-room-only audience
at the Ramada Inn cheered loudly
with each of Hooks' comments.
Hooks recently filled the executive
post after the death of Roy Wilkins.
Hooks said 31 percent of all
blacks live at or below the poverty
line and 51 percent of black youths
are unemployed.
"The budget cuts are real he
said. "Reagan has just lived in
another world. He's sincere, but
he's sincerely wrong Hooks added
that he did not consider Reagan a
rascist, but said "Reagan is anti-
poor. He wants to turn back the
clock, but we're gonna wind it for-
ward. We're gonna move
"The vote is our most powerful
See BLACK, Page 3
City Council Approves
Controlled Parking
Those Were The Days �"� �� CA"V ���"
Carol Martoccia, the owner of Pipe Dreams, chats with an
employee before the anti-parapernalia law took effect.
By DIANE ANDERSON
AmuUi Nrwi t.ditor
The Greenville City Council ap-
proved the establishment of a con-
trolled residential parking area near
the ECU campus Thursday night.
The area includes the north side
of Fourth Street from Summit to
Student Street and the east side of
Jarvis Street from Fourth to Third
Street.
The reason given for the
establishment of the controlled
parking area was that two-thirds of
the vehicles parked in the area
belonged to people not living there.
Residents in these neighborhoods
will be required to obtain parking
stickers which allow them to park
on the streets at any time of day.
Between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. on
weekdays, cars without stickers can
park in the restricted areas for only
two hours. Any unauthorized vehi-
cle parked for more than the two-
hour limit will be towed.
Signs will be put up designating
the controlled parking areas and
warnings will be given for the first
week of enforcement. The effected
areas are all single family, residen
tial neighborhoods.
Early in the meeting, SGA vice
president Marvin Braxton spoke as
a representative of the student
See PLAN, Page 3
On The Inside
Announcements2
Opinions4
Campus Forum4
Entertainment5
Sports8
t
r





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 13. 1981
Announcements
LAW SOCIETY
ECU Law Society will meet on
Thursday niflM, October 15 at i 30
in Room Hi. Menuertiall Guest
Speaker will be Linda Boon. Ofrec
tor o Placement, university of
Richmond Law School Please loin
us. Further information call Diane
Jones rS� �S�
SKI SNOWSHOE
Christmas and Spring Break
trips will be made to Snowshoe.
West Virginia for PMVE credit or
non credit There will be mn
organiiational meeting on Man
day, October 17 at 5 p.m in
Minges. room let. A slide presen
tat.on will be shown and informa
tion on ski packages will be
distributed Space is limited for
each trip Reservations will be ac
cepted at mis meeting For addi
tional information contact Mrs Jo
Saunders at W 4000. Memorial
Gym 705
VOLLEYBALL
THe PRC Society and Jeffery's
Beer and Wine will be sponsoring
a Co Rec volleyball Tournament
at Minges Coliseum on October 31
fromlJepm There is a ten dollar
entry fee First place, keg. second
place, pony keg Other prizes will
be awarded Sign up at the PRC
building iBehmd McDonalds and
across Irom Hardees on Cotanche
St 1 Deadline Oct W Teams must
consist of six persons with at least
two females per team
COMMUNITY ARTS
MANAGEMENT
There will be a meeting of all the
Community Arts Management
majors October 14 The meeting
will be held in Jenkins Auditorium
at :30 pm Mary Ann Penn
ington. Director of Greenville Art
Museum will be the speaker
GEOLOGY
The Geology Club would like to
invite all persons to attend Brown
Bag Seminar no J on October 16.
at 1 p m in Room 301. Graham
Building The topic will be
"Geochronology as a Tool for
Deciphering trie Geologic History
of me Appalachians presented
by Or Paul D Fullager, Prof of
Geology. UNC CH A short
meeting of the Geology Club will
follow the seminar to discuss up
coming events, including a Hallo
ween party Remember � bring
your lunch!
UNIVERSITY
COMMITTEES FOR
STUDENT MEMBERS
Applications are now being
taken for students wishing to serve
on university Committees for the
101 17 school year A number of
student positions art open on
University Admimstrtative Com
miftees and Faculty Senate Com
mi flees
These commmittees with stu
dent vacancies art
COMMITTEES
Administrative Committees
Alcohol'Orug Education Commit
tee
Committee for International Stu
dent Affairs
Committee for Residence Life
Committee on Status of Minorities
Committee on Student Health Ser
vices
Handicapped Student Services
Committee
Residence Status Appeals Com
mittee
Scholarship Weekend Committee
Traffic Appeals Committee
University Facilities Committee
HISTORY
All history maiors and minors
are invited to attend Phi Alpha
The'a's annual cookout Hotdogs
and other refreshments" will be
served1 Tickets can be purchased
for S7 00 from any Phi Alpha Theta
member or m the history dept of
fkre It will be he'd Oct 16 at 4 X
at tne picnic area next to
Memorial Gym
Any hisotry maior or minor who
has 17 h .n history, ag pa of 3 0
in history and a 7 y overall is m
vited to become a member of the
Lamoaa E'a chapter of Phi Alpha.
Theta international Honor Society
in H.story
SNEA
The Student National Education
Association meeting will be held
October Jl. Wednesday, at 4 00
p m. m Speight 701 All education
maiors are invited
NCSL
There wii be a meeting ot the
N C Student Legislature on Tues
day. October 13 at 7 p.m in
Menoenha" 717 All interested per
sons please attend
BILLIARDS
Register now for the ACU I
MEN'S DAY STUDENT
BILLIARDS TOURNAMENT to
be held Monday October 19 at 6
p.m. at Mendenhaii All ECU day
students who wish to participate
must register at the Billiaros
Center no later than Sunday. Oc
tober IS
This double elimination eight
ball tournament will determine
me top tour (4) day student con
tenders who will face the dorm
student winners m the ACU I All
Campus B'Hiards Tournament to
be held Monday November 2 and
Tuesday. November 3 The first
and second place finishers of the
All Campus Tournament will
represent ECU at the regional
tournament in Virginia in
February The ail expense paid
trip for me delegates will be spon
sored by Mendenhaii Student
Center
Registration torms and detailed
information is available at the
Billiards Center
Faculty
miftees
Senate Academic Com
WORSHIP
A Student Episcopal service of
Holy Communion will be
celebrated Tuesday evening. Oc
tober 13 m the chapel of St Paul s
Episcopal Church. 406 4th Street
lone block from Garrett Dormi
The service will be at 5 30 p m
witti the Episcopal Chaplain, the
Bev Bill Hadden. celebrating
Admissions Committee
Career Education Committee
Committee for Teaching EHec
tiveness
Course Drop Appeals Committee
Continuing Education Committee
Credits Committee
General College Committee
Student Scholarship. Fellowships
and Financial Aid
Teacher Education Committee
university Computer committee
University Libraries Committee
Applications may be picked up
at the following locations Office
of the Vice Chancellor tor Student
Life. 704 Whichard. Mendenhaii
Student Center information Desk
SGA Office. Mendenhaii Student
Center Office of intramural
Recreational Services. Memorial
Gym and Residence Han Drec
tors Offices
The university greatly ap
preciates the efforts of those
students who have served in the
past and hope that students will
continue their interest and par
ticipation Questions about
University committees and
membership may be directed to
the Office of the Vice Chancellor
tor Student Lite (757 6541)
SURF CLUB
A meeting will be held wednes
day October 14 and Aednesdav
October 71 at 7 00 8 OOP m . Room
771 Mendenhaii
All members are urged to at
tend New members welcomed1
CAMPUS
ORGANIZATION
REGISTRATION
The Office ot the Vice
Chancellor for Student Life is cur
rently registering campus
organizations for 1981 87 It you
are a member of a new or existing
organization, verify with the of
ficers that a registration lorm tor
your organization has been com
pleted and returned to this office
Forms are available at four loca
tions on campus Mendenhaii Stu
dent Center information Desk.
SGA Office, intramural
Recreational Services Office and
704 Whichard Building The final
deadline for receipt of these
registration forms is October 78.
1981 Organizations failing to
register will not be allowed to use
campus facilities The following is
a list of last year's organizations
that have not registered this year
Alpha Xi Delta. American Choral
Directors Association, American
Society ot Interior Designers Ar
chery Club of East Carolina Bap
fist Student Union Beta tcappa
Alphas. Buccaneer Campus
Christian Fellowship Clay Guild.
Delta Sigma Phi. Delta Zeta ECU
Adult Education Association ECU
Fencing Club, ECU Gay Com
munity, ECU Hillel. ECU Media
Board ECU Physical Fitness
Club. ECU Raquetbali Club. ECU
Snow Skiing Club. ECU Surf Club.
Gamma Sigma Sigma. Geoid. In
dependents for Anderson, intra
Fraternity Council, international
Students Association. Kappa
Sigma. Lambda Alpha Epsilon,
Lambda Chi Alpha. Medical
School Guild. North Carolina
Vocational Association. Omega
Psi Phi. Physical Education Ma
jors Club, Physical Therapy Club.
Pi Mu Epsilon. Pi Sigma Alpha
Rebel. Returning Older Students
in Education Rho Epsilon. Rock
Church Student Fellowship. Senior
Class Presdent Sigma Nu Sigma
Phi Epsilon, Sigma Pi Sigma
Sigma Sigma Sigma Sigma Tau
Gamma Sigma Xi Society lor
Collegiate journalists Society ot
United Liberal Students
Socialogy'Anthropology Club, Stu
dent Council for Exceptional
Children Student Dietetic
Association Student Legislature
of East Carolina Student
Volunteers tor Real Tau KaptM
Epsilon, University Folk � Coun
try Dance Club
COURSES FOR
NON MUSIC MAJORS
Music Appreciation (Must 77081
it the music class most often taken
by non music maiors However,
the following music classes also
are available tor General Educa
tion Fine Arts credit Muse 7718.
Orchestral Music Muse 7738. Con
temporary Music and Muse 7758.
History of Jazz Music
The following performance
groups accept non music maiors
by permission ot the instructor
Concert Band Symphonic Band.
University Chorale, Man's Glee
Club. Women s Glee Club and
Women's Chorus Limited spaces
will be available tor private
lessons m several applied music
areas
DEMOCRATS
There will be an organizational
meeting of the College Federation
of Young Democrats m Room 248
Mendenhaii at 7 p m Wednesday
mght All interested students
please attend A discussion of the
itinerary tor the February visit
from Vice President Mondale will
be discussed 11 there are any
questions please call Marvin
Braxton at 758 2 791
As of October 14 198' room
reservations for any organization
listed above desirng campus
facilities through the Central
Resevation Office will be held un
til verification ot registration has
Oeen received from the Office of
the Vice Chancellor tor Student
Lite
THE WAY
GOD wants you to have the best
lite now To get the best life now
you must understand God ano his
promises To understand God and
his promises you must understand
the Bible (Word and will of God)
is anybody out there not satisfied
with what the know and wants to
know more about how to live the
best life now it you desire to
know the truth come by and iOn
us on our enioyable quest Always
Monday and Thrusday night 7 30
p m MSC Room 242 and Thurs
day morning 11 30 am Room
212 dust past the music listening
room). Mendenhaii Stend Student
Center i Romans 8)
BACKGAMMON
T he ACU I All Campus
Backgammon Tournament will be
held Monday October 26 at 6 p m
in the MSC Multi Purpose Room
The double elimination competi
tion sponsored t Mendenhaii
Student Center, will determine the
two 12 representatives who will
compete at the ACU I Region v
Tournament n Virginia m
February The all expense paid
tnp tor the delegates will be spon
sored by Mendenhaii
All ECU students who wish to
participate must register at the
Billiards Center no later man Sun
day October 25
CORSSOCW
AH Corrections and Social Work
maiors and intended maior are m
vited to attend a "blast" with the
faculty Tickets to this wing ding
are $2 00 and are on sale at the cor
rections social work office on 3rd
floor Allied Health or from any
CORSO Member
PHI SIGMA PI
Tau Chapter ot Phi Sigma P Na
tional Honor Fraternity will meet
at 6 p m tomorrow to address m
vitations to the tall smoker Please
try to attend
PHOTOGRAPHY
Have you looked at a 35mm SLR
camera and thought how difficult
it must be to use with all the dials,
numbers switches and settings?
Many people are frightened away
from the camera because it does
look complex However, the
camera is designed for everyone
from beginner to professional
PHOTOGRAPHY a course now
offered at Mendenhaii Student
Center is an introduction for
beginners to the operation of a
35mm single lens reflex camera
and to some basic photographic
techniques Metering, depth of
field, shutter speeds aperture
control, filters electronic flash,
and types of film will be discussed
Participants will be required to
shoot film and have it processed
for reviewing during class time
Also participants must have a
35mm SLR or a twin lens reflex
camera to use during the course
The workshop will meet each
Tuesday evening tor six weeks
from 7pm until 10 p m begmn
ing October 27 Participants must
regster m person at the MSC
Crafts Center no later than Satur
day October 24
WOMEN'S BILLIARDS
Register now tor the ACU I All
Campus Women's Billiards Tour
namenl to be held Wednesday. Oc
tober 28 a� 6 p m at Menoenhall
The registration deadline is Mon
day October 26
This double elimination eight
ball tournament will determine
the one (1) winner who will repre
sent ECU m the women's billiards
event at the regional tournament
in Virginia in February The all
expense paid trip will be spon
sored by Mendenhaii Student
Center
Registration forms and detailed
information is available at the
Billiards Center
MODEL UNITED
NATIONS
There will be a meeting ot the
Model united Nations on Thurs
day October 15 at 4 00 m
Brewster C 105 All interested peo
pie are welcome to come
RUSSIAN ANYONE?
if you were closed out of Russian
1001 last semester or could not fit
it into your schedule, the course
will be ottered again Spring
semester. MWF at 9 00
Also offered wii be Russian
Literature of the 19th Century in
translation. (RUSS 7770) a course
which deals with Dostoevsky.
Tolstoy and other great Russian
wirters This course is taught m
English (MWF 1 00) and if may be
taken as an elective or to satisfy
the General College humanities
requirement
GTU
POETRY FORUM
ECU Poetry Forum meet this
Thursday. Oct 15, at 8 p m m
Mendenhaii 748 Open to anyone
wishing feedback on hisher
poetry Those planning to attend
are asked to bring 6 or 8 copies of
each poem Listeners also
welcome
CORSO
All Corrections and Social Work
maiors and intended maiors are
invited to attend the CORSO
meeting Thursday. October 15
(today) at 5 30 m room 271 of
Mendenhaii Student Center. We
are going to plan the big "bash"
with the faculty Please come!
GTU is the world wide
Geography Honor Society It pro
motes the advancement of
geography, and gives honor
students a chance to participate
and converse with others of me
same academic level its ac
tivities include field trips world
renowned travelers, domestic and
toreign dinners, interesting guest
speakers and much morel To
become a member, one must have
a 3 0 or above in at least I class ot
geography For more information
contact Chuck Ziehr at his office
(BA73S) or call Mitch Doub at
752 0673
Check it out! Why not come Dr
the next meeting of GTU on Thurs
day. Oct 15 at 4 p m Iff Brewster
C 703
COMPUTERS
The ECU chapter ol ACM
(Association for Computer
Machinery) will meet this Thurs
day at 3 30, October 15, m Room
771 Austin Anyone interested in
any aspect of computers is invited
to attend Dr Harper of Co
operative Education will speak on
the demand for Computer Science
maiors and minors to work thru
the co op program
CHEMICAL SOCIETY
On Monday. October 19
American Chemical Society Stu
dent Affiliate will have a business
meeting at 7 p m in Flanagan 702
If attending please bring a dsf
for a covered dish supper a.
members and interested person
are urged to attend F or further m
formation ran Dawn Williami
758 8948
BEGINNING PIANO
AVAILABLE
Beginning Piano Group classes
will be available 'o "on musii ma
,ors during the Spring Semester
Because of limited capacity 'or
these classes 't � , no' ofr- mat
these masses are eva lav - '
non music maior These (
classes win be taught Met
and Wednesdays at 12 ��and�OJ!
da,s and Wednesdays a' I V
Permission to enroll m one o�
these piano classes must re-
tained in advance If
RKhard Lucht Room 377 of �
A J Fletcher Music C I
SLAPMAJORS
pre regisira' on for ail '��
College students interested n n-a
lormg in SLAP will meet on Tues
day. October 13 at 7 p n-
Brewster D 113
ABORTION
� ; Jjp�
The Fleming Center has been hare for you since 1974
providing private, undeMtonding health care
to women of an aBS at a reasonable ooet
The Fleming Center we're here when you need ue.
OaP 781-S5S0 to Eakritf atnytiaM.
i
FLEMING CENTER
Civil Rights 'Intolerant'
The East Carolinian
S�v mi the i wnpus i 'tmmunn i
m-ctl92i
Published every Tuesday and
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The East Carolinian is the of
ficiai newspaper ot East
Carolina University, owned
operated, and published lor and
by the students of East Carolina
University
Subscription Rate: 570yearly
The East Carolinian offices
are located m the Old South
Building on the campus of ECU.
Greenville. N C
CHAPEL HILL
(L'Pl) � A chief
negotiator for the
University of North
Carolina in its recently
settled desegregation
dispute with the federal
government accused
civil rights leaders
Monday of intolerance
that has hampered at-
tainment of civil rights
goals.
UNC Vice President
Raymond H. Dawson,
speaking during the
commemoration of the
188th anniversary of
the founding of UNC,
said the civil rights
establishment gained
influence and power by
fighting injustice and
intolerance.
"How ironic, how
paradoxical, when we
reflect on that move-
ment, that some of its
present-day Ladership
has become intolerant
of dissent from its
prescriptions
Dawson said.
The settlement of the
desegregation dispute
has been opposed by
civil rights groups,
most notably the
NAACP Legal Defense
Fund. Dawson, while
praising the ac-
complishments of the
civil rights movement,
said dissent is now
unacceptable to some
civil rights leaders.
"Past ac-
complishments and
achievements do not
confer infallibility on
any of that leadership
or give it license for
vindictiveness toward
those who may hold
honest but different
views about how best to
carry forward the goals
of the civil rights move-
ment in higher educa-
tion he said. "Moral
prestige is not a wai-
rant for intolerance
toward dissenting views
and such a spirit is ut-
terly contrary to the
ideals of that move
ment
Dawson stressed he
was not critical of the
civil rights movement,
which he said
"embodies the hopes
and aspirations of
Americans tor equal
justice under law But
he said there is also a
"civil rights establish-
ment" that wields
tremendous influence
over the national media
and other opinion
leaders.
Dawson said he
believes the University
of North Carolina is
making progress in
desegregating its
system. He said univer-
sity officials want to do
better and are working
towards that coal.
POSTMASTER Send address
changes to The East Carolinian.
Old South Building. ECU Green
ville. NC 77834
Telephone 757 43�4. J7. J��
Application to mail at second
class postage rates is pending at
Greenville. North Carolina
InO,
F MONOGRAMS
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Oct13
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FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
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TYPING: TMESIS, manuscripts,
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LOST: ORANGEGREEN striped
beaded chokder necklace, along
E 10th St. Thursday morning
September 24. Contact Janice or
Renate at 757-MSl or come by
School ot Music office. Reward.
GREEN M and M's ar an ag old
secret to a helfhy sexual attitude.
Have tun skating. Victoria.
HELP NEEDED with term
papers. Good pay included. Cal
7S244M7.
Precision
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Stylist Ron Nichols
ECU Student Special
$7 For Layer Styles
$10 Ladies Fashions Styles
219 Cotanche - Suite 7
m
ROOMMATE WANTEO
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Near campus on E. Tenth St. Call
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hi paper. Prefes-
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T





rHE EAST CAROLINIAN ' lUHl-k 13, IY81
Nukes Protested By ECU Students
IF T Y
'IANO
T4
a
r
ily
I
.
it
se
&
B PATRICK
O'NEILL
surf V�rtirr
A large group of
Greenville residents in-
cluding 13 ECU
students and faculty
members joined the
North Carolina Peace
Network's igil Satur-
day at the gates of
Seymour Johnson Air
Force Base in
Goldsboro. The
group's central purpose
was to protest the
presence of nuclear
weapons at the base,
which is a Strategic Ail
Command base where
B-52 bombers are sta-
ll ond with nuclear
weapons on board.
l:dith Webber, an
ECU English teacher
who participated in the
vigil, felt it was a
positive experience. "1
wouldn't be there if I
didn't have hope-we've
got to do something
she said. "We're (The
United States)
senselessly building
these weapons without
thinking
ECU political science
student Tim Howard
stated. "The weapons
we're building now are
bringing us closer to the
threshold (of nuclear
war). 1 don't agree with
Reagan's defense
policies � 1 do believe
in national defense �
but he's going the
wrong way
The North Carolina
Peace Network is a
coalition of many
organizations
throughout North
Carolina. The group
has held vigil at
Goldsboro three
previous times and plan
to keep their focus
there.
"I'm not optimistic
at all, it doesn't make
any sense working for
peace by building
weapons that kill
said Vicki Marder, and
ECU nutrition major.
"Why can't we work
for peace in a peaceful
manner?"
The participants said
they felt good about
I heir efforts and noted
many positive gestures
from passing motorists.
"I'd like to see a lot
more students out
here Webber com-
mented. A small group
of counter-
demonstrators stating
their belief in peace
through strength felt
the N.C. Peace Net-
work was unrealistic.
"I'm for the nuclear
weapons here stated
John Durrett, a
Goldsboro resident
The two groups stood
next to each other and
conversed in a friend!)
manner. Passers-bv
were not even aware ol
the two separate groups
unless they read each
person's signs careful-
ly.
E CU students
Theresa Dulski and Sue
Lauver held a series of
signs stating, "No
nuclear weapons
USA USSR Save
Goldsboro On the
lighter side. Marders
sign read "More Cukes
� 1 ess Nukes
Goldsboro residents
Black Leaders Meet
Continued from Page I
weapon Hooks told
the audience " V e
don have to continue
the rest of our lives
with Senator John East
and Senator Jesse
Helms
Black leaders from
all over :he state at-
tended the convention
.in well as ECU faculty
and students,
Virginia Carlton,
president of the It I
chapter of the
NAACP, thanked the
students who worked
hard to make the State
Youth Convention.
aKo held in Greenville,
a success.
"We are in the learn-
ing stages ourselves and
now 1 have manv new
ideas from the youth
workshops Carlton
said Monday. "I'm
very optimistic She
united further student
participation in
NAACP activities.
"We are here for the
students to come to us.
W e want to help
Carlton also thanked
local NAACP president
I).I). Garreti and con-
vention chairperson
Willie Mae Carney for
their work at making
the convention a suc-
cess.
When questioned
about what role college
students should play.
Hooks said "we should
use our education and
build coalitions across
racial lines
"Don't give up hope
or faith he said. "As
sure as 1 stand, God is
still onthe throne. If
you do your best, there
is a reward
Plan Introduced
Continued from Page I
govern m en t. He
apologized to the coun-
cil for himself and S i
president L ester Nail
for the editorial that
appeared in the
September 22 issue of
The East Carolinian.
The editorial was in
reference to Greenville
merchants.
A : im prehensive
land development plan
was introduced by
planning director Bob-
bv E. Roberson. The
plan has taken dp
proximateh 14 months
to do he said.
Planner Skip
Browder explained the
plan's inclusion of ar-
rangements for pro-
gress and growth within
the K I campus. I he
plan includes student
living requirements,
utilities and public
transportation tor the
university.
Regarding t he
medical school com
plex, Browder stated
that the long-range
outlook was for it to be
"the regional medical
center.
Several Department
ol Geographv faculty
members were included
on the planning task
force.
Councilman I ouis I .
Clark said he was
"extremely proud to
have been a part of it.
It's not the answer, but
it's a good start
Regulations Enforced
B TOMHAI.I.
Sr�� fdiinr
All Of V O U
bicyclists�watch out!
The ECU campus
secuntv department is
keeping an eve on you.
"Because of the in-
creasing problems be-
ing caused by the
operation of bicycles
on university sidewalks
and walkways and the
dangers presented b
these bicycles to
pedestrian traffic, the
University Police
Department will place
greater emphasis on the
enforcement of bicycle
regulations on Univer-
sity property beginning
Monday, October 12
said a news release
issued last week by Joe
Calder, director of
secuntv.
Citations will be
issued for tiding
bicycles on sidewalks,
disregarding stop signs,
violating one-way street
regulations and tailing
to register bicycles with
the security depart-
ment, according to the
release.
S e v e r a I
"near-misses" between
pedest ria ns and
.bicycles on campus
sidewalks have been
reported, prticularly in
the area between the
A.J. Fletcher music
building and the
Brewster Building.
"Bicycles being
operated against the
How of traffic on the
one-wa) streets around
the Mall are creating a
haard to motor vehicle
traffic and pedestrian
traffic alike the
release continued.
The regulations app-
ly to bicycles, motoriz-
ed bicycles and motor-
cycles. The fine for an
unregistered bicycle is
$3. Those riding
bicycles on sidewalks or
riding the wrong way
on a one-way street will
be fined $5.
The requirement tor
registration of bicycles
is stated in Article II,
Section 8 of the ECU
Traffic Regulations
and restated in Article
XIII, Section 2. accor-
ding to the release. Ar-
ticle XIII, Section 5 of
the regulations states
that "bicycles will not
be operated on the
sidewalks of East
Carolina University.
Bicycles will not be
operated in excess of 15
mph, and will observe
and comply with all
stop signs, one wav
signs and all other traf-
fic regulations
ABORTIONS UP TO
12th WEEK Of
PREGNANCY
ABORT IONS FROM �-U
WEEKS
AT FURTHER EXPENSE
t'M.M Pregnancy Test, Blrtti
Control. and Problem
Pregnancy Counseling. For
further information call
�32 0535 (Toll Free Number
800 71) 25M) between 9 AW
ana 5PM Weekdays
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ORGANIZATION
�17 West Morgan St
Raleigh. N C
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FREE CONSULATION
Pitt Plaza Shopping Center
756-6200
found out this yeai how
close to disastei they
were when two nuclear
oombs tell from a II 52
bombet in 1962. Gover-
nor James Hunt asked
the Department of
Defense foi the com-
plete st.iiv and was told
that five ol six safety
devices had failed on
one of those bombs and
not all radioactive parts
had been recovered.
"I've leai ned to live
under the mushroom
cloud -aid Howard,
explaining why he
thought so few people
seem concerned about
the proliferaton of
n ucleai weapons.
"We're all into our
ow n heads we're ni
aware
"I his is lust one way
to ieach out to people,
but 1 think most people
are afraid � They
don't want to think
about the issues we
raise Marder com
merited.
c ommenting on the
Pentagon's idea ol a
limited nuclear wai
Howard said, "I don't
think there can be such
a thing "I've studied
this thing I know
their (nuclear bombs)
destructive power
that's a frightening
fact Marder final.)
stated her wish that
more students would
gel involved in the
poht leal process and
learn about the alter-
natives
I he group is plann
mil' to return to
Seymoui Johnson on
Decembei 19 and give
an open invitation lor
others to join them
Falwell Speaks
( on tinned from Page I
unemployed Falwell
continued. "So he
makes a nice $5,000
speech to attack the
Moral Majority. It w.
can help it, he will re-
main unemploved lor a
while.
falwell who also
heads the I homas
Road Baptist Church in
1 ynchburg, Va then
explained thai the
Moral Majority's
thrust is on people
coming together on
moral issues and active
ly participating a1- IS
citizens.
"Not ahristians,
not as lews, not as
Mi n m he em-
phasized. "As
citizens
Psssst .
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3Ure Saat dar0ltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Paul Collins, Eduorichj
Jimmy Dupree, m.�
Ric Browning, aww ofArtmt Charles Chandler, spom Editor
Chris Lichok. ���, m� Tom Hall, mm Edlor
Alison Bartel, �� w�w Steve Bachner, Emerta,nm,m Eduor
Steve Mcxre, a�h���. M��wrr Karen Wendt, s$ ��,
October 13, 1981
Opinion
Page 4
Charles Sune

I
Major Attractions Wizard
At the beginning of fall semester
in 1977 the Student Union Major
Attractions Committee was flat
broke. Through some miracle of in-
eptitude it had lost $60,000 the year
before.
Today the committee has a
budget in excess of $25,000 and has
sold out two of its last three con-
certs.
What happened?
Charles Sune, that's what.
Sune took over the chairmanship
of Major Attractions in 1977 and
turned it into one of the Student
Union's most successful commit-
tees. Now, in the wake of this, Sune
has resigned to concentrate on his
studies.
Among students currently at East
Carolina, Sune has done as much or
perhaps more than anyone for this
university, and we do not make this
statement idly.
In addition to serving as Major
Attractions chairman, he was presi-
dent of the Student Union for a
DOONESBURY
semester in 1979, he was a member
of the SGA legislature in 1977, he
was on the committee that presented
the recommendation which resulted
in the creation of the Media Board
and he was chairman of that board
for six months.
Still, Sune considers his work
with Major Attractions as his
foremost accomplishment.
When Sune took over as chair-
man, the committee had to go
$25,000 in debt in order to get back
on its feet. Under Sune's guidance,
that deficit has been turned into a
surplus.
During his tenure, the Student
Union purchased $12,000 worth of
staging and a $10,000 floor covering
for Minges Coliseum. Last year
featured back-to-back sold-out con-
certs (Jimmy Buffett and Cheap
Trick) that put the committee on its
firmest footing in years.
We need not say anything else;
Sune's record speaks for itself.
by Garry Trudeau
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South African Suppression Evident
By SAFARI MATHENGE
It is almost with a touch of emergency
that I have decided to raise a little out-cry
over the controversial South African
Rugby Team, which just completed a tour
of the United States.
On the surface, the issue does indeed
seem irrelevant, But with a little
humanitarian examination, the validity of
opposition is quite evident.
Last year, the United States boycotted
the Moscow Olympics in protest of the
Russian invasion of Afghanistan. Several
other countries, including many African
nations, joined the United States in the
boycott to demonstrate to the world that
peace loving people will not "play" with
Barbaric, inhuman, man-slaughtering
super powers. Little did the African na-
tions know, that this country was not truly
concerned with the Humanitarian aspect
of the issue - America must have been pro-
tecting its own self-interest.
How else can we look at it? Here is a
similar sporting issue: earlier this year
while campaigning for the Prime
Minister's Office, Botha (who won the all
whites election) was humiliated by Dr. An-
dries Treurnicht, the Arch-conservative
leader of Transyuaal Nationalist Party, on
the question of whether school boys of dif-
ferent races in South Africa would play
rugby (the same game in question here
now, during South Africa's craven week.
Dr. Treurnicht declared in public con-
tradictiong the Prime Minister, that it
would not happen. Both learned that if he
took this momentous issue to the party
caucus he would lose to Dr. Treurnicht,
and so backed down.
If Race and sports are so important in
traveling rights are limited. I have to ob-
tain permission whenever I want to go out-
side my hometown. This applies to all
black people, whether sportsmen or not.
But white men can move freely and may
choose to interact from city to city. Is this
the kind of policy that the American peo-
ple are supportive of?" "One may
South African politics, why should they be wonder Sipho continues, "Why I bring
unimportant elsewhere? In South Africa
today, even sporting teams that are in-
tegrated (like the Springboks � the con-
troversial rugby team touring the U.S.) are
restricted on the basis of color. To quote
Sipho Khanyile, a black South African stu-
dent here at East Carolina, "During the
past decade, blacks were not allowed to
mix in sports with the whites in South
Africa. Even soccer, which is the most
popular game in South Africa was
segregated. During these later years, the
white people have realized the athletic
superiority in blacks and so decided to
make sports multi-racial. But all this is
very ironical. Black sportsmen must use
separate bathrooms and facilities outside
the playing ground.
If the issue is sports and not politics,
then why must this be so? Color is race and
race is the fundamental issue here. I, as a
South African, have no rights in my own
country. At home, I have to carry a
reference (identification) book,
("dumb-pass") around my neck. My
in here the issue of 'dumb-pass law Black
athletes cannot play freely as they choose
in South Africa, unless they get the govern-
ments permission. This is only so because
of what they are �black
Is there any question then, why so many
humanitarian people have demonstrated
against American participation with South
African athletes? The issue here is sup-
pression. The only thing that will get
through to the racist South African
government is isolation. The world must
isolate them not only in politics, but also in
commerce and sports. There seems little
hope, with the Reagan administration
leaning so heavily towards the racist
government.
As I said before, Freedom for black peo-
ple is in our own hands. "The point that is
indisputable is that we who are oppressed
will be free. That is not in question says
Bishop Tutu of South Africa. It will only
take time and blood � and we are now
ready to die.
Americans 'Forced To Choose'
By DAVID ARMSTRONG
Several years ago, economists Milton
and Rose Friedman wrote a book entitled
Free to Choose that laid the foundations
for Reaganomics. Stripped to its core, Free
to Choose argued taht government is best
that governs corporations least, and that if riureiy bvhfs side"The" couple had just
we just encourage top executives to returned from a promotional tour to Chile
urious condominium atop San Francisco's
highest hill. Milton, who commutes to his
job at the Hoover Institute � the think-
tank inspired by the president who led us
into the last depression � was sitting in his
leather-upholstesred chair, looking fit.
Rose, in proper Republican fashion, sat
- Campus Forum
become as rich as they please, jobs will
trickle down to the rest of us, and America
will become bullish again. With the aid of
a massive publicity blitz, the book became
a bestseller.
This year, the Friedmans are back with a
follow-up to Free to Choose and just in
time for the fall season, too. In keeping
with 1981's no-nonsense political climate,
their latest is called Forced to Choose.
"The hot, new book you'll buy whether
you like it or not exults People, "from
the fiscal fun couple of the New Right
I met the Friedmans recently in their lux-
Harassment Coverage Praised
I would like to congratulate The East
Carolinian on its coverage of the issue of
sexual harassment. Your reports clearly
present most of the research, and I fully
endorse your editorial position that sex-
ual harassment is no joking matter. In-
deed, the degree to which young women
are being offended by faculty is supris-
ing. The students in our students in our
studies (Linda Kraus and myself) of sex-
ual harassment who reported being of-
fended by sexually offensive faculty are
good students who establish better than
average relationships with their peers
and with most faclty membres (most
report being offended by one professor).
Most of these students think of their ex-
periences as an unpleasant part of in-
teracting with some men rather than as
sexual harassment. The new policy clear-
ly states that female students have the
right to be treated as students and to ex-
pect all faculty to act as college pro-
fessors. Students, faculty and ad-
ministrators should be willing to work
together toward this worth goal.
One point in your report on the
Wilson and Kraus research needs to be
corrected. The level of physical assault
reported by female students is 0.9 per-
cent rather than nine percent. While the
proportion is smaller, the concern tha'
you expressed is still justified. As you
correctly reported, 0.9 percent of female
students at ECU is composed of 65
women. This is no joking matter.
While the proportions reported in our
studies are unacceptably high, no one
should conclude that ECU is unusually
bad. Most schools have not conducted
studies to determine the extent of sexual
harassment on campus, but every study
that has been publically reported has
found similar levels of sexual harass-
ment. Further, these levels should not be
interpreted as indicating that most facul-
ty members harass students. Indeed,
most victims report a single harasser;
about 95 percent of their teachers did
not offend them. People at ECU are
willing to consider and to work at solv-
ing the problem. The East Carolinian is
making a contribution to this process.
KEN WILSON
Asst. Prof, of Sociology
Letters Solicited
I am a prisoner on death row at the
Arizona State Prison, and I was wonder-
ing if you would do me a favor. I have
been here for quite a while and I don't
have any family or friends on the outside
to write to so what I was wondering is if
you could put a letter in your campus
newspaper for me for correspondence. I
know that you are not a pen pal club or
anything like that but I would really ap-
preciate it if you could help me.
JIM JEFFERS
Box B-38604
Florence, Ar. 85232
and England, where their ideas are much-
admired. They were polishing off a light
lunch with Werner Erhard when I arrived.
"I hear the tome is doing well I ven-
tured.
"Yes Milton said evenly. "Its
numbers one through 50 on the bestseller
list. Required reading for all Americans,
you know
"1 know 1 replied. "I got a phone call
ordering me to buy a copy, and hustle here
for the interview. Just what is Forced to
Choose all about, anyway?"
Milton puffed contemplatively on his
pipe. Rose straightened her stockings.
"Simply this he said. "That the time for
coddling the non-productive elements in
society is over. Some people didn't buy our
thesis in the first book he frowned.
"Well, in this one, we prove once and for
all that it's not enough to just let the cor-
porations make a few bucks; we have to let
them have it all
"How so?" I asked.
"Abolish government and let the cap-
tains of industry command Milton said
emphaticallyl. "We can get a man to head
Interior who's trained for the job by
fighting panty-waist environmental laws,
for example. He'll know how to make
nature safe for profits again. In time, we
can just do away with the department
altogether
"By the end fo the year, at the latest
Rose chimed in.
"All those damned trees Milton mut-
tered, "taking up room. What do they do?
Nothing. With a coat of paint and a little
toughening up, they can be converted to
smokestacks. And those groundhogs and
squirrels, they can be placed in productive
jobs. Those who are willing to work, that
is He arched his eyebrows meaningfully.
"That's preposterous I objected.
"Who ever heard of groundhogs digging
for Anaconda and squirrels carrying lunch
buckets for General Steel? And, besides,
who would just hand over the wilderness to
an anti-environmentalist? That's asking
the fox to guard the henhouse
"Ah, but it's the fox that lays the eggs
rejoined the cagey Nobel Prize winner.
"It is?" I said.
"Isn't it?" he replied. "Well, no matter.
Just listen to these ideas for getting
America moving again. How about ap-
pointing a New Jersey construction king
with suspected mob ties to lead the labor
department? And a doctor who's crusaded
against reproductive rights as Surgeon
General? And the Disney organization to
run the national parks � give 'em more
pizazz. It's all in here he smiled, tapping
the thick volume in his hand. "Both theory
and practice
Milton was warming to the task. I was
perspiring heavily. "More tea?" Rose ask-
ed, pouring a cup. It was piping hot.
"Enjoy she said.
Milton suddenly stood up, waving his
arms and pacing the room. His words were
hard to decipher, he was talking so fast �
something about letting the nursing home
industry run Social Security. Rose smiled
pleasantly and patted my hand. She gave
me an autographed copy of Forced to
Choose. "He wants you to have it she
whispered, nodding toward her husband,
who had strode out to the balcony, where
he began addressing a small knot of wdl-
dressed passerby.
Rose glanced at her appointment book.
A gentleman from The New York Times
stespped briskly into the room. "Scotty
Rose smiled. The Timesman gave her a
peck on the cheek, and joined Milton on
the balcony, where they slapped the high-
five. My interview was over.
I rode the elevator to the lobby, and ex-
ited to the bus stop, where I waited for
more than an hour. "No more public tran-
sit, you know the doorman in a nearby
condo reminded me. "Oh, yeah I started
walking. "And no more left turns he
called out, as I made to cross the street.
"They were ruled illegal this morning. On-
ly right turns now, if you please
1 started up the block, thumbing
through my copy of Forced to Choose,
taking only sharp right turns. It was a long
walk home.
nam
seen
eier
i
I
heat
I
i
I

y
1
l





I HI t S1 CAROl INIAN
Entertainment
OCTOBER 13. 1981
Page 5
V
ob-
g 3 out-
lo all
not.
j may
s this
n pco-
may
bring
Black
;hoose
overn-
?cause
many
Lstrated
South
! sup-
ill get
an
d must
also in
is little
ttration
It that is
pressed
says
only
now
I besides.
:mess to
asking
Hcggs
iner
matter.
getting
ut ap-
lon king
ne labor
trusaded
rgeon
ition to
m more
tapping
h theory
I was
lose ask-
ing hot.
Ivtng his
rds were
fast �
lg home
smiled
Jhe gave
rced to
ju she
msband,
where
of well-
it book
Ik Times
Jcotty
ft her a
lilton on
he high-
and ex-
iited for
iic tran
nearby
1 started
rns he
le street,
fing On-
vumbing
Choose,
a long
Frank Zappa:
He Reflects A
Crazed Society
B JOHN WEtl.ER
slid Wnlrt
"More people have heard my
name or have seen my face or have
seen me silting on a toilet than have
ever heard the music or have any
idea nhat I do. " � trank Zappa
The unfortunate accuracy oi the
above statement is the reason you
are reading this article As John
Swenson, in an article in High
Times, saw
"Frank Zappa is probably the
most misunderstood man in the
history of popular music. A brilliant
compose arranger, satirist and
critic, Zappa is nevertheless better
known as an eccentric crank who
writes funny and controversial
songs
nd why not, since the misan-
thropic musician releases albums
with titles such as Freak Out urn-
py Gravy, Burnt Weenie Sandwich
and H easels Ripped My flesh;
which include songs with such titles
as "Dog Breath "Who Are The
Brain Police? "Cleetus Awreetus
Awnghtus and "I'm the Slime
which concern such subject matter
as Montana dental floss ranches,
penguins in bondage, baby snakes
and a mountain named Billy (with a
tree named Ethel growing off of its
shoulder).
But behind the amus-
ingdisgusting titles and lyrics lay
something of substance. Most of
Zappa's songs are cleverly disguised
commentaries on modern society,
morals, lifestyles, and various
varities of "Cosmik Debris Even
the songs which appear to have no
meaning at all are making a com-
ment on the meaningless of our
existence.
Not only the words, but the style
of the music itself is making a state-
ment on the virtues of moving
ahead. While remaining on the edge
of commercialism, Zappa has
always been one of the most in-
novative and avant-garde of musical
experimentors; mixing rock and
roll, rhythm and blues, jazz,
classical, abstract inprovisation and
God knows what with his original
and often-unexplainable imagina-
tion, producing a totally unique
sound.
Strange as it sounds, Zappa ac-
tually has a real name and birthdate
� they are: Francis Vincent Zappa
See ZAPPA, Page 7
Popular jazz artist Maynard Ferguson received a standing ovation from a sell-out crowd last night in Hendrix Theatre.
'50s Creature He Once Walked Among Us
B JOHN WEYI.ER
Miff Wnlrr
( reature From the Black I agoon (1954)
Says Dennis Saleh in Science Fiction Gold: "When
you consider the sheer numbers of 50's sci-fi films, little
was truly memorable. But there was one figure who rose
up out of the din to a kind of permanent greatness, who
heath irp the decade's- ci-fi movie hall of fame as its
single best known visage.
Bad Sci Fi
"He was merchandized like a celebrity screen idol: on
posters, paperbacks, pencil erasers, figurines, lunch
boxes, belt buckles, bars of soap, and best of all, beach
towels. He was the entire ocean, all he seas' finny glory
come to join us out of the deeps: (the) C reature From
the Black I agoon
In some ways this 1954 monster movie was futuristic,
in other ways old-fashioned. It was created as part of
cinema's scientific counterattack against the then-
modern marvel, television: moviemakers hoped that the
3-D gimmick in particular and monster movies in
general (which were rare on TV in those days) would
lure audiences away from the already-hypnotic home
screen.
Though the "creature" carried on with all the com-
forts modern technology could provide, including the
latest in 3-D, under-water photography techniques, and
special effects, he still acted just like all the old creatures
of the 30's and 40's fright films.
Like Frankenstein, the Wolf Man, the Mummy and
many others long before him, the lagoon goon was
basically just a nice (if unusual) fellow, misunderstood
and hunted by the hard world around him, he had the
habit of kidnapping pretty young women for no ap-
parent reason, and got killed at the climax, only to
return whole and unharmed for the inevitable sequel.
The "creature" (or Gill-Man as he was also known)
was first found in fossil form. Scientists near the
Amazon find a preserved fishy claw. Hoping to find a
more complete fossil, they journey to the forbidden
Black Lagoon where they find more than they'd ex-
pected: a live specimen. This is, of course, when the pic-
ture's star steps (or swims) in.
After abducting the swim-suited heroine, the web-
footed throwback to the Devonian period is shot and
driven back into the water. The End. The multiple bullet
holes didn't stop him from returning only a year later,
to extract the Revenge of the Creature (1955).
In the first film, Florida stood in for South America.
For the second in the series, the producers didn't put up
with that pretense � they simply had the "creature" get
caught in his native habitat and shipped to Marineland
in Florida, where filming would be easier and cheaper.
Once installed as an exhibit in Marineland, the scaley
specimen is up to his old tricks, escaping, attacking, and
kidnapping young starlets. Says Donald C. Willis
(Horror and Science Fiction Films: A Checklist) regar-
ding this sequel: "The creature from the Devonian
should have faded into oblilvion instead of being given
another movie. Nerve-wracking music and childish
dialogue
A year later, The Creature Walks Among Is was
released. Not content with forcing the poor thing into
being a fish-show freak to be gawked at, the scientists
commit the ultimate indignity on the Gill-Man, an
operation which removes his gills and turns him into an
air-breathing sub-human who can't survive in the sea.
In A Pictorial History of Horror Movies, Denis Gif-
ford has pity for him: "The sinous swimmer, elegant in
his own element, turns into a shambling, clumsy hulk.
pathetic as he harks to the strange call of the oceans, ug-
ly in his sackcloth Frankenstein suit.
"For once, man is the monster, the monster his vic-
tim. Last seen the Gill-Man was heading out to sea,
preserving sufficient natural instinct to steer clear of
Abbott and Costello
'Stir Crazy' Cancelled
The Free Flick for this weekend. "Stir
Crazy starring Richard Pry or and Gene
Wilder, has been withdrawn due to a conflict
in booking beyond the control of the Student
Union Films Committee. Running in its place
is Richard Pryor's most recent film, "Bustin'
Loose co-starring Cicely Tyson. "Bustin'
Loose" will be shown on Thursday evening at
7 p.m and Friday and Saturday nights at 5.
7:15, and 9:30 p.m. The Films Committee
would like to apologize for the cancellation.
The committee hopes to reschedule "Stir
Crazv" for dates in the future.
It's No Mystery!
Lit Course Offering Holmes
The novels of Arthur Conan Doyle, among many others, will be covered in English 3430 this spring.
By CORNELL MEDLOCK
Staff Writer
Sherlock Holmes, Miss Marple and Poirot, Lord
Peter Wimsy, Nero Wolfe, Inspector Maigret, and Sam
Spade finally have their place in the ECU curriculum.
Beginning with spring semester 1982, the ECU
English Department will offer ENGL 3430, Mystery
Fiction, MWF 10:00-10:50 (3 s.h.). The new course will
fill General College Humanities requirements.
Curriculum
Mystery Fiction will concentrate on the history of
mystery writing from Poe and Conan Doyle to the pre-
sent, and it will cover the range of detective fiction from
the classic British novel of detection, such as those of
Agatha Christie and Dorothy L. Sayers, to the hard-
boiled American private eye stories of Dashiell Ham-
mett, Raymond Chandler, and Ross Macdonald. And it
will also include crime capers, police procedural, spy
stories, suspense novels, and gothics.
The new course � a companion to the English
Department's courses in science fiction, fantasy, and
westerns � appears at a time when the popularity of
mysteries is growing by leaps and bounds: paperback
publishers are reprinting classic mysteries of the 20's,
30's, and 40's; serious writers are trying their hands at
mysteries; two or three mysteries can always be found in
the best-seller lists; and on TV, PBS has run its Mystery
for two seasons and even network TV had Nero Wolfe,
in addition to its run-of-the-mill crime programs.
The course's instructor, Dr. McKay Sundwall, says
that the study of popular literature "can reveal to us im-
portant things about the concerns as well as the tastes of
past generations, for popular fiction reflects its au-
dience more clearly than serious or elite literature does.
"But, because popular fiction speaks so directly to
us, because it touches us and moves us, its study can
also tell us something even more important about
ourselves � especially the mystery story, for it is always
about what its readers fear and their reasons for fearing
it.
"The mystery is a realistic literary form, and there are
good mysteries which give readers an accurate and vivid
sense of life in an English country home or a Los
Angeles ghetto, 18th-century London or the Australian
outback, the Navaho reservation or a 7th-century
Chinese provincial magistrate's court. When a murder
occurs, whether it is an axe murder, death from an
Amazonian blow-dart dipped in curare, arsenic poison-
ing, tetanus infection, or a machinegun execution, he
society in which it occurs is ripped apart and threatened
with total collapse.
"It is the detecive's job to root out the deep evil, and
he can do it only by coming to understand the reason
behind the evil � the 'why' of ;t. And 'Why?' is both
the most difficult question to answer and the only one
worth asking. The answer to 'Why?' touches on the
stuff of dreams and nightmares
However, Sundwall � who began reading mysteries
at the age of seven (the Hardy Boys, Nancy Drew), went
on to Ellery Queen and Rex Stout, and still reads three
or four mysteries each week � intends for the course to
be more than just analylsis.
"Of course, I want the course to be good science he
says. "We will look at the evidence which mysteries of-
fer us in an objective way, keeping in mind broad social
functions and also moral and esthetic values. But I hope
that we � the students and I � can arrive at an
understanding of what makes mysteries so much fun to
read, and do it in such a way that, at the course's end,
we have even more fun reading mysteries, not less
f
i






THHEXST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 13. 1V8I
Zap.
Drop vour guard tor a
minute Even though you're
in college nght now, there
are many aspects of the Army
that you might find very
attractive.
Maybe even irresistible.
See for yourself.
MED SCHOOL. ONUS
You read it right
The Army's Health Professions Scholarship
Program provides necessary- tuition, books, lab
fees, even microscope rental during medical
school
Plus a monthly stipend that works out to
about $6,000 a year.
After you're accepted into medical
school, you can be accepted into our program
Then you're commissioned and you go
through school as a Second Lieutenant in the
Army Reserve.
The hitch7 Very simple. After you graduate,
vou give the Army a year as a doctor for every
year the Army gave you as a med student, with
a minimum obligation of three years service
INTERNSHIP
& CASH BONUSES
Besides scholarships to medical school, the
Army also offers AMA-approved first-year
post-graduate and residency training programs
Such training adds no further obligation to
the scholarship participant But any Civilian
Graduate Medical Education sponsored by the
Army gives vou a one-year obligation for
every year of sponsorship, with a minimum
obligation ot two years service
But vou get a $9,000 annual bonus even,
year you re paving back medical school or post-
graduate training.
So vou not only get vour medical education
paid for. you get extra pay while you're paying
it back Not a bad deal
A GREAT PLACE TO BE A NURSE
The rich tradition oi Army Nursing is one
of excellence, dedication, even heroism And
it's a challenge to live up to
Today, an Army Nurse is the epitome of
professionalism, regarded as a critical member
of the Army Medical Team
A BSN degree is required And the clinical
spectrum is almost impossible to match in
civilian practice.
And, since you'll be an Army Officer, you'll
enjoy more respect and authority than most o(
your civilian counterparts You 11 also enjoy
travel opportunities, officer's pay and officer's
pnvileges.
Army Nursing offers educational oppor-
tunities that are second to none As an Army
Nurse, you could be selected for graduate degree
programs at civilian universities
ADVANCED NURSING COURSE,
TUITION-FREE
You get tuition, pay and living allowances
You can also take Nurse Practitioner courses
and courses in many clinical specialities All on
the Army.
While these programs do not cost you any
money, most of them do incur an additional
service obligation
A CHANCE TO PRACTICE LAW
If you re about to get your law degree and
be admitted to the bar, you should consider a
commission in the Judge Advocate General
Corps. Because in the Army you get to practice
law right from the start
While vour classmates are still doing other
lawyers research and other lawyers briefs, vou
could have vour own cases, vour own clients,
in effect, vour own practice
Plus vou 11 have the pay. prestige and privi-
leges of being an Officer in the United States
Armv. With a chance to travel and make the
rnot ot what vou ve worked so hard to
become A real, practicing lawyer. Be an Army
Lawyer
ROTC SCHOLARSHIPS
Though vou re too late for a 4-vear
scholarship, there are 3 2 and even I-year
scholarships available
They include tuition, books, and lab tees.
Plus S100 a month living allowance Naturally
they're very competitive Because
besides helping you towards your
degree, an ROTC scholarship helps
you towards the gold bars of an
Army Officer.
Stop by the ROTC office on
campus and ask about details
UPTOSTTOAMONTH
You can combine service in the
Army Reserve or National Guard
with Army ROTC and get between
$7,000 and $14,000 while you're
still in school.
It's called the Simultaneous
Membership Program. You get $100
a month as an Advanced Army ROTC
Cadet and an additional $70 a month
(sergeants pay) as an Army Reservist
When you graduate, you'll be
commissioned as a Second Lieutenant,
but not necessarily
assigned to active duty Find
out about it.
A BONUS FOR
PART-TIME WORK
You can get a $1,500
bonus just for enlisting in some Army Reserve
units Or up to $4.000 in educational benefits
You also get paid for vour Reserve duty It
comes out to about $1.100 a year tor one weekend
a month and two weeks annual training
And now we have a special program to help
vou fit the Armv Reserve around vour school
schedule
Its worth a kxik
A SECOND CHANCE AT COLLEGE
Some may find college to be the nght place
at the wrong time tor a variety ot reasons The
Armv can help them too
A few years in the Armv can help them get
money tor tuition and the maturity to use it
wisely
The Armv has a program in which money
saved for college is matched two-fbr-one bv the
government Then, it one qualities, a generous
bonus is added to that
So 2 years ot service can get you up to
515.200 for college. 3 and 4 years up to 520.100
In addition, bonuses up to $5,000 are available
for 4-vear enlistments in selected skills
Add in the experience and maturity gained.
and the Armv can send (n individual back to
college a richer person in more ways than one
We hope these Armv opportunities have
intrigued vou as well as surprised vou Because
there is indeed a lot the Armv can otter a bright
person like you
For more information, send the coupon
r
i
rase toil me more about Ot AM I Medical School and Arnn Medicine
D lAN �the Armv Nurse Corps.l ALl Armv Law
DIFRI ROTC Scholarships. D (SS l Armv Resen e Bonuses
? I PC i Armv Education Benefits
-Mk
lM"RfcS
rn
�MU
n Hv.VI -TTtPIV.
p Ml i! P
I
1
I
Send to ARMY OPPORTUNITIES PC BOX KV
NORTH HOLLYWOOD. CALIF IKM
BE ALL YOU CAN BE. ,
ARMY.
Note To insure1 receipt of information requested, all blank mu-t be completed
XSSOC '0"CH
Continued From Page 5
Junior; December 21,
1940 (in Baltimore.
Maryland) His lather
was, and is. Francis
Vincent Zappa Seni r,
a scientist who in 1956
moved his famil) to the
desert desolation
Lancaster, California.
There young frank at-
tended Antelope Valley
High (a school chum
was madcap musical
maestro iptain
Beefheart) w h
teachers experiei
his eer ur
rebellious attitude
In the Z a
biographs o nm-
merciat Potential
Frank's former tea
Ernest Tossi rec i
his pupil: "Frank
the forerunner
dent militancy and a
forerunner of the I
niks I don't want to
use the word rebel, this
implies negativism, bu!
Frank was an indc
dent thinker
couldn't accept the
� �
Road To Homo
MARTY BE
In The Cotfehouse
PIZZA, Si
MonS
AAon. &
WEI
SPAGH
LARGI
OFSPI
garlI
- BONUS Tl
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j
i -� ���;�,
1





Zappa Twists A merican Dream
onlinued From Pae 5
Decembei 21,
1940 (in Baltimore,
Maryland) His fathei
a? and ;s. i rancis
inceni Zappa Seni
.i scientist who in 1956
ved his family to
California
ank at
I A alle
. urn
a nusical
. apt at n
enced

o om-
, ntial.
rank .her
ross ailed
ink was

1 don't wai

i
dent th k h o
I stablishment's set oi
rules
Early on rank
decided the work! was
tot ten and ridiculous,
oi at any rate he didn't
like it What he did like
was music, especially
rhythm-and blues and
the uorks o! Edgai
arese, the avant garde
model n com pose!
graduating from
high school ("with
about twenty units less
than what was re-
quired, simplv because
they were in a hurr to
gel tul of me") and at-
tending around one
semester of college, he
went 111 e r a 11 and
velly on the
: oad where he's I
evet since.
H lM Zappa form
ed the Mothers of In
vent ion, w ith w I
group he made music
and committed strange
atrocities on stage, as
desct ibed in a ife
trticle on
c New Rock
igt then s the
possibility that
anything can happen.
Dolls are mutilated. A
gas mask is displayed.
A bag of vegetables is
unpacked and examin-
ed. There are spaced in-
tervals o 'honks' and
suddenly the Mothers
perform 'Dead Air
I hey stop, sit down
and ignore the audience
. . . they keep this going
foi as long as it takes
the audience to become
unsettled, uncomfor-
table and angry. Then
a p p a calmly a p -
proaches the mike and
savs, 'It brings out the
hostilities in you,
doesn't it?
Zappa's biarre an-
tics aroused the ire of
others besides au-
diences. His conflicts
w ith critics, music com
pany executives and oc-
casional law enforce-
m eni officials are
legendary. He
persevered however,
producing over the
years an astonishing
satietv and number of
live concerts, albums
(over .10 to date), films
(200 Motels, Haby
Snakes) and other
assorted exceptional
enterprises
1 oday Zappa runs
his own record com-
pany (Zappa Records),
has started creeping in-
to the public con-
sciousness, and has
even begun becoming
(gasp') popular. The
latter fact is attested to
by the verv existence of
a mass-circulation
biography, No Com-
mercial Potential. Its
author, David Wallcv,
describes him thusly:
"frank Zappa is
definitely an American
artist in so tar as he
repeatedlv examines
and is fascinated by
American concerns;
(Mir love affair with
technology, our overtly
puritanical libertine at-
titudes about sex. our
acceptance of mediocri-
ty . an environmen
tal artist, he focuses on
maior trends, amplifies
them, and presents
them for public con
sumption, twisting the
fragments of an already
twisted American
dream
Zappa Looks
For America
Zappa of course has
own views on America:
"In the United States,
the problems are a
combination of
organied religion,
television, poor educa-
tion, military
industrial-complex and
the government which 1
think is extremely cor
rupt on all levels and
the easiest way to at
tack that is through the
medium which caused
it. They (those who
protest against
America) have to get
into . . all the things
that are causing the
problem and straighten
it out from the inside.
It's verv difficult to at-
tack these things exter
nally, there's virtually
no hope of ripping it all
down. I don't even
think it's advisable. '
� from an interview
with Chris Hodenfeld
in England; June, 1970.
Some see Zappa as a
ruthless pup-
peteer pirate who ap-
propriates the music of
other people, whom he
then discards along the
wav. Others call him a
genius who will one day
be remembered as a
major figure of 20th
century music
Frank Zappa himself
characteristically
couldn't care less what
people sav about him.
His former teacher,
Ernest I ossi, was
perceptive enough to
somewhat understand
him: "He's an indepen-
dent thinker and to
make progress you've
got to be creative and
independent in your
thinking. The direction
in w hich you take your
independent thinking is
something else

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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
Page 8
I
Prxto By Dave Williams
Jody Schulz (95) returns after intercepting a Richmond pass
Buc Defense Emerges
The East Carolina football
team showed something different
in its 17-13 win over Richmond
Saturday � defense. Darn good
defense.
"This was the best defensive
performance we've had since I've
been at East Carolina com-
mented an overjoyed Pirate head
coach Ed Emory. "The defense
played well in all phases and
came up with the big plays when
we needed them
The Pirate defenders have
struggled this season, and really
needed the super-strong pefor-
mance they had against the
Spiders. With the Buc offense
finding it hard to do much of
anything, the defense hung in
there and eventually came up
with two big plays that led to the
victory.
In fact, the defense set up every
bit of ECU's scoring. The first
came in the opening quarter when
safety Marvin Elliott intercepted
a pass. That paved the way for a
43-yard field goal by Chuck
Bushbeck.
On the next-to-last play of the
third quarter, and the Pirates
trailing 7-3, defensive end Jody
Schulz intercepted another Spider
pass and returned it to the Rich-
mond eight-yard-line. On the
first play of the fourth quarter
the Pirates followed up Schulz'
steal with a touchdown.
Perhaps the game's biggest
play came just after the
aforementioned TD. Cornerback
Gerald Sykes blocked a Rich-
mond field goal try and Schulz
scooped up the loose ball and
returned it to the Spiders'
32-yard-line. Three plays later the
eventual winning ECU
touchdown was scored.
The most impressive thing
about the showing was the fact
that the defense never seejned to
lose its intensity despite the fact
Charles
Chandler
that the offense was naving a sub-
par performance.
"The defense could have quit a
million times Emory said.
"But they didn't. They hung in
there and that's why we won this
football game
The defensive unit had a
number of stars. Schulz, of
course, was one them. Not only
did he come up with seven tackles
but he also got to step into the
limelight as a runner on the two
big returns.
Sykes had a superb day, in-
tercepting one pass and breaking
up three others in addition to
blocking the kick. The ex-split
end said he had hopes of a block
all of last week.
"We saw on film last week that
they had a slow � incredibly
slow � kicker Sykes explained.
"We worked hard on the block
and it paid off for us.
"Also he continued, "their
center was kind of jittery. He
jerked before he snapped the
ball. When he jerked that was my
key to go
Certainly one of the more
welcome accomplisments by the
defense Saturday was the play of
linebackers Mike Grant and
Glenn Morris. That position has
been one that Emory has been
concerned with all year.
Against the Spiders, though,
Grant and Morris each had 15
tackles, definitely making for the
best performance by the
linebackers this year.
Defensive end Mike Davis has
played in Schulz' shadow all
year, but he did his part as well in
the Saturday win. He had nine
tackles and made Sykes' blocked
kick possible.
"The key to the whole thing
was Mike Sykes said. "He
came hard inside. The man that
was supposed to block me went
inside to block Mike. After that I
had a clean shot
Perhaps the biggest "story" on
the defense, though, comes from
freshman nose guard Tony
Smith. The Laurinburg native
was injured and red-shirted last
season. He started this year as the
club's fourth-string nose guard.
When Wally Myers quit the
club and Fee Griffin was injured.
Smith was suddenly the back-up
at nose guard to Mark Ervin.
Smith was forced into the game
Saturday when Ervin went down.
Smith's response was simply
fabulous.
He finished the contest with
five tackles. Two of them,
though, were sacks of Richmond
quarterback Steve Krainock on
the last drive of the game when
the Spiders were threatening to-
pull off a miraculous comeback.
The last of the sacks ended the
game, Smith throwing Krainock
for an 11-yard loss as the buzzer
sounded.
"I was really nervous when I
went in said an ecstatic Smith
in the locker room following the
game. "I felt like I had
something to prove, though. I
knew I could play. I wanted to
show the coaches 1 could
"I was just going all out
Smith said of the game-ending
sack. "1 got past my man and
grabbed him (Krainock) ana pull-
ed him down as hard as 1 could.
It was really a great feeling
Indeed, it must have been for
each member of the ECU
defense.
Big-Play Defense The
Key In 17-13 ECU Win
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Npom r dilor
RICHMOND � The East
Carolina defense came through with
its best performance of the season to
lead the Pirates to a 17-13 win over
Richmond in the Tobacco Bowl
Saturday.
The Pirate defenders came up
with two big second-half plays to
rally a struggling offense from a 7-3
halftime deficit.
The four-point Richmond lead
lasted through the third period. On
the next-to-last play of the quarter,
though, ECU defensive end Jody
Schulz intercepted a pass from
Spider quarterback Steve Krainock
and returned it to the Richmond
eight.
Two plays later, on the first play
of the fourth quarter, Pirate QB
Carlton Nelson hit tight end Nor-
wood Vann with a six-yard scoring
strike. Chuck Bushbeck's extra
point put the Bucs up 10-7.
The Spiders rallied back quickly,
moving to the ECU 24 before hav-
ing to settle for a Scott Schramme
field goal attempt. Pirate corner-
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back Gerald Sykes found an open-
ing in the Richmond line, though,
and blocked Schramme's try. The
ever-present Schulz returned the
loose ball to the Richmond 29.
Three plays later Nelson faked
out a number of Richmond
defenders en route to a 29-yard
touchdown run. Bushbeck con-
nected on the extra point and the
Buc lead was 17-7.
Sykes gave a teammate the ma-
jority of the credit for his crucial
block.
"The key to the whole thing was
Mike Davis (defensive end) Sykes
said. "He came hard inside. The
man that was supposed to block me
went inside to block Mike. After
that I had a clean shot. I didn't even
get touched
The Spiders responded well
following the second big play by the
Pirate defense. Bushbeck's kickoff
was returned by Billy Starke 50
yards to the ECU 47-yard-line.
Eleven plays and four minutes
later Krainock hit wide receiver
Kevin Jackson with a two-yard
touchdown pass. A two-point try by
the Spiders failed as the Buc lead
dropped to 17-13.
The Richmond defense held the
Buc offense to but one first down on
its next possession and gave the
Spider offense the ball on its own 20
with 1:37 remaining in the game.
Krainock's passing moved 'he
ball to the ECU 43. The Spiders
began the drive with no timeouts,
though, and game came down to a
lone play with 11 seconds remain-
ing. Krainock went back for a pass
but had no chance as a nose guard
Tony Smith dropped him for an
11-yard loss.
Smith, a freshman, had replaced
starter Mark Ervin, who was injured
in the first half.
"This was one helluva defensive
game ECU head coach Ed Emory
said following the contest. "This is
the bet defensive effort we've had
since I've ben at ECU. I'd say we
won it on defense and didn't lose it
on offense
The defensive effort was definite-
ly the key to the game, as the Buc
offense struggled the entire first half
and had its share of problems in the
second.
Actually, neither team did very
much at all offensively in the first
half, the two clubs combining for a
mere nine first downs.
All of the first-half scoring came
in the opening period. Turnovers set
both scores up.
A Harold Blue fumble set up
Richmond's touchdown. Heisman
Trophy candidate Barry Redden got
the score, hauling in an eight-yard
pass from Krainock. An intercep-
tion by Pirate safety Marvin Elliott
led to a 43-yard field goal by
Bushbeck at the midway point of
the quarter.
For the game, the Pirates commit-
ted four turnovers � two fumbles
and two interceptions. Richmond
actually finished the contest with
more first downs and total yards
than the Pirates. The Bucs picked
up but ten first downs and 201
yards, while the Spiders had 14 firsts
and tallied 244 yards.
Redden, though he had a sub-par
day, gained nearly half of the Rich-
mond total, picking up 114 yards on
34 carries.
Second-year Spider coach Dal
Shealy was obviously disappointed
following the contest.
"We played our hearts out and
still came up short on the
scoreboard he said. "There's not
much you can say when that hap-
pens. Our guys are giving it
everything they have, but still
haven't been able to get that real
taste of victory. That hurts us great-
ly
Shealy's Spiders travel to Ohio to
face Cincinnati this Saturday. The
Pirates go south to face
Southwestern Louisiana before
returning home to host 13th-ranked
Miami (Fla.) on October 24.
Richmond Suffering
After Heartbreaker
By WILLIAM YELVERTON
Autetanl Sports Editor
A game of incredible similarity.
With 1:48 remaining, the situa-
tion was the same. Even the teams
were the same. However, Rich-
mond, not East Carolina as in last
season's thriller won by the Pirates,
24-22, was faced with a do-or-die
situation: score a late touchdown or
lose to a bitter rival.
Even a few drops of rain were
falling, a reminder of last year's bat-
tle played in a rainstorm.
But for the University of Rich-
mond, the eventual results were the
same � a tough defeat, 17-13.
"I can't say a whole lot on a
positive note said a disappointed
coach Dal Shealy in the Richmond
dressing room. "When you come up
short and your guys played hard,
there's not much to say t
For Richmond, the loss was in-
deed frustrating, especially after
two impressive wins in a row. The
last victory, a 24-7 decision over
James Madison, coming without
quarterback Steve Krainock and
tailbck Barry Redden, who were out
with injuries.
Krainock, suffering with a slow-
healing shoulder separation, was
only 10-25 for 105 yards and threw
two interceptions against the Pirates
while Redden was hobbled with a
strained knee, even though he rush-
ed 34 times for 131 yards.
"Redden showed real heart and
courage when he technically
shouldn't have gone back in the
game (he was shaken up in the first
half) Shealy said. "At halftime he
said he wanted to go back
The Heisman Trophy candidate
had trouble catching passes. "He
dropped more today than I've ever
seen him drop Shealy said. "But
when you're hurt you do things you
don't ordinarily do
The Richmond coach applied the
same logic with Krainock. "He
doesn't ordinarily throw intercep-
tions, but he was hurt
Krainock, however, refused to
make any excuses. "I just couldn't
throw the ball like I usually can he
said softly. "If I can keep loose, it
feels good. Once we started runn-
ing, I tightened up. I'll just have to
live with it right now
There was an uneasiness in his
voice. "I thought we had a good
week of practice he said. "But to
come back and have something hap-
pen the same way it did last year, it
just hurts bad
Even though the two Richmond
stars were below par, Shealy was op-
timistic about winning. "When we
went up 7-0 he said, "1 thought
we were in control of the game. But
we kept East Carolina the ball
Sec SHEA I Y, Page 9
Photo By Dave Williams
Tight end Norwood Vann (81) hauls in ECU's second TD of the day in 17-13 win
Cage Drills
Open On
Thursday
By CHARLES CHANDLER
sports M�or
Competition. It is said that all
coaches like it. If this is true, then
East Carolina head t lsketball coach
Dave Odom should be a happy man.
The 15-member Pirate squad will
begin pre-season practice this
Thursday. The newest members of
the ECAC-South head into the
1981-82 season with more depth
than in either of Odom's two
previous seasons at the helm.
"We're going into practice with
almost every position open Odom
said. "The competition for playing
time should be at an all-time hiah
here
Indeed. The only position that ap-
pears to be set as practice begins is
point guard, where 6-4 Tony Bvles
returns after a one-year absence.
The flashy playmaker is back for his
senior year after starting in '79-80.
Freshman Bruce Peartree and
sophomore Herbert Gilchrist are ex-
pected to share back-up time at the
point.
Junior Charles Watkins, the
See DEPTH page 10
A 'Fake' TD
Richmond's second and last touchdown in the club's
17-13 loss to ECU Saturday was literally a fake. Here,
tailback Barry Redden (20) dives for the end zone from
two yards out. Meanwhile, QB Steve Krainock (7)
prepares to hit wide receiver Kevin Jackson (not pic-
tured) with a scoring strike. Most everyone in City
Stadium thought Redden had the ball. (Photo By Dave
Williams)
D,
I
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in
didn't lose if
efinite-
a- :he Buc
half
Iems in the
n d;d e;
the first
or a
�rmg came
-ers set
up
Heisman
Kedden got
ard
: cep-
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. a bj
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ommit-
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Dal
ted
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to face
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happy man.
te squad will
ractice this
members of
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doms two
helm,
jractice with
en Odom
for playing
H-time high
Ition that ap-
ice begins is
Tony Byles
par absence,
nack for his
kg in '79-80.
irtree and
Jurist axe ex-
time at the
ii kins, the
fee 10
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Indians Scalp ECU
SAAD'S
SHOE
Photo By GABY PATTERSON
ECU's Mike Swann eludes defender.
Depth An ECU Plus
East Carolina saw
their record fall to 3-7
Sunday after losing to
the Indians of William
and Mary 4-1 in soccer
action.
The victory was 18th-
ranked William and
Mary's eighth against
one loss and one tie.
The Indians were ahead
4-0 at halftime.
The only East
Carolina goal was
scored by Brian Win-
chell on an assist by
Mike Swan.
East Carolina was
credited with 18 saves,
13 by freshman goalie
Danny Curtis who
replaced Steve Brown
after the Pirate star was
struck in the eye with
the ball. At first, it was
believed that Brown
was bleeding internally
behind his eye but was
taken to the hospital
where he was pro-
nounced fit.
The Pirates travel to
Pembroke State
Wednesday afternoon
at 3:30.
113 Grande Ave
758 1228
Quality

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( ontinued From Page 8
team's leading scorer last year with
a 12.8 average, is the top candidate
for the other guard position.
Sophomore Mike Fox. a 6-3 sharp-
shooter will provide a threat,
though.
The big forward position is full of
candidate. Sophomore Morris
Hargrove, at 6-6 and 215 pounds, is
said bv Odom to be the most im-
proved plaver on the squad. Tom
Brown, a 6-6 transfer from Maine,
joins the club after sitting out last
season due to the NCAA's transfer
rule. Charles Green and Al Mack,
both JuCo Ail-Americans last year,
can also line up at big forward,
though Mack may see more action
at center.
Mark Mel aurin (6-6) and Bill
McNair (6-5), along with Green, ap-
pear read) to battle it out for play-
ing time at small forward.
McLaurin, who averaged 9.4 points
per game last season as a starter,
and McNair can also shift to big
guard.
At center, senior Michael Gibson
(6-8) and Mack are the top can-
didates. Freshman David
Reichenecker, a sturdy 6-10, and 6-8
sophomore Jeff Best are also
available.
Odom appears excited about his
team's chances. "I really fell we will
show definite and marked improve-
ment said the third-year Buc
coach. "Perhaps the biggest pro-
blem we as coaches have outside of
having a winning season is meeting
the needs and desires of our players
as far as playing time is concerned
The Pirates begin their season on
Saturday, November 28, when Ohio
University invades Minges Col-
iseum. Tip-off time for the opener is
7:30 p.m.
V.
Shealy Praises Pirates
(ontinued From Page 8
game.
"The three interceptions were
really big. and the missed field goal
proved to be gigantic. Coach Emory
had his team really prepared. They
made fewer mistakes. Penalties and
missed opportunities were the key
As was a young offensive line.
"Our inexperienced line is giving us
problems he said. "But they are
trying hard. We're just too young
and inexperienced in the offensive
line for this type of game. But we
did gear down in a few pressure
situations. The played courageous-
ly. We put too much responsibility
on that area of our team this week.
"You can't have the turnerovers
and penalties we had and still win
the ball game
The ineffectiveness of Krainock
proved to be costly for Richmond.
"He wasn't as sharp as he usuall
is Shealy said. "1 put too much
pressure on him at the start. His
timing wasn't as good as it should
have been
Shealy inserted freshman quarter-
back Napoleon DuBois in the first
half after Krainock was unable to
move the team. "We put him in so
we could run more spring outs and
options he said. "East Carolina
was gung-ho on Redden I wanted
to loosen them up a bit, but our er-
rors were verv, very critical.
"Our game with East Carolina
was disappointing last year he
continued. "Last year's game with
VMI was disappointing (a 22-17 loss
for the Spiders). This game ranks
right with those
Shealy continued to praise the
Pirates. "Talent-wise he said,
"East Carolina was as good as
anybody we'll play. We rank their
defense with Southern Mississipi's.
Their whole team is explosive and
dangerous
Richmond was not surprised by
the fact that the Pirates opened the
game with the I-formation, Shealy
said. "East Carolina didn't fool us
at all. When they've gotten behind
they've abandoned the 'bone and
thrown more and run more options.
We helped them out with field posi-
tion
Even with the disappointing
defeat, Shealy wasn't discouraged
with the play of his team. "Our guys
are doing everything they can he
said. "They're living with the agony
of defeat. They deserved more than
what was on the scoreboard
"The attitude on the team is real
good Kraiock echoed.
"Everybody is closer together on
Monday after a loss. It's just a dif-
ferent atmosphere this year
But for Richmond the results on
an overcast Saturday in October
were painfully the same as one year
before.
PRESBYTERIAN
CAMPUS
MINISTRY
East Carolina University
Greenville, N.C. 27834
Stewart LaNeave, Campus
Minister
104 Hardee Circle
A listening ear
A sounding board
A guiding spirit
752-7240 or 758-0145
PROGRAM
At the International House
306 East 9th Street
Tues. $2.00
5:30 Discussion & Dinner Out
Wed.
Noon
Thurs.
Noon
Faculty & Staff
Mendenhall Faculty Dining
A time of sharing and
discussion over meal.
Mendenhall Snack Bar
Student Fellowship Lunch
Join us with lunch.
BLACK RUSSIAN
IS COMING
ECCDEC
FOR MORE
INFORMATION WINTER
CALL: 7S88448 GUARDE
Proudly &&
81
KM
Chaps
Hwy. 25t North
Kins ton, N. C.
Eastern North
Carolina's Largest
& Finest Private Club
YOUR FAVORITE BEVERAGE
Out S'From M P.M.
35'From 9-10 P.M.
TACOS this
COMING TUESDAY
OCTOBER 13TH
October 14 Kays�Ladies' Night
October 16 Entertainers
October 17 Showmen
rHE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 13. 1981
S
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each of th� advertised items is required to be readily available lor sale
below the advertised price in each AP Store, escapi as specifically noted
in this ad
at o7
o
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT. OCT. 17 AT AP IN GREENVILLE, N.C
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL
DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
Highway 264 Bypass
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Greenville, N.C.
OKTOBERFEST
It's a festival of Green P's
I A&P QUALITY FRESHLY
Ground
5 lb. Roll Pkg.
Limit 10 lbs. with
$7.50 Additional
Food Order
A&P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
New York Strips
16-20 ib
avg
Cut Free!
U.S.D.A. INSPECTED FRESH FRYER
ilV Box-0-
-T7 Chicken
Canned Savffi9S
Vegetables
3
APPLESAUCE � TOHATOtS � SW�T PEAS
� CUT OR FRENCH GREEN BEANS
� SUCEO CARROTS
� MIXED VEGETABLES
� SAUERKRAUT � WHOLE 1 SVl 02.
OR SLICED POTATOES "
C4MS
Your
Choice,
ANN PAGE
Homestyle
Buttermilk
Biscuits
4igoct. "7Q0
cans � w
TROPIC AN A CHILLED
Orange Juice
89'
64 oz.
ctn.
FROZEN
Totino s Pizza
� Canadian Bacon
� Pepperoni
� Hamburger 12oz.
� Sausage pkg.
ANN PAGE LOOK-FIT
Ice Milk
19
'4 gal.
ctn.
1
Save
20
BEEF FLAVOR
Tony Dog Food
5 1
cans S
CONTAINS RICH BRAZILIAN COFFEES
Eight O'clock
Instant
Coffee 10 oz.
Jar
299
SALISBURY STEAK � MEAT LOAF
CHICKEN-TURKEY
AnnJage Dinners
r oir
Dinners
PLAIN � SELF RISING � UNBLEACHED
Red Band Flour
5 89
October 21
North Tower � Ladies' Night
October 23 kid Shaken
October 24 Tempest
October 28
Castaways � Ladies' Night
October 30
We play it all.
October 31
Fantastic Shakers
(Halloween Party)
Ladies' Night � Lady Members Free
Bands Swbfact to Chant Without Notic
Memberships Required
Annual Memberships � $10 Special
Price for ECU Students wID's
$5.00 � Available Sept. & Oct. Only
All ABC Permits Phone 523-2449
" SFRESH WITH QUAUTY
CALIFORNIA CRISP ICEBERG
Head
Save 78
On 2 Heads
Lettuce
large
heads
GOLDEN YELLOW RIPE
Dole Bananas
00
3 v 1
SUNMAtD QUALITY
Mini Raisins
14
v�o.
DkCfS
t
I





r
10
1HE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 13. IWI
Charlotte Wins Championship
By CHRIS
HOLLOMAN
Staff Writ
The East Carolina
volleyball team finished
second to UNC-
Charlotte in their own
Invitational last
weekend. The Pirates
and the Forty-Niners
faced each other in the
finals for the second
year in a row.
To reach the finals
on Saturday, however,
the Pirates had to face
and defeat some very
tough foes in their own
pool. Teams included
UNC-Wilmington, the
University of Virginia
and High Point Col-
lege.
In the first match of
the day, East Carolina
faced the Lady
Seahawks and defeated
them in two straight
games by scores of
15-10 and 16-14.
The second match of
the tournament match-
ed Virginia against the
Pirates. Once again,
East Carolina prevailed
in just two games by
identical 15-5 scores.
The Pirates' third
match provided one of
the first real upsets of
the day as High Point
defeated East Carolina,
14-16 and 7-15. The
loss gave three out of
the four teams in the
pool 3-1 records. By us-
ing the scoring
margins, High Point
and East Carolina were
allowed to advance to
the championship
round against the top
two teams in the other
pool which included
Duke, UNC-Charlotte,
Elon and North
Carolina A & T.
In the other pool,
Duke finished first with
a 3-0 mark while UNC-
Charlotte finished se-
cond at 2-1.
On Saturday morn-
ing, Duke and East East Carolina come
Carolina squared off in back and take the se-
the semi-final round. In cond set.
George
' Vaults'
To Title
V'olleying
Lady Pi rale Lit a Lamas (3) volleys
in last weekend's ECU Invitational
as Lexanne Ketter (9) looks on. The
Lady Bucs finished second in the
tournament to USC-Charlotte, fall-
ing in the finals 15-10. 16-14.
(Photo By Gary Patterson)
For East Carolina
swimmer Nan George,
uhat a different a year
makes.
Last year she was a
ECU gymnast but
because of a restructur-
ing in the athletic
department that caused
her sport to be drop-
ped, she chose to
become a swimmer.
And did it pay off.
In the East Carolina
Pentathlon, an intras-
quad competition,
George won the overall
championship with a
total of 2436 points
over Sally Reinhard,
who tallied 1846.
George won the 200
IM with a time of
222.81, the 100-meter
breaststroke in a time
of 114.87 and the
100-meter freestyle in a
time of 57.54. She also
placed second in the
100-meter fly with a
time of 105.48.
Dordi Henriksen
finished third with 1614
points.
In the men's division
Kevin Richards was the
overall winner with a
total of 2098 points. He
placed first in the
100-meter backstroke
in a time of 57.24 and
claimed second place in
the 100-meter fly in
54.75. He also finished
third in the 100-meter
breaststroke in a time
of 107.01.
Doug Nieman finish-
ed second place with a
total of 1857 points
while Doug Mac-
Millan's 1627 points
enabled him to finish
third.
Next action for the
Pirate swimmers is the
Purple-Gold Meet is
scheduled for October
21 at 7 p.m. in Minges
Natatorium.
:
EVANS SEAFOOD
MKT.
203 W. ?th St. 752-2332
'Variety ot Fresh & Frozen Seafood
�Lobster Tails 'King Crab Legs
Clams'Crab Meat
'Hard Crabs
DON'T LET THE NAME OF OUR
RESTAURANT FOOL YOU WE
ALSO SERVE FANTASTIC
LUNCH AND DINNER VlTTLES
SUCH AS BAR-B-Q BEcT RIBS,
FRESH COUNTRY STYLE FRIED
CHICKEN, STEAKS AND MUCH,
MUCH MORE.
BUY ANY MEAT
BISCUIT-GET
ADDED
EGG OR CHEESE
FREE
6 A.M6 P.M. Only Monday
Oct. 12-Friday 16
No Coupon Required.
CAS
WE PAY IMMEDIATE CASH
CLASS RINGS FOR:
WEDDING BANDS
DIAMONDS mam-mm
ALL GOLD & SILVER
SILVER COINS
CHINA & CRYSTAL
FINE WATCHES
&RINC
OF KEY SALES COc
401 S.EVANS ST. ZZnv"�
(HARMONY HOUSE SOUTH) KHUNC 3-JOOO
I YOUR PROFISSIONAI PERMANENT DCALIR
r Just fell us
wnalyou want.
Your ArtCarved representative will be on campus -soon to show you the
latest in class ring designs. With dozens of styles to choose from, you'll abe proud to select
your one of-a-kind design. Just tell us what you want. And be on the
lookout for posters on campus to get you where you want.
Oct. 14,15,16
DATE: 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Location ECU Student Store Lobby
Now is th� �� � mohe y�ur bwt 9�W fl buy
the best thrce-out-of-
five match the Pirates
won by downing the
Blue Devils in three out
of four games. The
team scores were Duke,
15-4, and East
Carolina, 15-5, 15-11
and 15-6.
This combined with
the Forty-Niners' win
over High Point set the
stage for the rematch
between ECU and
UNC-C.
In the first game of
the match, UNC-C
downed the Pirates,
5-15. only to have the
Charlotte then won the
last two games by iden-
tical 9-15 scores to take
the ECU Invitational
for the second year in a
row against the host
team.
In the consolation
game the University of
Virginia defeated
North Carolina A & T
to take fifth place.
After the tournament
head volleyball coach
Lynn Davidson was
pleased with the com-
petition and the overall
play of her Pirate team.
played against Duke,
we played very well
she said. "We had the
best blocking we have
had all season. Lexanne
Keeter had her best
game this year
"In the match
against UNC-C
harlotte.wepiayed very
inconsistently she
noted. "We never real-
ly established an offen-
sive pattern. Observ-
ing game hurt us.
"I thought Jenny
Hauser and Sandy
Gideoms did a fine job
for us she continued.
"I think overall it was a
wins though we didn't
play well against UNC
C. The Duke and
Virginia games were
very good wins,
though.
The Pirates placed
Hauser on the all-
tournament team.
East Carolina will be
back in action Tuesday
night against the
University of North
Carolina Tar Heels in
Chapel Hill. The
Pirates then return
home on October 16 to
face Appalachian
State, a team they were
beaten by earlier in the
season.
I-FREE
D
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good tournament for
"The first match we us. We picked up a few
SOAP-WASH HOUSE-FREE SOAP-WASH HOUSE-FREE SOAP-WASH 1
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The wash house will supply detergent to every
washing machine you use absolutely Free.
You no longer have to buy your own detergent. Just bring
this Coupon to either of the two conveniently located Wash
Houses for Free Detergent.
This offer is good MonSat 8:00 5:00 For The Entire Month of October at
The Wash House on 10th St. (across from Krispy Kreme) or The Wash
House on 14th Street (one and a half blocks from Belk Dorm).
Coupon For
FREE
Detergent For Every Wash
Offer Expires Oct. 31,1981
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Coupons For Free Detergent will appear in
Thurs. Edition of The East Carolinian
Throughout The Month of October.
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WASH FREESOAP-WASH HOUSE-FREE SOAP-WASH HOUSE-FREE SOAP-WASH HOUSE
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OMEGA'S
PRESENT TOES. OCT. r?
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HeOONALOS
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Title
The East Carolinian, October 13, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 13, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.153
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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