The East Carolinian, August 25, 1981






She
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 56 No. 1
Tuesday, August 25,19S1 Greenville, North Carolina
36 Pages- 3 Sections
Futrell
New Chairman
Elected By Trustees
By PAUL COLLINS
MHor la Chief
The East Carolina board of
trustees Monday elected Ashley
Futrell as its new chairman at its
first meeting of the school year, at
which three new members were also
sworn-in.
Futrell, a trustee for the past 11
years and the previous vice chair-
man, was chosen by acclamation to
succeed Troy Pate. Pate had been
chairman of the board for six years.
The three new members were
Katie Morgan, Thomas Bennett and
Roy Flood. Morgan, the wife of
former U.S. Senator Robert
Morgan, is presently the only
woman member of the board of
trustees.
The board also elected Ralph
Kinsey as its new vice chairman and
Harvey Beech to serve as secretary.
Both were elected by acclamation.
In accepting the chairmanship,
Futrell told the board, "You have
given me a high honor, but you have
given me an even greater challenge,
as 1 see it
Futrell. publisher of The
Washington Daily News, said in a
later interview that he felt the
university "sort of needs to do some
settling down
He said that ECU had made
significant progress in recent years
in building new facilities and in-
stituting new programs and that it
was now time to assure quality.
"We need to consolidate our gains.
"We're outstanding in many
areas� music, art, business are
several� but there's always room
for improvement
Futrell also thanked outgoing
chairman, saying he could not fill
Pate's shoes.
Reflecting on his years as chair-
man, Pate said. "The last six years
have seen many changes for East
CarolinaMany friendships have
been deeloped, and 1 am thankful
for them
Pate then turned his seat over to
Futrell. "Welcome to the peanut
gallerv trustee John Bridgers jok-
ed.
The board unanimously voted to
approve affiliation with the ECAC
South athletic conference after hear-
ing Athletic Drector Ken Karr's
report on the negotiations which
had been completed earlier in the
week.
Overload
Program Flooded
With Applications
By JIMMY DuPREE
Ptwto By ROCHEL ROLANO
Chairman Ashiey Futrell addresses ECU board of trustees.
Just as overloading an electrical
circuit can cause a system to short
out, the record number of students
applying for North Carolina In-
sured Student Loans has caused that
program refer applicants to another
source.
In a letter sent to applicants being
turned down the College Founda-
tion, Inc. explains that the
"condition of the national
economy, particularly the revenue
bond market, made it impossible for
the N.C. State Education Assistance
Authority to obtain adequate
funding to meet the heavy student
loan demand for 1981-82
Reports indicate that as of the
June 15 deadline for filing for
NCISLP, loan application volume
was up over 81 percent from the
same period last year. Students are
now being refered a lender-of-last-
resort program under arrangements
made by the Assistance Authority
with Citibank of New York.
"It means (students) will get
guaranteed student loans rather
than be turned down explains
Robert Boudreaux, director of
financial aid. "We're talking about
additional processing time to fill out
new applications which have to be
filed with Citibank.
"We are working on getting addi-
tional temporary help to try to speed
up processing and help the students
meet the October 1 filing date
Notarized applications must be
turned in to the financial aid office
for certification, but the individual
student is responsible for having the
application postmarked on or
before October 1, 1981. The Bor-
rower Certification must be com-
pleted in the presence of a Notary
Public "who is not affiliated" with
the university.
Terms of the agreement with
Citibank are basically the same as
that of NCISLP, but there are
disadvantages to the lender-of-last-
resort program.
Students already receiving loans
from N.C. Insured Student Loan
Program will be expected to pay
back the loans simultaniously when
they are converted to repayment
status.
"We're talking about delaying
loans maybe a month or two
Boudreaux maligns. "That will un-
doubtly put an unavoidable strain
on some students
Offer Special Deals
By MIKE DAVIS
SUN Writer
With the beginning of a new
semester, many things need to be
done. One important decision or
question, to be answered by many
students is, "What bank should 1 do
business with?" All banks are very
similar in'procedure and all follow
the rules and regulations set down
by the state of North Carolina and
the Federal government. All banks
in Greenville offer the "Full Service
Banking" for both residents and
students of Greenville.
The following banks offer a varie-
ty of services, anf a few offer a little
bit more for the students.
-Bank of North Carolina. This
MSC
bank offers the "Now Account"
which means if a savings account
has a minimum balance of $500,
and a checking account, then each
account will earn 5 1-4 per-
cent. I merest is compounded daily,
which comes to about 5.39 annual
rate.
If a student does not have $500,
then "free checking"will be ensured
with a $200 minimum savings ac-
Would Mean Fee Hike
By KAREN WENDT
Newt Milor
A proposed $3.8 million addition
to Mendenhall Student Center could
mean an increase in student fees of
$37 per student per semester.
The proposed addition would in-
clude a full-service dining facility
for 300, a ballroom with three parti-
tions, a special dining room, a
meeting room for 50 with a parti-
tion, a buffet dining room for 100
and two storage rooms.
Plans call for the proposed addi-
tions to be placed behind
Mendenhall.
When time came to vote on the
final proposal the only opposing
vote came from SGA President
Lester Nail. "I'm not exactly sure
what the students' opinion is on it
he said.
Mendenhall Student Center
Director Rudolph Alexander has
done much of the work on the pro-
posal. He stated that it is often dif-
ficult to get meeting room space in
the present facility and with the in-
stallation of permanent seating in
Wright Auditorium there is no type
of ballroom space on campus other
than the gymnasiums. Alexander
also stated that dining facilities on
campus are not adequate.
The addition of dining facilities in
the proposed complex is the result
of a planning commssion goal to
"curtail" cooking in the rooms in
the future, according to Alexander.
Lester Nail, SGA president, con-
firmed that this is one of the plann-
ing commission's goals though there
is no set date for the transition at
present and it is dependent on the
construction of adequate dining
facilities in all areas of the campus
The proposed addition would
take up an estimated 32,955 square
feet of space, including hallways
and elevator space. .
The next step for the proposal is
to go to Chancellor Thomas Brewer
for approval.
The only problem still remaining
for the proposal is the financial pre
jections. Alexander said that now
might be the proper time to begin
such a facility because he has been
informed that there is an estimated
15 percent increase in building costs
each year.
All parties involved stress the fact
that it is only a proposal and no
definite plans have been made.
Representatives from a variety of
organizations including the SGA
and the Student Union were involv-
ed in drawing up the end proposal.
Nail mentioned the possibility of
placing the question of building the
facility on the upcoming election
ballot for SGA legislators.
The elections are scheduled to oc-
cur the last week in September,
though Nail said that he hopes to
have the date moved up one week.
The facility would have to be
financed solely by student fees with
no help from the UNC system or
ECU.
count balance. Bank of North
Carolina has regular services such
as: Travelers checks, loans for those
who qualify, safe deposit boxes, but
does not have a 24-hour machine.
Mr. Alexander of Bank of North
Carolina, says that it would be ad-
vantageous to have an account here
in Greenville, and it would be in the
interest of each student to balance
their statements when they come in
the mail.
Bank of North Carolina has two
locations in Greenville, E.lOth St
and the corner of 4th and Cotanche
St.
-Branch Banking and Trust Co.
They offer free checking for
Students. They also offer the max-
imum 5.25 percent on your checking
account. They too are a full service
bank with a 24-hour Teller machine.
With school opening, Darlene
Latham of Branch Banking urges
students to come to the Stop-N-Go
on 10th St. on Wed. and Thur.
From 10:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m
each day. Branch banking personnel
will be opening savings and check-
ing accounts for students with a
minimum deposit of $100. No
balance is required to be maintained
to get free checking.
Branch Banking and Trust Co.
has three locations in Greenville;
Green St Arlington blvd and one
at Medical Village, out by the
hospital.
-First State Bank. As most banks,
they too offer the Now Accounts.
Their banking procedure is advan-
tageous for those students who like
to do their banking after 2:00 p.m
and especially on Fridays. They of-
fer automatic deposit, which is
keyed into their computer. Almost
all the other banks close their writ-
ten work day out at 2:00 p.m
which means that if a student makes
a deposit, on a Friday, after 2:00,
their account would not be credited
until after 2:00 on that following
Monday. First State credits ac-
counts automatically.
Teresa Morris of First State Bank
says that their Safety Boxes are the
lowest in town at $6 per year. They
also have a 24-hour Teller machine.
All of the various banks that have
24-hour machines, all do about the
same as if you were at a teller's win-
dow.
In a machine, you can get cash
from your savings or checking ac-
count. You can make deposits or
payments, and you can also find out
what your balance is in either one of
your accounts. You can also
transfer any sum of money from
one account to another.
The most important thing a stu-
dent can do each month is to
balance their statement with your
records. First State Bank is located
at 301 Evans, downtown.
-North Carolina National Bank.
With four locations in Greenville.
201 W. 1st St South Park, West
End Shopping Center, and East End
Shopping Center, NCNB offers
students a full service bank. They
offer bonus Checking with a $500
balance which earns 5.25 percent on
both savings and whatever the
balance in your checking, to get
Free Checking, one has to maintain
a savings or checking balance of at
least $300.
Ann Guerrant of NCNB, sys that
NCNB if a full service bank with
two 24-hour machines, both located
on 264 By-Pass. If one should open
an account with an out of state
check, it could take as long as 10
working days for the funds to clear.
This is true for all banks. Also
students are again advised to keep
up with their checks and to balance
their statements.
-Peoples Bank and Trust Co. Is
another full service bank located at
Carolina East Mall. They too offer
5.25 percent on regular savings, but
they offer three different checking
plans.
The first checking plan is a
regular checking account with a $2 a
month maintainence charge and a
.15 charge for each check written.
Their second plan is "Peoples Free
Checking You have to maintain a
$200 balance in either savings or
See CHECKING, Page 11
Student Union Slates
Blackfoot Next Month
Blackfoot, with Johnny Van Zandt and Del Leppard, will appear in ECU's
first concert of the school year on Sept. 1 in Minges Coliseum. Student
Union Major Attractions Chairman Charles Sune predicts that the concert
will be a sell out.
By KAREN WENDT
N�wt Editor
Student Union Major Attractions
Chairperson Charles Sune has an-
nounced that Blackfoot, with
special guests Johnny Van Zandt
and Def Leppard will be appearing
in Minges Coliseum on Thursday
Sept. 17 at 8 p.m.
"I predict a sell-out said Sune,
"and I don't mind being quoted on
that
Tickets for the concert will go on
sale to students only beginning Aug.
31 at the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall and will be made
available to the general public Sept.
3.
Ticket prices will be $6 for
students in advance of the show and
$8 for the general public or for
anyone at the door.
Sune says that the Student Union
has "in excess of $20,000 invested in
this show but that ticket prices
were determined on a "break even
basis" as is the standard with Stu-
dent Union sponsored concerts.
"Frankly, this price, $6 for
students and $8 public, is a steal
said Sune. "They're as low as we
can keep ticket prices and still break
even
A concert in Fayetteville featuring
Blackfoot sold out, according to
Sune, and the same concert being
featured at ECU will also be
featured in Charlotte, though the
date on that concert is unknown.
The Greenville appearance is the
only upcoming area appearance
scheduled for the group.
Sune also said that he felt the con-
cert was scheduled for "a good
night, a party night, vhen the
students still have money The
concert will be on a Thursday night.
Citing the success of two sell-out
concerts last semester, Jimmy Buf-
fett and Cheap Trick, Sune recom-
mended that students buy their
tickets early.
Tickets will go on sale to the
public in several area locations and
in Jacksonville and New Bern.
"1 think we've got an excellent,
excellent package for the beginning
of the year said Sune.
Sune also announced the pur-
chase of a portable metal stage for
this and future concerts. He said
that the stage cost the union
$12,000. He called the purchase
"part of the cost of doing
business
The stage will cut production
costs and for the present time would
be stored under Ficklen Stadium,
Sune added.
An earlier attempt to schedule a
concert featuring Joe Walsh
sometime in September fell through
when Walsh canceled his 16-date
tour, according to Sune.
On The inside
Announcements2N
Campus Police3N
Opinions4A5N
Campus Forum5N
Buccaneer8N
Housing9N
Football1-3S
FilmsIF
?
i





THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 25,1981 P�ae2
,

Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
M you or your organization
would like to have an item printed
in the announcements column
please send the announcement (as
brief as possible) typed and
double spaced to The tan Caroli
man in care of the nrws editor
There is no charge lot an-
nouncements, but space is often
limited
The deadline for announcements is 5
p m. Friday for the Tucsdav papei and
5 p m. Tuesday tor IBf Thursdav
paper
The space is asailabie to all campus
organizations and department!
CHANGE IN MAT
FEE-EFFECTIVE
AUGUST 2d, 1981
Mr John Childers, Director of
Testing. ECU reports that.
because of the continuing escala
fion of costs passed down from the
testing companies, the Testing
Center is obliged to increase the
Miller Analogies Test (MAT) fee
from the present SIO to $13 per test
administered The new fee will be
effective with the beginning of
Fall Term, August 26. IV8I
cso
The Center for Student Oppor
tunities (CSO). School of
Medicine, is currently seeking
hghly qualified undergraduate
and graduate students to work
part time as tutors interested
students with expertise in either
chemistry, anatomy, physiology,
b.ology, math, physics, English,
or SLAP are encouraged to apply
Other academic areas are also
considered Competitive wage
Contact Dr Frye. Center tcr Stu
dent Opportunities, 3'7 Whichard
Annex, or call for an appointment
a' 757 4172 6075. or 6081
POETS
The American Collegiate Poets
Anthology and International
PuDlications is sponsoring a Na
tional Poetry Contest in the fall of
i�8l. The deadline is October! 31
For more information write to In
ternationai Publications, P.O Box
44977, Los Angeles Ca 90044
CLASSIFIEDS
ROOMMATE WANTED
Responsible male wanted to share
mobile home. $90 per month in
eluding utilities. Eight minutes
from campus Call 7S6-8669
ROOMMATE WANTED )i a
month plus utilities Five minute
walk from campus Call 758 4903.
PART TIME HELP needed Call
for appointment only. Gordon
Fulp Goll, Ski, Tennis Shop
located at Greenville Country
Club 756 0504
FOR SALE Sanyo I.I cubic feet
refrigerator Perfect for dorm,
like new. only one year old $90
neg. Call 757 3210, leave name and
number with answering service
KISWAHILI
kiswahili is the most commonly
spoken language in Africa,
seconded by French and Arabid
Its territorial dominance extends
from all along the east African
coastiands of Kenya, Uganda and
Tanzania and embraces the cen-
tral Affrican countries or Congo,
Zaire. Central African Republic,
Ruanda and Burundi. Kiswahili
has also penetrated the western
hemisphere only to rank fifth after
English, French. German and
Spanish as the most spoken
language in the world. This year.
ECU students will be given an op
portunity to study an African
language for the first time
Kiswahili will be taught as a non
credit course If interested, pisee
contact Safari Mathenge at
752 8736 or the Office of Continuing
Education 757 6321
EPISCOPAL WORSHIP
A student Episcopal service of Ho-
ly Communion will be celebrated
Tuesdayevening, September I, in
the chapel of St Paul's Episcopta
Church, 406 4th Street (one block
from Garrett Orom). The service
will be at 5:30 p.m. with the
Episcopal Chaplain, the Rev Bill
Hadden. celebrating Supper will
be served fotowing the service.
Traffic
The Greenville Traffic Commls
sion will meet at 4 p.m. In the list
floor conference room at City Hall
on Thursday August 77.
BILLIARDS
interested In loining � billiards
league? All billiard players, man
and women, who ara interested In
forming a league to meet weekly
may sign up at the Mendenhall
Billiards Center. An organize
tional meeting will be hatd Tues
day, Sept IS at 7 p.m. in the
Billiards Cantor. League scores
will be handicapped so persons
with various levels of ability can
compete equally. Trophies will be
awarded in several divisions.
ERA WALK
The Greenville Chapter of the
National Organization for Women
will sponsor a Walk A Thon Satur
day, Aug. 79 This event is part of
the final year's campaign to ratify
the Equal Rights Amendment.
Each person will be sponsored in
the walk by individuals or com
panies who have pledged a con-
tribution to NOW's ERA ratifica
fion fund. The ten mile walk
should take three hours to com-
plete. All women, men, and
children are invited to participate
as walkers or sponsors. For more
information, contact Lit Simmons,
Greenville NOW president, at
7S7 4440 or Phyllis Conner at
757 4940 after 5 30 p.m.
BICYCLE
Do you have a bicycle but wish
you knew better, safer ways to gat
where you want to go? would you
like company as you explore �
area? Are there changes you'd
Ilka to see m laws affecting bicycle
riders? If so. you wouto be in-
terested in Mm Tar River Bicycle
Club. The group sponsors bike
rides every Saturday morning of
varying degrees of difficulty. Aug.
29 will be a 25 to 40 mile trip. Sept.
S will be a shorter trip of about 20
mites. Sept 1 will be a beginners'
or family trip of about 45 minutes
or an hour around town. Sept. 19
and 26 will be longer trips, like
that of Aug. 29. in addition, a
business meeting is scheduled for
Sept. 15 at 7:30 p.m. at me com
munity buiding on 'he corner of
Greene and Fourth Streets. All
rides leave from the Elm Streer
Gymnasium at 8 a.m. on Saturday
morning. For more information
call 758 9978
BOWLING
MSC Mixed Doubles bowling
leagues are now being formed for
fall semester. Students interested
in bowling on a Monday or Tues
day evening league may sign up at
the ground floor bulletin board at
Mendenhall Student Center. The
league organizational meeting will
be held Monday. September 14 at a
p.m. Bring some friends and sign
up today.
MINI-COURSES
Register today tor a non-credit
mini-course in clogging, CPR
training, popular dance, or
calligraphy. These courses art
now being offered by Mendenhall
Student Center and art available
to all ECU students, faculty and
staff MSC members and their
guests.
Individuals must register in per-
son at the Mendenhall Central
Ticket Office between the hours of
10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Monday
through Friday. Registration will
be accepted through me day prior
to the first class meeting. The first
course begins Monday, Sept. 14
For further information contact
the Central Ticket Office or Tana
Nobles at 757 6611. Also, course
schedules and detailed inform
fion art available at the MSC In
formation Center.
DROP-ADD
Due to the renovations on
Wright Auditorium, drop add will
be held in Memorial Gym. It will
not be held in Brewster as it was in
the summer.
SKIING
I f s not too soon to start thinking
snow for skiing at Snowshoe, West
Virginia at Christmas and during
spring break. Contact Ms. Jo
Saunders at 757 6000. Memorial
Gym, Room 205 for information.
Limited registration.
HOUSING
For ECU students needing help
with non-university housing, the
Off-Campus Housing Office
publishes a listing of available
rooms, apartments, houses and
mobile homes in the Greenville
area. Since materials are updated
daily, students should come by me
office in parson tor me most cur-
rent information. Listings for
Greenville apartment complexes,
tor students seeking roommates,
and a telephone tor placing local
calls are also provided. The offices
serves faculty and staff as well as
students
NUTSHELL
A collage of current campus
trends in education, entertain
ment, and sports is covered in this
year's NiuskeU masvine, distributed
free oa campus by (ax ECU Alumni
AwociattOB. Don Leaped. Director of
Alumni Relations, said the magazines
will be available near Mendenhall Stu
dent Center, the entrance to the Student
Supply Store and the A.J Fletcher
Musk Building mall on Friday. Auf.
28
CRAFTS
Crafts workshops are now
available at the Crafts Center In
Mendenhall Pottery, darkroom
techniques, floor loom weaving,
photography, Christmas pat
chwork, handbuilt Christmas
ceramics, beginning iewelry, silk
screening, and woodworking are
the workshops which art
available
All ECU students, student
dependents, as well as faculty.
staff and their dependents who are
MSC members, art eligible to par
ticipate Everyone must register
tor the workshops at the Crafts
Center no later than the Saturday
prior to the first meeting of a
workshop Workshop schedules
art available at the Crafts Center
and the MSC information Center
The first workshop begins Mon
day. September 14, 1981
Crafts Center hoors are 3 p.m
until 10 p.m Monday through Fn
day. and 12 noon until 5p m Satur
day.
For further information call the
Crafts Center or Tana Nobles at
757 6611
PLANNING
There has been a special call
meeting of the Planning and Zon
ing Commission scheduled for
Tuesday, Aug. 25 at 12.30 p.m in
the Council Chambers of the
Municipal Building
BINGO
Get ready for bingo and ict
cream on Tuesday, Sept 8 at 7
p m in the Mendenhall multi
purpose room Prizes will be given
to bingo winners and ice cream
will be given to all at Mendenhall's
Monthly Blngolce Cream Party
It's f'ee to everyone so come ioin
the fun you lust can't lose!
CHEERLEADERS
The East Carolina cheertssdsu
are planning to increase trw
number of male cheerleaders on
me squad this fall Prospects
should meet at the stadium end y
Msnges Coliseum at 5 p m on
Wednesday Aug 26 No previous
experience is required
JVCHEERLEADERS
The first meeting for those in
terested in Junior Varsity
Cheer leading will be held at 5 p.m
on Tuesday, Sept 1 at the stadium
end of Minges Coliseum Th
schedule of practice sessions �or
the tryouts on Thursday. Sept 10.
will be discussed
L
The East Carolinian
Smmg the campus community
since 1921
Published every Tuesday and
Thursday during the academic
year and every Wednesday dur
mg the summer
The East Carolinian is the of
ficlal newspaper of East
Carolina University, owned,
operated, and published for and
by the students of East Carolina
University
Subscription Rates
Business $35 yearly
All others $25 yearly
Second class postage paid at
Greenville, N.C
The East Carolinian offices,
are located in the Old South
Buil. ng on the campus of ECU.
Greenville, N C
1 elephone: 757-6M6, 617, 6309
wHCtf Yoo ewe e)oo6H
To SEttD TH� VfTRY BeST
SAAD'S
SHOE
�� REPAIR
yff 113 Grande Ave
m 7541-1228
BACK TO SCHOOL BONUS
Ellen's welcomes you back to
Greenville with a gift of silver jewelry
FREE with any $10.00 purchase.
Come see our Preppie posters,
puzzles and plaques, large selection
of calendars, mugs, stationary and
Stuffed animals. And remember, we're Greenville's
Smurf, Muppets and Animal
Farm Headquarters.
COPY CENTER
Copies 4.25$
100 OR MORE
5C 1 TO 99
CASE PRICES ON
BEER & WINE
Wholesale & Retail Ice Sales
8 lb a 4 lb bags
Keg & Ice Delivery � 24 Hours
Visa and Mastercharge
Greenville � 752 8772
Chapel Mill �967 9791
HOME BUILDERS
SUPPLY INC
JlHLDERS HMdOUARTERS 7
FOR YOLK EVERY BtlLPlAG !UEP -X
Welcome Back ECU Students
Home Builders has a
complete supply of:
�shelving board
�paint
�lock shop
�mill work shop
�other small building materials
TMC
AAIIMAO
UH0OraSS
CIRCLE
We also have up-to-date supplies
and materials for the students.
�Interior Design
�Industrial Tech
�Art
Come by for your
complete building
needs.
. Wast�"Cord
taw -a af
DIAL
7584151
200 DICKINSON AVE GREENVILLE
ViSA
HOME BUILDERS
SUPPLY INC
THE
GREAT AMERICAN
FAVORITES
ARE BACK!
GET HEAPING PORTIONS
AT A PRICE
ALL AMERICA CAN AFFORD!
August 27, Thursday .rsavn
CHICKEN PAN PIE. 2 vegetables $209
August 28, Friday
SALMON PATTY. 2 vegetables $2W
August 29, Saturday .r�cn
VEAL PARMESAN. 2 vegetables S259
August 30, Sunday
SMOTHERED CHICKEN $239
2 vegetables
August 31, Monday
MEAT LOAF & SPAGHETTI 2?9
2 vegetables
September 1, Tuesday
FRIED CHICKEN. 2 vegetables $239
September 2, Wednesday rna
STUFFED GREEN PEPPER $209
2 vegetables
Everyday . - .
CHILD'S PLATE � l25
A delicious choice of fried chicken, chopped steal, or a
specified entree plus 2 vegetables and a roll! For
children 12 and under with adult.
Proud?
Be Proud of
ECU and your
newspaper �
The East Carolinian
Po
Ph
B KARl
NaT
East C
pus Polk
on two
to help
campus
ding
Security Jl
The firf
the in I
telephone
connect
campus
by
� er
chboard
v.hich phc
being mat
an
mediately
ed to that
aid
der
officer i
regardless
or not the
He
what pr
tern mI
added
puse
I
Back to School Special
GOODYEAR TIRE CENTER
WEST END STORE ONLY
3-DAY
COUPON SPECIALS
S�S5
cafeterias
LUBE, OIL CHANGE
Prrmlum OH
CALL FOR
APPOINTMENT icKONT END ALIGNMENT
756-93711 -
Tire Life ftooet MPG
' Moat Care
Carolina East Mail. Mon f rl LUNCH
11 a.ea2:lS p.m SUPPER 4.30 p.m -
8p m (S :30Frl.). Sat A Sun Ham -8 pm
tontiauoualy (8:50 Sat.)
5S4
MONTUES. Available for
private parties � Papa Katz
will cater any party or func-
tion. We also have a mobile
DJ. for public use.
WED. � "ORIGINAL
LADIES' LOCKOUT" �
8:30-10:00- LADIES' ON-
LY � GENTS IN AFTER
10:00.
THURS. � "SUPER
COLLEGE NIGHT"
Sponsored by the Sig
Ep's � Doors open at
8:30 � One cover at door
� free beverage all night
long.
FRI. � "SPECIALS
DAY" � with a pig
pickin' once a month
starting Sept. 11 from 3
until closing � 45C for
your favorite beverage �
no cover all day.
SAT. � "A NIGHT TO
REMEMBER" After a
meal on the town � come
enjoy your favorite dance
music � hors d'oeurves
'til 11:00 � ladies free all
night.
SUN. � "KOPY KAT" �
Ladies' Lockout till 10:00
� gents in at 11:00 with
no cover all night long.
MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION
All members will be entitled to 3 guests
par evening Neat dress and proper idrn
tlflcatton will be required of ell members
and guests.
�bring application A dues to me door and
receive your membership card mat night
l��� MEMBERSHIP ����i
River Bluff Rd.
Behind Putt Putt
7587912
"A Touch
Of Class"
I
DAT!
SMMATVtl ,J
4
I





�ADERS
MM IH
g laadai OR
on
LEADERS
i s p m
oo� 'Of
1
cial
� TER
Y
LS
ay
v
ALIGNMENT
o.t MPG
U art
:non� 7 56-4J71
tl Putt
912
Such
��
155
Police Installing
Phone System
B KARF.N WENDT
last Carolina Cam-
pus Police are counting
on two new programs
help them combat
campus crime, accor-
ding to Director of
security Joe Calder.
The first program is
the installation of 11
telephones that will
connect students with
.ampus police merely
h picking up the
receiver. K lighted swit-
chboard will tell police
vhich phone the call is
being made from, and
an officer will im-
mediately be dispatch-
ed to that area, Calder
said.
Calder noted that an
office! will be sent
regardless of whether
or not the caller speaks.
He was uncertain of
what problems this
system will create but
added that other cam-
puses had been suc-
cessful with it.
According to Calder,
all the equipment need-
ed for the system has
arrived but that the
telephone company has
not set an installment
date.
The phones will be in
the following locations:
�The large paved park-
ing lot south of Joyner
Library and
Mendenhall Student
Center, in the norih
center area of the lot.
�The corner of Seventh
and James Streets on
the east side of James
Street.
�The middle of the
grassy area between
Bloxton House and
Garrett Dorm.
�The grassy area bet-
ween Jenkins art
building and Jams
Dorm on the north side
facing the service drive
I Mi IASIAKOI IMAN
MJGUS1 25. 1981
Page 3
Doonesbury Joins Paper
Joe Calder
of Memorial Gym.
� lhe bus stop on the
southeast side of Tyler
Dorm.
� The grassy area east of
Minges Coliseum and
west of F i c k 1 e n
Stadium, located cen-
trally between the col-
iseum and the stadium.
� In the parking lot west
of the SI AP building.
The grassy area by the
ortheasl corner of
installed
elevators
library.
in the
in Joyner
Speight,
�The southsest corner
of Wright Auditorium.n
�The west side of the Harrington Meld. nea.
Croatan. th� restrooms.
�The southwest corner Phones will also b
Jenkins and the press
box.
Calder explained that
the second program,
which is still in the
planning stages, would
create a position for a
crime prevention of-
ficer at ECU.
A proposal for the
program was written by
Lynn Singleton, a cam-
pus police officer.
The East Carolinian
this week will begin
featuring Doonesbury,
the Pulitzer Prize winn-
ing cartoon by Garry
Trudeau.
Doonesbury, with its
now famous characters
Zonker Harris, the
Rev. Scot Sloan,
Megaphone Mark
Slackmeyer, Virginia,
Joanie Caucus, B.D
Uncle Duke, and of
course its namesake
Michael J-
Doonesbury, will ap-
pear on the editorial
page.
The cartoon has been
well known for its
radical political views
expressed in a barely
veiled humorous style.
The cartoon debuted
at Yale University in
1968 when Trudeau
was a student there and
has since been read by
more than 60 million
readers in both the U.S.
and Canada.
Trudeau's style has
created controversy
many times with his
strips (an unusual style
for political car-
toonists).
The strip has been
put on editorial pages
and occasionally drop-
ped (for instance, some
newspapers dropped
Dooneshurv when
Trudeau look up the
problems of Nixon and
Kissinger visiting a
foreign land).
The strip was also
dropped in some papers
when Trudeau referred
to Jack Lord (son o
the President) as a
"pothead
Trudeau is con-
sidered a journalists oi
sorts. He regularly
reads everything from
newspapers to govern-
ment documents to
come up with ideas for
strips which are not
sent more than a few
weeks in advance.
Trudeau also regulai'y
shows up for Senate
hearings, conventions
and other news events
Trudeau's characters
are often thinly-
disguised real people.
Such characters are
such well-knowns as
journalist Hunter S.
T hompso n (U n c I c
Duke), activist Mark
Zanger (Megaphone
Mark Slackmeyer), the
Rev. William Sloane
Coffin, Jr. (the Rev.
W.S. Sloan, Jr.), and
football star Brian
Dowling (B.D)are
Clyde, her freeloading
boyfriend who buys a
new Buick with silver-
fox fur seats because
"I'm into comfort
Joanie Caucus is a
former housewife who
regulars in the realm of left family and husband
Trudeau's strips.
Other characters
have unknown origins.
Zonker is a child of the
drug culture and talks
to plants. Virginia, a
liberated black student,
has problems with
to enter and graduate
from law school and
live with Rick, a
newspaper reporter.
Joanie and Rick
recently shocked
readers by getting mar-
ried.
A Better Way of Banking
FIRST STATE CLUB!
Students need more from c, bank than ust checking or
savings . . . and First StatefCtub has it'
Free checking, personalized Club checks, 24 hour bank-
ing AND special discount coupons, including $2.00
movie tickets . . . plus much, much more!
Your Hometown Bank can help make Greenville a little
more like home . . . with a Better Way of Banking!
First State Bank
. g .��. Around m G
Member FDIC
ntt
756-2427
ABORTIONS UP TO
! 2th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
ABORTIONS FROM 13 i
WEEKS
AT FURTHER EXPENSE
JIBS 00 Pregnancy TpsI Birth
Control and Problem
Preqnancy Couns.lmq I
turtru-r �ntormat.on call
832 053 Toll i �� � '�
800 221 2568 "� �� �
ana 5 I V ��-� etidays
� � v '�
HE ' � �
ORGANIZE
CAS
WE ARE BUYING
We have a buyer who has put in an order for 2,500 class rings.
We desperately need to fill that order as soon as possible, so for
the coming week Coin and Ring Man will be offering a SPECIAL
PREMIUM on all class rings . . . from High Schools, Colleges,
Armed Services, Fraternities. Sororities, Technical Institutes,
Organizations all class rings will be bringing an EXTRA HIGN
PRICE all week. Take advantage of this offer.
K
the taco difference
4$1.39
39e Each
Every Wednesday & Sunday
We also have five different
dinners to please everyone's
budget and the Big Red �
"A Meal In Itself"
Also featuring:
Burritos
Enchiladas
Sanchos
Nachos
Tamales
Tostados
Chili
Taco Burger
Taco Dogs
ALSO BUYING GOLD & STERLING FRATERNITY AND
SORORITY PINS, RINGS, ETC. AND ANY GOLD OR
STERLING NECKLACES, BRACELETS, RINGS.
rS
�Copyright 1 MO Coin Ring Man of
Kay Sato Co. All Right Rr�d
l jinmm Knjajif I
Located beside Toyota East
on Greenville Blvd. � Phone 756-2072
OF COURSE, WE
ALSO PAY CASH
FOR STERLING,
SILVER COINS,
AND ANY OTHER
�0LD MARKED
10K, UK, 18K.
& RING i
0 KEY SAIES CO ��
401 S.EVANS ST. o�"
OPEN 9:30-5:30 MON -SAT
(HARMONY HOUSE SOUTH) PHONE 752-3866
ini'Mn u i.i.MivnijJ frvnLi-iim-iUi





?
QUre East (Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Paul Collins, �,
Chuck Foster, um.m Ammm Jimmy Dupree, wj�u�n, trf��f
Chris Lichok, ��,��. � Charles Chandler. soon, Edllor
Steve Moore, on -� Karen Wendt. �, &�.
Alison Bartel, �c�- ur Steve Bachner, ru� Ed,��
August 25. 1981
Opinion
Page 4
Bus Shelter
Expensive Solution To Problem
Students who have had to wait
for a bus in front of Mendenhaii
Student Center understand the hor-
rors of standing in the rain, snow,
or hot sun. When shelter was taken
inside the lobby of Mendenhaii, it
was difficult to see when the bus ar-
rived or to catch it before it left.
But, these days are over, accor-
ding to Rudy Alexander, Associate
Dean, Mendenhaii Student Center.
With funding from the 1979 and
1980 Senior Classes, SGA, and
Mendenhaii, a bus shelter has been
partially completed in front of the
Student Center.
Nicky Francis, the 1978 Class
President, was the 'mastermind
behind getting the money' for the
shelter, according to Mr. Alex-
ander. Because of Mr. Francis'
great efforts, there will be a plaque
placed inside the shelter in recogni-
tion of his hard work in getting this
project completed.
This steel, brick and concrete
structure has brick benches shaped
to form the letters "E.C.U It has
a steel frame and roof, and will be
further lanscaped to add to its at-
tractiveness.
The project was executed as
economically as possible, with one
half of the brick donated by San-
ford Brick Company, the design
done by one of the faculty in our
own Art Department, and the
University doing the painting and
landscaping.
The entire project, however, ac-
cording to Mr. Alexander, will cost
around $20,000. The 1979 and 1980
classes, and the SGA, raised ap-
proximately $17,500, and
Mendenhaii will pick up the extra
costs, paying for the electrical
materials and labor.
Although the shelter is for the
convenience of the students, and is a
useful addition to the campus, it
seems to be an extremely expensive,
aesthetic solution to the problem of
waiting for the bus in front of
Mendenhaii.
The Student Center is an area fre-
quented by visitors to the campus,
and should be an attractive
representation of the University.
However, this project, no matter
how aesthetic, is an outrageously
overpriced solution to the problems
of this transit stop. Although there
is a definite need for a bus stop in
this area, the purpose could have
been served by a more economical
bus stop, which would have been
less extravagant, saving the stu-
dent's monies for more beneficial,
worthwhile endeavors.
Mendenhaii Addition ECU's
Latest 'White Elephant
Isn't it heartwarming to know
how concerned administrators are
with the needs and wants of the
students at this university? And
guess what they're planning for us
now. That's right: A $3.8 million
addition to Mendenhaii Student
Center that would only increase stu-
dent fees by $37 each semester.
What a bargain.
The proposed addition would in-
clude, get this, three new dining
rooms, a ballroom, a meeting room
for 50 people and two storage
rooms.
And if we're lucky they might let
us students use one of the storage
rooms or maybe even one of the
dining rooms once in a while. Who
needs it?
Let's face it, students need this
addition and the ensuing fee in-
crease like they need a hole in the
head.
The addition is of questionable
benefit to students and in this day
and age must be regarded as an un-
necessary luxury. In a time of ex-
panding expenses and contracting
financial resources, spending nearly
$4 million on such a luxury is mere
foolishness, especially at a universi-
ty as desperately underfunded in
many areas as East Carolina.
Furthermore, Mendenhaii is
already one of the most under-
utilized facilities on campus. The
addition, rather than increasing use
of the building, migh turn
Mendenhaii into East Carolina's
Great White Elephant.
And exactly what would be done
with this white elephant?
Plans call for one of the new din-
ing rooms to be used by students
since ECU's planning commission
in its own inimitable style h?.s decid-
ed that the university should phase
out cooking in dormitory rooms.
Just as surely, though, one of the
dining rooms would be used for
faculty dining. Technically students
would be permitted to dine in the
facility, but the implication in the
term "faculty dining" is clear.
The idea of using student fees to
pay for a faculty dining room is
reprehensible. To do so would be to
blatantly exploit students.
We might also wonder who would
use a ballroom, most particularly
one where no alcohol can be served.
Fraternities and sororities are not
likely to use such a facility, and how
many "balls" does ECU have in a
year?
What's more, Mendenhaii
already has meeting rooms by the
score, so what would be the prac-
tical purpose of one more?
Perhaps the bottom line is that it
is East Carolina's administrators
and not its students who want the
addition to Mendenhaii. But, at
least where the student center is con-
cerned, it is the students' wishes that
should be heeded.
Abuse It,
You Lose It
Campus Police are in the process
of installing a system that, hopeful-
ly, can help reduce crime at ECU.
The system features 11 telephones
scattered across campus. Students
who are victims of or witnesses to a
crime need only pick up the phone
and an officer will be dispatched to
the scene. Someone will be sent
whether or not the student says
anything.
Inherent in such a system are cer-
tain advantages and disadvantages.
For the victim who is unable to do
more than lift the receiver, these
phones may be a lifesaver. On the
other hand, the potential for abuse
is great.
It doesn't take a genuis to figure
out how to use these phones to play
pranks on the campus cops.
We would hope, though, that
students would realize the stupidity
of playing such pranks: The success
or failure of this system will depend
on whether or not students abuse it.
'Tarzan Land' Misconceptions
By SAFARI MATHENGE
What is it about Africa that creates the
image of "Tarzan Land" � miles upon
miles of jungle land with monkeys jumping
from one branch of a tree to another and
the natives running around half naked,
save the piece of zebra skin for loin cloth.
It has never ceased to amaze me the ex-
tent to which ignorance and sterotyping
has been cultivated in the average
American about foreign countries and
especially Africa. As a second-year
African student in the United States, it
came as a surprise to me to be confronted
with social prejudices from both white and
the black races in this country. Of course
with my prior knowledge of the United
States as a modern Rome and a peace lov-
ing country, I was sure that my stay here
would be academically rewarding and that
socially I would be judged according to my
individual personality and not by the
trivial media stereotyping.
However, I was taken aback to find that
even my most intelligent classmates viewed
Africa as being like the TV show
"Tarzan
But as it turned out, I discovered that it
is not the youth of this country who inten-
tionally choose to despise foreign cultures
and tradition, it is the media and the
government in their attempt to promote
partiotism which portray a one-sided im-
age of the rest of the world. For instance,
Africa is to a large extent still what Elspeth
Huxley described in her book, The Flame
Trees of Thika. In this book, Huxley
recalls her impressions of Africa as it ap-
peared when she arrived there as a child in
1903:
The enormous vastness of Africa seemed
to go on forever and ever; beyond each
range of hills lay another far horizon.
There was no break and no order, no road
and no town, no place even; just marks on
a map which, when you got there, turned
out to be merely an expanse of bush or
plain exactly like the rest of the landscape.
What Huxley did not know was that
within this enormous vastness lay a hidden
wealth � a sophisticated civilization that
would require study and exploration.
Beyond each hill is a rich culture and a
people unknown to the rest of the world.
They are there, just like sleeping lions that
will awaken at anytime and resume their
positions as kings and queens.
In the interest of improving the lot of the
international student, not to mention inter-
national relations between the United
States and Africa, I have gathered here
several differences that exist between the
American ;youth and the down-to-earth
African youth.
The American youth of today has learn-
ed to enjoy the wealth that is handed to
him by his parents. There is no clear cut
distinction between what the adults enjoy
as the fruit of their efforts at work, and
what the child sees as his due. The average
American youth jeers at the fact that the
average African college student does not
drive to school. As a matter of fact, the
American youth has been able to enjoy this
luxury only after the benefits of the second
world war.
The African youth realizes and involves
himself or herself, with the problems that
face his or her nation and the continent as
a whole. In most African countries, college
age students are the first post-
independence generation. It should not be
surprising, therefore, if on occasion you
find us a little more concerned about where
we go and what we do. There is a heavy
burden of expectation and responsibility
on many African children as compared to
American.
Social prejudices can take one of many
forms that exist. I have observed that the
majority of white people in this country
are more receptive to an African than to a
black American. They arc inquisitive and
warm, but at times patronizing because
"the poor Africans live in jungles and are
not privileged with the modern luxuries
found in this country
On the other hand, some black
Americans in North Carolina, or at least a
few that I have met, take little or no in-
terest in the affairs in Africa or the
African. It seems to m� that they stwe u
overcome their identification with the
Third World: the land of their roots. Con-
sequently, there seems to be a lack of com-
munication between the African student
and the American. The African student
dismisses the black American as proud and
unwelcoming, while the black American
brushes the African off as being backward
and not so "cool
(Safari Mathenge is an ECU student from
Mombasa, Kenya.He is a junior SLAP
major.)
Strikes: Drastic Action By Labor
By DIANE ANDERSON
The three major union strikes within the
past few months � first the seemingly
unending baseball strike, then the nearly
unaverted postal strike, and most recently
the air traffic controller's strike � are giv-
ing people of this nation a good look at the
lack of effective communication among
our business and industrial leaders.
Obviously, the question has arisen as to
the necessity of a strike being used as a
means to solve the disagreements between
employees and employers over wages and
other compensations. Since when have
thousands of individuals had to walk off
the job on a nationwide scale to effectively
convey to their employers that they are
dissatisfied with present working condi-
tions? On which side does the fault he,
with the unions or with management?
It is possible that the union leaders have,
RCkj IlD. t Nsr cu be 1
Tic0TF-lRM& TH'tiG, Of Y0O&
FASHt'fdS ivV- 0.
cu7 of-
mor rs
FASTMi' Pif5
in recent tunes, lost the patience to
bargain. Instead of taking the time and
energy to discuss and debate the grievances
of their union members, they have chosen
to call for strikes to get their point across
On the other side, the employers may be
unw illing to listen to the grievances of their
employees � trying to placate them on
minor issues, but not dealing with major
wage disputes. In this case the only alter-
native that the union members may feel
they have to get the compensations thev
deserve is to walk off their jobs. Although
this action is quite extreme and certainly
not a positive step towards better relations,
it seems to be the means that the unions
have found to be most effective in reaching
an agreeable compromise over such things
as wage increases and retirement benefits.
The government, in an effort to prevent
a strike by any of its workers, has made it
illegal for them to do so. Although this law
may have been somewhat of a deterrant to
the postal workers during their contempla-
tion of a strike, the air traffic controllers
don't seem to be affected by President
Reagan's threats that they will lose their
jobs permanently or be arrested if they
don't re 1 urn to work.
Given all of these circumstances, it
seems that we have some people in high
places who either have a genuine lack of
communication skills or refuse to openly
negotiate with labor until some extreme ac-
tion is taken to bring grievances to their
employer's attention. It is obvious that
workers on a nationwide scale would not
risk their jobs and economic security
unless they were working under extremely
poor conditions.
So, why can't low wages, bad working
conditions, etc be discussed with manage-
ment and labor presenting opposing com-
promises until a solution is agreed upon.
Or maybe the baseball players and the
air traffic controllers just needed a summer
vacation.
Publi.
smooth!
Nothing
may not
head off
spreadingl
There 11
tra" j
minis' I
went by
controller!
pa;
I hat
( a-
boa
the:
dis I
the
Teacr
nor.
mini
Ab
hing i
man c
of the t I
ed h
So
des -
denied
discip
educat i
tailsps:
(j:
tributed 1
higher J
I ea I
resent!
tion ol
DOONE!
�- A
ii
, "
k
� -

t �
�-
& .
I
�ex
-r-nr
r
DOONE!
-
Ml
"
KJX
WP
rCai
1 1
76 M
and draj
a drug li
1 W 1
ale-
1 uas
which w
test ten
hna
been lot
1 I
so I've
been md
had any
as to th(
the tree
I'd hi
tile a la
1907 or
Nest or
would hi
No on
an placj
can find
you will
Attic. (
the
day nigj
have yo
Now
is also
one cow
state. T
since Sul
Mavb
to some





lems thai
m ment as
les, college
I pos t -
It d not be
tsion you
KHit where
i a heavy
msibility
r ared to
many
ru that the
is country
than to a
isime and
g because
e and are
luxuries
e black
at least a
r no m-
fca or the
stric to
with the
ots. Con-
:k of com-
m student
in student
l roud and
merican
oac k ward
dent from
SLAP
ience to
time and
grievances
iv e chosen
lint across.
:rs may be
cs of their
them on
ith major
lonly alter-
may feel
Itions they
Although
certain!)
relations,
he unions
In reaching
luch things
It benefits.
to present
las made it
gh this law
leterrant to
pntempla-
i iit rollers
President
lose their
:d if they
stances, it
)le in high
ne lack o(
to openly
Extreme ac-
to their
Ivious that
Iwould not
security
extremely
Id working
jli manage-
)smg com-
ked upon.
rs and the
a summer
Other Opinion
NCAE Targets Legislators, Pushes Conditions
By CLAUDE SITTON
Public schools are opening all across North Carolina,
smoothly and without interruption for the most part.
Nothing so remarkable about that or the year after that
may not be the case, not unless state and local officials
head oft he crisis in employer-employee relations now
spreading through public education.
There is a parallel in the neglect that led to the air
traffic controllers' walkout. The Federal Aviation Ad-
ministration let controller complaints fester as the years
went by. So, in violation of the law and their oaths, the
controllers struck against the FAA, the air transporta-
tion system and the public even though they were well
paid.
That same pattern has been developing in North
Carolina for years between teachers and the school
boards, who employ them, and the state, which sets
their pay and qualifications. Unlike the controllers,
teachers are not well paid. But, like that group,
dissatisfaction with non-salary issues underlies much of
the unrest in teaching ranks.
Teachers no longer receive the respect and apprecia-
tion that once substituted for money. They lack the ad-
ministrative and parental support they enjoyed in the
past. Abusive and apathetic students have turned
teaching into a thankless and even dangerous task in too
mans cases. These and other changes have driven many
of the best teachers out of the profession and discourag-
ed highly qualified prospects from entering it.
Society has dumped the problems created by racial
desegregation into the laps of the public schools and
denied teachers and principals sufficient resources and
disciplinary authority to deal with them. A blight of
educational fads has helped to send achievement into a
tailspin from which it only now is beginning to recover.
Growing numbers of incompetent teachers have con-
tributed their bit. And, now, the public is demanding
higher standards of teachers and greater productivity.
Teachers, not surprisingly, have grown increasingly
resentful and militant. Their mood is reflected in the ac-
tion of the North Carolina Association of Educators in
DOONESBURY
targeting 35 legislators for defeat. It's unfair to judge
lawmakers by their votes on only five issues, as th
NCAE is doing. And drafting hit lists in retaliation for
opposition to a group's pet causes does little for the
democratic process.
Nevertheless, what caolition of business, industrial or
labor interests has shown compunction about playing
power politics? NCAE critics would have difficulty
responding convincingly to the defense of the organiza-
tion move offered Friday on this page by Peter G.
Toggerson. He is a Wake County teacher and president
of the county chapter of the Association of Classroom
Teachers and a member of the state NCAE board.
"NCAE has played the quiet, dignified role for years
in its lobbying effort asserts Toggerson. "What have
we gotten for it? We have been ignored, mistreated and
insulted. Teachers in this state are tired of subsidizing
not only public education, but grand state office
buildings and horse arenas. The very folks who are cry-
ing the loudest about the NCAE hit list are the same
ones who talk about quality education on one hand and
vote against it on the other
That's the sentiment that led delegates to the NACE
convention last spring to reaffirm their support for col-
lective bargaining by a vote of 674 to 576. Bargaining
with public employees is discouraged by state law. It
would enable teachers to negotiate salaries, benefits and
working conditions. It also would give them some voice
in educational policy. This is the direction being taken
nationally by the Association in response to competition
from the AFL-CIO Teachers Union.
No thoughtful person wants to turn either the schools
or the teachers over to a union. That would rob teaching
of whatever professionalism it retains, strip teachers
and their supervisors of needed flexibility and further
reduce the quality of instruction. Nevertheless, just as
the AFF's neglect finally brought a controllers' strike,
so that of state and local officials could bring the time
when schools stay closed on opening day.
(This article is reprinted with the permission of The
News And Observer.)
"TUmOHTAX CfifiWIS? NOWH-TWW WOULD DESTROY PUBLIC
EDUCATION AS Wfc KNOW IT
'Learning Process' Modern?
by Garry Trudeau
OKAY. LETS LOOK
have your ueirrww
HOME ad- lets be
PRESS FIRST REASON-
ABLE OtW7
A REPUTATION IS AT STAKE
HERE HIKE YOURSEif, I'M
�E AUfe-LON6PUBUCSER-
M mM? IN FACT. TM JUST
ABOUT TO RUN FOR FOU-
J1CALOFFKE
DOONESBURY
by Garry Trudeau
�rtffc? W UNCLE DUKE
3l' ' HJHOS HE SAYS HE'S
Wr FT FROM THINKJNGOF
i ZONK? GETTING BACK
INTDCVLITICS
whs
iV-ti
Wf THENEWS Um
J LASTNIWT. FOR7
PROBABLY
ACCEPThG
SOMETHING
ftifcfl�? ANY COMMENT,
"k PUKE?
r�&!
UK'
By MICHAEL KERNAN
1 spent a large part of my
childhood at the Utica Cat and Dog
School. The name on the letterhead
was the Utica Country Day School.
It was what they called a progressive
school, which had something to do
with the ideas of John Dewey.
"Learning by doing "The mind is
not a muscle
Some of the most elite kids in
Utica went there, and we studied the
Depression and the Dust Bowl and
Hitler and the CCC in Current
Events. Those things were all very
remote to us, and i hen we held a
mock election in 1936, Alf Landon
won in a landslide. Only Joan Der-
byshire and I voted for Roosevelt.
Joan was a senior and I was a fifth-
grader. I was in love with her.
I don't know what happened to
those schools. 1 guess the Bomb
gave progress a bad name. As far
back as 1938, Dewey himself pro-
tested that many disciples were over-
doing the education-by-experience
thing. At any rate, they faded out
with World War II, except for a few
charming relics supported by
parents who remember how it was.
Today's drillem-and-testem folks
in the back-to-basics crowd certain-
ly aren't about to invite them back.
It's a shame.
I know: Adults always say that
education isn't what it was when
they were young, and we will pro-
rCampus Forum
Former Student Misses Greenville Life
l attended ECU in 1975 and
'76. My major was broadcasting
and drama. That was stopped by
a drug round-up in June of 1976.
I was arrested and convicted of
sales of cocaine and MDA.
I was given 15 to 20 years,
which was until this year the stif-
fest term for drugs in North
Carolina. The last five years have
been long, dull and boring.
My friends have all relocated,
so I've lost touch with them. It's
been more than two years since I
had anyone to keep me informed
as to the changes taking place in
the free world.
I'd have to say I miss Green-
ville a lot. A pizza from Darryl's
1907 or breakfast at the Crow's
Nest or happy hour at the Rat
would be a dream.
No one can tell me that there is
any place in the world where you
can find any prettier girls than
you will find at the Elbo Room or
Attic. Only if you have known
the joys of Wednesday thru Sun-
day nights around Fifth Street
have you lived.
Now I've been told Greenville
is also the home of the number
one cowboy saloon in the whole
state. Then it would have to be
since Super Grit is from there.
Maybe I could be of some help
to someone studying criminology
or penoiogy by relating what life
is like in the home of the people
zoo.
Really, the one who would gain
would be me. Emotionally more
than any way, letters from the
free world sure help.
So, I ask you to please publish
my letter. Maybe someone will be
interested enough to write.
LLOYD JAY HEATH
P.O. Box 58
McCain, NC 28361
Spinal Research
1 was paralyzed from the
shoulders down from a fall nearly
three years ago. On the day of the
injury, I was told that I would
never walk again. However, to-
day new evidence indicates that
there is a chance for paralyzed
persons to walk again. I want
that chance as do, I'm sure, the
other half million people now in
wheel chairs. Medical authorities
report that a cure for spinal cord
injuries could come within three
to five years, maybe less, if
enough money is raised to effect
a crash research program.
If you would like to help me
and others in my situation, you
can by becoming a part of a na-
tional organization, Spinal Cord
Society of Minnesota, which is
feverishly pushing politicians to
raise the needed money. Your ef-
forts will cost you no money. For
further details, please write to the
address below.
And please, the next time you
hear a newscaster say "He's
paralyzed for the rest of his life"
or "He'll be confined to a
wheelchair for the rest of his
life say it ain't so.
STEVE LAIL
192 25th St.
Hickory, NC 28601
Unity Urged
The time has arisen for the
cohesiveness and the sense of uni-
ty that our ancestors of color
once possesed to ignite for all
those who see the aims and ideals
of those same ancestors being so
compromised.
Pres. Reagan, (Our Pres.) who
is surely to send us all to war for
the sake of economy, (for whose
sake is another question)
preaches facts of conservaton
and rer urcefulness from his
secluded vacation ranch home
while the federal government
axes student's financial aid and
state government increases tui-
tion.
As we all enter into this new
school year, make awcre of the
gains that have been made and
the losses that can be gained.
Do not dishonor Martin L.
King, Booker T. Washington,
Frederick Douglass and your
grandmother. We have been
blessed with a mind capable of
creating and innovating. The
time is now to tighten our belts
and roll up our pants (or dress)
whatever the case may be.
DWAINE JEFFERSON
Senior, Envir. Health.
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes
letters expressing all points of
view. Mail or drop them by our
office in the Old South Building,
across from Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification,
all letters must include the name,
major and classification, address,
phone number and signature of
the author(s). Letters are limited
to two typewritten pages, double-
spaced, or neatly printed. All let-
ters are subject to editing for
brevity, obscenity and libel, and
no personal attacks will be per-
mitted. Letters by the same
author are limited to one each 30
days.
bably be hearing this again when
schools open in several weeks. Our
parents no doubt said the same
thing. But for a kid at Utica Coun-
try in those days, it was great. We
loved coming to school. The
teachers were good sports.
In the first grade we were given
little smocks and placed in front of
standing easels with cans of poster
paint � I can still smell that clean,
chalky odor, the smell of school
itself � and brushes as wide as your
thumb. The teacher would gaze in-
tently at some psychotic swirl of
browns and muddy greens and say.
"But that's a lovely border,
Charles
In the second grade we made a
train out of blocks and sat in it in
reverent silence. When we studied
Holland with Miss Hentschke in the
third grade, we made cocoa and, for
some reason, bread.
All I remember is sitting in our
low chairs eating bread and cocoa
and listening to Walter Damrosch's
music appreciation course, a major
attraction of the school. In the
public schools of that day, teaching
by radio was considered radical
nonsense.
That was the year we studied
cavemen and built a cave out of
chicken wire and burlap. We sat in it
the whole day.
In the fifth grade, we had Miss
Wells and studied ancient Rome.
We loved Miss Wells. She was tall,
rangy and gray. We spent about a
month studying the Roman arch.
We made one of plaster of Paris
bricks, molded in tiny homemade
cardboard containers. (If anything
killed progressive schools, it pro-
bably was that they ran out of
plaster of Paris.) Then we made
model Roman catapults.
Now, Roman catapults were all
very well, but the thing that in-
terested me that year, for reasons I
can't possibly recall, was the
guillotine. So I built a model
guillotine instead. "Very nice,
Michael said Miss Wells. At the
spring fair and field day, our
Roman exhibits were ranged on a
table in the corridor: the arch with
its keystone self-righteously in
place, six catapults and a guillotine.
The other thing we did a lot of
was act in plays. Some we put on
before the whole school, some we
just did for ourselves. There always
seemed to be a play in the works, the
way certain people always seem to
have a cigarette going. When we
were studying ancient Greece we did
"The Odyssey or at least the
homecoming scene. We wrote it
ourselves. Sometimes we dramatiz-
ed a book we had all discovered in
the school library, like The Lance of
Kanana.
I was Kanana, a brave little boy in
the Holy Land. 1 always had the
male lead, because Prentiss was too
tall (he specialized in fathers), Jack
and Dave were too short and
Johnny's voice was changing.
Besides, I stuttered. Learning was
fun, and therapy too.
My greatest role was not Kanana,
however, nor Ulysses (come to think
of it, I was Telemachus in that one,
and Prentiss did Ulysses), nor the
Trumpeter of Krakow. It was
Hiawatha, in the second grade.
What a production. We perform-
ed it in the small pine woods behind
the school. Jack was an owl and sat
in a tree the whole time. Prentiss
was Hiawatha's father, and Phyllis
was Minnehaha. I was in love with
Phyllis. The parents sat on folding
chairs at the edge of the woods and
peered into the gloom while w
recited our verses.
As 1 say, we studied politics too.
In the sixth grade, when Miss
Robinson said we should elect a
class president, Dave objected.
"Everybody has presidents he
muttered. "Why don't we have a
dictator?"
This was in 1937, you understand.
So Dave became the class dic-
tator. He appointed the person who
wiped the blackboards, the person
who got to clap the erasers out the
window, the person who fed the
polliwogs. (We had captured the
polliwogs on a field trip to the creek
behind the school. We build a dam
and a diversion tunnel and a holding
pond, and it took us four hours and
sank us up to our socks in mud and
made us miss composition,
geography and gym. It was very
progressive.)
The dictatorship was a tremen-
dous success.
The Cat and Dog School liked to
say it offered preparation for life. I
don't know about that, but certainly
there was a bond, perhaps a sense of
conspiracy, among kids who actual-
ly liked going to school. When 1
transferred to public school in the
seventh grade we took up cavemen
again.
(This article is reprinted with per-
mission from The Washington
Post.)
Opinions
Solicited
In addition to the "Campus
Forum" section of the Opinion
page, The East Carolinian will soon
begin to feature various faculty
members and students as guest col-
umnists. The staff of the newspaper
is proud to announce this innovative
effort to better serve our readers
and provide another outlet for opi-
nions.
The column will be restricted in
content only with regard to rules of
grammar and decency. Persons sub-
mitting columns must be willing to
accept "byline" credit for their ef-
forts, as no entrys from "ghost
writers" will be published.
Persons interested in participating
or desiring further information may
contact Jimmy DuPree, managing
editor of The East Carolinian, at
757-6366, 6367 or 6309 or by visiting
the newspaper office on the second
floor of the Publications Building.


t





Chapter I.
Getting J?e
CLAIROL SHAMPOO
Condition
20-Oz.
Btl.
Shampoo i
W
SHAMPOO OR CONDITIONER
L'oreal Ultra
16-Oz.
Btl.
30 FREE WITH 100
MULTI-POTENCY MULTIVITAMIN
Centrum
$E77
130-Ct.
Btl.
SAVE
$5"
-
REGAL K6727 WH
SELF-BUTTERING
Com Popper
Only
REGAL K 7427 WH, 4 CUI
Hot Pot
$Q97
Only 0
GILLETTE 1000 WATT HAIR DRYER
Supermax 2 1000
$16
SAVE
$2 MORE
SAVE WITH GILLETTE
3� MAIL-IN
REBATE!
MEDICATED SKIN CREAM
Noxzema
$487
10-Oz.
Jar
Copyright 1981
Kroger Savon
Quantity Rights Reserved
None Sold to Dealers
Items end Prices
Effective Wed . Aug 26
tnru Sat. Aug. 29. 1981
in Greenville
ADVERTISED ITEM
POLICY
Each of these advertised
items is required to be
readily available for sale
m each Kroger Savon,
except as specifically
noted m this ad if we do
run out of an item we will
offer you your choice o'
a comparable item when
available, reflecting the
samsavinga or � rain-
check which will entitle
you to purchase the
advertised item at the
advertised price within
30 days
A

V
i
rtfj
��!
Wit'
34-
' : r j�- f
BIANCO 5R
Remigo
Lambrusco
Chapter IV
The Party
TAB, MR PIBB.
MELLO YELLO OR
Coca-Cola
$405
2-Ltr.
Btl.
WISE
Potato Chips
8-Oz.
Twin
Pack
OSCAR MAYER
ALL-MEAT SLICED
Bologna
8-Oz.
Pkg.
�'
Ht- ROSE, CHABLIS
RHINE OR
CRiajaJH
Cribari
Mello Burgundy
$07 7
Ltr. JW
Bti. MM
FAVORITE BREW
Wiedemann
6S4 39
12-Oz. m
Btis. m
SAUSAGE OR PEPPERONI
Tony's Pizza
89
r.
1-
Ea
FROM THE DELI-
SLICED TO ORDER
14-Lb.
ALL VARIETIES COUNTRY CLUB
Wafer Sliced Meats
-
3-Oz.
Pkgs.
y
Chapter III
The Apartniej)f
U.S.DA. INSPECTED QUALITY
CONTROLLED CHUB PAK OR REG
STORE PAK
Ground Beef
$4 28
Lb. &
BATHROOM
Northern Tissue
Roll
Pkg.
SPRINGDALE HOMOGENIZED
Whole Milk
$489
Gal S
Jug SI
NOKTHCRN
WE MAKE IT
YOU BAKE IT
VARIETY TOPPINGS
For
WITH ROLL & ICE TEA
SERVED 12 NOON TO 7 PM
Spaghetti
Dinner
GAl
Only
C .
Oniy

� ftj�fM�Mi
J





f

1
v:

Make
Kroger Sav-on
Your ONE
STOP
SHOPPING
- Headquarters
all through
the year!
U X
U.S. NO 1 WHITE
Potatoes
etit
DECORATIVE
NORTHCRII
Foliage Plant
$449
4-Inch W.
Pot �
THOMPSON WHITE
Seedless Grapes
i
GALAXY 20" BREEZE BOX
3-Speed Fan
Only
SAVE
LL & ICE TEA
NOON TO 7 PM
ighetti
inner
9
c,
tttntcr
OPEN Mon. thru Sat. 8 AM TO MIDNIGHT-Sun. 9 AM TO 9 PM
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
BEST RITE LINED
ChaPter lJ
The Class
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS
Business Analyst I
$4Q88
Onlv � 1
SAVE
�2OT
200
.J
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS "MATH ON KEYS"
BOOK AND Tl 30 CALCULATOR
TI-30 Math Kit
$14
88
SAVE
only wm WM $�11
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS
SCIENTIFIC CALCULATOR
TI-55 Scientific
$2888
MEAD 5-SUBJECT
Theme Book
$4 27
Ea. �
FABER CASTELL NO 2 YELLOW
Venus Pencils
�� �
5 Subject
Divided
Notebook
12-Ct.
Pkg.
FrrnnTn
1 il.il J 1 11 U
I - .
Only
SAVE
� 307
ASSORTED COLORS FIBER POINT
Flair Pen
Ea
i'
BLACK &
SILVER
COLOR
G.E. 3-5307 A PUSHBUTTON RECORDER
Mini Cassette
88
Only
Chapter V
The Big Q9ttj
2 PIECES & ROLL, SNACK PAK
Fried Chicken
FROM OUR BAKERY,
BIG FRESH BAKED
TIRE BREWED STROH'S OR
Stroh's Light
6$489
12-Oz.
Cans �
SERVE N SAVE
ALL-MEAT OR ALL-BEEF
SfcRt
iSA VI�
wieners
12-Oz.
Pkg.
Chocolate Chip Cookies
I





I H I I -
h
M
i i: i s! : -
Page H
Book Progresses Under Pickett's Guidance
B I'M I (oil s 0j (hc btx), had been finished when
she look ovei in lune
editoi m Picket "When I took the job, 1 didn't
ie Byland in that realize Inns little ol the book had
c ha� indicated that been done Pickett commented "I
have the yearbook didn't realize that nothing had been
I and distributed on campus done
ess Byland, on the othei hand, tell
'� o perceni that percent ol the work on the
. , hack bel book had been finished when she
gned ' lust because only H
id paces have been sent in doesn't
mean thai a lot more sork hasn't
� ui thai ih .lone
Byland said that most ot the
ries toi the book had been writ-
ten and edited and thai most of the
photographs had been taken
t ommenting on hei decision to
resign, she said, "I dec. led to go
ihead and do what was inevitable
id save every body a lot ol
meaning the Media
i a e
Byla
main faili
mana
time
thai n
eithi
tion
need
dub
undei 13
tali
sn
Ho
Thr
Ann Picket!
ind aid that she met with submitted a! thai lime
axwcll the Friday before she sub 4 pages were scheduled to have
hei resignation and that at been completed
. he gave her the impression rhe board first asked Bvlai
1 a

' she did not resign she would about the missed dead! : its
te been tired "I asked turn what meeting on May 25. "Ban I
appen it I didn'l resign, and was onnel problem Maxwell
would just fire me
� rig about it, 1 decided
md resign, she continued
aid i w - a ol hassle u
� "Bui
have voted fire hei h.o e in b thai I
explain 1 fell thai
new hairn
hae a chant urk the
BUSCH K�!
respond
1awell. a
dated May 20 was the
n the board had thai
thi I aneei
s � vleadhru
paces had been
ik Tiila
Quench Your
Thrist With
Busch Beer
in 12 Oz Cans
Ma
By
Bu
He
i

L
Supporl and
. p a
ton ot Six
M.91
VV
BUSCH
FREE HAIR DESIGN
Pay for your 1st California Concept
Hair DesignGet your
r second FREE
ad! thru Oct 1 st!
bi new customet
-Precision Cuts
The Cut is the Style
752 2967
1100 Charles Blvd. Appt only Mon-
Greenville, NX. Fri. 9 am 6 pm
Room
Tues Crazy Tuesday
Wed Hump Nite
Thurs College Nite
Fri "End of Week Party
Sat "Best in Dance
Music


Sun "Ladies' Nite

� �
BACK-TO-

-c
.2
SCHOOL
Economics!
�Facto'
D're tl
a
WELCOME BACK
ECU. STUDENTS
$99�
260�
$34900
-
GREAT FOOD AMIGOS!
Calvin Klein
Denim Jeans
reel S42.00
now
$
34
99
TACOBELL
COUI
BUY ONfc
BEEFY TOSTADO
GET ONE TACO
FREE
TACOBELL
L.
TACOBELL
BEEFY TOSTADO
GETONF
CINNAMON CKISPA
FREE
TACOBELL
TACO BELL
Work
part time
Earn
full time.
)is11 ibutor I; .
SUt.
Shaklee
Independent
Distributor
I your I
I �
� ivel Sell Natui : tred
iyci 10 years oi Shaklet
DANII 1 CLIFTON 752 2076
I HI LIFE-FORCE
620 S. PITT ST.
(BETWEEN 5th & DICKINSON)
FAMILY HAIR CARE SALON 752 5048
SPECIAL UNTIL SEPT. 15th
�SHAMPOO, HAIRCUT & STYLE $5 95
FREE HATHA YOGA CLASSES
C STKRS
Restaupant
s
it
M
Sa1 9 30 ;
Open 7 Days a Week





weeks of
terest pro-
vvhat hap-
pen of the
m Byland
i of u was
v major
?ver she
leo-i some
1 aked
jl assumed
il recently
ahng had
ntervies
counted
I a d n o
enal
t feel that
lite she
I ed un-
"N
veaalize
rdable
lifure"
ttes
hair
J
J"erGoxJ
� V Ser' I
o
r Good
� pt 21
dining with
e best food
Thank You
)anie Smith
d Hostess
IS
I Drive
"H834
14
& Dinner
ir, Steaks,
Dinners
fampagne
)ms
Permitted
mbers"
-9.30 p.m.
-9:30 p.m.
a Week
Housing Office Again Has
Three Person Rooms
9
There will be "no tion is expected to be
surprises"for returning completed in the fall,
residence hall students, Some students have
according to Housing expressed concern that
Director Dan Wooten, the alarms will be easily
but the on-campus triggered by cooking
is
housing situation
tight again this fall.
According to
Wooten, 450 students
will be residing in three-
person rooms. An addi-
tional 12 will be hous-
ing in two social rooms
in Garret Dorm. But
Wooten says that
under our present
system we guaranteed
freshmen accomoda-
tions" and he believes
they have been suc-
cessful.
But transfer students
have been left, for the
most part, without on-
campus housing.
There are also a lot
of proposed and actual
changes in residence
hall life for returning
and freshmen students.
The most obvious
change will be that all
dorm phones should
have been connected by
the time the students
returned to their
rooms. The installation
fee and the monthly
service charges will be
paid by the university.
The charges were in-
cluded on this year's
rent for the rooms.
This has made possi-
ble the elimination of
paging systems to the
women's residence
halls. Wooten cited
problems with the pag-
ing system as the main
reason for the addition
of a house phone
system. A house phone
will be located in the
lobby of all halls and
will be available for use
by visitors rather than
the traditional paging
sytem. The paging
system had been tried
in men's residence halls
but had been unsuc-
cessful.
Wooten also cited Ti-
tle IX as one of the
determining factors in
the change. (Title XI
concerned equality.)
The installation of
smoke detectors is
another summer addi-
tion that will surprise
students. Though not
all of the units have
been installed, installa-
and smoking in the
halls, but the exact sen-
sitivity of the alarms
has not yet been deter-
mined.
There has been a pro-
posal to eliminated
cooking from the
rooms some time in the
distant future. A pro-
posed addition to
Mendenhall Student
Center may house addi-
tional space for food
service and this pro-
posal may be a deter-
mining factor in the
end decision.
Wooten said, "There
has been interest ex-
pressed in that area
But the initial concerns
are about those
students who are three
to six to a room. At
present the priority for
moving people is to
move two of the six
people from the social
rooms in Garret first
and then begin moving
people from the three-
person rooms. "Six
personalities are hard
to biend said Wooten
as an explanation.
One change from last
year is that the three-
person rooms were
marked and all return-
ing students who signed
up for the rooms were
warned that there
might be a third person
living with them.
Freshmen have also
been warned that the
later they applied for
housing, the better
their chances were for
being placed in a three-
person room.
One hundred and
seventy one male
students will be housed
in three-person rooms
in Jones. White, Cle-
ment and Greene Halls
will each receive 75 per-
sons in three-person
rooms. Both Cotton
and Fleming will also
receive some three-
person rooms, but
Wooten cited that these
rooms had been
originally designed for
use by three persons
and the third person in
these rooms will be the
last to be moved when
space becomes
available.
Wooten attributed
the lack of enough beds
in the fall as the biggest
problem his depart-
ment has had to deal
with.
But the loss of 44
beds in the conversion
to co-ed dorms in the
past year has not in-
fluenced the procedure.
Wooten said that
there are almost always
a much greater number
of women applying for
housing than men and
this was a factor in the
conversion. Wooten
cited that his depart-
ment has "just about"
satisfied the on-campus
housing requirements
for both freshmen and
transfer students. He
said that there are
"50-ish" women
students on the waiting
list and due to cancella-
tions, there should be a
smaller number left
without on-campus
housing in the fall. He
also stated that most of
the students accepted
will be in school and
tha the lack of on-
campus housing deter-
red very few students
from attending ECU.
ANDCONVENIENCE CENTRE
evbaeh
THE PLACE TO BE FOR
BACK-TO-SCHOOL
European
Trained
Stylists
Call ahead or corrie by-
today for the
new fall hairstyles.
FREE
CONSULTATION
Pitt Plaza Shopping Center
756-6200
DISCOUNT
COUPON
BOOKS
ECU
Studen ts!
fiNG Sandwich
Delicatessen
2729 E. 10th Street
(Colonial Heights
Shopping Center)
PICK UP YOUR COUPON BOOK
OPEN: MONSAT.
11 A.M8P.M.
752-4297
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26th
8:30 A.M8:30 P.M.
MENDENHALL CENTER
Student Organization Room
rWi
W&iSP'
TRY
US FOR
THE BEST SAND WICH
SELECTION
IN TOWN!
TREMENDOUS STUDENT
DISCOUNTS OFFERED
BY MANY OF OUR 70 STORES!
KM
6 different breads to choose from.
Cheese Steaks
Cheese Burgers
Hoagies
and many, many more
to select from.
Call ahead for take out orders!
'AfA'JAVA
wm
tftOflflM
w
.���:�
��.?.�.�.���.
�.�j
m&tti-
AND CONVENIENCE CENTRE
264 By-Pass On Hwy. 11, Greenville
A
t
r
m�mM�Mp� � �� �'��
sm.rl M





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 25, 1981
Page 10
If you missed the
JIMMY BUFFETT and
CHEAP TRICK sell-outs
last spring then you
WON'T want to miss . . .
BLACKFOOT
with special guests
JOHNNY VAN ZANDT
and
DEF LEPPARD
Checki
Continued From Pug i
checking. Under this plan you
receive: money orders, travel
checks, and cashier checks all
of charge.
The third plan is called
ClubFor J4 a month, you get
checking, check print i
Traveller's checks, money
and nationwide discounts at R
way Inns, Holiday inn, Rarr
Inn, Hertz and Avis Rent a-1
Also, under this plan you re I
book of coupons twice a yea
for reduced admission at f
resorts such as, Six Flag' O
and Carowinds You also may
chase $2 movie rickets good al
Plitt, Pitt, and Park Theaters. I
prices are comparable to
door.
Supply
Moved
B KARFS UKM)1
"We have tried aur bes
adequate sinage up
Clark, Manager of the Stude:
ply Store.
But the current layout of the c
pus bookstore will be coi fu
those who have been there
and for those who have
they'll have to wait and see.
Due to the renovatioi
Auditorium one hai!
bookstore, the area
recently housed the entir
tion, has been partitioned i
books which were housed tl
now housed upstairs in th j
area of the auditorium a
stage. The steps to th:
behind the double doors that a j
the lobby area.
According to Clark ail
will be located upstair, alonf I
limited number of school supl
such as paper, pens and f
Clark says that he was '
the changes will only be r !
for two months and that after
period the store will be return
normal.
Normal, that is. with some
changes.
The primary change will t
addition of six large pill
will serve as supports foi A
auditorium. (Two more wil
located in the store's storage
According to Clark, I
registers will also be locate i
r.
Thursday, September 17
8PM
Minges Coliseum
ECU STUDENTS $6.00 (in advance)
PUBLIC $8.00
Tickets go on sale to STUDENTS ONLY Monday,
August 31 at 10 AM in Mendenhall. Tickets go on
sale to the general Public Thursday, September 3
at all area ticket outlets. Tickets will be sold on a
first come, first serve basis.
fM'gt
VISA"
The Best Piz;
Fa
Game
Machines
pizza & si
AAon. & Tues. 5:30 8
AAon. thru Fri. 11:3(
Wed. � All you can
Thurs. � Lasagna
e
WE'VE
&
Bring this
10dis,

QWHS
EKS1S
lumber toj
j





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 25, 1981
Page 11
VISA'
Checking Accounts Vary At Different Banks
Continued From Page 1
checking. Under this plan you may
receive: money orders, travellers
checks, and cashiers checks all free
of charge.
The third plan is called "Bank
ClubFor $4 a month, you get free
checking, check printing,
Traveller's checks, money orders,
and nationwide discounts at Road-
way Inns, Holiday Inn, Ramada
Inn, Hertz and Avis Rent-a-car.
Also, under this plan you receive a
book of coupons twice a year, good
for reduced admission at major
resorts such as, Six Flags Over Ga
and Carowinds. You also may pur-
chase $2 movie tickets good at the
Plitt, Pitt, and Park Theaters. These
prices are comparable to $3 at the
door.
You also under the Bank Club
plan, bocome a member of Check
Cash. As a member of Check Cash
you are able to travel and cash your
personal check at more than 6,000
nationwide banks who are membeis
of Check Cash.
Beth Smith of Peoples Bank says
that students should open an ac-
count in Greenville and should keep
track of your checks. It also would
be a good to have an account here in
the case you should need to contack
someone to help straighten up a mix
up. Remember Greenville has a Mer-
chants' Bad Check List.
-Planters National Bank. Has
three locations in Greenville, 3rd
St Pitt Plaza, and Carolina East
Mall. They too are a full service
bank, but they do not have a
24-hour machine.
Planters also offers the Now Ac-
counts with standard 5.25 percent
on both savings and checking with a
minimum of $500. If you can main-
tain $200 average checking or sav-
ings balance you can avoid a $2
a-month basic checking account
charge and .20 each check. Accor-
ding to Steve Shuford of Planters,
balancing one's account is very im-
portant, and they also offer a zero
maintainance checking account.
This means any balance in a check-
ing account will not be charged, the
only charge will be $.25 for each
check that is written.
-Wachovia. Has three Teller II
locations in Greenville. There are 91
Teller II locations through out the
state of North Carolina. They too
are a full service bank who offer
5.25 percent on regular savings.
They charge $1 a-month service
charge on checking accounts and . 15
each on written checks. With $500
you get Free Way Checking.
Wachovia is the only bank to offer
each student a personal banker.
Jerry Smith of Wachovia says
that students should be thrifty, kep
records and clearly keep up with
their balances. Wachovia can be
found on 10th St across from cam-
pus, downtown in the Wachovia
Building and also on 264 By-Pass.
-ECU Student Bank. I located on
the first floor of Mendenhall Stu-
dent center. The type of service that
they offer is check cashing for in
and out of state checks and local
checks. The maximum that a stu-
dent can obtain from the bank is
$125 every seven working days of
the bank. However if you get a
University payroll check for more
than the amount, they will honor
that check.
The Student Bank also collects
telephone bills. They ask that if you
pay with a check that yu make the
check payable to Carolina
Telephone Co. They do however
have a savings account that does not
bear any interest. The hours are
from 10:00 a.m. until 4:30 p.m.
Monday through Friday.
Mrs. F. Dorey says that the
following rules shuld be honored;
present valid I.D. and activity card,
clearly print your I.D. number,
local telephone number, and local
university address. There is a $5
charge on all returned checks.
Supply Store Books
Moved Upstairs
By KAREN WENDT
Ncwi Kdilor
"We have tried our best to put
adequate sinage up says Joe
Clark, Manager of the Student Sup-
ply Store.
But the current layout of the cam-
pus bookstore will be confusing to
those who have been there before,
and for those who have not, well
they'll have to wait and see.
Due to the renovations in Wright
Auditorium one half of the
bookstore, the area which until
recently housed the entire book sec-
tion, has been partitioned off. The
books which were housed there are
now housed upstairs in the front
area of the auditorium and the
stage. The steps to this area are
behind the double doors that are in
the lobby area.
According to Clark all textbooks
will be located upstairs along with a
limited number of school supplies
such as paper, pens and notebooks.
Clark says that he was told that
the changes will only be necessary
for two months and that after that
period the store will be returned to
normal.
Normal, that is, with some slight
changes.
The primary change will be the
addition of six large pillars which
will serve as supports for the new
auditorium. (Two more i'l be
located in the store's storage space.)
According to Clark, five cash
registers will also be located in the
upstairs location in addition to five
in the regular bookstore.
Clark said the store had hired ad-
ditional personnel to man the addi-
tional registers and handle book
customers. He also said that some
additional personnel will be needed
as long as the books are kept
upstairs.
At the end of the school term
some books can be sold back to the
bookstore for one-half the original
price. The book will then be resold
at three-fourths of the current price.
According to Clark, if the price of
the book goes up during the
semester the price the bookstore
pays for the book is one-half the
new price, not that which was paid
for the book. This is one way that
the bookstore makes money and
students save money.
But apparently the bookstore
didn't make as much money as it
might have last year.
According to Clark money for the
scholarship fund did not develop
last year. In fact, "none went in last
year said Clark. According to
Clark, first the funds must be used
to pay normal expenses, such as
salaries and operating costs. Then
the funds go to pay off renovating
the bookstore (done four years ago,
which will still take an estimated
three to four years to finish pay-
ment) and to pay for the Student
Center Snack Bar and to pay the in-
terest on the two accounts.
atti
a
Weekdays
11:30-11:00
Fri. & Sat.
11:30-12:00
300 E. 10th St.
758-6121
The Best Pizza in Town! (Honest)
Fast Service!
Game
Machines
k
Big
Screen TV
Drive Up
Window For
To Go Orders
PIZZA & SPAGHETTI BUFFET
AAon. & Tues. 5:30-8:00$2.79
AAon. thru Fri. 11:30-2:00$2.69
Wed. � All you can eat Spaghetti -5:30-8:00 $2.69
Thurs. � Lasagna � One Reg. Price.Second One
$1.00
� e
WE'VE GOT BLOCK
& BOARDS!
Bring this ad and get a special
IV O discount on any shelving
purchase for all ECU students

Lumber Cojnc.
We also have a
complete line of security
hardware for your
apartment or room.
says
WELCOME BACK STUDENTS
Dire
torV
ct
ture
SaleS
756-3844
-n i4 pjk, f
11 �JB4 ��� f
I iJL-llUL
lfaJk-fML.f
CHINESE FOOD
TIULY UNIQUE PUCE TO DINE
FEATURING A COMPLETE
CHINESE fir AMERICAN MENU
THAT INCLUDES CHILDREN'S
6- SENIOR CITIZENS' PLATES
TAKEOUT SERVICE
IANQUET PARTY ROOM FACILITIES
GREENVILLE
2317 MEMORIAL DR.
Welcome
Back
E.C.U.
Students
"We Specialize In Affordable Furniture"
Twin Mattress & Box
260 12 Up All Wood Dinettes
$OAQ00
�� I Sofa, Loveseat, & Chair
We Can Special Order Student Desks
Remember Us, For Your Furniture Needs
BEER �f WINE
PACKAGE OF0-12OZ. CANS
Budweiser W
PACKAGE OF 6 � 12 OZ. CANS BUDWEISER
Natural
Light 2�
PACKAGE OF 6 - 12 OZ. CANS
Busch$179
PACKAGE OF 6 -12 OZ. CANS REGULAR A LIGHT
Schlitz s99
PACKAGE OF 6 - 1 2 OZ. BOTTLES
Pabst
Blue Ribbon $19
1.5 LITER - HEARTY BURGUNDY, RHINE, RED ROSE,
PINK CHABLIS, CHIANTI
Gallo 329
1.5 LITER - WHITE, GOLD, RED, PINK
Taylor Lake
Country $339
1.5 LITER - CHI ANTI, ROSE, RHINESKELLER
Colony 39
V. GALLON - FLORIDA OOLD
Orange Juice 99
10 OZ. JAR - INSTANT
Maxwell House
Coffee 333
6.5 OZ. IN OIL
Star Kist
Tuna
75
OOD
TOWN
LFPINCSCVA
THESE PRICES GOOD AT THE GREENVILLE FOOD TOWN STORE ONLY
� 115 EAST RED BANKS ROAD - SOUTH PARK SHOPPING CENTER
'





THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 25,1981 P�ge �
rJ
Pepsi
ALL DAYTUES.AUG.25&WED.AUG.26
Sg Pepsi T Shirts
FIRST 100 CUSTOMERS TUES.
BOTH DAYS
Pirate Rags
Pirate Fan Hands first 50 customers tues
2 litre Pepsi, DietPepsi,&Mountain Dew
-99
TUES.& WED. ONLY
c?�C I At
&

'�:�����"��.�;��,
TUES.& WED.ONLY
selected
T-Shirts
2.95

ecu
?SVECI4
TUES.& WED.ONLY
selected
GymShorts
2.95
BOOK RUSH
HOURS
TUES. 9-530
WED9-5-30
THURS8-9O0
FRI8-900
SAT95:30
t�fe
Jls
Ifeps
U.B.E
528 S. COTANCHE
GREENVILLE, N.C.
,00$
'g;
3j






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
AUGUST 25.1981
Pirates Admitted To ECAC-South
I he news came last week � the
- that East Carolina athletic
followers haved waited and hoped
for for over a year.
L ast week the Pirates were admit-
to the Eastern College Athletic
iferencc (EC AC) for men's
basketball and some unnanounced
non-revenue sports by the league's
executive couneil. The admission is
ding approval from the total
U membership, which should
make a decision on the matter in
September.
ECU was placed in the ECAC-
South, one of seven divisions of the
232-member conference. Other
members of the ECAC-South in-
clude Old Dominion, George
Mason, James Madison, Richmond,
William and Mary, and Navy.
The Pirate men's basketball team
will become eligible immediately for
conference play. ECU Athletic
Director Ken Karr had already made
the proper scheduling arrangements
last spring.
The Bucs will compete in the con-
ference tournament, set for March
2,4 and 6 at an undetermined sight.
The tournament champion will get
an automatic bid to the NCAA tour-
nament.
"This is a very positive thing for
East Carolina University Karr
said after the announcement. "The
best thing, of course, is that it pro-
vides access to the NCAA tourna-
ment as early as this season
The announcement by the ECAC
boarJ came as somewhat of a sur-
prise, as four of the previous
ECAC-South members had an-
nounced last October that they were
pulling out of the league.
Those clubs were ODU, Rich-
mond, James Madison, and William
and Mary. Those four combined
with ECU in an effort to form an
entirely new conference.
Stumbling blocks greeted the five,
though, as the group could never
determine what school would
become the sixth and final con-
ference entry (NCAA requires six
teams in a conference).
Due to the problems the four that
withdrew reapplied to the ECAC-
South, at the same time, of course,
that the Pirates applied to the league
council
Karr said that he did not an-
ticipate any problems when the
league membership makes the final
decision in September.
Karr also did not rule out the
possibility that the schools would
once again try to branch out into a
new league at the end of the year.
Emory Says Pirates To
Be Greatly Improved'
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports txSHor
East Carolina football coach Ed
Emory may not be predicting any
miracies but he does say that his
Pirates will be a much better team
than the one that went a disappoin-
ting 4-7 a yea: ago.
"We'll be entirely different
orv said. "We'll definitely be a
great K improved football team.
We're already twice the football
team that at this time last year
There are various reasons why the
er team this year than
last, wh club suffered through
its first sing reason since 1971.
irse, is the fact that the
ai coaching staff now has
son under its belt.
. n Emory is high on
. tad is based on what he
.v a ery strong group of new
"V er pleased with the
and transfers Emory
"This is a very gifted
-roup. A number of them
already battling for starting
,it.iOili.
er seems assured of a
that being defensive
Schulz (6-4, 230), a
Chow an. Two other
.ruits, Mike Grant and
are in the battle for
s arting linebacker positions.
ee treshman running backs
been very impressive thus far
Ali-State performer Jimmy
n, Stefon Adams and James
have looked well and ex-
-ome early playing time.
in split end Ricky Nichols
een a most pleasant suprise
early. I he tleet youngster has
already run a pair of 4.3 40-yard
nes and is vying for playing time
,i- an alternating receiver.
: io ot transfers from Villanova
also have made a few heads turn on
the Pirate practice field. The
Philadelphia-based university drop-
football program last year
and opened the way for Emory to
bring in quarterback Kevin Ingram,
ker (hack Bushbeck, running
k Milton Corsey and linebacker
aid Rogers.
Rogers will miss this season due
to i boat with mono. Bushbeck is
Bushbeck
Status Is
Questionable
hast Carolina kicker Chuck
Bushbeck was informed Friday that
he is suffering from Hodgkin's
disease, a milignant cancer that af-
fects the lymph nodes.
Bushbeck was operated on Thurs-
day at Pitt County Memorial
Hospital and had a knot removed
from his chest. He was put on hold
as to the nature of the knot, as tests
had to be run to determine what had
caused the growth.
Bushbeck was informed Friday at
4 pm. that tests had proven positive
for Hodgkin's disease.
It is not known as of yet whether
Bushbeck will be able to continue in
his role as the Pirates' starting
placekicker. He won the job easily
after transferring to ECU in the spr-
ing from Villanova, which dropped
its football program.
Bushbeck expressed determina-
tion after the announcement to con-
tinue as the ECU kicker, saying he
plans to "keep on playing football
until someone tells me to stop
Tests will be run at Pitt Memorial
this week to determine what
treatments and procedures need to
be taken to move the kicker toward
recoverv. After the tests, an an-
nouncement will be made concern-
questionable after surgery last week
revealed that he was suffering from
a milignant tumor. The kicker's
status should be known sometime
this week.
Ingram and Corsey, though, are
in camp and performing admirably.
Ingram is pushing holdovers Greg
Stewart, Carlton Nelson and Larry
Brobst at the quarterback position.
Corsey is currently listed as one of
the team's top backfield reserves.
Though the newcomers on the
Pirate squad have grabbed a lot of
the early attention, Emory says the
improvement of the holdovers has
him just as excited as the new blood.
"Our kids came back this fall in
great shape he said. "We are
showing to be faster and stronger
than we were in May (during spring
drills).
"Also Emory continued, "our
attitude is 1,000 percent better. Our
intensity and organization are also
much improved
The big word in the Pirate camp
this year, though, is "if
"If our youth can blend with the
rest of the team so that we have
some chemistry and our schedule
doesn't kill us Emory said, "we
can be a fine football team
The schedule is definitely a tough
one. Included on the slate are Atlan-
tic Coast Conference foes North
Carolina, N.C. State and Duke.
Also listed is powerful Miami, like
Carolina a sure top 20 pick, and
West Virginia.
"The schedule is definitely not an
advantage for our squad Emory
claimed. "If we were older and
more experienced, maybe, but it is
awfully tough for a team as young
1981 ECU FOOTBALL SCHEDULE
(Home Games In Caps)
Sept. 5 � WESTERN CAROLINA, 7 p.m.
Sept. 12 � at North Carolina, 1 p.m. Sept.
19 at N.C. State, 7 p.m. Sept. 26 �
TOLEDO, 7 p.m. Oct. 3 � at Duke, 1 30 p
.m. Oct. 10 � at Richmond, 1:30 p.m. Oct.
17 � at Southwest Louisina, 7:30 p.m.
(CDT) Oct. 24 � MIAMI (Fla.), 1:30 p.m.
Oct. 31 � at West Virginia, 1:30 p.m. Nov. 7
� EAST TENNESSEE STATE
(Homecoming), 2 p.m. Nov. 14 �
WILLIAM AND MARY, 1:30 p.m.
as ours.
The Pirate coaching staff has
divided the schedule into six "must
wins" and five "big games The
five "big games" are with the five
previously-mentioned clubs. The
other six are Southwestern Loui-
siana, Richmond, William and
Mary, East Tennessee State, Toledo
and Western Carolina.
"I told the kids that we have to
beat those six teams Emory said.
"We should be better than they are.
Our program is bigger and we've got
to win
The five "big games" are where
Emory hopes to make his big break.
"If we win two of those and the
other six we'll have a helluva team
he said. "If we win three of the 'big
games' and the other six we're going
bowling someplace
Before any of those goals can be
reached, though, Emory says it is
important that the young Bucs gain
some early confidence. Therefore,
he has placed a lot of emphasis on
the season opener with Western
Carolina.
"I certainly hope our team
doesn't look past our first game
with Western because of the
Carolina game (game two on the
Buc schedule) Emory said.
"Western has most everybody back
and will be a very tough opponent
As the Pirates prepare for the
season opener perhaps the most
watched position on the football
team is the quarterback spot. Cur-
rently junior Carlton Nelson is run-
ning ahead of Kevin Ingram, Greg
Stewart and Larry Brobst. Emory
made it clear over the weekend that
all four were still under strong con-
sideration for a starting bid,
though.
Stewart may be a bit behind the
others, having been out of practice
for about a week with a minor in-
jury. He is expected back this week.
Sophomore Ernest Byner and
senior Harold Blue are running
ahead in the race for the two
halfback slots. Freshmen Walden,
Corsey, Adams, along with vets
. Leon Lawson and Marvin Cobb are
running close behind.
Burlington native Roy Wiley, a
husky 6-0, 240, is the first team
fullback. Georgia Tech transfer
Preparing For Western
The East Carolina football team is busy
preparing for its Sept. 5 opener at home
against Western Carolina. The team
scrimmaged for several hours Sunday. In
some of Sunday's action, the offensive
and defensive lines converge above.
Below, the offensive line opens a hole for
a back to go through. The team will go
through its last two-a-day practice routine
today. Beginning on Thursday the club
will have only one practice, that being at
3:30 p.m. (Photos by Rochel Roland)
Chip Simmons is the backup at this
point.
All-America candidate Tootie
Robbins heads up what should be a
much-improved offensive line. Rob-
bins and his counterparts will form
what could be the largest offensive
front in ECU history.
Robbins (6-5, 275) and Miami
transfer Tom Carnes (6-5, 265) are
the starting tackles. Mindell Tyson
(6-4, 270) was running ahead of
Carnes before being sidelined by an
injury.
Bud LaCock (6-2, 260) is at one
guard spot while Terry Long (6-0,
280) and Oscar Tyson (6-1, 225) are
vying for the other guard position.
Tony Hensley (6-0, 232) is heading
into his second year as the team's
starting center.
Defensively, the Pirates are look-
ing for big things from holdover
starters defensive tackle George
Crump and defensive end Mike
Davis.
The secondary is short on depth
but has five people with some star-
ting experience: Freddie Jones,
Clint Harris, Gerald Sykes, Marvin
Elliott and Smokey Norm.
The graduation of Jeffrey Warren
and the loss of Rogers to mono bad-
ly hurt the linebacking position's
depth. Still, Mike Grant, Amos
Twitty Glenn Morris and Donald
Reid are on hand and fighting for
the two starting linebacker posi-
tions.
NCAA Tourney Now Accessible
Conference Will Do Wonders For Bucs
Chuck Bushbeck
ing Bushbeck's availability to the
Pirates this season.
Bushbeck had a banner three-year
career at Villanova before the
school dropped its program due to
financial problems. He connected
on 42 of 47 extra point attempts
during that time.
He has been billed in many circles
as a bonafide All-America can-
didate in this his senior season.
"He's an All-America person as
well as player ECU head coach Ed
Emory said following the announce-
ment Friday. "The character he has
shown today indicates the fight and
determination that he will use to
work toward full recovery
Fantastic.
ECU fans from all over must be
overjoyed at last week's announce-
ment that the Pirate men's basket-
ball team will compete in the
ECAC-South this coming season.
The announcment of the Bucs in a
conference is one that ECU fans
have hoped for for quite some time.
More importantly, the ECAC-South
has an automatic berth to the
NCAA national championship tour-
nament.
What this means is if the Pirates
are able to put together three good
nights of basketball in early March,
they could end up in the prestigious
NCAA event.
Sounds great, right? Well, it is.
But it is not what ECU officials had
in mind a few months ago.
The Pirate brass worked all of last
fall and throughout the summer
with four other schools � Old
Dominion, James Madison,
William and Mary, and Richmond
� in an effort to form a new con-
ference. The problem was that the
five could never agree on a league
member number six, that being the
number required for a conference
by the NCAA.
Ironically, two schools that the
Charles
Chandler
five were considering as a sixth
member, George Mason and Navy
(UNC-Wilmington was another)
were already in the ECAC-South.
The four schools that had reached
agreement with ECU had just drop-
ped out of that league.
As it turned out, the four schools
that left the ECAC-South simply
went back in at the 11th hour. At
the same time, ECU applied for ad-
mission as the loop's seventh
member.
Last week the league council ap-
proved ECU's application. All that
remains for it to be official is an
okay from the total ECAC member-
ship of 232 schools. That appears to
be no problem.
Football To Benefit?
What benefits will the Pirates
reap from the new league?
Quite a few, surely. There is no
doubt that the fact that the school is
a part of an established conference
will help when cage coach Dave
Odom talks to recruits this year.
Of course, there is the big advan-
tage of the Bucs having a lot easier
� though not easy � access to the
NCAA tournament.
The improvement of the basket-
ball program could help Pirate foot-
ball as well. ECU Athletic Director
Ken Karr will no doubt develop a
good relationship with Navy, one of
the ECAC-South's members. Who
knows? Eventually, he might work
up a contract that would give the
Pirates a home-and-home series
with Navy. That would definitely be
a step in the right direction.
Karr Doing The Job
Speaking of Karr, the man has
come under his share of criticism in
his first year and one-half on the job
at ECU. Much of it has been unfair.
Karr is an experienced, well-
known administrator. He was a
member of the NCAA Basketball
Tournament Selection Committee a
year ago. He has been on
numerous other NCAA groups
and was one of the founders of the
Holiday Bowl.
Karr's popularity among NCAA
circles certainly played a big part in
his scheduling future football con-
tests with such schools as West
Virginia, Florida State and
Missouri.
Karr has a lot of dreams for ECU
athletics and is working hard to
make them come true. Some of his
early dreams have already
developed, the future football con-
tracts and the gaining membership
to the ECAC.
Karr has had to make some tough
and sometimes disheartening deci-
sions to take the steps that need to
be taken. Having the gall to make
such decisions is an admirable quali-
ty.
Befoie being to hard on the man,
perhaps it would be wise to sit back
and take a look at what he has done
and is doing.
No matter, it won't be long
before things that Karr has in mind
start happening. Maybe then his
talents will be fully appreciated.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 25. 1981
Pace 2
Supermarket, Inc
"Home of Greenville's Best Meats"
P.O. Box 2 � 211Jarvis St. � Greenville, N.C. 27834 � Phone: 752-5025
�Wvnow.buVW ,
Welcome ou.�- t0 ieu r-
nke a lew mmutes oi your btteets
� .1 located at me comer 01 tte.
We are convemen downtown Green
� 2 owned -r e "
e are convem� . �w��" to
i 2 blocks hom ECU ano day
L metown lamily �"�AJS meat prices, and deep
Overton's, a "��W" Greenvdle � low;e 0verton , we
low 1� -�-2 J 'd-J. No stamps, no
cut advertised specks P stop tagh boo yQU money.
lW�te'ie S oo Have to dc. �s p you wlll rece-ve V
ZL Si TllSiYour checks,
check-out ume � gladly cash y
U) discount- We ding Keg Beer.
full Une ol paW SUPPU . � Qverton's every
!����
I

y, Suoermarket, inc.
���,

�ft
Leo Jenkins i
Art Center
Ja
rVS
a

0
Summit
Jarvis
o
B: I
co
last
clue
tic.
pos
idc
pos
the I
froj
the I
dej
stuj
toil
ID
cen
Kei
on
to
of
:
inn
aa
stut
ant
lint
cot
seat
)
see
thr
at
Ofj(
ty
? ' S ' �p1 to brH
Tne coupon
to receive
voor W D�sc
ount
We will furnish a cart for you to carry your
groceries back to your dormitory.
RITZ
CRACKERS
1 lb. box
99 C
�JJ))f
Dannon
Yog
8 oz. cups
STROH'S
BEER
COCA-
COLA
Six Pack
16 oz.
carton of 8
PIRATE COUPON
10 Discount on
ANY FOOD ORDER
. � Regardless of size.
Present this coupon and show your ECU ID
to cashier. Offer expires Sept. 13th.
ID Number
jTvPucchqse
RC
Soft Drinks
Diet Rite,
Orange, Grape,
and
Root Beer
2 litre bottle
88
M
a
ti
tn
ac
gi
Pi
t






Revised Group Plan Ready
New Ticket Pick-up Set
A restructuring plan for Ficklen Stadium was announced
last spring by East Carolina athletic director Ken Kar. In-
cluded in the plan is a system in which students will pick up
tickets (free of charge) prior to each home game.
The system is not to be confused with the now dead pro-
posal that would have had students buying their tickets. That
idea died, though, after it met with masses of student op-
position.
Under the plan that was passed, students will be seated in
the nort stands in sections 21 26. This represents a change
from past practices which allowed students to sit anywhere in
the north stands that they desired.
The change came about, Karr said, as a part of the athletic
department's push to create more revenue.
The ticket pick-up ws brought about to prevent hassles for
students such as have been the case in the pat, when they had
to wait in long lines on game day to enter the stadium with an
ID and activity card.
"That's the biggest change as far as the students are con-
cerned said Assistant Athletic Director for Promotions
Ken Smith. "That should make things a lot more hassle-free
on game days. Now studnets will have a hard ticket to get in-
to the game
The plan was finalized in the spring with the aid of a group
of student leaders. An outline of the plan follows:
. Students will sit in sections 21-26. This area will be divided
into two different sections � a Reserved Seating section and
a Reserved Section.
Tickets to the Reserved Seating section will put the
students in a particular seat. These seats include all of section
and half of section 25. These seats run from the 30-50-yard
line. Tickets to this section will be distributed on a first-
come, first-served basis.
Tickets to the Reserved Section will seat students in any
seat they desire from the goaline to the 30-yard line.
(For clarification on the locations of these two sections,
see the stadium diagram.)
2. Students may pick up their tickets from Tuesday
through Thursday during the week of a Saturday home game
at the Minges Coliseum ticket office or at the Central Ticket
Office at Mendenhall Center by showing their ID and activi-
ty card.
The Mendenhall ticket office is open from 10 a.m. until 4
p.m. only. The Minges office is open from 8 a.m5 p.m. on
Tuesday and Wednesday, and from 8 a.m6 p.m. on Thurs-
day.
Students MA Y NOT pick up tickets on Fridays but will be
allowed to make late pick-ups of the tickets remaining (after
sales and earlier pick-ups) at a special student window at
Minges prior to the game on Saturday. These tickets will be
for the Reserved Section only.
The ticket office will close the Saturday game-day pick-ups
two hours before the contest begins. For the season opener
against Western Carolina, the office will be open from 8
a.m5 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 5.
3. Each student will be allowed to pick up their own ticket
and one for one other person by presenting the ID and activi-
ty card of both individuals on pick-up days.
4. Each student will be allowed to purchase one student guest
ticket per activity card for $4.50. (In the past there was no
reduced rate for student guests.) After purchasing the one
guest ticket the student may buy as many other tickets as
desired at $9 each.
SPECIAL GROUP PLAN
5. Student group seating will be available in the Reserved
Seating section only. All groups, whether fraternity, sorori-
ty, dormitory or other, must register with the ticket office.
6. Groups must request a minimum 20 tickets and must elect
one designated representative and an alternate.
The first group meetin will be held this Thursday, August
27 at 5 p.m. in Room 142 in Minges Coliseum. The
designated representatives of ALL interested groups should
be present.
The following is the schedule that will be followed each
week concerning group ticket pick-ups:
� Each Friday before games on Saturday week (for exam-
ple, Friday, August 28 before the Saturday, Sept. 5 opener
against Western Carolina) group reps should contact the
ticket office and set up an appointment for the following
Monday.
On Monday, the group representatives will be involved in
a draw to determine where each group will be seated. This is
done so that each group will have a fair shot at the best seats
each week.
On Wednesday following the Monday draw the group
representatives will be able to pick up their tickets from the
Minges office.
Board To Guide A thletics
By CHRIS
HOLLOMAN
SUfT Writer
This tall a new
organization will be
working with the East
Carolina athletic
department to create
more student involve-
ment in the Pirate pro-
gram.
The ECU Student
Athletic Board (SAB) is
a direct outgrowth of
East Carolina's inten-
tion to develop a "big
time" athletic status,
according to the pro-
gram's coordinator
Pam Holt.
She said the purpose
of the SAB is to lend
leadership, interest and
enthusiasm and to pro-
mote and encourage the
Pirate intercollegiate
athletic program by
boosting player morale,
building fan support
and increasing student
involvement.
Holt is the assistant
athletic director for stu-
dent life.
This fall the main
conerns of the program
will be football and
both basketball teams.
"The Student
Athletic Board pro-
vides a chance for the
students of East
Carolina to have some
input into the Pirate
program as to what
they want and what
they expect Holt ex-
plained. "It will give
the students involved a
chance to meet the
coaches and the players
as well as the athletic
staff. Also the SAB will
work with hosting
various Pirate Club ac-
tivities and with
meeting alumni and
recruits
The idea for an SAB
is not new and has
often been successful in
other large athletic pro-
grams at major univer-
sities.
One of the top SAB
organizations in the
country is at Indiana
University. The group,
starting its 25th year of
existence, works with
the entire scope of the
athletic program �
from selling tickets to
football games to
organizing special
events for the children
in the Bloomington,
lnd. community.
"The program at In-
diana is a very suc-
cessful one, and we
eventually want ours at
East Carolina to cover
the same areas as the
one at Indiana Holt
continued. "This
organization will give
the students direct in-
volvement in the pro-
gram and a chance to
learn about everything
from football to public
relations.
"The most impor-
tant part of the Student
Athletic Board though
will be to have fun. In
order to accomplish
our goals on campus,
however, we need the
support of the student
body
The organizational
meeting for those in-
terested in football and
the SAB will be held in
Room 142 and 143 in
Minges Coliseum on,
Tuesday, Sept. 1 at 4
p.m.
State, UNC
Tickets On
Sale Thursday
Student tickets for two big East
Carolina away football games will
go on sale this Thursday at 5 a.m.
Tickets to the Pirates games with
both North Carolina on Sept. 12
and N.C. State on Sept. 19 will go
on sale Thursday at 5 a.m. at the
Athletic Ticket Office in Minges
Coliseum.
The early pick-up time is designed
so that students will not have to miss
classes to buy tickets.
Students can purchase a max-
imum of two tickets to both con-
tests. Passes to the State game will
cost $5 for the first and $10 for the
second. All tickets to the Carolina
contests will cost students $10.
Duke is the third and last Atlantic
Coast Conference team on the
Pirate schedule. Tickets to the Oct.
3 game in Durham are available now
at the Minges ticket office. Students
can buy as many tickets to that
game as they desire for $10 each.
What's so Different
about this
Price Tag?
about $24.
Top quality, famous labels
at 30-502 off the
regular retail price!
where? at the
NAME
DROPPER
of course!
GREENVILLE SQUARE � GREENVILLE, N.C.
10-9 MonFri. � 106 Sat. � 756-4001
THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 25, 198I p�ge 3
$
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is required to be
below the advertised price in each A&P Store e
in this ad
readily available (or sale at or
cept as specifically noted )
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT AUG. 29 AT A&P IN GREENVILLE N C
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER
RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
Highway 264 By-Pass
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Greenville N. C.
D
BACK-TO-SCH
II
COSTS LESS WITH GREEN P's
L
U.S.D.A. INSPECTED
Fresh Whole Fryers
lb.
2 in a bag
Limit 2 Bags
49c
U.S.D.A. INSPECTED FRESH FRYER
lb.
49�
A&P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
Bone In
Full-Cut
Round Steak
lb.
A&P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
WHOLE
Boneless
Beef Strips
10-14 lb. Avg.
Cut Free into Boneless
V New York Strip Steaks
lb.
gL22S
ALL VARIETIES V QoifinriO " ANN PAGE
Duncan Hines Sav,n9s 2LowfatMilk
Cake Mixes
I8V2OZ.
69
0
gal. jug
83
NATURAL LIGHT � Ctrl, of 6
12-oz. cans
205
Budweiser Beer
199
Ctn
of
6
Coke, Mello
Yello, Tab Sprite
2L�er I 09
Bottle I
MINUTE MAID CHILLED
Orange Juice
IN QUARTERS
Shedds Spread
ALL FLAVORS
Sealtest Ice Cream
V2 gal.
ctn.
189
1 Sa
Save 76
FROZEN
Ann Page Pizzas
� Hamburger
� Pepperoni
�Sausage i2oz
� Cheese pkg.
99c
WHITE-YELLOW-BLUE
Charmin Tissue
4&99�
EJAOV
GOLDEN YELLOW RIPE
Dole Bananas
3, 100
only I
CALIFORNIA PLUMP
Seedless Grapes
lb.
79�





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Al'tUST 25, W8!
Page 4
Five ex-ECU gridders now
in the professional ranks

EDITOR'S NOTE: "Pirates in the pros" is
designed to inform the ECU student body oj the
efforts of former Pirate athletes as they give it
there all in an effort to make it big on the profes-
sional level. The feature will appear throughout
the year when appropriate.
A total of 11 former ECU football players were
in various professional football training camps
this summer. Four remain in the National Foot-
ball League and one in the Canadian Football
L eague.
A capsule look at each of the players' efforts
follows:
WILLIE HOLLEY: A Pirate defensive back
last season, Holley played for a time this summer
with the now-defunct Charlotte Chargers of the
AFA. When the Chargers folded due to financial
problems, he had a tryout with the Ottowa Rough
Riders of the CFL.
Holley arrived in Canada when cuts were being
made and simply did not have enough time to
have a fair shot at making the Ottowa squad. The
Rough Riders still have him on a call-up list in
case injuries occur.
THEODORE SUTTON: The second leading
ground gainer in ECU history performed quite
admirably during pre-season camp for one of the
toughest organizations in the NFl . the Dallas
Cowboys.
Sutton went to the Cowboys as a free agent and
was not cut until last Tuesday, when the squad
was narrowed down to 60 players. The Cowboys
are set at running back, of course, with the likes
of Tony Dorsett, Ron Springs and Robert
Newhouse on hand.
Sutton was the last back that the team cut prior
to the regular season. Sutton's agent. Ken Hut-
chison (former ECU assistant coach) said the
burly fullback had hopes for a shot to play this
year in the CFL. There is also the possibility that
the Cowboys could call him back up hould an in
jurv occur.
MIKE HAWKINS: The Hendei-on halfback
lost a battle with the NC AA in the spiing concer-
ning his eligibility with the Pirates in 1981. The
negative decision left Hawkins with little time to
make himself known enough tor the draft.
Still, he latched on as a free agent with the
Atlanta Falcons and was cut only last Tuesday.
He, like Sutton, hopes to catch on in the CFL.
MIKE BREW INCH ON: The Greenville
native finished his days as a Pirate linebacker in
1979 and failed in a pro bid with the Kansas City
Chiefs a year ago. This year Brouington latched
on as a free agent with the New York Jets.
Like Sutton and Hawkins, Brewington was cut
last Tuesday when the NFL teams cut their rosters
to 60 teams.
FDDIE HICKS: One of the great backs in E( I
history, Hicks has had his problems m the pro
PIRA TES
in the pros
ranks.
For two years he played with the New York
Giants, but was cut early last season. Afterward,
he signed a contract with the Philadelphia Eagles
and went into this pre-season camp with high
hopes.
All hopes fell through for Hicks, though, as he
was injured on the first day of sprints and was cut
very early by the defending NFC champions. His
chances of earning another chance in the NFL ap-
pear slim.
REGGIE PINCKNEY: A five-year NFL
veteran, Pinckney rates as one of the all-time
greats in the ECU secondary.
Pinckney has been somewhat of a journeyman
in the NFL and is now with the Baltimore Colts.
He is expected to make the final cut and be a part
of the Colt secondary in 1981.
SAM HARRELL: A former halfback with the
Pirates, Harrell was drafted by the Minnesota
Vikings following the 1979 season. An injury
forced him out of the '80 NFL season, but he is
back and battling for the back-up fullback spot
with the Vikings this year.
Harrell has added quite a bit of weight since
leaving ECU. He weighed in at 210 during his
senior season with the Pirates and now tips the
scales at 228.
ANTHONY COLLINS: A second round draft
pick by the New England Patriots this past spr-
ing, "A.C is definitely making his mark up
north.
Collins, who is referred to by the northern
press as Tony instead of Anthony, has to rate as
one of the brighter rookies in the NFL at this
point.
Last week against Tampa Bay, he scored the
winning touchdown in the fourth quarter for the
Pats. A week earlier, he returned two kickoffs
past the 45-yard line and led the team in rushing
against the Los Angelas Rams. Collins romped
for 80 yards from scrimmage in the latter contest.
Collins is rated as the team's number one
kickoff return man and is battling with Horace
Ivory and Vagas Ferguson for a playing time in
the Patriot backfield.
Collins has drawn raves from the Boston
media. In fact, The Boston Globe recently did a
feature article on the Penn Yan, N.Y. native.
ZACK VALENTINE: The ex-Pirate defensive
end was drafted in the second round three years
ago by the then-defending world champion Pitt-
I 0� J1" Pirates Banking On
Wachovia Tickets
Ei
ANTHONY COLLINS:
Pats' "Tony" during Pirate days
sburgh Steelers. After two years of impressive
play on the specialty teams, Valentine appears set
to make his mark as a Steeler linebacker in 1981.
Injuries to all-pro linebackers Jack Lambert
and Jack Ham have opened the door for Valen-
tine during pre-season practice.
After suffering an early-camp injury, Valentine
returned last week to play against Philadelphia
and did an admirable job.
Though he is currently listed behind Loren
Toews in the Steeler depth chart, agent Hutcher-
son thinks Valentine has an excellent chance to
move into a starting role due to the injuries to
Lambert and Ham.
HAROLD RANDOLPH: This former ECU
linebacker has made his rounds in tryouts with
both NFL and CFL clubs over the last several
years. This year he tried out for the CFL's Mon-
treal Allouettes and was cut.
Randolph was called back to Montreal later,
though, and got some playing time before being
dropped again.
DANNY KEPLEY: One of ECU's all-time
greats and a member of the school's Sports Hall
Of Fame, Kepley rates as one of the true stars in
the Canadian Football League.
A member of the Edminton Eskimos,
linebacker Kepley has earned about every award
that the CFL hands out. Again in 1981, he is the
ringleader of a tough Eskimo defense.
By WILLIAM YELVERTON
Aatataai SporU Milor
For many years, the main ticket
outlet for East Carolina football has
been Minges Coliseum. Now,
though, this no longer holds true �
thanks to Wachovia Bank and Trust
Company.
The East Carolina Department of
Athletics announced in late July the
joining of Wachovia Bank with the
university to aarket football tickets
for Pirate games this fall.
Wachovia is serving as a ticket
outlet for East Carolina in 27
eastern North Carolina cities, utiliz-
ing 44 branches of the bank.
Brenda Edwards, ticket manager
for ECU, said the distribution pro-
gram is "doing pretty good. We
have right many ticket orders
She adds the program has
nowhere to go but up. "In the first
year, you have to give things a
chance to get off the ground. We've
sold many single-game tickets and a
few season tickets
"I'm just happy to help East
Carolina University remarked a
pleased Tom Bennett, Regional
Vice-President for Wachovia and
newly-elected ECU Board of
Trustees member, after the an-
nouncement. "We've already had a
good relationship with the universi-
ty . This is just an extension to it.
"I wanted to do it � I went to
school here. I've got purple blood in
me. We just want to help sell tickets,
plain and simple
The agreement marks the first
time East Carolina has ever had any
outside ticket outlets for fans to
have easier access in purchasing
tickets.
East Carolina Director of
Athletics Dr. Kenneth Karr feels the
merger "is a major step in taking
the East Carolina product to the
people. Our target market for
saturation of Pirate support is
within a 75-nii.e radium of Green-
ville. Wachovia will be providing ac-
cess in this total area for our fans to
purchase tickets.
"It is a right step forward Karr
continued. "Time will tell whether it
will increase our ticket sales. We are
extremely grateful
Karr added that the agreement
would enable followers of East
Carolina football to make plans
earlier in the week to attend games
instead of having to make last-
minute decisions.
The 27 cities serving as ticket
outlets are: Ahoskie, Aulander,
Aurora, Bayboro, Beihaven, Bethel,
Elizabeth City, Goldsboro, Green-
ville, Jacksonville, Kinston,
LaGrange, Morehead City, Mt.
Olive, Sea Level, Hamilton,
Harker's Island, New Bern,
Pantego, Robersonville, Rocky
Mount, Snow Hill, Vanceborb,
Walstonburg, Washington,
Williamston and Wilson.
By J
Iwl
touted
State
again)
Sout
first
Asso
2!) pc
the
all it
com
talen
as trl
Pira
squa
H
Andn
( ar
b iilo
I
I
final
ped
81-71
Sen!
t
i
CAROLINA EAST MALL, GREENVILLE
REED'S JEWELERS
Dates: August 27, 28, 29
Register for one of 43 prizes to be given away. Grand prize give-away
includes ladies' diamond ring valued at $1,000, one gent's Witt-
nauur watch, one ladies' Wittnauur watch, and $25 gift certificates.
Reed's Jewelers opens its newest
and finest store in Carolina East
Mall with grand opening prizes and
grand opening prices.
Floating Hearts $2.00
Bulova, Pulsa, Citizens Watches 20
s
&
14 ct. chains
15" � $17.95
18" � $19.95
24" � $25.95
14 ct. Serpentine Bracelets
usually 14.95 sale price $7.95
Add-A-Beads
3mm � 49C
5mm � 51.49
7mm �51.99
Birth Stone
Rings
20 ��
Diamond
Earrings
from $24.95
and up
Man's 12 ct.
Diamond Cluster
usually $1,075
Sale Priced $575
.4Tv

i
THE REED'S VALUE STORY - When we stated that there would be
something very grand about our opening we are really talking about the
famous diamond importing reputation we bring with us to the Greenville
area We ve been in the ieweiry business since 1893 and are masters in the
diamond trade We know the high standards our customers have come to
expect from us and we know where to go to find and import rhe incredible
gems we offer Your trust in a jeweler is part of the key to happiness when
buying a fine diamond The quality value and honesty you find with us
will make you one o� our many satisfied regular customers. Thank you
for the opportunity ot serving you in this area it will be a very grand
opening
fMf�'k7
Fine Jewelers and Diamond Importers
Hours: MonSat. 10 a.m9 p.m.
Mastercard, Visa, American Express,
Reed's Charge and Lay a way

oB
.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 25, 1981
Page 5
n
Enter AP Top 20 Poll
tickets.
It ie first
had any
fans to
irchasing
r of
feels the
In taking
It to the
rket for
port is
If Gree ri-
nding ac-
i tans to
' Karr
lether it
We are
;eement
' Fat
s plans
Barnes
e last-
ticket
u lander,
i. Bethei,
Green-
n s t o n,
Ml
imilton,
Bern,
Rocky
iceboro,
ngton.
Women Post Record Season
B JIMMY DUPREE
M.ntging tdtior
Two wins over highly
touted North Carolina
State, a near miss
against national power
Southern Cal, their
first appearance in the
Associated Press Top
20 poll, the first trip to
the A1AW regionals:
all these feats were ac-
complished by the
talented group known
as the 1980-81 Lady
Pirate basketball
squad.
Head Coach Cathy
Andruzzi came to East
Carolina three years
ago with the dream of
builoding a floundering
program into a national
contender. She says the
program has not yet
reached her goals, but
their 23-7 mark with a
final AP rank of 16 had
to be satisfying.
The season was cap-
ped by a disappointing
81-70 loss at the hands
of returning AIAW na-
tional champion Old
Dominion at ODU
Field Huse. As was the
case in many games,
senior Kathy riley led
ECU scorers with 29
points, with junior Sam
Jones adding 20.
Lfanky Anne Donovan
paced the Lady Monar-
ches with 26 points,
with and 17 rebounds,
with South Carolina
transfer Jean Walling
contributing 12 points.
The Lady Pirates
quickly gtot into foul
trouble in that contest,
with sophomore Mary
Dendler notching her
third less than five
minutes after the open-
ing tap. Center Marcia
Girven committed her
third foul trying to
guard the 6-8 Donovan
with 11:28 before inter-
mission, but remained
until the 5:12 mark
when she was charged
with her fourth.
Senior returnee Sam Jones hits boards
"Wh (had) people on
the bench that wc
didn't need to have on
the bench in a game of
this type Andruzzi
commented after the
game.
Troubles at the free
throw line and a re-
juvenating attached by
the Old Dominion of-
fense proved too much
for the Lady Pirates, as
they never again
threatened the Lady
Monarches reign.
"I'm really proud of
the girls said Andruz-
zi. "They were down 21
points and came back
to make a game of it.
Not having Girven in
therre hurt us a lot.
Then at the end when
we needed those one-
and-ones, we couldn't
hit. That cost us six
points at a very critial
time.
"I think we did end
the season on a positive
note she added.
"Getting into the
regionals well certainly
help our program
The Lady Pirates had
lost to Old Dominion
89-77 earlier in the
season, but victories
over talented Indiana,
West German FNa-
tional and Virginia
teams propelled the
Lady Pirates into the
national coaches' poll
for the first time in late
January.
After rattling off a
string of 64 consecutive
in-state victories, the
Wolfpack of N.C.
State dropped an over-
time thriller 78-77 in
Minges Coliseum. A
rowdy record crowd of
4,000 ECU fans watch-
ed as the Lady Pirates
held off their 13th
ranked guests.
The Lady Pirates
went without a timeout
after a layup by State's
dKaren Brabson. An-
druzzi's troups were
looking inside for
center Girven, but 5-6
Lydia Rountree took a
teammate's pass, dou-
ble pumped and calmly
laid in the go-ahead
bucket with five
seconds remaining.
NCSU signaled for a
timeout with three
seconds left, but their
set play failed.
The Wolfpack led by
three and the Pirates
four with less than four
nminutes to play in
regulation. ALaurie
Sikes 18-foot jumper
with 1:49 remaining put
the Lady Pirates ahead
72-68, seemingly icing
the game.
But State's Lacey
connected on a tur-
naround jumper to cut
the lead to two and
later sank a pair of free
throws with :25 left to
knot the score at 72.
ECU Kathy Riley threw
up a last second effort
which missed the mark
sending the game into
overtime.
The Lady Pirates'
victory was the first by
a North Carolina team
over the Wolfpack
since 1976.
"This is a win for the
entire university said
Andruppi. "We've had
such great support,
especially since the
ranking came out
MOnday. We've
recveived flowers and
telegrams, and this
crowd was somethng
else tonight
But there was little
time, still, for the
Pirates to enjoy their
young success, as the
nationally eighth rank-
ed Trojans of Southern
Cal invaded Minges
Coliseum in the midst
of a snowstorm.
Despite, or possibly
because of, inclement
conditions, 4,500
faithful fans packed
Minges for this event.
Mary Denkler again
led the Lady Pirates
with 26 points, but it
wasn't quite enough to
pull off another upset
as the Trojans fought
to a 77-73 victory.
Despite identical
twins Fpam and Paula
McGee combining for
27 points in the opening
half. Southern Cal
managed only a five
point advantage at in-
termission.
With senior Sam
Jones and junior Mary
Denkler returning for
the 1981-82 season, An-
druzzi has ample
reason to be op-
tomistic. Jones returns
to her guard position
with 14.7 points and
5.3 rebounds per game,
while Denkler brings
14.4 points and 6.8 re-
bounds to the lineup.
Richmond native
Darlene Chaney, a 6-2
center and 5-7 point
guard Loraine Foster
from Spartanburg are
the top freshmen com-
ing into practice.
Back to
School
Eyeglass
Special
For all ECU Students,
Faculty & Staff
Offer Good Through
Aug. 31, 1981
Located across Dr. Park
752-1446
OPTICIANS
opticians
assooatjon
of amenca
9-5:30
AAon
Fri.
OPEN 7
DAYS A
WEEK
WINE &
BEER
PERMITS
Luncheon Special 2.25
includes iced or hot tea, soup, egg roll,
fried rice and main course.
HflvBwet 05 all you
sunday J.yj caneat
"Specializing
in Chinese
Gourmet Cuisine
757-1818
100 E. 10TH ST
GREENVILLE
3El3C3E3Ei:
RESTAURANT & LOUNGE
ATTITUDE ADJUSTMENT HOURS
5:00 � 6:30 AND AT 10 - 11PM
WE HAVE A NEW FORMAT,
A NEW MENU AND,
NEW AFFORDABLE PRICES.
TRY THE DINNER BUFFET
AT 5:30 PM EVERY TUESDAY
GIVE US A TRY ECU.
YOUR WALLET WILL LIKE US.
CLOSE TO THE ECU CAMPUS
IOCATFD IN THE MINGES BUILDING
CORNER OF 3rd & EVANS ST. DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
OPEN LUNCH AND DINNER MONSAT.
I
o
&
a
Locations
2826 S. Memorial Dr.
AttheCamelot Inn
756-1506
710 N. Greene Street
752-0090
j
Visit our lounge
located in Memorial
Dr. Restaurant �
lowest priced mixed
drinks in town.
i

Fried Chicken
2 vegetables
3.50
BBQ Chicken
2 vegetables
3.50
Crab Cakes
French fries, slaw
3.50
MONDAY - only
ALL YOU CAN EAT
Fried Trout
French fries, slaw
2.99
DAILY SPECIALS
Every Day
COMBINATION Barbecue & Fried Chicken-Potatoes or Stew & Slaw
White Meat$3-25
Dark Meat$2.95
BARBECUE AND SLAW
Large $3-25
Small 2.75
BARBECUE DINNER (Potaotes, Stew, & Slaw) 2.75
BARBECUE RIBS (Choice of Sauce) 3-95
SLICED PORK 3-2$
CHICKEN PASTRY - Small (Pastry Only) $2.25
Large includes 2 vegetables 2.75
FRIED CHICKEN - Small (2 pieces) 2.75
Large (h pieces) 3.25
BARBECUE CHICKEN-Small (2 pieces) 2.75
Large (h pieces) 325
FRIED LIVERS 3-00
FRIED GIZZARDS 3-00
HAMBURGER STEAK 2.75
CHILDREN'S PLATES
Children Under 12
FAMILY STYLE $2.00
BARBECUE DINNER 1.50
FRIED CHICKEN w 2 VEG 1.50
CHICKEN PASTRY w 2 VEG 1.50
BEVERAGES
Iced Tea
Hot Tea
Coffee
Sanka
Milk
Pepsi .hO
Coke .L0
Mt. Dew .U0
Sprite .L0
SANDWICHES
A
Barbecue
Sliced Pork
Fish
Chicken
DESSERT
Banana Pudding
Lemon Pie
Chocolate Pie
FAMILY STYLE - ALL YOU CAN EAT
Barbecue, Fried Chicken, Brunswick Stew, Pastry,
Boiled Potatoes, and Slaw$h.25 each
NO DOGGIE BAG FROM FAMILY STYLE DINNERS
ENTIRE TABLE MUST ORDER FAMILY STYLE
2.75
Family Style
Chicken, BBQ, Chicken Pastry,
Boiled Potatoes, Slaw, Brunswick Stew
4.25
SHRIMP PLATE
Lunch Only
2.99
SEAFOOD
FRIED SHRIMP
BOILED SHRIMP
FRIED OYSTERS
FRIED TROUT
FRIED FLOUNDER FILET
FRIED CRAB CAKE
COMBINATION - Choice of Two
PLATTER - Shrimp, Oysters, Crab Cake,
Flounder Filet
Above served with French Fries,
CHILD'S PLATE � of Above Prices
SMALL
$3.95
$h.25
$3-50
$3.75
$3.50
$h.95
$6.50
Slaw & Bread
LARGE
$IT9?
$h.95
$5.25
We also Broil Flounder, Trout, Shrimp, Oysters
All Seafood Cooked To Order!
MONDAY -
TUESDAY -
DAILY SPECIALS
Ham Hocka or Country Style Chicken. . $2.75
Dry Lima Beans, Cabbage
Backbone$2.75
Blackeye Peas, Squash, CollardB
WEDNESDAY - Country Style Steak on rice$2.75
Macaroni 4 Cheese, Garden Peas
THURSDAY - Backbone$2.75
Blackeye Peas, Mashed Potatoes,
Collards
Stew Beef$2.75
Stewed Apples, Turnip Greens,
Dry Lima Beans
FRIDAY -
ALL DINNERS INCLUDE YOUR CHOICE OF 2 VEGETABLES
Cole Slaw
Beets
French Fries
Brunswick Stew
String Beans
Candied Yams
Boiled Potatoes
CALL US FOR YOUR CATERING NEEDS
We cater from 25 - 5,000. Prices range from $2.95 - $9.00
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED
-
I





BACK TO SCHOOL SALEM!
AMPEX
v:
A.
8
sa,
v�V?
c
Low Noise
High Output
Economy Cassettes
ih n, 1 isf cassettes are
iceal tut Miuc and mm-vrttkal
musk reu�rd�g. A grva "te
along" lap? tor v.�ur pnrtabk'
No. 352C903
Reg. $3.38
P@RTABi�
Texas Instruments
electronic slide-rule calculator
Tl-30
No. 03630
Reg. $12.97
Special
4
f '���� '����� � ��!�
11.97
� Dial the heat you want from
low to h.gh Thermostat auto-
matically maintains desired tem-
perature
Special
s2.99
THE SKIN MACHINE
Batt "ated Cleansing Brush
� Tesithtvk sofi � np ex on brushes
� � - �� � - � i se sample and batteries included
� eused � " a ac s n (leanser
� . eaves sk n fee ng fesn and anwe
W'�Kii0
ROYAL 4
w.
SW '
Reg. $9.47
Special
s8.50

CLAIROL
Clairol Seta-Way
D
rjDCD
CD GOOD
CD CD CD
CDDO
ROYAL
No. 018163
Reg. $11.94
Special
s9.97

Reg. $lT79b
Special
11.9
THE
1800 Series
Escort'
Reg. $25.97
Special
22.99
S� A LOT OF FEATURES.
m C3 � I s'herTxstecc
Our Already Low Prices
1800 Series Only
col 35mm autopraT c
Minolta SLR Easy
enough for Degirrers
buipace . "
sophisticated fecrt ires
Reg. $216.95
Special
s199.95
Cfl&KBABK
� �� :�' StV '
CLAIROL
Vivitar703
Point n Shoot
Pocket Camera
� Built-in Flash
� Telephoto Lens
?��
minoQ s.
233E&
.
'
"A
I . - � ���
7rrf
W r

!�
CLAIROL
Special
Reg. $13.47
M1.99
When the nhoment
has to last forever
Get a Vivitar!
Reg. $49.88
CKBISH
iC Styung Brush
Special UJiiJD
NOROCO COLLAPSIBLE
Curi
COMPACT
CURLING WAND WITH MIST'
ftt�
UNDERWOOD 319
The complete portable typewriter
Reg. $79.94
Special
s74.95
� DlAL-A-BREW control Svste-
tor mdivtduahzed taste
preferences
� Brew Miser Basket .
save coHee Decays? oucan
make as e as 3 to; cups
� Dnp filter system makes tf
Pest tastmg cotee
� CoHee never bcis so i s "eve' : tte
� Holds cotlee at trie perfect serv-
ing temperature Kn "ours
� Brews '2 cups-j?:c 5C zi
-
OnlyNorelco
has
DIAL-A-BREW
With
BREW MISER
to save on
No. HB5170
Reg. $29.97
Special
$27.98

CB-2
CLAIROL
e
jHU
Reg. 12.47
11.25
fp Reg.
COLLAPSIBLE 511-7
Reg. $20.95
Special
s18.95
KODAK
tOLORBlJRST 50
Instant Camera
No. HB1606
Special
KODAK Instant
Color Film
tit ,i hv
No. PR10
Reg. $6.60
s9.99
New Time-Zero
Supercolor
SX-70
Polaroid's OneStep
The world's simplest camera
No. 2173
Reg. $27.77
Special
s25.98
Polaroid film specials!
Reg. $5.98
5.50
Type 108
The Button!
� Polaroid's new low-f .�� '
instant camera
� Economical hxed I
batteries
� Uses dazzimg New Tim�
coior SX-70 film
� Press only one bur
Reg. $6.89
Special
S5.98 s5.95
Type 88
Polacolor 2
Reg. $4.95
Special s3.95
Special
Prices Good Through Saturday, September 5
I.D. DAWSON COMPANY
Catalog Showroom
Your Catalog Gift Store � And A Whole Lot More
No. 2101
Reg. $25.88
Special
s18.95
Quantities Are Limited.
No Special Orders or Rain Checks
Phone
752-1600
Phone
943-2121
2818 E. 10th Street
Greenville. N. C.
102 E. Main Street
Belhaven, N. C.
p





Four Vying For QB Spot
I Hb FAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 25. 1981 Page i
B I HRl ESC HAMMER
'The difference is like da.v and night
East Carolina head football codh Ed Emorv
certainly must be able to sleep better this August
than last � that is, if he spends any time at all
worrying about the Pirates' quarterback position.
One can rest assurred that he does
A year ago at this time the Emorv had no one
on the team that could fill the QB spot that had
any game experience. The signal-calling position
was a big question mark.
Three oung men � Carlton Nelson, Greg
Stewart and I arry Brobst � battled it out for the
carting position, with Nelson finally getting the
nod
NeKon went down with an injury in a mid
season loss to nationally -ranked North Carolina,
though, leaving Stewart at the controls of the
Bucs' wishbone offense
It was later discovered that Nelson had a crack
ed vertabrae and that surgery would be required if
he ever intended to plav football again. Even
then, doctors said, his chances were no better
than 50-50.
The picture was a gloomy one foi Emory as he
looked over the quarterbacking spot, an all-
important spot on am tootball team. It got no
better when he failed in efforts to sign some
highly-touted high school seniors.
All of a sudden, though, things began to shape
up. The word came in April that NeKon would be
able to plav agam this fall. In Mav. Villanova
I niversity dropped its tootball program, leaving
every player on the squad available for recruiting
bv other colleges.
One of the most sought-aftei persons on the
'earn was rising sophomore quarterback Kevin In-
am. Over 80 schools, including Oklahoma and
1 ennessee ottered the speedy youngster a scholar-
ship. It was Emorv and the Pirates that eventually
:ided Ineram. thous
Nelson
The siination now is simple, vet positive for
Emory . Ingram is a super athlete that is still learn-
ing the ECU system. Nelson is back stronger than
ever and working harder than ever with Ingram
supplying lots of competition. Stewart and Brobst
are in the thick of things after making mass off-
season improvements.
"We're in really good shape at quarterback
now Emory said. "We've got four kids that
know the offense and are very talented. We've
come a million miles at the position from a year
ago. That's not to sav, though, that we don't still
have another million to go
Emorv sas all four still have a chance to be the
team's starting quarterback come Sept. 5 when
the team opens at home against Western
Carolina.
Currently, Nelson is running fust with the
others bunched closelv behind.
"If I had to play today Emory said follow
ing a Sundav scrimmage, "I'd start Carlton
Nelson. He's really come a long wavs and is
showing some very positive leadership
Nelson's recovery from the surgery is complete.
It is now a matter of holding oif the other three
quarterback candidates Many observors in the
Pirate camp feel the hoopla that surrounded the
signing of Ingram helped to stir the competitive
spirit in Nelson.
AUG
Gotcha
. 24-29
Co vered
WEAR
HO-13
AUTHENTIC WESTERN
BLOUSES AND SHIRTS
$18-22 VALUE
ABILENE AND OURANGO
BOOTS 20�
OOFF
HWY. UN
AYDEIM, N.C.
PLUS
FREE GIFT WITH PURCHASE OF
BOOTS MONTHURS.
WITH THE PURCHASE OF ANY PAIR
OF CORDS - SAVE 20 ON
ANY REGULAR PRICED TOP &
MANY MORE BARGAINS
$600 OF FREE PRIZES AND REFRESHMENTS
:4c
m
'�
Stewart
Brobst
"I'm sure Kevin's presence and speed on cam-
pus have helped Carlton Emory said. "But he
would have been in for a battle from the other
two even if Kevin were not here
Emory said that he was "extra pleased" with
the progress of Ingram's adjustment to the ECU
offense.
"Our offensive system is very complicated
the second-year ECU mentor claimed. "I would
hate to ask a genius to come in and learn it right
away. I think Kevin is picking things up very fast.
He looks better with each practice
Stewart has been sidelined with a minor injury
for about a week. For a time he was runnic in
the number one spot.
"It's a shame that Greg got injured Emory
said. "He'll be back in a weekut will be behind
the other three guys. He has looked aw fully good,
though
The improvement of Brobst over a year ago has
been one of the pleasant surprises in the Pirate
camp this fall.
The ECU coach continually stressed that the
quarterback battle was a four-man affair.
"Nobody's out of it yet Emory proclaimed.
"We've got 16 more practices before the Western
game. Anything can happen between now and
then. I'm just glad to have this kind o competi-
tion at the position
-
Carlton Nelson, shown above in 1980 action, is leading a
pack of four that are vying for the starting quarterback
position on the ECU football team.
At Last. A Bank That
Treats College Students
Like They Have Money.

2-
'�v Wf
t
iKv. I gives ti
- stud � � i
� king No ifs
WithaTillicAlltimt-TdUiciiri
v i! can use the BR&T Tilhe
machine at our Arlington
utevard Office 24 hours a day
7 days a week
I
Nobody works harder for your money.
BB&T





THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 25. 1981 Pae8
Baseball Strike? Not In The Old North State
In Summer League
baseball action, Todd
Evans, above, takes a
swing. Below, Robert
Wells slides into se-
cond base in a key
game with Campbell.
By WILLIAM YELVERTON
AatelaM S�arU Mitor
Whoever said history never
repeats itself was on ly partly right
when referring to the North State
Summer League.
Opening Day on June K) produced
a wild affair between UNC-
Wilmington and the Pirates of East
Carolina in a game won by ECU,
7-6, in the ninth inning.
A month and a half later the same
clubs were battling again � this
time for the North State title.
History did repeat itself in one way,
but not entirely, as the SeaHawks
edged the Pirates, 3-2, on a wild
pitch in the bottom of the seventh
for the championship.
The Pirates lost the game and the
title, but in no way did that make
for a disappointing season, accor-
ding to Coach Gary Overton.
"We got off to a slow start he
said, recalling early-season hitting
problems for his team, "but at the
end, we were a good club. If we had
had a hit here or there, we cold have
won this thing. Our players had a
good attitude at the tournament
The league tournament, in its in-
augural year, proved to be a success
attendance-wise and excitement-
wise, Overton added. Campbell, the
regular-season champion was
eliminated after two straight losses.
The first four finishers during the
regular season qualified for the
tournament. Last-place North
Carolina did not.
"We accomplished several
goals Overton continued.
"(Catcher Jack, a transfer from
Guilford) Curlings came a long way;
he did a fine job. And Todd Evans
gained a lot of experience at first.
(Evans was an outfielder last spr-
ing.) We were a much better team at
the end than at the beginning
Head Coach Hal Baird echoed
Overton's sentiments. "By far, this
summer league season was the best
one. I'm not speaking specifically
about our team's performance, but
the media was more aware of our
league, as were the fans.
"I was happy with our team, con-
sidering a lot of our players were
playing in other leagues
Pitchers Bill Wilder and Bob Pat-
terson were competing in the
Virginia Valley League, a league
that boasts the best players from the
East Coast. Hitting star John
Hallow played half the season in
that league before returning from
Greenville.
Another Buc stalwart, shortstop
Kelly Robinnette, played in a
"little" different league this sum-
mer � the Alaskan League. Players
are invited to participate, including
many from the powerhouse Pac-10
Conference.
Even with some of the team's best
players missing, the Pirates returned
an accomplished infield for summer
league play. Third baseman Todd
Hendley was dependable all season,
as was Mike Sorrell at second and
Pete Persico at shortstop.
Outfielders Robert Wells, Jay
Carraway and Mark Shank provid-
ed a speedy defensive combination
"We stablized our catching posi
tion with Curlings Baird noted
"Also, Charlie Smith, who was our
regular DH during the spring, got in
a lot of pitching work and has
shown promise in that area. We ac-
complished most of what we set out
to do. We're very pleased.
"Mike Sorrell had a real fine
summer, as did Wells and Hallow.
We would have like to have won it
(the title), but I can't complain
The Pirates finished the regular
season with a 16-14 record, good
enough for second place behind the
Camels of Campbell (20-10).
Highlights of the season included
a 19-10 slugfest win over Campbell in
late June. To win, the Pirates scored
10 runs in the top of the seventh inn-
ing. East Carolina dominated N.C
State and North Carolina thoughout
the season but had trouble with
Wilmington and Campbell
On a hot and humid night in mid
July, Todd Evans belted a two-out
grand slam in the bottom of the
seventh to give the Pirates a 8-4 win
over Campbell. The Pirates' victory
seemed deserving as the Camels us
ed last-minute heroics to defeat
ECU in nearly the same situation a
week earlier.
Pirate hurler Rick Rarney was the
only unanimous selection to the
league all-star team. He was 7-2 dur-
ing the regular season and was join
ed by teammate Mike Sorrell on the
squad.
-p wm �� ��� iwy. � ��� -ij vjpi; �
�� .� � �� ,C �:�!� �-�'�
owne
USA
CALL
758-1427
CALL
758-1427
204 E. 5th St. - Downtown
(Across from New by's Sub Shop)
1011 CHARLES STRE
PHONE �752-1373
ALL SMOKING ACCESSORIES
� NO LONGER AVAILABLE AFTER OCT. 1
� BUY YOUR CHRISTMAS PRESENTS NOW!
� PAPERS BY THE CASE
SPECIAL ORDERS NOW BEING TAKEN ON
QUANTITY ORDERS OF ANYTHING!
HOURS:
Mon. Wed.
8:30a.m11:00 p.m.
ThursSat.
8:30a.m1.00 p.m.
750-0000
Call For Take-out
It takes 12 inches
to make a hero
Deli Sandwiches - Salads � Vegitarian Sandwiches
Homemade Soups Heroes on freshly baked rolls
New Deli Coupon
50toff any'2 hero or specialty
sandwich
Most varied Biscuit COMBINATIONS!
JUMBO Bor-B-QMBEEF RIBS
Southern fried CHICKEN
Homemade Apple Jacks.
BURGERS.
75$ off any who,e her0 c75t
COUPON EXPIRES AUG. 29 LIMIT ONE
Good Food -Good Times
513 Cotanche Street Across from U.B.E. Parking in Rear
Attitude Adjustment Daily� 4 p.m7 p.m.
MEN
Ho�S
OHM TWW WINDOW
Smit
As B
With the Pm
rirst soccer game o
jeason looming
weekend, head ci
Brad Smith is regai
'lie season with gi
�d optimism.
His team returi
players and
Starters from last y
7-14-1 team.
4il think that
defense came on I
well last year, espej
toward the end
season, but our
needs a lot of imi
ment before e j
the kind of teai
want to be
said.
The defense wi
again be the
strong suit and i
Yoi
2
Pil
Toba
T
UNIVE
?





THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 25, 1981 Page 9
e
�rl Wells. Jay
k provid-
vt combination.
catching posi-
Band noted
ih. who vas our
he spring, got in
k and has
Uac
what we set out
aA a leal tine
Hallow
i m on it
i the
son included
Campbell in
'nates scored
seventh inn
muted N.C
tughoui
ie with
the
.i 8 4 win
am els us
o defeat
! o i n -
n the
Smith: Offense Needs Won
As Booters Set For Season
With the Pirates'
first soccer game of the
season looming this
vseekend, head coach
Brad Smith is regarding
the season with guard-
ed optimism.
His team returns 14
players and nine
starters from last year's
7-14-1 team.
"1 think that our
defense came on real
well last year, especially
toward the end of the
season, but our offense
needs a lot of improve-
ment before we will be
the kind of team we
want to be Smith
said.
The defense will once
again be the team's
strong suit and is led by
goalie Steve Brown
who had five shutouts
last season.
The offense,
however, averaged only
one goal a game last
season and is one of
Smith's biggest worries
this season.
"The key to our
season will be the im-
provement of our of-
fense he said. "There
is no way you can win
many matches averag-
ing only one goal a
game. This is
something we will be
working on very hard
The news is not all
bad on offense,
though, as senior Brad
Winchell returns. Win-
chell comes into this
good for our program.
We just need to have
the students' support.
"This year is a very
important year for the
soccer team as well as
the other teams at East
Carolina he con-
tinued. "The players
know that they need to
make a good showing
so everyone is working
for improvement
Smith, who is enter-
ing his fifth year as
Pirate coach, has im-
proved his record each
year.
This year, against a
schedule that includes
Old Dominion and
William and Mary,
Smith is hoping for his
first winning season.
season needing only
two goals to become
the all-time leading
scorer in East Carolina
soccer history.
The schedule in-
cludes a home game
against the nationally-
ranked Wolfpack of
N.C. State. That game
will be played in
Ficklen Stadium, mark-
ing the first time soccer
has been played there.
"The students on
campus have been wan-
ting us to play a
nationally-ranked
Atlantic Coast Con-
ference team at home
so this should be a big
game for us Smith
said. "Playing in
Ficklen should be very
WELCOME
BACK
Your Last Chance
20
OFF
on our soon to be
outlawed inventory
Pipes � Snuff Accessories
Tobacco � Bedspreads � Gifts
220E.5TH
UNIVERSITY ARCADE
752-481
pipe dreamsI
�LCOME o 1 I
WENDY'S HAMBURGERS
ARE FRESH NOT FROZEN.
AIN'T
REASON
TOGO
ANYPLACE
ELSE.
501 E. TENTH ST.
103 GREENVILLE BLVD
r I'M Ufiick v lnlrrn,iliondi Inr All rnjhi-rorrvrij
OLD nSHIOHXO
CALL
758-1427
CALL
758-1427
�- �
-etf
204 E. 5th St. - DOWNTOWN
(ACROSS FROM NEWBY'S SUB SHOP)
SALE EVERY WEEK
EXCELLENT CATLOGUE STOCK
WE BUY & SELL USED LP'S
BEST CUT-OUT SELECTION
SMOKING ACCESSORIES
BLANK TAPES
AND LAST BUT CERTAINLY NOT LEAST �
BEST PRICES IN TOWN
P.S. LOOK FOR THE NEW "STONES" &"FOGELBERG
LP'S � MONDAY, AUGUST 31st! ON SALE






THE EAST CAROL INI AN
AUGUST 25, 1981
Page 10
Awesome Robbins
Leads Line Corps
� "�
�.
Pirate football 1981 features a host of new
faces both on defense and offense, but one
massive lineman should be familiar to ECU
faithfuls � senior all-America candidate Tootie
Robbins.
Even if you have only seen him on campus it
would be obvious that this hulk belongs on the
football field, dishing out punishment to defen-
sive linemen who dare attempt to stifle the Pirate
offense.
The 6-5, 275 pound Bertie County native
established himself a year ago as a leader in the
trenches, but the 4-7 mark posted at that time
drew a great deal of criticism to the youthful
front line. Now, however, experience and speed
are the key words describing that segment of the
team.
"We've got a lot to prove to people reasons
Robbins. "I think we'll be a lot better. Everybody
is experienced. We know what to look for in a
game and we know what the coaches are looking
for in a game
After All-American Wayne Inman was lost to a
knee injury prior to the Florida State game last
season, Robbins became a leader despite being
hampered by injuries of his own. A pre-season
shoulder injury and a nagging leg injury caused
him to miss starting two games. Many speculated
Robbins was injury-proned, but new line coach
Terry Lewis feels differently.
"there are two things in football that it
generally accepted you cannot control says
Lewis, "weather and injuries. If Tootie Robbins
was injured last season, then I am sure it was
legitimate.
"He is a rare talent on the offensive line
A rare talent, indeed. But is he the player the
pro scouts are looking for. Not quite yet, accor-
ding to Lewis.
"If Tootie has one major shortcoming it would
have to be his pass protection Lewis offers.
"But that's not his fault either. You get better by
repetition, and just weren't throwing the ball that
much last year.
"We are going to emphasize (the passing game)
this year, and that will give him the experience it
takes. I feel he can do it
The Pirates will be without the services of the
starting backfield of a year ago, as Theodore Sut-
ton, Anthony Collins and Mike Hawkins com-
pleted their eligibility. But Robbins has faith in
the "new" corps of runners.
"Experience-wise, we'll lose a lot he says.
"But with Earnest Byner, Harold Blue and Mar-
vin Cobb back at halfback, we'll still have good
experienced backs. And having Roy Wiley at
fullback will be great for blocking. Those guys
can get the job done and we've got some good
recruits coming in.
"But the runningback job depends on the
blocking up front. If we get the job done, their
job is easy. If we don't get it done, they don't get
it done. It's that simple
Lewis has confidence in not only Robbins, but
the entire offensive line.
"Size, mobility, agility, the ability to retain
football knowledge � that's what it takes to be a
great football team Lewis explains. "Barring a
lot of injuries, I feel we have the potential to be a
great football team.
"We have a lack of prior success; we have to
learn to win. But I feel this group can do it.
"We can be great � there shouldn't be
anybody we fear
�$s
Tootie Robbins buries defender
FOSDICK'S
1890 SEAFOOD
2311 S.Evans
756-2011
AUTO SERVICE SPECIALS
NEW & USED
Retread Tires
S7.00 & Up
ERVlCf
CorPomi
Brake Safety
and cof P�,er
NOW OPEN MONDAYS
MONDAY NIGHT SPECIAL
SHRIMP
ALL YOU CAN EAT
Clam Chowder & Salad Bar
$6.95
4-CvndeT
$29.95
6 and S cyUnto
All size
tires
available
$1.00
OFF
ANY MENU ITEM
WITH PRESENTATION
OF THIS COUPON
One Coupon Per Meal
Not Good Towards Specials
OFFICIAL NORTH CAROLINA STATE INSPECTION SIAItPN
WE SERVICE NATIONAL ACCOUNTS
ItFGoodrieh
TIRE CENTER
SAllS ftSUVVlCl
SATURDAY
8.00 A.M1:00 P.M.
OPENMON. FRI.
8:00 A.M5:30 P.M.
Coggins Car Care
756-5244
320 West Greenville Blvd.
r
master charge
VISA'
DAILY LUNCHEON
SPECIALS
Fast, Courteous Service
FEATURING MANY REGULAR
MENU ITEMS
$1.00OFF REG. MENU PRICE
NEWSY'S
205 E.S1-
758-03f6
Specialties of the House
Sandwiches
SPECIAL
(CAPPAIOLAIW KARPSALAMl)
(?0ASTBEEF
HAM
JURKEY
HWfTuacar
MIXED GfEESE
MEAT SU0
HEAT"
.& ZJO �Z5 4�
f 85 3.05 35 &
L35 2J� U 4.IO
L� 7JO 35 5Z
fi? 2.� 3� 5.30
.eo 2.� 3.�5 Sfi�
(.75 ZiS 3,45 $fio
I.50 2b 2.�w 4?o
.7C 2�? & �
19 2.45 3.25 4.�0
SANDoe Double
YzSua Meat
-rOPRJETORSPREFERANCE 2J55 55
Zpfi&T BEEF, PKOMDLONE, SPROUTS fTOMflOE,HOT PEPPERS, W ON 5UB
"rJ5& krWO ON
. . KAJSEK rOLL
VtKwEGETPKlAN
ANEKlCW,SWC& .PROVaONE.SrTOUTS.MOTORSWEET PEPPERS
MUSHROOMS, MAYO ON DAMASCUS ftXKET BREAD -
SteakSanpwiches &� qas
-DELUXE � 2-SO
6REEN PEPPERS,ONIONS, PROVOLONE, IWO ON 6UB ROLL
"Special 75 2&
LETTUCE .TOMATO .PfDVOLONE ,MAVO ON SUB ROLL
-CHEESE UTO 2�
PKDOLONE ,MAYO ON SUBfcU-
GREENPEFPERONION t45 Z2Q
VfTH MAYO ON sub roll
AIL A83VE IKCUJpeSLEmxiE.TOMATDE.MAYOtSEASOMlKj 0Wj�el-
Y0UR.G4OICE OF BPEAC)-
telSEft,RjOCErBBEAp(pAMA�CUS),RyE ,Sue&U,Wrfcl�WMEAT
EXTR7VS 'zsus whole
Chee.se 25 .50
P&vezs (hot or. sweet) A 5
Husk rooms 20
SCOUTS 35
30
.73
AssortepTreatb
Eog Roll .vo
Fries .45
CheeseFkies no
HotDooreush .45
HuSHRjfPIES .75
Onion RisfcS lO
PfCKTEL .35
(E66, GARLIC, HONEYt RAISIN K
0KION .PLAIN, PUMPKNICXEL)
Drinks
PEPSI
Mr. Dew
DrRepper.
Tup
Diet-Pepsi
Lg. .45
AllpuCanDrjnk(5
AllwcwnkTceiea .tO
FOOTBALL SEASON SPECIALS;
MONDAYS � All Day � 2 Hot Dogs � 75
All beverages discounted during
NFL Monday Night football
TUESDAYS �All day�
Any regular Steak Sandwich � $1.00
wpurchase of all you can drink
tea or soft drink.
WEDNESDAYS � AH day � Dollar Day
Any 12 Sub � SI.00
wpurchase of all you can drink
tea or soft drink
THURSDAY � Ladies' Night
All beverages discounted for ladies
from 7 p.m. 'til closing.
SUNDAYS � All Day � 2 Hot Dogs � 7S
All beverages discounted during
NCAA Football
SATURDAYS
All Day � 2 Hot Dogs � 75'
All beverages discounted during NFL Football
.Watch NFL and NCAA with us en Saturday. �un�av and Man
day nighti and with free MntfwlchM. AM you havt ta da Is pick
th� total number of points scared in the half. Chtsest pick wins a
tree 12 sub of your choice at the end of each half. Mvst reaister
your pick at the cash reaister before each half begins and must be.
present to win. .
f
ATTENTION
ALL DANCE
STUDENTS!
THE COLLEGE STUDENTS'
HEADQUARTERS
FOR ALL DANCE WEAR
Capezio and
Danskin
We have a com-
plete selection
of leotards,
tights; and tap,
ballet and
modern dance
shoes, in a spec-
trum of colors!
Downtown
Second
Chance
We Sell Used
couches
chairs
beds
lamps rw
stereos g
appliances(lg. and sm.)
pictures
typewriters
desks
dining tables
coffee tables
end tables
sets of dishes
carpet
Just to name a
televisions
mattresses
dressers
chests
night stands
bars
skates
few.
Second
Chance
Open: Mon Wed Fri Sat. � 10-6
Tues Thurs. � '0-8
Located across from Western Sizzlin'
in old A&P building at 2808 E. 10th St.
Phone 757-1322
Pira
New
By JIMMY DuJ
Msut� UHs
If you're not
about the futj
East Carolina Ll
ty athletics, y
bably haven't
with Richard
recently.
Dupree took
executive direc
the Pirate Club
but his root:
grow deep He
associated �i
university for I
14 years as a
and faculty mer
He was gradi
Pirates
Be On
Saturday
This con
day is "Mei
Pj r a t e s Do 1
downtown Gi
with a number
being plannec
Downtown Me
Association.
The entire
squad will be
on the downr
from 11 am
p.m. The idej
simply general
interest in E
ball.
Most all of lH
coaches, include
man Ed Emor
pected to be o
as well as
Director Ken K
There will
free autograph
ball given awa
dition to soi
prizes that
awarded. Al
meone will be
will both sinj
and season tic
sale.

T





THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 25. 1981 Pagell
Pirate Club Takes On
New Goals, Leadership
By JIMMY DuPREE
�Mto
If you're not excited
about the future of
East Carolina Universi-
ty athletics, you pro-
bably haven't talked
with Richard Dupree
recently.
Dupree took over as
executive director of
the Pirate Club in June,
but his roots at ECU
grow deep. He has been
associated with the
university for the past
14 years as a student
and faculty member.
He was graduated in
Pirates To
Be On Mall
Saturday
This coming Satur-
day is 'Meet The
Pirates Day" in
downtown Greenville,
with a number of things
being planned by the
Downtown Merchants'
Association.
The entire Pirate
squad will be on hand
on the downtown mall
from 11 a.m. until 1
p.m. The idea is to
simply generate local
interest in ECU foot-
ball.
Most all of the Pirate
coaches, including head
man Ed Emory, is ex-
pected to be on hand,
as well as Athletic
Director Ken Karr.
There will be two
free autographed foot-
ball given away, in ad-
dition to some other
prizes that will be
awarded. Also, so-
meone will be on hand
will both single-game
and season tickets for
sale.
1974 with a B.S. degree
in biochemistry, then
entered graduate school
and joined the faculty
of the School of
Business in 1976.
"1 can describe in
one simple word the
real reason I want to
work for East Carolina
University and its
athletic program
Dupree said at the time
of his appointment.
"Love. Love for its
tradition, people and
courage.
"East Carolina
means a whole lot to
me he says. "The
school has given me a
lot of opportunities to
succeed
The first few raon-
thes on the job have
basically consisted of
"getting administrative
details ironed out the
way I wanted to But
Dupree has already
begun to develop ideas
and formulate plans for
the future of the East
Carolina University
Educational Founda-
tion, better known as
the Pirate Club.
"One thing we are
very interested in is
developing a better line
of communication bet-
ween the Pirate Club
and the student body
Dupree reasons.
"Students now are the
Pirate Club people of
the future. I think it's
important to com-
municate with them
now.
"If you're apathetic
as a student, it's going
to be hard to get you on
the bandwagon in the
future. People of the
community have shown
a willingness to support
athletics; we need to
work on building sup-
port from within the
university.
The Pirate Club of-
fers graduating seniors
the opportunity to sign
up for a free year of
basic membership, but
Dupree notes that
response has historical-
ly been low. In an ef-
fort to reverse the
trend, he intends to
make it easier by setting
up registration boothes
on campus.
Dupree encourages
student organizations
to plan more activities
around athletic events.
"I think if a fraterni-
ty, sorority, service
organization or
whatever wants to plan
something ahead of the
game, then that helps
boost the spirit that
much more he says.
"Why can't a student
organizations have a
band or group or
something (in Ficklen
Stadium) earlier on the
day of a game.
"We're in the pro-
cess of building an im-
age here at East
Carolina. When people
begin to realize we
can't and don't want to
be like other schools,
then we'll be moving in
the right direction.
Michigan can't be like
Ohio State, Ohio State
can't be UCLA, UCLA
can't be Southern Cal,
Southern Cal can't be
Alabama, Alabama
can't be UNC and East
Carolina can't be UNC
or N.C. State.
"We're out to create
an identity of our
own
Dupree stresses ser-
vice when visiting
various chapter
meetings of the Pirate
Club.
"The membership of
the Pirate Club gives
money and time to
benefit the program
here at East Carolina
he explains. "We like
to look at it as we are
thanking them for their
contributions by awar-
ding various privileges,
rather than they con-
tribute in order to get
these privileges.
"We call it The
Spirit Of Pirate Giv-
mg.
Dupree sees his job
as part of a selling force
promoting East
Carolina athletics.
"We have to do a
better job of selling our
product Dupree in-
sists. "We've got so
many positive things to
sell and so many
resources we haven't
tapped. I'm very op-
tomistic about the
future of Pirate
athletics.
"For the entertain-
ment dollar, (athletics
are) hard to beat
Golfers
To Meet
Tonight
Persons interested in
playing on the East
Carolina golf team are
asked to attend a
meeting tonight
(Tuesday).
The meeting with
golf coach Bob
Helmick will be held in
Room 144 in Minges
Coliseum at 8 p.m.
Prospects will play a
try-out round later in
the week.
Persons wishing to
try out for the team
that cannot attend
tonight's meeting are
asked to call Helmick
at 757-6029.
iovia letter II
Wachovia
Teller H
. fc
, Vn
Sooner or later,
you're going to
need one.
Medical Park102 Stantonsbur Rd.
Pitt PlazaHwv. 264 Bypass
Universitv802E. 10th St.
Wachovia
Bank&Trust
Membi-rK.P.l.L

I 1
ed
e
- 10-6
8
Sizziin'
10th St.
H L HODGES
COMPANY
LOCATED AT 210 EAST FIFTH STREET
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
BOND'S
SPORTING GOODS
Located At 218 Arlington Blvd
Two Stores To Serve You
Welcome To Greenville
20 Won shoe purchase
Coupon Good Pnffl Sept 15. Mint Pment With ECO ID Gvi.
ASAHI
Tretora

'ELMfMCl
I
Adidas
SPERRY TOP SIDER
COUPON
Fraternity and Sorority
Jerseys
2 color letters now available.
ECU Sweatshirts
& Jackets
Ask about our
HodgesBond Shoe Chek
i
I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 25. 1981
Page 12
Purple Pride Moves Northwardr,
IF YOU THINK LOOKING GOOD
COSTS TOO MUCH, CUT OUT
FOR SAVINGS
to Off DCMNBIMMB
By�cb A Lomb
S0fTC0KUai�HS�5H69
By WILLIAM VELVERTON
Aatetaat Sf�1i Mtlor
and Ginger Rothermel got in some playing time, newspapers in two of three years
The South lost to the East in their first game, Syracuse University became a sort of mini-
Bulletin: East Carolina did not open a branch 21-17, but defeated the West, 19-7, in the next con- Olympic Village, Edwards said. There were 3600
in Syracuse NY in late July It only seemed test- In a similar position the men's squad was in, athletes participating in the Sports Festival,
that way because'the host city "of the National the women dropped an 18-17 decision to the Television iand attc ndan� basted morale at
Midwest, thus spoiling advancement to the gold the Festival. ABC-TV taped the last 10 minutes of
medal round. the men's team handball gold-medal game with a
In the Bronze medal game, Rothermel and crowd of over 1000 attending.
I
in Purple and
Sports Festival was "covered
Gold.
The reason? There were eight East Carolina
students participating on the South team handball
squads.
The South women, led by Pirates Maureen
Buck, Ginger Rothermel, and Gail O'Brien cap-
tured the Bronze medal by defeating the Midwest,
21-13.
The Sou'h men did not fair as well; they were
defeated by the West, 25-23, for the Bronze
medal.
"There wasn't a single university in the nation
that had a contingent as large as we did said Dr.
Wayne Edwards, East Carolina dierector of In-
tramural and Recreational Services, who attended
the Festival as a national coordinator for the U.S.
Team Handball Federation.
"This speaks well for East Carolina
Karl Karpinski of Winston-Salem was a
member of the South men's team handball squad
but did not see much playing time. The South lost
their first game to the East, 20-16, but bounced
back to defeat the West, 22-16, in their next con-
test.
The South's third game, against a tough -j . flu-j'
Midwest squad, proved to be a heartbreaker to Up Oy i3lX kjlUllOrlS
the men from Dixie, as they lost a 22-21 contest on
a last-second shot. If the South had tied the game,
Edwards said, they would have advanced to the
gold medal round.
Seven East Carolina women werer members of
the South team (15 members overall). The team
was "quite a story" in Syracuse, Edwards
remarked. "Incredible he said. "That's the on-
ly way to describe it
Maureen Buck was a starter at the wing posi-
tion, and Edwards labeled her performance as
"super She scored two goals in the first game
and added three more in the next three contests.
She added three more goals in the Bronze medal
game.
Gail O'Brien was a starter at the circle-running
position and also performed superbly, Edwards
noted. She did not score as much as Buck did
because her position is primarily for setting picks
and screens.
Edwards said the other players, Donna Eason,
Shirley Brown, Jolanda Clayton, Elaine Davis
O'Brien added one goal each.
"I'm so proud of our kids Edwards said.
"They've worked hard, and this has been a
tremendous experience for them
Team handball was introduced in the Olympic
Games at Berlin in 2936 but was discontinued un-
til the Munich Games of 1972. The sport returned
to Olympic competition in the 1976 games in
Montreal.
Several prominent amateur athletes competed
in the Festival. Included are four-time Olympic
discus champion Al Oerter, 110-meter hurdles
world record-holder Skeets Nehemiah and skater
Scott Hamilton, the Festival champion. Highly-
touted center Pat Ewing, a Georgetown
freshman, created much excitement in the media
in Syracuse.
"There were a lot of younger people there
Edwards said. "They are basically unknown, but
we'll be reading about these kids in the
Emory Show Picked
The National Sports Festival was made up of
33 sports including archery, bseball, basketball,
boxing, cycling, field hockey, fencing, track and
field, yachting, volleyball and softball. Com peti-
tion ran from July 23-29, and many events were
carried by the Entertainment and Sports Pro-
gramming Network.
The Festival was designed in Olympic-type
fashion in order for the people of the United
States to become more familiar with Olympic
sports.
iSSSSSS0
!�i m �"
I
h
L
iosetocm2D4 j mdgcoukton
D6COUKTOK�tX5USSCS AMDPHCHO
C�r�vl�bi� torpno�tt64y�MtAdoHtrttt�ou0iAufu( I
J� KWiMMvOptomctncCffCMtCffilriocMyw
1
20 OFF MOH�I�SCWPT10N
SUNGUSSCS
Ottcf tipuB Kuqju F� i�i �t n Opwmefnc Ey�
Can Cctjr kxjoon
0��cipiftt Aufu� ft Wi ManyOptomctnc Eye
Ct Center louOon
&6DBCOUHTFOATW7
ON PLASTIC ICHSCS
0rr euxrev Aufus ft mi t any Optometnc.
Eye Cre Center location
OPrOMCTMC
�Y�CAA�C�KT�R
oiar�nW��A
m a��Nviu t tivo tipton anmex
7S�-9404
� � !��
1
J
Nol good with any other coupons or discounts Dr. Peter HOlllS
With the recent ex-
pansions of The Ed
Emory Show a total of
15 million viewers will
be able to take a weekly
look at East Carolina
football.
The show's host sta-
tion, WITN-TV in
Washington � Chan-
nel 7 � is the local
outlet. The Emory
show can be seen every
Sunday from 12:30
p.m. until 1 p.m.
John Castleberry of
WITN will be Emory's
host and will head up
the show that will be
carried by no less than
six stations in a three-
state area.
In addition to
WITN, the following
stations have con-
tracted to carry the pro-
gram: WKFT, Channel
40 in Fayettville;
WGGT, Channel 48 in
Greensboro; WPDE,
Channel 15 in Florence,
S.C WTVZ, Channel
33 in Norfolk, Va and
WWAY, Channel 3 in
Wilmington.
Emory says there are
still last-minute efforts
to get a station to air
the show in the
Charlotte and Raleigh
markets.
Attic Enters
10th Year
Greenville has the distinction of housing the No. 6 live rock night club in
the South. The Attic, located in 103 E. Fourth St. For ten years, quality
and divt sification in music has been the Attic's goal.
Last year the Attic presented 9 different bands to its customers, more
than any other club in a three-state area. Such nationally famous names as
ROBBIN THOMPSON BAND, CAROLYNE MAS, CATFISH HODGE,
ASLEEP AT THE WHEEL, JOE ENGLISH BAND WBONNIE
BRAMLETT, NIGHTHAWKS, LE ROUX, NANTUCKET, SHABOO
ALL STARS, DIXIE DREGGS, POINTER SISTERS, ROBIN LANE
AND THE CHARTBUSTERS, MOTHER'S FINEST, have performed
upon the Attic's stage in just the past year. Three of these acts, Carolyn
Mas, LeRoux, and the Pointer Sisters were video taped for national broad-
cast. Regional favorites such as Brice Street, Super Grit, Nighthawks,
Eaze, Choice, The States, Sidewinder, No Vacancy, Pegasus, Snow,
Badge, and Sutter's Gold regularly fill the Attic to capacity. In addition to
the whole spectrum of live rock music including Album Rock, Country
Rock, Southern, Show, Blues, Fusion, Jazz, and New Wave, the Attic also
offers a large dance floor and your favorite beverages at easy to swallow
prices. And on one Friday per month a fraternity or sorority sponsors an
"afternoon delight" between 4 & 7 offering even easier to swallow prices.
Pinball and footsball are also available. The Attic, who introduced
footsball to Greenville in 1972, has hosted the N.C. State Footsball Cham-
pionship for the past three years.
Located in the back room of the Attic is the Phoenix Room which
presents live music specializing in Blues, Jazz, and Fusion Rock on Tues-
day nights. The Phoenix also offers at 7-ft. TV screen showing selected live
and recorded musical acts and sports events and is open to Attic customers
on most nights of the week.
Tom Haines and Stewart Campbell, managers of the Attic, feel that the
clubs downtown are important to most of the students at ECU because
they fill a void in the students' curriculum. It provides them with an alter-
native to work and study: a place to relax, unwind, and socialize. "After a
big test, a long term paper, or a grueling academic week, nothing beats a
cold one, a large crowd, an accommodating date and good band � all
readily available at the Attic
As Chip Gwynn (staff writer) said in a past article in this paper, "The
Attic seems to have reached a certain pleateau of success. It has remained a
favorite nightspot of students for several years and has remained successful
because students know the Attic is going to book good entertainment, even
if they have never heard of the performing band Open 6 days a week, the
Attic's low cover charge (generally $l-$2), student oriented specials and
Friday "Afternoon Delights" make it a favorite gathering place for ECU
students.
PAID ADVERTISEMENT
East Carolina Dining Services
JONES CAFETERIA
"All you can eat, three meals per day"
M-F
Sat.
Sun.
Breakfast7:15-9:308:00-9:30Brunch
Lunch11:00-1:3011:30-1:3010:00-1:00
Dinner4:30-6:304:30-6:004:30-6:00
MENDENHALL SNACK BAR
"Continual Service all day long"
BreakfastM-F SatSun.
Lunch7:30 A.M 11:00 A.M
Dinner7:30 P.M. 6:30 P.M.
THE GALLEY
"Located next door to Jones Cafete
Lunch DinnerM-F lftTTT� SatSun. 10:30-2:30 a � , CLOSED 4:30-7:30
Faculty-Staff Buffet Dining MonFri.
Reopening onAug. 31 uu,tn 11:00-2:00
Int
til. intrtmural Ucpj
The staff o
Department
I n t r a m u r a
Recreational Sel
would like to extl
sporty welcome
the students, fi
and staff at ECU I
More than
tivities have been
ned for your enjo
in addition
numerous in!
recreational op
tuniues. They
from traditional
like flag f
basketball, I
and softball
unique acti
Almost Anything
arm wrestling.
hockey and bicy
ing.
Each year n?
challenging ac
are offered.
1981-82 is no
tion. A genuine
co spitting
start the year o
Servomation � E.C.U.
P. O. Box 3375
Greenville, N. C. 27834
Wei
Stw
Students
Beach fashi
Stubbies, O.
Fashions
for Guys &
Gals
'efc TuCer
Carolina east maU KSgreenvilte
5.00 DOWN HOLDS YOUR
PURCHASE UNTIL
SEPTEMBER 7th!
For just 5.00 down your
blazer will be held on lay-
away until Sept. 7th. On
this date, regular monthly
payments will begin, with
final payment being made
in full by December 7th.
Layaway now!
Misses' and Junior
Wool Blend Blazers
49.88
Regular $60 to $65
You'll be the campus hit
with a 2 button front
back vented and
nylon lined blazer
flap pockets,
one breast
pocket and 3
sleeve but-
tons Navy,
grey, hunter
or camel.
CE
N
CAR
321 Ei
7!
BOTH S
Al
7 DA'
Greet t
Fa
Occl
Save $10 on Jr. and Misses'
100 Cotton Corduroy Blazers!
29.88
KA
Located
ce
old
t l20l,
rot
You'll go first class in your classic corduroy blazer with flap and
patch pockets, notch collar and nylon lining. Jr. and misses' sizes.
Shop Monday through Saturday 10 a.m. Until 9:30 p.mPhone 7S6-B-E-L-K (756-2355)
jM0tU
t
t
MVMM





D
IT
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 25, 1981
Page 13
H69
1 Intramural
ICCTJU
IMW i.�e
-I
I
1
J
lolli!
UR
INTIL
7th!
kl


V
lisses
azers!
8
,tth flap and
usses' sizes
ECU lnii�murml Dept
Of
the
of
The staff
Department
Intramural-
Recreational Services
would like to extend a
sporty welcome to all
the students, faculty
and staff at ECU.
More than 40 ac-
tivities have been plan-
ned for your enjoyment
in addition to
numerous informal
recreational oppoor-
tunities. They range
from traditional sports
.ike flag football,
basketball, volleyball
and softball to such
unique activities as
Almost Anything Goes,
arm wrestling, roller
hockey and bicycle rac-
ing.
Each year new and
challenging activities
are offered, and
1981-82 is no excep-
tion. A genuine tobac-
co spitting contest will
art the vear off with
all the big chewers con-
gregated in front of
Memorial Gym. A
punt, pass and kick
contest, patterned after
the national competi-
tion, will take place this
fall. Meanwhile all the
"major league" slug-
gers can take a swing at
the Home Run Derby
this spring.
A faculty-staff rac-
quetball tournament
will be offered, and co-
recreational basketball
is sure to bring some
new excitement for
roundball enthusiast.
The IRS WANTS
YOU to participate, to
become involved and to
have fun. If we can
answer questions regar-
ding any aspects of in-
tramural programming
please come by 204
Memorial Gym or call
our Intra-Action Sport-
sline at 757-6562.
Entry dedlines for
the following sports
and activities are ap-
proaching, so be sure to
sign up soon.
Intramural Sports
Bicycle Race
The second annual
"Little 500style bicy-
cle relay race is coming
to East Carolina
University on Thurs-
day, Sept. 10. Foui-
person relay teams will
compete in the 50-mile
race around Bunting
Track. Men and
women will compele in
the race, but not
against each other. The
race should be one of
the most exciting ant:
competitive events ol
the year, so sign up cat
ly and keep this in
mind: "Ladies and
gentlemen, start your
training
Early Bird Swimming
Monday. Wednesday
and Fridav mornings
from 7-8 a.m. (trial
period Aug. 31-Sept.
25). An opportunity for
early risers (students,
faculty and staff) to
beat the crowds and get
some exercise. Lap
sv imming only.
Friday Night Free Play
Volleyball and bad-
minton offered Friday
Nights in Minges Col-
iseum gymnasium for
interested groups or in-
dividuals. All equip-
ment furnished, just
come play and enjoy.
Dates as follow:
Vary
Sept. 4, 11, 18, 25; Oct.
2, 16, 23, 30; Nov. 6,
13, 20
BACK TO NATURE
Canoes, backpacks,
tents and bicycles may
now be rented for a
very nominal charge,
on a daily basis or for a
long weekend, from
room 115 in Memorial
Gym. Hours are
Monday-Friday from
2-3:30 p.m. Informa-
tion is also available
about state and federal
parks and camping
sites.
9 I
.��
LUGATOl
VQRSALE
LOCATED AT
THE GOLF SHOP
AT
GREENVILLE
COUNTRY CLUB
WE HAVE ONE OF THE LARGEST SELECTIONS OF
MEN'S AND LADIES' IZOD LACOSTE SHIRTS AS WELL
AS IZOD SWEATERS IN THE AREAI
IF THEY ARE BUYING TWO OR MORE, THEY CAN
GET A QUANITY DISCOUNT (MAY MIX SIZES).
FOR CHILDREN WE HAVE IZOD SLEEPERS, SHIRTS,
PANTS, AND SWEATERS.
GORDON FULP
� 756-0504
OPEN 7 DAYS
Welcome Back,
Students
Students � Take care of all of your summer needs.
Beach fashions by Beach Towne, Cole of California,
Stubbies, O.P Hobie and Surf Shirts.
CAROLINA
MARKETING &
TRADING
WE BUY, SELL & TRADE
Fashions
for Guys &
Gals
Located at
Rivergate
Shopping
Center and
Atlantic
Beach
Phone
752-7711
STUDENTS, HERE IS YOUR
CHANCE TO SAVE MONEY
THIS FALL. It's good clean us-
ed merchandise at REAL LOW
PRICES. Any and all stereo
equipment, guitars, cameras,
watches, car stereo equipment,
portable radios, small dorm ap-
pliances, sporting goods, TV's,
furniture, kerosene heaters,
wood stoves and much, much
more!
417 EVANS ST. MALL
OLD WACHOVIA BLDG.
GREENVILLE
PARKING ACROSS FROM ATTIC!
757-1237
Miss CAushf TWiW
CMftt fall, a.C.
enB
CMf
KASH&KARRYNQ.8
CON VENIENCE STORE
Located at 14th & Charles (formerly Pirate Pit Stop)
Free Dip Of
PINE STATE
ICE CREAM or
FOUNTAIN COKE
8-21 thru 8-23
C�ld
o-
6P
$K
riat
ro
$j.i�
rfow us yexe L a4 . ,
T,dL yo kve c 0.0U. lo yo. Miss ml 7 Ij
rwK oJJLsJ l sW�g. peofle P�r?'e fC 3i-
wKf eU rvtos i -fU- qys w 4- 0&v�7
kvuDfditvLio you' zMttj, odSl U. 30. dret rcMty
"cool" iVe. cJrtwae-� ru ivw'oke. QnMpleJw � woei
loolcs life OM Von voJu see in M�W - Ne, k.
L Msftf tool cMU -M�ct�.
BAG ICE
5(K
SELF SERVICE
GAS
Thrift Motor Oil
8H Quart
WISE TWIN PAK POT A TO CHIPS
9H 8 oz. pk.
Prices Good August 22nd-September 6th
will loot C4jf (M �.
t 0br' o,
" fOJLl- CTU � JM-
t





Y( ' �
iit

hi t.(ty.)
STUDENT SUPPLY
STORE
WRIGHT BUILDING
pa � �� i

PLEASE PARDON THE INCONVENIEN(
� �

u to shop Student Supply Store
ir one-stop shopping center for:
textbooks
v nirs
jewelry
�ph ing
� rued wearing apparel
�art supplies
� al class rings
�I ire reading book
�gift items
�medical supplies
V

vv
,
. vv
0
oni M oim rah i
H 1 s� (AROIIN V I'MYIKSin





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
AUGUST 25, 1981
38 Free Films:
From Tess To
Pvt. Benjamin
The Student Union Films Com-
mittee has booked its biggest lineup
of free movies ever with an un-
precedented schedule (38 films in
all) of weekend "popular" and
Wednesday "special" movies, dou-
ble features, Sunday festivals, and
late shows.
Short discussion groups follow
each single Wednesday night film.
As ever, admission is by ID and
Activity Card for students and MSC
membership for faculty and staff.
All films will be shown in
Mendenhall Student Center's Hen-
drix Theatre.
This fall's list includes the follow-
ing weekend films (shown on Thurs-
day, Fridav and Saturday nights):
Altered States (Aug. 28, 29), The
Competition (Sept. 3, 4, 5), Or-
dinary People (Sept. 11, 12), The
Long Riders (Sept. 17, 18, 19),
Fame (Sept 24, 25, 26), The Stunt
Man (Oct. 1, 2, 3), Private Ben-
jamin (Oct. 8, 9, 10), Stir Crazy
(Oct. 15, 16, 17), The Great Santini
(Oct. 22, 23, 24), Halloween (Oct.
29, 30, 31), Nine To Five (Nov. 5, 6,
7), Raging Bull (Nov. 13, 14),
Airplane (Nov. 20, 21), The
Elephant Man (Dec. 3, 4, 5), and
The Idolmaker (Dec. 10, 11, 12).
Wednesday night films (shown at
8 p.m.) are Breaker Morant (Sept.
2), The Tin Drum (Sept. 9), Cousin
Angelica (Sept. 23), Melvin and
Howard (Oct. 11), Tess (Oct. 28),
Kagemusha (Dec. 2), and Closely
Watched Trains (Nov. 18).
Wednesday night double features
(shown at 7 and 9 p.m.) include
Throne of Blood and Macbeth
(Sept. 30), Casablanca and Play It
Again Sam (Oct. 21), plus Lancelot
of the Lake and Monty Python and
the Holy Grail.
Sunday afternoon film festivals
feature the movies of Fred Astair
with Top Hat, Funny Face, and
Daddy Long Legs (Oct. 11); and
Alfred Hitchock with Foreign Cor-
respondent, The Lady Vanishes, To
Catch a Thief, and Frenzy (Nov.
22).
Friday and Saturday late shows
are The Kids Are Alright (Sept. 18,
19), Martin � The Pittsburgh Vam-
pire (Oct. 30, 31), and Rock 'n Roll
High School (Dec. 4, 5).
Wallet-size film cards that include
a complete listing of all Student
Union fall films, their respective
show times, and dates, may be pick-
ed up at the Information Desk in
Mendenhall Student Center.
Gold Haw. in .he mo wide puMicized scene from her "Priv Benjamin The film b only one of an incredible J�.
Some Words Of Wisdom For A New
By DAVID R. BOSNICK
Special lo Th� fc��l CmoUwm
Unpack, do it all quickly, take the side of the room
that one sees when one first enters the room. Then you
don't contend with the open door. You will feel better
about campus if you are able to come back to a room
that is recognizable.
U rains a ot in OreenviUe, one cannot allow the rain
to signal a despondency. You will find most of the early
days here at school unbearably hot and humid
(especially if you are from the North) and you might
take as many as four or five showers a day.
You will buy a fan, and buy a couple of new albums,
give yourself a treat.
Do not sign up for early classes unless you are well
disciplined. The people who take early morning classes
are almost invariably elementary education majors who
are coming back to school for a second degree and have
nothing to sav beyond "Will that be on the midterm" or
"Could you spell that again They never speak in class
and if they do they hold opinions you would be embar-
rassed to attribute to your little sister. They never miss
class and are always engaged, separated or just married.
There is not much difference between the
bureaucracies at your old school and the ones you will
come across here. The center of all administrative activi-
ty at this institution is the provost. She is a woman, and
while she is generally fair and open-minded, she is
humorless and a company man. Plav it straight with her
all the time.
If you have already registered, when you receive your
schedule, walk around campus and see where all the
buildings are. It is easier than rushing about that first
morning. The campus is small and all of the buildings
are marked with signs and faces of pirates.
You will receive an incredible amount of garbage
from companies and student interest groups. They will
give you anything from petitions to small bottles of
shampoo. The petitions are useless, and the short ex-
planation at the top gives you no idea of what the pro-
blem is. If it makes you feel more a radical young col-
lege student to sign it, then do. Keep the shampoo and
give it to your roommate. You bought all that stuff
while you were home anyhow, and it's nice to get on
good terms with your roommate for the first few days.
This is what to know about your roommate. If you
generally get along well with people, do not have a
history of violent or sexual crimes and the person in the
bed across the floor annoys you, it is his fault, and move
out. There is no need to make desperate efforts to get
along with anvbody. There is a housing shortage on the
campus and changing rooms would not be difficult
Live off-campus if you have to. Any doctor's note will
give you university permission to hve off campus as a
freshman or transfer student.
Moving off campus can be expensive, moving too tar
from the campus will isolate you more than one needs.
It multiplies the difficult problem of early classes, rainy
days, cold weather, ill health, laziness. You will see peo-
ple in your classes who are in your dorm and will talk to
them on the walk from class. These are other possible
roommates; check the classified ads in the school
newspaper.
And now a word about Greek life here at ECU.
They are like goddamn locusts on this campus. They
will be putting notices on or under your door from the
moment you move in, until the end of first semester.
They are fraternities (sororities). They are exactly alike
in their structure and generally alike in philosophy. Peo-
ple need organization. There is strength in numbers � a
flag to flv under. It is an immediate circle of "friends"
It is also" fairly expensive (70-80 dollars a month) and
anywhere from 900-1,100 dollars a year to live at the
house.
They will attack you with parties and company. They
will call you "brother" and "sister The number of
good, intelligent, responsive individuals is exactly pro-
portionate to the number outside of organization. Ex-
cept those in the group needed to join. There are excep-
tions on both sides of this generality, but they prove the
rule.
There are other organizations you are automatically a
member of: a class, the Men's Residence Council
(Women's) or you are a "Day Student You will have
representatives, who were your homeroom delegates in
high school. There are occasional group outings where
they give you beer, which they feel is enormously liberal
at this institution. They are chaperoned by the heads, or
the emplovees of the sponsoring organization. You can
judge the entire program by the administrators they pre-
sent to the public.
There are very few angry young men at this umversi-
There is nothing 1 can say on drugs or sex that would
not sound ridiculously pompous and oratorical. There is
a sufficient amount of both Downtown" where the
quality of both fluctuates, but does not cease.
You meet the people there. They are attracted to
popular music, various forms of dance, and each other.
There is almost vengeful disco, the same caliber rock
and there used to be a jazz place. They are all somewhat
See WISE, Page 10
i 0 H

t
Reep And The Old Days
Art Professor Worked For Hollywood
Phoo�r�p�i By Larry Zichernun
ECU Art Professor Edward Reep
FWn vht East Carotin. University Artist-In-Residence EdwardI Reep
Sown C htudio at home. Reep worked in Hollywood film
shown here in Ms 8�a designer, an illustrator and a
StUT� HeeaseSht d�tl of Musaolini during the second
Wotlrrie" e -bout his impressions of life and his
woik as an artist.
By DIANE HENDERSON
SufT Writer
An art professor at East Carolina for the past
11 years, Edward Reep has a past filled with
unusual events ranging from the vision of
Mussolini, dead, hanging by his heels, to an in-
troduction with a Pope. He brings to his art and
his teaching a world of vibrant and tragic ex-
perience.
From junior high school through five years at
the Art Center College in California, Reep was
steeped in technical training. An unflinching
drive to learn the art kept him going even during
the Depression.
"Some of the students today complain of poor
facilities Reep remarked with a chuckle. "I us-
ed to ride across town (to art school) in a street
car for an hour and a half, then transfer and do
the same again at night. Then I'd stay up most of
the night working on the kitchen floor.
"After my first year, I won a scholarship,
which meant if I cleaned up nine Johns three
times a day, I had my tuition � $300. That was
more than my whole family had at that time.
"So I cleaned Johns for the next four years,
and I went to art school for five years night and
day � and Saturdays
But with all this technical training, Reep felt
lacking as an artitst without the understanding of
the deeper implications of painting which could
come only with experience. He began to achieve
this understanding after he joined the Army, he
said.
"I always felt that I could not drawl knew to
my heart that I wasn't composing and drawing as
well as I ought to. I did learn to manipulate
media and became a rather good technician. And
then the War came along
A few months before Pearl Harbor, Reep
volunteered for a year's service, which turned
out to be five years. But his dedication to pain-
ting did not cease.
"We'd get up at five in the morning and fall
out, and we'd be through with our hiking in boot
camp after about two in the afternoon. In the
long summer days in July and August, 1 would
take a shower and then put my art materials on
my back and go up in the hills to paint
The work the young artist did during those
months brought him national attention. Besides
winning first place in one Life magazine contest,
Reep won fourth place in Life's All-Service com-
petition.
Shortly after this, Reep met the woman who
would be his wife.
"We were married with $13 to our names,
Reep recalls with a smile. "We got married the
day I graduated from officer candidate school
and went off to the Ozark mountains, where, in
the ice and snow, 1 fell out troops at 5:30 a.m.
with icicles hanging from my cap. I taught a
company how to blow up and build bridges anda
lot of other things that I wasn't too expert in
Reep was transferred from the ice of the
Ozarks to the warmth of New Orleans, then to
Alaska and back to Monterrey.
"There I was contacted by the secretary of war
with a telegram asking me if I would consider be-
ing a war artist overseas
Reep eagerly accepted the position and became
a part of a corps of 42 artists that went
throughout the world for the next few years,
painting the second World War.
"I was thrown in with some of the great artists
of that era: Reginald Marsh, Thomas Benton
and Yasuo Kunyoshi. And they scared me
because I was so young and inexperienced.
"So, 1 got a call one day from Gen.
Eisenhower's adjutant. I went to his head-
quarters, and he called me into his office, and
said, 'Reepthere are five artists; and you're a
Second Lieutenant, and I'm putting you in
charge of these five artists And he said. There
are five divisions going into Italy. Pick a divi-
sion, and assign these other four men to a divi-
sion. That is all
"1 was with him for possibly 40 seconds and
had to make the decision. I saw there were four
infantry and one armored division, so I put
myself down for the armored one, just to be
significant Reep said with a laugh. "Soon
after, we were on our way to Italy, the invasion
of Salerno and up Italy
Reep feels that his most amazing war ex-
perience came in Italy. He and his sargeant were
driving on a road near Milano one day. They had
intended to bypass the city, when the sargeant
suggested, "What the hell. Let's go into
Milano and the quick turn Reep made led
down a path that would bring him one of his
most vivid memories.
"Halfway in we were stopped by two partisans
with machine guns. They were very excited,
shouting, 'Americani, Amencani They had
these big paper American flags, and they put one
on each fender. Then they jumped on the fenders
and said, 'Do you want to see Mussolini?'
"So 1 drove into a service station, where they
had Mussolini and his girlfriend and 17 other
people killed and hanging up by their feetThen
they were cutting them down, and people were
lining up. Women were taking their heels off and
beating Mussolini to a pulp
At the end of the war, Reep returned to the
States as a captain who had been given the
Bronze Star. More important to his profession,
he had also been awarded a Guggenheim
Fellowship, which he worked on for a year after
leaving the Army.
Reep taught at the art school he had once at-
tended but quit after four years and went to work
in the film industry.
"1 worked in the film studios as a set designer,
an illustrator and ultimately as a scenic painter.
!�ee REEP, Page 7
t
t





jt
THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 25, 1981 Page 2
The Saving Place
BACK-TOSCHOOL SALE
Tuesday thru Saturday
fBMOS 25
$17�
X
178.00
5 cu. ft. Refrigerator
Compact unit features top freeze crisper, door
storage. Walnut color top and door.
IBS 260
-r
II . i
Our Reg. 22.74
5-Shelf Storage Unit
Gray finish resists stains and
wipes clean for easy care, ideal
for dorms, apartments & more.
19.97
3-Speed Fan
Wisper quiet, cools at
three settings.
Bluewhite.
24.96
Our Reg. 31.97
12" Oscillating Fan
3 speeds, cools entire room.
Quiet and energy efficient
27.97
Our Reg 37.97
2-Drawer File Cabinet
Steel, comes in beige or black
Key for safety locking
99.00
Compact
Refrigerator
Freezer compartment,
adjustable thermostat.
1.6 cu. ft.
MacDonaum
M270
88.00
Modular Stereo by McDonald
AAAFM MPX radio with 8-track stereo
player, phonograph & speakers.
15.88
Our Reg. 21.88
Serving Cart
3-tier metal cart has elec
trical outlet, brass casters.
288C
Renu7.it Solid
Air Freshener
Goes anywhere available in dtt
te"ent scents
� .5Limit 2
32 ox.
Spray 'n Wash
Removes stains ano tougn sc
mat .s Dr "ewe"
.U1
L
3.00
Parson
Tables
Stack them for more space,
sturdy plastic, available in
several different colors.
Plus Deposit
1.57
Coca-Cola
Products
8 � 16 oz bottles. Stock up now &
save
44
Bic Pen
Special
3 per pkg Black or blue ink.

2.57

Tri-Fold Organizer
3 compartments, complete with paper, dividers and folder
10" Live
Hanging
Baskets
Beautiful plants for all rooms,
many to choose from.
V
m
7.97
Live Plants
For Show
in 10" pots Many to choose
from.

t
1 .Limit 2
12 Gal. Final
Touch
Fabric Softener
To give your domes tresh, scrft
smell
1.37umit2
32 oz. Wisk
Liquid Detergent
The heavy duty laundry
detergent
:
White or Avocado l
1.37
Sylvania
Soft White
2.77
Kmart
Corner
Broom
Plastic long
wearing
washable
oroom
4 pack light buios Available in 40.
60. 75 or 100 watl
6.97
Bright
Stick�
Wicker-I
Hamper
Doubt ZJPP1,
D�coCo�or�
Complete fluorscent fixture. In
stalls quickly, onoff switch for
easy use.
15.83
Bean Bag
Chair
Comfortable tor all rooms
available in decor colors.
Padded lid, upright style, beige or
white.
21.00
Limit 2
175 Sheets
Filler
Paper
Fits 3 or 5 ring binders Save
10.88
T-Leg
Ironing
Board
Ventilated top for easy ironing,
adjustable height.
17.97
16 pc.
Corelle
Dinnerware
v m? f
Set � 4 plates, 4 saucers, 4
cups, 4 bowls.
97
14 NFL
Pencils
Choose your favorite team and keep
them at all times.
21.00
Easy
Wipes
The all purpose, re usable cloth,
strong, economical.
Introducing
Wrangler
& Levi
Jeons
at Kmart
LOW
EVERY-
DAY
PRICES
Our Reg. 13.97
9.97
Men's
Sport Shirt
Button up front, pocket,
fashion style in many solid
colors.
7.97
Men's Nylon
Warm-Up Jackets
For those cool days, just around the
corner.
Store Hours:
MonThurs.
9:30to9:00
Friday-Saturday
9:30 to 9.30
12
INCH
di�ial
� COMIC
69.00
KMC 1221
12" BlackWhite Portable TV
Comes on instantly Built in antenna. Goes
anywhere.
59.97

Our Reg. 69.97
Hoover
Celebrity II
Vacuum
Canister vacuum com
plete with attachments A 4J7
for easy cleaning. �
V
1.97
Corefree
Panti Shields
48 p�?r DC" COfT '
? - eVness
JMmai i ,j
Quwn Six 911
288 C
Totol Comfort
Knee Hi's
t "�" SSfS Or
1.37
m Under Bed Chest
JlOrflflfi Woodgroin tool,
Chest 4 da
Sturdy fiberboard
with wood grain
finish. Save
1.77
200 Sheets
Typing
Paper
For all typewriters Shop now for
term papers & save
1.57
Metal
Propane
Cylinder
Disposable, many uses, save
now
F
m
12.88
5 pc.
Both Set
Complete with tank cover, lid
cover and two floor rugs
Fried
Chicken
Dinner
with 2 veg roll
& outter.
1.69
1.17
20 Qt.
Potting
Soil
Our Reg. 2.37
W
WE
Ready to use, odorless, won't
burn. Save.
Jmh'
Shown ab
Willis Buill
and widt-si
s
Am-
the
full
maSS nv -I
As alv
Sin;
taking our
Mankinc
none were
tion, super
the re
Ulysses
The exp
were cclcbl
rytellin,k
comic booi
now, moti
derring-do
never
profu-
)m are
lone Ranj
l onun mt-
Super
a few I
superb
plaj i
I
The V i
;wo teej
Siegel ona
Februarv
world-cone
"Listenil
Bat
Go(
1.
Pi
Wh. I
head )
i on
in Pa I
with r
op





THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 25. 1981 Page 3
e Hours:
Thurs.
0 to 9:00
Saturday
C to 9 30
ortt
iV
Goes
ITI
tort
teets
m or
fE
8
�t
cover, lid
igs
�eiuaj Roil
�e Butter
SPA
��
V
Development Institute
Provides Regional Aid
Photograph B M�n�nnc Baine
Shown above is the The East Carolina University Regional Development Institute located in the
Willis Building at the corner of First and Reade Streets. "The services of i
and widespread as any single university department
��
East Carolina
University offers
several sources of
assistance to the sur-
rounding region
beyond the boundaries
of the campus. One
such available resource
is he East Carolina
University Regional
Development Institute.
The institute is located
in the Willis Building at
the corner of First and
Reade Streets. This
' location, at the extreme
northern end of cam-
pus, gives the impres-
sion to the casual
observer that the in-
stitute is not directly af-
filiated with the univer-
sity. In contrast to this
impression, the services
of the institute are as
diverse and widespread
as any single university
department.
The institute was
founded in 1966 after
two years of planning.
Its initial funding
assistance was the U. S.
Department of Com-
merce, which saw the
university center as a
foundation for increas-
ed economic develop-
ment in eastern North
Carolina. This associa-
tion continued until
1971 when state sup-
port was obtained. The
institute has been
located in several loca-
tions on campus but
moved into its present
facility in the fall of
1974. The present
16,000 square foot
building houses a
muUi-use auditorium,
which is the location of
various meetings and
conferences. Also, the
institute has conference
rooms, drafting and art
studios, office space,
and a library which of-
fers statistical and nar-
rative information on
eastern North Carolina
and related subjects.
The scope of service
of the institute is
basically divided into
two categories
businessindustry and
community service.
The business sector
provides assistance in
securing market data
and assessing the
feasibility of commer-
cial and industrial
enterprises in the 32
eastern-most counties.
Industrial park designs
and economic profiles
are also provided.
� asnoif 4$dm � asrtoif 14 s dm � asnoi tfOM � asnoq usom �
o
c
w
3
o
The Place to
Wash
.
t
a
Superheroes In Demand
The $L
WASH
HOUSE
111 E. 10th St. (Across from Krispy Kreme)
514 E. 14th St. (Across from Hot Dog City)
e
o
Also �
�Color TV
� Pinball
�Attendant on Duty
� Lots of Washers & Dryers
:
3
By JOHN WEYLER
Sun Writer
America is crying for help. Superheroes by the
score are responding to our plea, by shattering
the confines of the comic page and leaping to
full-blown, live-action life in our nation's major
mass media, the movies.
As always, they arrive in the nick of time, sav-
ing us from the clutches of Evil Economy and
Sinister Social Turmoil, or at least temporarily
taking our minds away from these vile villains.
Mankind has always needed heroes. When
none were available, we turned to our imagina-
tion, superstitition. religion � superheroes were
the result, whether their names are Siegfried,
Ulysses, St. George or Superman.
The exploits of these amazing adventurers
were celebrated through the ages in song and
storytelling. Today we tell these tales in books,
comic books, comic strips, radio, television, and
now, motion pictures. While daredevils and
dernng-do were always a staple of celluloid,
never untii this summer has there been such a
profusion of cinematic superheroes, among
whom are Indiana Jones, Tarzan, Zorro, The
Lone Ranger, James Bond, Flash Gordon and
Conan the Barbarian.
Superman started it all. The success of his iilm
a few years ago was the start of the current
superhero craze, as well as the reason for the now
playing "Superman 11 which so far has grossed
over $75 million.
The Man of Steel was conceived 40 years ago
by two teenagers, Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster.
Siegel once discussed ("Mediascene January-
February 1975) what led to the creation of his
world-conquering character:
"Listening to President Roosevelt's 'fireside
chats being unemployed and worried during Germany I had the great urge to help help COUPON
the depression and knowing hopelessness and the despairing masses, somehow. How could I O Good for on FREE WASH onMon. ocThurt.
fear. Hearing and reading of the oppression and x m m g 9 o.m4 p.m. - Offor epirs Soot. 30
slaughter of helpless, oppressed Jews in Nazi See SUPERHEROES, Page 9 . w$h hou$� . w�h hous� .
?
�� College
� Shop
Back to School Special
10 Off!
. on all fall j
merchandise I
CLIPCOUPONj
Good Thru Aug. 25-Sept. 30
112 Price on BrOWfl
Portsmouth Shoes
When raindrops are fallin' on your
head, your feet will be stayin'
completely dry. You'll look ust duck.e
in Pappagallo's puddle protection
with slip resistant sole
h.
222 E. 5th Street only
Shop Rite Aid For
Quality And Savings!
RITE AID
10 PACK
BALL PENS
BLUE OR BLACK
OUST At
STENO
6" i 9" -80 SHEETS
COLLEGE
RULED
THEME BOOK
�Will"
100
SHEETS
COLGATE
TOOTH-
PASTE
9 0Z. TUBE
S8VS8S
FtVI SKTKW
MARBLE
COMPOSITION
5 SUBJECT
SPIRAL
THEME BOOK
KITE AID
LEGAL
SIZE
CLIPBOARD
PERT
SHAMPOO
NORMAlDItT OR OUT
IS OZ. BOTTLE
SCRIPTO OR
CRICKET
i LIGHTERS
PRO.
OF 3
c
PENCILS
16 TO
PACKAGE
KLEER-VU
REPORT
COVERS
EFFERDENT
DENTURE
CLEANSER
PKG.
Of 40
TABLETS
efferdent
TYPING
PAPER
RPI AID PKG. OF 200 SHEETS
RITE AID
ENVELOPES
100 LETTER SIZE
OR SO BUSINESS SIZE
GRAPH
PAPER
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES
MIKES EFFECTIVE AUG. 34 THRU 30, 1981
NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TTPOGRAPNKAL ERRORS
AVAILABLE
ONLY AT:
2814 EAST 10TH STRICT
WEST END SHOPPING CENTER
CAROLINA EAST CONVENIENCE CENTER,
RT. 11 AS. MEMORIAL DR.
� 1102 WEST 3RD STRICT
GREENVILLE, NC
t





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUgUST25, 1981
Page 4

f
I
Bucki
dome.
Novel
Series
c
Char II
the saml
his acti
Even
activitiel
boyish
Besid
it's han
engineei
market'
Thce
inventoil
is devel
Compai
The
several
or gas
of othei
tion an
The
substanj
ed on t
metennj
new m
The
that insj
machin
usually
works
togethe
ed and
Cam
dinary
is a PI
volved
gadget:
trunk
Cain
for mo
170B
owner
stde it
much
inside
i
�.v.
X





THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 25, 1981 Page 5
44
TV Or Not TV: The Battle Rages
Buckminster Fuller
Buckminster Fuller, designer of the geodesic
done, will speak in Hendrix Theatre on
November 17 as part of the MSC Lecture
Series.
By DAVID NORRIS
Surff Writer
The argument raging
over television violence
and its harmful effects
on our society has
escalated in recent
months. Many people
think that the constant
flow of violence on TV
watched by so many
people is making ours a
more violent society.
There is one thing
that 1 think helps keep
TV from affecting our
lives as much as it
might: the fact that
most people don't pay
attention to the shows
they are watching.
Think about the
number of times that
you've come into a
room where someone
was watching TV and
couldn't tell you what
program was on, who
was in it or anything
that had happened in it.
(That will teach you to
come in after that
show's started.)
It seems that many
people use television
simply as background
noise. A simple turn of
a knob (and a lot of
frantic fiddling with the
fine tuning and the
antenna) can really
liven up a dull, quiet
room. Or, it could also
drown out a lot of
racket (like from living
in a dorm or some
other outlandishly
noisy place.)
There are good
things about the idea of
looking upon TV as a
mere background hum,
instead of something to
watch intently. For one
thing, people can get
lots of reading done.
Also, people can be
spared some of the sex
and violence on TV,
unless they read sexy,
violent books.
The radio also can
serve as an more-or-less
unobtrusive
background noise for
many people. I'm used
to working in studios in
the art building, which
can be unbelievably
dead and quiet if one is
working alone. Even
?he worst songs on the
radio are somewhat
welcome then, since
they provide a little
A
By JON YUHAS
ment.
refurbished and resembles a modern,
Charles Cain bears the mantle of genius with sophisticated aircraft. Cain refers to himself as
is With A Heart
The interior of the plane has been largely of the sixties) and DuPont, which is how he end-
the same affable humor that characterizes all of
his actions.
Even when he is involved with the most serious
activities, that smile that at times becomes a
boyish grin is always present.
Besides being a genius (Cain will tell you that
it's hard to eat genins), he is an inventor,
engineer and president of the company that
markets one of his inventions, the Cain Encoder.
The encoder, publicized last year along with its
"Super Chicken" when he talks about his flying.
Although he is an expert and IFR-rated, he never
flies in even marginally bad weather. "There are
old pilots, and there are bold pilots, but there are
no old, bold pilots Charles Cain expects to get
very old.
After any conversation with Cain it is difficult
not to feel like Dr. Watson. Cain, like Sherlock
Holmes, operates on a plane somehow separate
from the one that most men operate on. I
inventor in Business Week and Popular Science, mind makes imaginative leaps that leave the mor-
ed up here in Greenville, not exactly the Mecca of
the industrial world. While at DuPont, he
developed the Encoder and so just naturally
headquarters his company here.
Charles Cain's wife is MyTa Cain, the assistant
to the vice-chancellor for academic affairs and an
assistant professor of English here at ECU. They
have two children, Meg, who begins her second
year as a student at Princeton this fall, and
Glenye, who is in the 7th grade.
Cain earned his bachelor's degree at Vander-
bilt University and his master's degree at
Auburn.
is developed and marketed by the Cain Encoder
Company that has its headquarters in Greenville.
The device can, when connected with any of
several communications systems, read an elelctric
or gas meter and report the reading and a number
of other bits of information, including malfunc-
tion and tampering.
The device could save utilities companies a
substantial amount of money that could be pass-
ed on to the consumer. It will make time-of-day
metering a possibility without the purchase of
tal behind in a cloud of confused wonder. His
taste in music runs to High Opera and his
favorite album is The Greatest Hits of 1720
which includes "Pacobel's Canon in D
He can quote Milton, Shakespeare and
Chaucer (in Middle English of course) as well as
read German, Russian and Latin (some French
too, enough to translate patent law).
He is also an accomplished mechanic and has
done most of the work of converting his Cessna
to IFR himself. He has singlehandedly kept any
number of cars on the road when they would
The relatively peaceful exterior gives no hint otherwise have perished.
that inside, Charles Cain is walking mayhem. No The Renaissance Man would certainly be
machine is safe from his careful scrutiny, which Charles Cain in this day and time. He is a
usually involves dismantling and studying the sublime blend of the artist and scientist as well as
works' To be sure, the machine goes back the humanist. He moves with grace and ease
together again, but only after its guts are examin- among his business partner Lazard Freres and his
cd and the principle of its function is understood, less sophisticated friends such as reporters from
" Cain's car is the first hint that he is not the or- The East Carolinian, .is gif is much more than
dinary businessman he may appear to be. The car
is a Plymouth Vaiiani that looks like it was in-
volved in a hardware store holdup. Tools and
gadgets of every description fill the back seat and
trunk.
Cain is also a private pilot and has been flying
for more than 20 years. He owns a 1952 Cessna
170B. The airplane reflects the personality of its
owner in much the same way the car does. Out-
side it loks like a lail-draager that has seen too
much hard service as an Alaskan bush plane, but
inside there is a small fortune in IFR radio equip-
the sum of his talents. He is Plato's philosopher;
he has seen the sun and is come back to the cave
to enlighten the rest of us and yet has not lost any
essence of humanity.
Charles Cain is, besides being a Renaissance
Man, a truly unselfish friend to many students
and faculty members. He is generous with the lit-
tle time that is his own and is always ready to
share his wisdom and experience with his friends.
Cain's skill as an engineer has gotten him jobs
with such corporations as North American
Rockwell (working on the guided missile projects
sHMrTSWOBLP
WELCOME BACK,
STUDENTS
EVERY TUESDAY
IS COLLEGE NIGHT
with VALID ID.
$1.00
104E.REDBANKSRD.
756-6000
relief from the silence.
Despite the
thousands of study
handbooks that say
that people must have
absolute quiet to study,
most of us seem to
work a little better with
a TV or radio going.
(The same guidebooks
say not to eat while stu-
dying, and not to study
without sitting up
straight. I never paid
any attention to them.)
Having TV and radio
to pre ide an electronic
barrier of sound is one
of the great changes
that this century's
technology has brought
about. Just imagine liv-
ing in, for example, the
colonial days. People
had to read and study
in silence, unless they
could afford to hire
people to stand around
making noise.
Eastern Carolina
School of Bartending
A DIVISION O BAH SERVICES INC
LOCATED IN GREENVILLE
218 Arlington Blvd.
E.C.S.Bs Experienced. Qualified Instructors can certify you
as a Fully Trained Bartender upon completion of our
Comprehensive Course in just Two Weeks!
Bartending offers Career Opportunies, Great Pay, Flexible
Hours, and Lots of Excitement!
With Liquor by the Drink
Qualified Mixologists are in GREAT DEMAND!
Let us prepare you with The Ability end Diploma from
Eastern Carolina School of Bartending!
Upon Graduation you can take advantage of our Complete Job
Placement Service! As a Qualified Bartender job opportunities
are worldwide! �
Accepting Applications For Enrollment V
For Registration Information
CALL NOW
(919) 756-6644
EACK ID COLLEGE
p
k

�a
n
Us &
� a
.v
AVW

v.v
v.v
I
v.v
:�:�:
� � �
� � � �
HOLLOWELL'S
DRUG STORES
Old Fashioned
t Orangeades and Lemonades
AaMt smalL33C
rt large48C
Fountain Coke and Pepsi
smalL24C
large38C
Banana Split.����������������������Je
Sundaes?1.1
Float
smalL42C
large62C
Milkshakes62C
Hot Dogs2forM
We are open every day of the year to serve you.
We have been in Greenville for over 50 years.
This fountain special is offered only at
Holloweirs � 911 Dickinson Avenue
Holloweirs � 1700 West Sixth Street
We have 3 stores to serve you in Greenville
911 Dickinson Avenue 752-7105
1700 West Sixth Street 758-4104
315 Stantonsburg Road 757-1076
Specials Good for 2 days only
I
ssx
� � � -
I
:��
m
:5ft
i
sss:
This Friday
And Saturday!
6 7
10 �L
off All
Regular Price
Merchandise
�(( JIXZ5sJ
This is only for E.C.U. faculty and students,
so you must bring your I.D. card and ask
for your discount (exceptions: Polo and Pendleton)
Lay-Away
Put up a
coat for
only $10.00
Phone
756-9955
VIRGINIA �
Hours
10:00-9:00
M
m&m

A





I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 25, 1981 Page 6
Back-to - school sale
Save on all
plain pocket�
jeans for
men.
Sale
10.99
Reg 13 50 Men's denim jeans
The same great fit as the big best
seller Polycotton blend Waist 28
to 42
Sale
11.99
Reg $15 Men's cord's in the
same great fit, and fabric as the
big seller Waist 28 to 4 2
Special
Pack-up values
for back to school
Special 6.44
Feather weight nylon knapsack has a
front pocket and top zipper closure.
Dual adjustable padded shoulder
straps. Washable and water repellent
Save 8.50
to 10.50
on women's
sportswear
Sale 8.49
to 13.49
Ong $16 to $21 . Choose jeans or
slacks, stripe shirts or solid shirts.
Big saving for back to school
clothes. Misses and junior sizes.
15" X11" x4"
Special 8.88
Lightweight backpacks and roll bags
make travelling a breeze! Constructed of
tough nylon with a urethane coating for
extra strength. Choice of handsome
colors.
Sale $12
Reg. $15. Plain Pockets plaid shirt
Easy care polycotton Slim fit style
or regular fit Men s sizes S.M.L,XL
Special 16.99
30" footlocker with an enamel-like metal
finish over plywood veneers. Top snap
locks and handles. Measures
30x16V2x1212" Choose from a wide
range of colors.
2
5 off
alarm clocks
Timex
fimex
Timex
Timex
electric alarm, with snooze
Keywood alarm, metal case
lighted dial with snooze
Daby ben. with alarm
Reg Sale
9 99 7.49
1899 14.24
1399 10.49
1899 14.24
R
Whenever
and work
ury to a
� my fih
sold a thiJ
"Whenl
my firs' u
in a rooij
where n
Shirley
photos ol
were ben
'Thert
tional I
$350 a w
I was mal
smiling
letter
Paradincl
and on
scenic ps
with stard
do and Fl
"I me
but the
couldn't
Astaire
'Don't
1 was or
came up
and was
want to
To trui
industr
"I h
Housner
nouncer
Bet You
Tokar,
Miller ai
Profes
with a si
"I cal
made m
taught il
Reep
all his fl
that reqi
"Mai
were p
birds coj
scenic bi
"Onc
that a
under tl
just hit
dog juj
recover
For
weeks.
I
Rl
vi
20 off men's
athletic appare
Sale 2.79
Reg. 3.49. Basic athletic short with elastic waist and
vented leg. Assorted solid colors with contrast trim.
Sizes XS to XL.
Sale 7.19
Rag. 8.99. Track and Court� athletic jerseys in great
styles like V-neck, button front baseball look and
length jersey. Polyestercotton Assorted colors
and sizes.
Sale 4.39
Reg. 5.49. Gym short with notched leg,
elastic waist and navy stripe trim down
sides. Polyestercotton. Grey. Assorted sizes
25 off
Back to school
shoes for men & women.
Men's leather boat shoe
Women's boai shoe
reg $27 Sale 20 25
reg $27 Sale 20 25
Men's casual suede lace-up
reg $22 Sale 1 6.50
Women's casual leather lace-up
reg $26 Sale 1 9.50
22.99
Beat the heat
in the dorm
with this
three-speed box fan.
Rib-cord
bedspread.
$14
Rib-cord textured throw-
style bedspread in easy-care
cottonpolyester. Deep-
tones; all machine
washable. Twin sizes.
Rice straw
accent rugs
and wall
hangings
3.49
8.99
Imported from China in
many styles and sizes.
Choose from round, but-
terfly, oval or rectangle.
VISA"
Catalog
Shop 10a.m. 'til9p.m.
Phone 756-2145
JCPenney
Shoo 10 a.m. 'til 9 D.m. � Phone 756-1190 � Pitt Plaza W
�1981. J C Pw,n�y Company. Inc
Auto Center
Shop a a.m. 'til 8:30 p.m.
Phone 756-2800
t
1





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 25, 1981
Pe7
S or
torts
20 25
20 25
Reep Recalls Hollywood Days
Continued From Page 1
Whenever 1 needed money 1 would quit teaching
and work because teaching and painting is a lux-
ury to a certain extent, and in my painting sales
- my first 10 or 11 one-man shows � I hadn't
sold a thing.
"When I first went to work in the film studios,
my first job was on 'Duel in the Sun 1 worked
in a room next to the Shirley Temple room,
where two women were busy all day signing
Shirley Temple's signature and sending out
photos of her, and on the other side Tarzan films
were being produced.
"There 1 was, working for Selznick Interna-
tional. I got paid an awful lot for those days,
$350 a week which was about 10 times more than
1 was making with the art school Recp noted,
smiling.
Later Reep worked as an illustrator on The
Paradine Case in which James Mason starred,
and on "Little Women He then became a
scenic painter for MGM and worked on pictures
with stars such as Jean Simmons, Marlon Bran-
do and Fred Astaire.
"I met some very profane Hollywood stars,
but the stories that were told about the stars
ouldn't really be believed. I was told Fred
Astaire was a very hard man to get along with �
Don't have anything to do with him But while
1 was on the set painting for 'Bandwagon he
came up and talked to me for about a half hour
and was just as nice a man as you would ever
want to meet
To this day Reep has many friends in the film
industry. .
"1 had (taught) a class once with Jerry
Housner, George Fenneman (one-time an-
nouncer for Groucho Marx's game show You
Bel Your Life), Richard Crenna and Norman
Tokar, who was the first Henry Aldrich, Sidney
Miller and others
Professor Reep remembers his class of artists
with a smile.
"1 called them my celebrity class, and tney
made me laugh so much 1 don't know what I ever
taught them
Reep takes pride in his scenic paintings most ot
all his film work. He explianed that it is an art
that requires precision.
"Many a day outside vhere the skies and trees
were painted on a backboard, I've watched the
tvrds come sailing in to land on a tree and hit the
scenic backdrop and slide down to the ground
"One day, although I didn't see it, I was told
that a cat being chased by a dog tried to run
under the dummy western set barroom door. He
just hit the wall hard, was stunned and while the
dog just watched in amazement, the cat
recovered and ran away
For "Bandwagon" Reep painted, in three
weeks, a mural 500 feet long and a hundred feet
Phonograph By Larry Zkherman
ECU Artist-ln-Residence Edward Reep shown
here discussing his "Lines and Occlusions
Number 5 "To communicate, that's the rub.
To give the private instruction that works and
goes on to serve .
��
high of the city of New York.
"But I never climbed a single ladder because
we worked in an eight-story building, where on
the sixth floor there were cuts in the floor. You
just pressed a button, and the whole wall would
go up or down. There were at least four murals
going on at the same time. That was the heyday
of motion pictures. Now they go on location
more and more
Even when he attended art school, Reep had a
chance to get free-lance work in the film in-
dustry But no matter how tough it was to make
money during the Depression, the young artist
refused to sacrifice respect for the art in order to
cet a job.
"1 remember once when I was called to the
studio by a young man named Orson Welles,
who is a couple of years older than me. Mr.
Welles wanted me to illustrate Shakespeare s
'Twelfth Night 'Hamlet 'Othello' - five
books in al � that he was going to rewrite tor
high school consumption. After dickering with
him � they wanted to give me $3 a drawing, 15
drawings in a book - 1 went back to the head of
the art school and told him.
"He said I should take no less than 515 a
drawing. So I went back to RKO studios where
Mr. Welles was having his shave and haircut at
the time and yelling at me. He said 'Go in and
talk to my business manager 1 did, and l got
$15 a picture, $225 a book, which was a lot of
money at the time. When 1 came back out, Mr.
Welles said, 'Well, I see that you've reached an
agreementFine. You understand I went to art
school, and I'm going to put onion skins over
those drawings so I can say, "Written and Il-
lustrated by Orson Welles
"I said 'You aren't going to do that with my
drawings, Mr. Welles. I'll see you some other
time And I walked out
Although Reep enjoyed his work in films, he
noted that painting and teaching were more im-
portant to him. Most of the last thirty years of
his life have been spent at the California Institute
of the Arts (formerly the Chouinard Art In-
stitute) where he was chairman of the painting
department while Walt Disney was chairman of
the board of trustees.
"I was very fond of Disney, even though he was
a very straight, conservative man, and I con-
sidered myself a liberal. I think, in retrospect,
that he was not all that extremely conservative,
and 1 am not all that liberalWhen he died the
school changed hands, and some new people
were brought in. Then 1 decided there wasn t any
future for me there
For 11 years the professor's lively wit and
wealth of experience have been helping young ar-
tists at ECU grow. Reep seems to be as commit-
ted to his students' work as he is to his own, and
he has some definite ideas about what it takes to
be a good teacher. .
"To communicate - that's the rub. To give
the private instruction that works and goes on to
serve as a foundation for tomorrow's efforts to
give the instruction that inspires, invigorates and
be fully understood before moving on Reep
wrote in a paper he once wrote about effec-
tiveness in teaching.
Part of that communication, Reep teels, is
recognizing what level a student is capable of
performing at and getting that student to work
within guidelines, even if that means doing
remedial work.
A more practical concern for the school ot art
stems from the art students' special needs in a
university system, he continued.
"We have not yet come of age in the school o
art to the extent that our regimen is established
bv us We should make our own schedule. We
have got to either piggyback classes or extend art
classes because the art student has special
facilities problems. This is one of my greatest
criticisms .
Besides teaching, Reep sets aside a large por-
tion of his day for painting. After a variety of
professional experiences including working as a
court reporter for Life magazine, preserving
history in more than 60 paintings which will
someday hang in a military museum for U.S. war
memorabilia, working with men such as Ray
Bradbury and Henry Dreyfuss, Ed Reep has set-
tled in eastern North Carolina. But for him settl-
ed does not mean to stagnate.
"I'd hate to think I was stagnant. I try not to
be. 1 think by trying to change that hopefully it
will keep me from getting old. And until I reach
senility, I'm happy trying to investigate different
things.
CASH PAID FOR DIAMONDS AND GOLD
FLOYD G.
ROBINSON
JEWELERS
407 EVANS MALL
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE, N.C. 27834
JO SPARROW J MIKE ROBINSON
BUSINESS
(919)758-2452
INDEPENDENT
JEWELERS
jeweliy
!
RIGGAN
SHOE
SHOP
DOWNTOWN
OSCRNVILLf
TWO DOORS HIOM
COX PLOHIIT
inw.�$�.
SHOE REPAIR
AT THE
VERY BEST
7584)204
ABORTION
Tte Fleming Center has been here for you smoe iw74
nrovktag private, underetandlngheami care
to women of an agse at a reasonable ooet
.m 1 it i �� ImiPl
Itoe Fleming Center weTe here when you need ua
�:i
FLEMING CENTER
HELP SEND
A STUDENT
TO ECU
For Each Student Who Opens an Account, We'll Give ECU
One Dollar for Unrestricted Use as Scholarship Money
x
WESTERN
SIZZLIN'
Tuesday Special
Lunch and Dinner
Beef Tips
Beef tips wonions & peppers or mushroom gravy,
baked potato or French fries 8c Texas toast.
Tuesday Only � Free Tea
1.99
Famous Salad Bar
Take Out Service 2?03E. 10th St. 758-2712
Hours: 11:00a.m10:00p.m.Mon-Thur$ lOa.mll P.m. FhSun.
Come by and open a checking account at any one of our three close-to-
campus locations. With a regular checking account, you qualify for free
checking as long as you keep a $200 minimum in a Planters checking or
savings account.
If minimum balances are not your strong point, we have a budget check-
ing account for you, too.
Planters National Bank in Greenville. When you consider service, conve-
nience and all the extras, you'll find we're the logical choice.
Planters National Bank
PLANTERS
NATIONAL
BANK
Downtown. Pitt Plaza. & Carolina East Moil.






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 25. 1981
Page 8
Dorms: 'High Density Living'
By DAVID NORMS
Staff Writar
The dorm room, with a little work in the
decorating department, can be a wonderful place
of quiet solitude � a comforting shelter from the
day-to-day pressures of life.
You can lie down, relax and enjoy a refreshing
interlude, that is you can until your roommate
arrives with 12 obnoxious friends who are ready
for a 100-decibel full-tracking of the new Van
Halen album.
Peace and solitude are exploded and blown
away in a sea of beer cans and thundering music
as a thought forms in your mind: "I've got to get
rid of this guy or 111 go crazy
The "roommate crisis" is something that
strikes one out of every one college student at
some time in his or her university career. Dor-
mitory living is an excellent example of "high
density population sort of like those ex-
periments where they put hundreds of rats in a
cage, and eventually they all kill each other.
Pressure is bound to build up in a situation
that throws two perfect strangers (or even im-
perfect strangers) together in such tiny, uncom-
fortable cells.
Sometimes roommates may turn out to be
merely harmless ecentrics.
One friend of mine roomed with a guy who
polished the bottoms of his shoes and drank
Texas Pete.
Another shared his room with someone who
only listened to Black Sabbath albums and went
to bed at 8 a.m.
It's very important 'hat roommates have
something in common, like schedules. For exam-
ple, one student � who for security reasons (my
security) will be referred to as "X" � would
make everyone in the dorm shut up at ten so he
could go to bed.
Of course it was okay for him to get up at six
and turn on the radio, television and stereo at the
same time at an intense level of volume. All this
invariably woke up "Y his roommate, not to
mention half the dorm. "Y" usually came in at
two in the morning and got revenge by snapping
on the overhead light and stomping around
enough to wake up "X
Temperature regulation is another source of
friction between roommates. Some people like
the window open and the fan on in January.
Others are glad that dorms are provided with
heat in April and wouldn't think of opening a
window and spoiling the 95 degree temperature
in the room.
Also, it often helps to have a roommate who
likes different kinds of food than you do. This
helps avoid having a roomie eat you out of house
and home.
There have been students who had to keep
their food in other people's refrigerators to keep
it out of reach of their ravenous roomies.
There may come a time when the absurdities of
the situation becomes too much and it becomes
necessary to get rid of your roommate.
Two things p remember are that the most
flagrantly obnoxious people never have room-
mates and that murder is frowned upon by most
dorm hall advisors.
Have you ever known two roommates who
particularly dislike each other and were frantical-
ly determined to drive the other one out?
In such instances both become stubborn and
refuse to move out, no matter what happens.
They go through a war of attrition, bringing in
their most obnoxious friends for parties when the
!ar Landing Seafood
Restaurant
other is trying to sleep or eating all his food if he
is gone.
t People have spent months stubbornly enjoying
the misery of this kind of domestic squabble.
If you need to drive out a roommate,
remember to act more weirdly thaSi he docs. Try
putting a sheet over your head and chanting
obscure mantras. A week of this will drive him
out or make him kill you.
Burning your roommate in effigy is useful as a
hint that he is unwanted. Actually burning him is
in most cases too drastic.
A James Bond-like device called an "ejector
bed" is useful but is not practical if you do not
live on the top floor.
Letter bombs and even transfer forms from the
I.
& II
tf.
iM
Bob Hearing � Manager
Phone 758-0327
BgnmnBaaggBBiggBB
housing office have been used successfully.
Once your roommate is gone you may want to
avoid future trouble by hanging onto your
coveted private room. Stay away as much as
possible to avoid contact with prospective room-
mates. Cultivate eccentric interests, such as
tarantula growing or Nazism as useful tools for
avoiding roommates.
Of course, potential roommates can be driven
off with anything from a simple "no" to small-
arms fire. The surest way, however, is to go to
the housing office and pay the extra fee for a
private room if one is available.
The cost may be high, but it's worth it when
you see that "PAID" receipt wipe that smirk off
tjie face of some smart alec.
'Two Tickets To Timbuctoo
tfenneth Richter's travel fUm "Two Tickets to Timbuctoo" will be
presented on January 26 at Hendrtx Theatre. The film is part of the MSC
Travel-Ad venture Film Series.
SERO
SHIRTMAKERS
Nothing is obvious
except the quality.
Sold exclusively at
any of our fine stores.
2!a nieUotie ttetmbu tfmon
�tembe'
-4
fcf
Welcomes Back
ECU Students
ALL BODYWAVES
AND
4
MEN'S SHOP
Downtown Carolina East Mall Pitt Plaza
Back to
School Special
taClfR. by Nature's,Way
specializing in natural hair cuts for men A women
Present ECU Student I.D. Foi
20 Off Your Next Haircut
Otfr oyj tftru S�pt I. 1W1
Downtown Mali
Greenville
40. 00 cffl
" CURLY PERMS
40.00 off -oh-
LIGHTING
THRU SEPT. 30
"BY SELECTED STYLISTS ONLY"
1. Trained in all current
national hair trends.
2. All phases of
Hair Coloring.
3. The very latest
in perr &
body waving.
4
Get ready
for fall with
an exciting
new De$rgn Cut
and take
advantage of
fantastic
savings.
Call today for appointment or consultation.
752-3419
2800 E. 10th St.
appointments only
758-7841
ntroductory
Specials
Tuesday & Wednesday
Shrimp or
Flounder
inchrios French Fries, Colo Slew,
��4 Hotov?�iof
3.50
You 8 I love
roast beef at
Combination Shrimp and Flounder
inciwdet franch frits, C.I. Shnr, md H�Iim��J�

Arby's In Greenville
� E. Greenville Blvd. In Greenville Square
Lean, Trim & Delicious
No gristle. No surprises.
No Sir! It's America's Roast Beef
Yes Sir'
4l99
2 Arby's� Roost Beef
Sandwiches For Only �
$2.00
Cross Tor liver hridao - toko loft at hfht -
boiMinf loentod on loft
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
����'�'� ���� � � �'��
I 2 Arby's� Super Roast
I
I
I
I
Please present coupon to cashier before
ordering. Limit one coupon per customer per
visit.
Good at participating restaurants.
Offer expires September 18, 1981.
Please present coupon to cashier before
ordering L'mlt one coupon per customer per
visit.
Beef Sandwiches For Only �
$2.59
Good at participating restaurants.
Offer expires September 18, 1981.
�1
I
I
I
I
I
I
-I
I
I
I
I
I
I
Si
help thd
SupermJ
aiding
caught
He hi
held it ij
pearanc
The kid
1941,
animate
action,
and
then bv
Mole
show
Siege
pulps,
ticularl
The Mi
Doc wj
sionallyl
imperse
mid-up
cinema?
Jones.
Jones,
turer (,
was Th
a movie
man fill
Pre
who fi
"All-Si
Rice B
writer
tion
ed a pi
crean
Superr
be dif
wester
Lord
film
characi
popul
"Med
Tan
summi
pany ii
timeles
peal,
ed age
beforel
whom
Men
monke
Far
troducl
Volur
had or
"Wl
began
in full
rhetor
on the
were
claime
Flash

I






i
Iviill be
eMS(
1
i�
lie
wide Square
I
i
I
I
I
I
-I
I
I
I
I
I
I
-J
Superheroes A bound
Continued Front Page 3
help them, when I could barely help myself?
Superman was the answer. And Superman,
aiding the downtrodden and oppressed, has
caught the imagination of the world
He has caught our imagination, indeed, and
held it in his mighty grasp ever since his first ap-
pearance in Action Comics number 1, June 1938.
The kid from Krypton flew into films as early as
1941, the subject of an excellent series of
animated films. Soon, he was incarnated in live
action, first by Kirk Alyn in "Superman" (1948)
and "Superman vs. The Atom Man" (1950),
model of a hero insuperable, a real hero, even if
his achievements were in remote and fantastic
worlds. I had a profound affection for Flash
Gordon and his creator, along with those of my
age group. When I think of it, it seems as though
he actually existed. At times in my films, I seek to
find the color and verve of Flash Gordon and his
world . . � .
Ironically, the style of Fellini's films found
Flash Gordon � for the recent movie of the same
name was designed by Danilo Donati, who
designed many of Fellini's masterpieces.
Though the film "Flash Gordon starring
Sam Jones in the role and Max Von Sydow as
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 25,1911
Pc9
Tight Jeans Are A Pain
I
ana superman vs. inc ium iviiui yijvt, ����� � -� , . n an
ft. by GeorgeR�v� in "Superman and The �J;�2SiZ�Sof"
Mole Man" (1951) and the long-running TV
show.
Siegel and Shuster were influenced by the
pulps, cheap action-packed paperbacks, par-
ticularly by the popular pulp hero Doc Savage.
The Man of Bronze rather than the Man of Steel,
Doc was the prototype for Superman, occa-
sionally even being called by that name. Doc was
impersonated by Ron (TV's Tarzan) Ely in the
mid-up's movie, but has gone on the greater
cinematic success in the incarnation of Indiana
Jones, hero of "Raiders of the Lost Ark Like
Jones, Doc was a globe-trotting scientistadven-
turer. (Incidentally, the pulp's most popular hero
was The Shadow, who is currently the subject of
a movie script by the co-author of the new Super- Eyes Only
extreme, it showed the continuing popularity of a
character who first appeared in 1934 in the classic
comic strip by Alex Raymond. Flash, a blue-
eyed, blond Earthman fighting a repressive
regime on the planet Mongo, is needed by us on
Earth. The condition of Fellini's country during
his childhood, not to mention Ming's mad
monarchy, bears a sinister resemblance to the
state of many modern nations, including this
one It's a good thing that Mr. Gordon's back.
Bond is back too. First seen in the 1952 novel
"Casino Royale" by Ian Fleming, who used his
WWII secret service experiences as inspiration,
James Bond has strutted his stuff in eleven
movies, the latest being this summer's "For Your
man films, David Newman.)
Pre-dating Doc by many years is a character
who first appeared in the October 1912 issue of
"All-Story Magazine the brainchild of Edgar
Rice Burroughs. Though Burroughs became a
writer only as a desperate effort against starva-
tion his intrepid jungle man, Tarzan, has earn-
ed a place in fiction's hall of fame beside other
creations like Sherlock Holmes, Macbeth and
Superman, maybe even Mickey Mouse. It would
be difficult indeed to imagine any child in the
western hemisphere who has not witnessed the
Lord of the Jungle in action either in books, on
film and TV, or in the comics. Burrough's
characters are timeless � and apparently "more
popular today than ever" (quote from
"Mediascene").
Tarzan is indeed quite popular these days (even
summing his desecration by Bo Derek and com-
pany in the excreble "Tarzan the Ape Man") and
timeless, which is the secret of his animalistic ap-
peal He belongs not to this or any other record-
ed age but to the primeval past. He is Adam
before the fall, a superbly masculine savage
whom the shackles of civilization cannot hold.
Men want to emulate him, women want to
monkev around with him.
Famed film director Federico Fellini (in the in-
troduction to the Steranko History of Comics,
Volume One) wrote of the influence superheroes
had on himself and his generation:
"When the gallant vicissitudes of the heroes
began to gain in popularity, Ital�was navigating
in full Fascism, in full lugubriouTand repressive
rhetoric. Fascism, it is true, relied on boldness,
on the necessity to dare, fight and win, but these
were only fastidious words, and those who pro-
claimed such virtues were not really appealing.
Flash Gordon, instead, appeared instantly as a
Being Bond is the wish-dream of modern man.
The super-spy is suave, sophisticated, sexy: a
heroic Hugh Hefner. The character could be con-
sidered a creature trapped by his culture � so far
he's one cf the few superheroes to have to hold a
steady job. He's weighted down by the countless
commercial paraphernalia of our capitalistic
society � Fleming's books are filled with detail-
ed descriptions of Bond's favorite foods, clothes,
cars and contraptions (every real Bond buff
knows his hero won't step outside without a 7.65
caliber Walther PPK in a Berns Martin Triple-
draw holster). He is even officially known by a
number � 007 � rather than a name.
Christopher Reeve at "He Mm �f Steel
But we get the impression that beneath all that
lies another Bond. He utilizes the trappings of
our over-civilized society but does it so effortless-
ly and flippantly he seems to be making fun of it
� and us. The real Bond is a brute � a red-
handed, woman-raping wild man.
Which brings us to the most savage superhero
of all, Conan. Creatd by Robert E. Howard, an
erratic writer who killed himself at the age of 30
in 1936, Conan has more of Bond's modern man-
nerisms. A product of the Myborian Age, a
mythical period before the dawn of recorded
history, Conan is a bloody, often-beserk bar-
barian, at various times in his carnage-filled
career a pirate, a professional thief, a mercenary
soldier, a hired killer.
Howard's hell-raising hero will soon be seen in
an upcoming big-budget film. He's been quite
popular in pulps, paperbooks and comic books,
dating back to his initial appearance almost 50
years ago, in the short story "The Phoenix On
the Sword" in the December 1932 issue of
"Weird Tales" magazine.
Why then should this blood-thirsty savage not
be a cinematic superstar? Conan will quite likely
be the national idol of the '80's � a symbol of
how far we as a nation have sunk, a reason why
we have to yell for heroes in the first place.
Tight jeans may
cause vaginitis, a health
hazard affecting one
out of five women.
And summertime in-
creases the hazard.
Hot weather, wet
bathing suits, pan-
tyhose, tight jeans, and
synthetic underpants
that don't "breathe"
all provide the in-�
cubating environment
thai causes vaginitis or
inflammation of the
vagina.
About half the cases
of vaginitis are caused woman who is apt to
by monilia, a yeast in- discontinue treatment
fection, with symptoms
of itching, burning,
and abnormal
discharge.
Just in time for the
vaginitis season is a
new, quick, treatment
for moniUa. Treatment
has been cut from 14
. to 7 . . . now to 3 days
as a result of the FDA's
approval of Mycelex-G
3-day therapy.
This is especially
helpful for the average
when the symptoms
subside, usually within
three days, but before
the infection is
eliminated.
Other common
causes of vaginitis in-
clude sexual contact,
towels and wash rags
used by others, vitamin
and diet deficiencies
that weaken resistance,
prolonged use of an-
tibiotic and steroid
medications.
PHONE 758-4056
BOYD'S BARBER &
HAIR STYLING
By Appointments
1008 S.EVANS
GREENVILLE,
sryt
Welcome Back Students


JJ
from
Morehead City
Greenville, N. C
FAMOUS PIZZA
We are having a PARTY �
UBlDjE CUM Pl2iATO'
come CELEBRA TE the new
school year with us
�AADE amUWTtH
FREE
BEVERAGE
FREE
PIZZA
FRIDAY, AUG. 28th 4:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m
758-5982 321 E. 10th St.
ECU DINING SERVICES
MEAL PLANS ON SALE
IN
JONES CAFETERIA
(Remodeling Now Underway)
9:00 A.M6:00 P.M.
In your life!
Our 2020 Meal Plan
offers "all you can ear" for only
Put a little sun
HANGING
BASKETS now 588
6 in. FOLIAGE 249reg.5.9�
CLIP THIS COUPON & SAVE!
LOCATED 1 Vt MILES SOdYH OF TV STATION ON EVANS ST. EXTENSION
I
i





1HM VS1 C AROl 1N1AN AUGUST 25, 1981 Page 10
tAg0AJlr ,0UT COLUU Ttif Wf0 NAj
W look!
8V Pvip tiotfi
Wise Words About ECU
( ontinued From Page 1
noisy and easv to get
lost in.
" ou will have in-
ctors that are ex-
iraordinarv 1 "hey will
be viable scholars, in-
terested in their sub-
rhe will be unin-
timidated b genius,
iiid undiscouraged b
athetic and dull au-
snces. The) will be
frequent, but regular.
The others will de-
mand attendance upon
punishment, read from
t text, let you leave
. and credit ou
with merely the ability
to understand what is
taught. There is a way
to successfully deal
with this type of in-
uctor but 1 don't
a i Perhaps death
depilitory.
rher s a woman in
Admissions office
med Mi - w hiteside.
a saint. She is
tnd intelligent
� ai ' She can
i. any ol our
tions herself, or
send you to so-
le ot equal sinceri-
can.
i e things ai e im-
Camouflaged Fatlquas And T-
, Sifting Bags Backpacks,
no. Equipment, Slant Tond
. Dlshas, And Ovnr 700 Dif-
Nnw And Uand items
Cowboy Boots �M 95
ARMY-NAVY STORE
1501 S Evans Street
possible to do anything
about.
1) Bad food in the
cafeteria.
2) Math 65 � required
courses.
3) Parking problems.
4) Dorm Counselors
who take their job too
seriously.
5) The heat.
6) The rain.
7) The inability of cam-
pus cops to be
everywhere at once.
There are literally
hundreds of clubs on
this campus. There are
cheap private music
lessons available, and
the music building re-
mains open late
everynight.
There are student art
shows and recitals and
the departments are
strong.
This college can be
more than a place to
wait out the final years
of your adolescence. It
is not the Harvard of
the South, but there are
programs and resources
at this university that
will enable one to learn
a great deal. One can
grow beyond the scope
and emphasis of this
university, but merits
of this institution are
varied and can inspire a
sense of the worth of
intellectual develop-
ment.
The "EZU" concept
is an attitude, not an
absolute.
NEED EXTRA
MONEY?
immediate opening for
student to sell complete
hne of screen printed
sportswear Excellent
commission for
energetic person
Rush resume to
SPORTS& SOUNDS
Sherow Plaza
Sherow, S. C. 29520
THE SAVING PLACE
White Good Sole
Tuesday thru Saturday
(No �-amchecks on items below)
Ik JM Our Reg IV 97
t97 Twin Size
Comforters
Assorted styles, easy to care tor
Full or Queen Size Reg 24 97 . . .
16 97
Windsor Blanket 3.57
Laurel Blanket5.97
Baronet Blanket 8.97
Wovenaire Blanket 10.97
Classic Blanket12.97
(All above are
standard 72 x 90 size)
EASTERN N.Cs NO. 1 BEACH CLUB
WELCOMES BACK
ALLE.C.U. STUDENTS!
� s� Doubt. ShHl. FlaVFttMd i t)
�� ijuMcSAM FlaFM4 �" ,
HI Standard PiIIowcmm Pr '�'�'
��nr� � - wk s
Mattress
Pad Sale
Twin6 00
Full�00
Queen 12.00
j 5.47
Koolnite
Sheet Blanket
I

f V
Thin blanket for chilly nights
when little is needed.
4.97
Dainty Daisy
Sheets
No iron sheets in floral pat
terns. Color choice
Weekly Beginning September:
MON
BEST IN BEACH MUSIC
TUES
LADIES' NIGHT - BRING YOUR NICKLES
WED
HUMP NITE - BRING YOUR QUARTERS -
25C
THURS
OVER THE HUMP NIGHT
The Weekend Begins Here . . . Don't Miss It
With the Best in Beach
END OF THE WEEK 3-7 P.M. BUCKET PARTY
BRING YOUR BUCKET UP TO 32 OZ.
GET IT FILLED UP FOR $1.00
FREE ADMISSION
SAT
AFTER THE GAME PARTY
Relax and Enjoy After Latest Football Game
SUN
THE ALWAYS FAMOUS NICKEL NITE!
FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 752-9745





Title
The East Carolinian, August 25, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
August 25, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.141
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy