The East Carolinian, July 29, 1981






She
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
ol.55o.ftfr-
Wednesday July 29, 1981
6 Pages
Med School Progresses
Faster Than Dreamed
B SAFARI MATHENGE
Surf Hrilrr
The seemingly remote dream ol
forming an East Carolina University
School of Medicine was conceived
during the early sixties by Dr. Leo
W. Jenkins, president of the then
East Carolina College. In a span of
several years an act to create a two-
vear school of medicine at East
Carolina College was passed in
1965.
Seventeen years later, the school
came of age when Gov. James B.
Hunt Jr. declared that, "the dream
of Leo Jenkins and so many sup-
porters of this university has been
realized
Hunt was speaking at the gradua-
tion ceremony for the charter class
of physicians on May 8 of this year,
when the ECU school graduated its
first four-year pioneering class of 28
physicians. The ECU school of
medicine has now been awarded full
accredition by the Liaison commit-
tee on medical education.
Dr. William E. Laupus, Dean of
the School of Medicine, in his ad-
dress to the graduates last May,
referred to the graduates as "the
'home grown' products of the state
who excel educationally and profes-
sionally
Students enrolled in the school of
medicine have so far come from
North Carolina. Enrollment will be
increased by 52 freshmen in the fall
and projected estimates place the
figure to 64 freshmen during the fall
of 1982.
In this attempt to improve
primary health care in Eastern
North Carolina, the school coor-
dinated the expansion of clinical ser-
vice areas at the Pitt Memorial
Hospital including addition to
radiology and nuclear medicine, the
emergency rooms, surgery and the
ambulatory medical surgical unit.
The Brady Medical Science Building
is nearing completion. Its occupan-
cy is slated for late December 1981
but may be delayed until early 1982.
When the school's objectives are
fully realized, provisions will have
been provided for education of
primary-care and family medicine
physicians. This is intended to
alleviate the high rates of infant
mortality in this area. Studies have
shown that Eastern North Carolina
had one of the highest infant mor-
tality rates in the nation.
In view of such statistics, it is the
school's objective to formulate ways
by which the institution could con-
tribute to better health care for the
citizens of Eastern North Carolina
and the state.
- ttf
The ECU Med School
is ahead of schedule according to the Dean of The Med School Dr. Laupus.
Two ECU Deans Resign Their Posts
Both the School of Nursing and
he Division of Continuing Educa-
tion will lose deans at the end of the
year. Dr. David J. Middleton and
Evelyn L. Perry have announced
that they will resign from their posts
at the end of the year.
Perry, dean of the School of Nur-
sing for the past 12 years, has an-
nounced her retirement from the
deanship and her professorship ef-
fective Dec. 31, 1981.
In a letter to Dr. Robert H.
Maier, vice chancellor-academic af-
fairs. Dean Perry said "My interest
in the progress of the School of Nur
sing has not, and will not diminish. I
look forward to hearing of newer
and more advanced developments
Maier, in announcing Dean
Perry's decision, said "Evelyn Perry
has rendered many years of service
to our School of Nursing, both as a
faculty member and as the dean. We
thank her for this service and wish
her well upon her retirement from
both of these positions at the end of
1981
Perry joined the nursing faculty
at East Carolina in 1962 after four
years on the faculty ot the Watts
School ol Nursing, Durham, and a
tour of active duty as a U.S. Army-
nurse during the Korean conflict,
serving in both Japan and Korea
with the rank of major.
She attended Elon College and
holds a BSPHN (public health nurs-
ng) and MSN degrees from UNC-
Chapel Hill. She is a former resident
of Raleigh and Smithfield.
In 1969 she was named dean of
the School of Nursing succeeding
the first dean, Eva Warren, upon
Mrs. Warren's retirement.
Dr. Maier said that a committee
will be appointed early this fall to
begin a nationwide sear rh for Dean
Perry's successor.
Middleton, dean of the Division
of Continuing Education since it
was established, has announced that
he will resign as dean effective next
Jan. 1.
Although relinquishing his dean-
ship after 19 years as the university's
chief administrator of continuing
education and extension programs,
Middleton will remain on the divi-
sion's faculty as a tenured pro-
fessor.
During Middleton's tenure as
dean, the Continuing Education
program has expanded into s wide
variety of credit and non-credit pro-
grams off-campus, reaching as
many as 20,000 people annually, in-
cluding businessmen, teachers, the
military, commercial fishermen and
others.
This growth "could not have been
possible without the support of the
ECU administration and most par-
ticularly the heavy involvement and
interest of the faculty in rendering
public service programs Mid-
dleton said.
He added, "Through Continuing
Education, the university has reach-
ed many people ;r Eastern North
Carolina who otherwise would not
have had the opportunity to enroll
in the university programs nor the
improve themselves educationally
An important note is that this ha
been done at low cost to the State
and to the taxpayers.
"However Dr. Middleton con
tinued, "in the immediate future
some form of outside funding is ol
critical importance if ECU is going
to continue a role of providing ser
vices to a variety of the state's
citizens in this region. Otherwise, we
See DEANS, Page 2
Increased Tuition
Will Be Voted On
A t Friday Meeting
By KIT KIMBERLY
SurrUrilrr
A fee increase proposal for all 16
institutions in the University of
North Carolina system will go
before the board of governors on
Friday.
If passed, the proposal will mean
an increase of about $62 for in-state
and $130 for out-of-state tuition per
year for East Carolina
undergraduate students.
The proposed increase, which is
included in the statements which
have been sent out to students this
week, raises in-state tuition to $186
and out-of-state tuition to $1080 per
semester. This brings the total pay-
ment due for in-state dorm students
to $711 and out-of-state dorm
students to $1,605.
This proposal follows an increase
in student fees and dormitory costs,
approved in March by the ECU
board of trustees.
According to C. G. Moore, vice
chancellor of business affairs, the
reason that the not-yet-approved in-
crease was included in the
statements is so that students can
meet the deadline for mailing in
payments.
Moore said that had they waited
until the proposal was voted on, the
statements could not have been
mailed before Monday. This would
make it nearly impossible for most
students to meet the deadline for
mailing in payments and avoid a $10
late fee. "We were just trying to
save the students some money
Moore said.
He added that in case the pro-
posal does not pass, the extra money
will be applied to student fees for
Spring 1982 or refunded to the stu-
dent.
According to Moore, the propos-
ed change was prompted by an at-
tempt on the board of governor's
part to work towards a uniform tui-
Faculty Receive
Official Promotions
Clifton
tion collection for all 16 North
Carolina institutions.
Part-time students and part-time
tuition have been recategorized.
Full-time undergraduate status,
formerly nine hours or more,is now
constituted by 12 or more hours.
Tuition for in-state students taking
Moore
between nine and 11 hours is 2.140.
In-state tuition for six to eight
hours is $93, and five hours and
under will pay $47.
Graduate students, who are also
included in the proposed increase,
have also been reclassified as to
part- and full-time.
The Office of Academic Affairs
has announced the promotions of 24
ECU faculty members. Five
members received promotions to the
rank of professor, eight to the rank
of associate professor and 11 to the
rank of assistant professor.
Raised to full professors were Dr.
George Bissinger of the Department
of Physics, Dr. Mark Bnnson of the
Department of Biology, Dr. Robert
Morrison of the Department of
Chemistery, Dr. Jerry Hunt of the
School of Business and Dr. Y.J.
Lao of the Department of En-
vironmental Health in the School of
Allied Health and Social Profes-
sions.
Bissinger graduated from the
University of Chicago in 1962 with a
B.S. He then graduated from
DePaul in 1964 with an M.S. and
from the University of Notre Dame
in 1969 with a Ph.d.
Brinson received his B.S. from
Heidelberg College in 1965. He
received his M.S. in Botany from
the University of Michigan in 1967
and his Ph.d. in Botany from the
University of Florida in 1973. Brin-
son was the receipient of the Helms
Research Award in Biological and
Medical Sciences in 1978.
Morrison was unavailable for
comment.
Hunt received his bachelor's
degree from the University of Col-
orado in 1964 and his Ph.D. in 1968.
Lao received his B.S. from Na-
tional Taiwan University in 1958 and
his Ph.D. from the University ot
Michigan in 1969.
Promoted to Associate Professors
were Paul Hartley, Art; Richard
Kerns, Business; Clinton Downing,
Education; Rosalie Haritun, Music;
Anthony Papalas, History; Alfred
Muller, English; Paul Tschetter,
Sociology and Anthropology; and
Larry Bolen, Psychology.
Promoted to Assistant Professors
were Clarence Morgan, Art;
Rosemary Fischer, Selma Gokcen,
Donna Coleman, David Hawkins,
C. Bradford Foley, and Deborah
Chodacki, Music; Helen Everett
and Roberta Edwards, Nursing;
David Downing, Drama and
Speech; and Nell Eutsler, English.
Two Canadians Arrested
Controller Nets Cocaine Bust
WILMINGTON, N.C. (UP1) An
airport controller's suspicions
resulted in the seizure of cocaine
with a street value of about $3
million early Tuesday and the arrest
of two Canadians at the New
Hanover County Airport.
The cocaine was found inside a
briefcase one of the men left inside
the airport's private aviation ter:
minal, said Gil Payette, an official
of the U.S. Customs Service Patrol
Division.
Five packages containing a total
of eight to 10 pounds of cocaine
were found inside the briefcase,
Payette said. Preliminary tests in-
dicated the presence of cocaine, but
authorities ordered lab tests to
determine its purity.
The two men were identified as
David Mark Greenberg, 44, of
Brome, Quebec, the pilot of a twin-
may be a popular pastime of ECU sstudents during the engine plane that stopped for refuel-
hreaL 'n8i and DiNunno Pasquale, 44, of
Surfing
Montreal, Quebec, a passenger on
the plane.
They were charged with violation
of North Carolina's 1979 drug traf-
ficking law, which sets a prison term
of 16 to 40 years and a mandatory
fine of $200,000 for possession of
more than one pound of cocaine.
Greenberg was jailed under $3
million bond and Pasquale under a
$1.5 million bond.
Authorities said the airplane land-
ed at the airport around 2 a.m. for
refueling and a controller in the
tower became suspicious about the
actions of the men on the plane.
Payette said Federal Aviation Ad-
ministration personnel at airports
have been asked to report such
behavior to customs and drug
authorities.
'There were a couple of things.
Nothing that anybody could put
their fingers on he said. "The
FAA, we work with them and
they're learning to be observant of
flight patterns and procedures
The controller notified federal of-
ficials who asked the New Hanover
County Sheriffs Department to
send deputies to the airport and
observe the two men until federal
officials arrived.
A.K. Giacoman, a detective with
the county narcotics squad, said one
of the deputies sent to the airport
saw one of the men take a briefcase
from the plane into the private avia-
tion terminal and leave it there.
Deputies detained the two men
until federal agents arrived.
Authorities watched the terminal
building for a brief period before
opening the briefcase and discover-
ing the cocaine inside.
Greenberg and Pasquale denied
any involvement or knowledge
about the contents of the briefcase,
but Giacoman said, "We had an of-
ficer eyewitness as to the briefcase
The two men were turned over to
state officials for prosecution
because of the heavy penalties under
the drug trafficking law, Payette
said. The law sets a legal presump-
tion possession of large quantities of
specific drugs, including cocaine.
means a person is a drug dealer.
The seizure was the second in-
volving cocaine in the past two mon-
ths at the New Hanover County Air-
port. In early June, two New
England men were arrested during a
refueling sU p and more than 400
pounds of cocaine were found in
their twin-engine airplane.
On The Inside
�HHHMHHMMMHMM
Editorials5
Features4
SportsS
Classifieds�
t





SJjje lEaHt daroltntan
l. 55 No. Wr-
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Wednesday July 29, 1981
6 Pages
Med School Progresses j
mm
Faster Than Dreamed
By SAFARI MATHENGE
Sun W rilrr
The seemingly remote dream ol
forming an East Carolina Universitv
School of Medicine was conceived
during the early sixties by Dr. Leo
W. Jenkins, president of the then
East Carolina College. In a span of
several years an act to create a two-
year school of medicine at East
Carolina College was passed in
1965.
Seventeen years later, the school
came of age when Gov. James B.
Hunt Jr. declared that, "the dream
ol Leo Jenkins and so many sup-
porters of this university has been
realized
Hunt was speaking at the gradua-
tion ceremony for the charter class
of physicians on May 8 of this year,
when the ECU school graduated its
first four-year pioneering class of 28
physicians. The ECU school of
medicine has now been awarded full
accredition by the Liaison commit-
tee on medical education.
Dr. William E. Laupus, Dean of
the School of Medicine, in his ad-
dress to the graduates last May,
referred to the graduates as "the
'home grown' products of the state
who excel educationally and profes-
sionally
Students enrolled in the school of
medicine have so far come from
North Carolina. Enrollment will be
increased by 52 freshmen in the fall
and projected estimates place the
figure to 64 freshmen during the fall
of 1982.
In this attempt to improve
primary health care in Eastern
North Carolina, the school coor-
dinated the expansion of clinical ser-
vice areas at the Pitt Memorial
Hospital including addition to
radiology and nuclear medicine, the
emergency rooms, surgery and the
ambulatory medical surgical unit.
The Brady Medical Science Building
is nearing completion. Its occupan-
cy is slated for late December 1981
but may be delayed until early 1982.
Wrhen the school's objectives are
fully realized, provisions will have
been provided for education of
primary-care and family medicine
physicians. This is intended to
alleviate the high rates of infant
mortality in this area. Studies have
shown that Eastern North Carolina
had one of the highest infant mor-
tality rates in the nation.
In view of such statistics, it is the
school's objective to formulate ways
by which the institution could con-
tribute to better health care for the
citizens of Eastern North Carolina
and the state.
The ECU Med School
,is ahead of schedule according to the Dean of The Med School Dr. I
aupus.
Two ECU Deans Resign Their Posts
Both the School of Nursing and
he Division of Continuing Educa-
tion will lose deans at the end of the
year. Dr. David J. Middleton and
Evelyn L. Perry have announced
that they will resign from their posts
at the end of the year.
Perry, dean of the School of Nur-
sing for the past 12 years, has an-
nounced her retirement from the
deanship and her professorship ef-
fective Dec. 31, 1981.
In a letter to Dr. Robert H.
Maier, vice chancellor-academic af-
fairs, Dean Perry said "My interest
in the progress of ihe School of Nur
sing has not, and will not diminish. I
look forward to hearing of newer
and more advanced developments
Maier, in announcing Dean
Perry's decision, said "Evelyn Perry
has rendered many years of service
to our School of Nursing, both as a
faculty member and as the dean. We
thank her for this service and wish
her well upon her retirement from
both of these positions at the end of
1981
Perry joined the nursing faculty
at East Carolina in 1962 after four
years on the faculty of the Watts
School of Nursing, Durham, and a
Increased Tuition
Will Be Voted On
A t Friday Meeting
tour of active duty as a U.S. Army
nurse during the Korean conflict,
serving in both Japan and Korea
with the rank of major.
She attended Elon College and
holds a BSPHN (public health nurs-
ng) and MSN degrees from UNC-
Chapel Hill. She is a former resident
of Raleigh and Smithfield.
In 1969 she was named dean of
the School of Nursing succeeding
the first dean, Eva Warren, upon
Mrs. Warren's retirement.
Dr. Maier said that a committee
will be appointed early this fall to
begin a nationwide sear h for Dean
i j an
Perry's successor.
Middleton, dean of the Division
of Continuing Education since it
was established, has announced that
he will resign as dean effective next
Jan. 1.
Although relinquishing his dean-
ship after 19 years as the university's
chief administrator of continuing
education and extension programs,
Middleton will remain on the divi-
sion's faculty as a tenured pro-
fessor.
During Middleton's tenure as
dean, the Continuing Education
program has expanded into & wide
B KITKIMBERI V
SUff Writer
A fee increase proposal for all 16
institutions in the University of
North Carolina system will go
before the board of governors on
Friday.
If passed, the proposal will mean
an increase of about $62 for in-state
and $130 for out-of-state tuition per
year for East Carolina
undergraduate students.
The proposed increase, which is
included in the statements which
have been sent out to students this
week, raises in-state tuition to $186
and out-of-state tuition to $1080 per
semester. This brings the total pay-
ment due for in-state dorm students
to $711 and out-of-state dorm
students to $1,605.
This proposal follows an increase
in student fees and dormitory costs,
approved in March by the ECU
board of trustees.
According to C. G. Moore, vice
chancellor of business affairs, the
reason that the not-yet-approved in-
crease was included in the
statements is so that students can
meet the deadline for mailing in
payments.
Moore said that had they waited
until the proposal was voted on, the
statements could not have been
mailed before Monday. This would
make it nearly impossible for most
students to meet the deadline for
mailing in payments and avoid a $10
late fee. "We were just trying to
save the students some money
Moore said.
He added that in case the pro-
posal does not pass, the extra money
will be applied to student fees for
Spring 1982 or refunded to the stu-
dent.
According to Moore, the propos-
ed change was prompted by an at-
tempt on the board of governor's
part to work towards a uniform tui-
variety of credit and non-credit pro-
grams off-campus, reaching as
many as 20,000 people annually, in-
cluding businessmen, teachers, the
military, commercial fishermen and
others.
This growth "could not have been
possible without the support ol the
ECU administration and most par-
ticularly the heavy involvement and
interest of the faculty in rendering
public service programs Mid-
dleton said.
He added, "Through Continuing
Education, the university has reach-
ed many peop'? ;r �� North
Carolina who otherwise would nut
have had the opportunity to enroll
in the university programs nor tht
improve themselves educationally
An important note is that this has
been done at low cost to the State
and to the taxpayers.
"However Dr. Middleton con
tinued, "in the immediate futurt
some form of outside funding is of
critical importance if ECU is going
to continue a role of providing ser
vices to a variety of the state's
citizens in this region. (itherwise, we
S�e I)KAV, Page 2
Faculty Receive
Official Promotions
Clifton
tion collection for all 16 North
Carolina institutions.
Part-time students and part-time
tuition have been recategorized.
Full-time undergraduate status,
formerly nine hours or more,is now
constituted by 12 or more hours.
Tuition for in-state students taking
Moore
between nine and 11 hours is 3140.
In-state tuition for six to eight
hours is $93, and five hours and
under will pay $47.
Graduate students, who are also
included in the proposed increase,
have also been reclassified as to
part- and full-time.
The Office of Academic Affairs
has announced the promotions of 24
ECU faculty members. Five
members received promotions to the
rank of professor, eight to the rank
of associate professor and 11 to the
rank of assistant professor.
Raised "to full professors were Dr.
George Bissinger of the Department
of Physics, Dr. Mark Brinson of the
Department of Biology, Dr. Robert
Morrison of the Department of
Chemistery, Dr. Jerry Hunt of the
School of Business and Dr. Y.J.
Lao of the Department of En-
vironmental Health in the School of
Allied Health and Social Profes-
sions.
Bissinger graduated from the
University of Chicago in 1962 with a
B.S. He then graduated from
DePaul in 1964 with an M.S. and
from the University of Notre Dame
in 1969 with a Ph.d.
Brinson received his B.S. from
Heidelberg College in 1965. He
received his M.S. in Botany from
the University of Michigan in 1967
and his Ph.d. in Botanv from the
University of Florida in 1973. Brin-
son was the receipient of the Helms
Research Award in Biological and
Medical Sciences in 1978.
Morrison was unavailable for
comment.
Hunt received his bachelor's
degree from the University of Col-
orado in 1964 and his Ph.D. in 1968.
Lao received his B.S. from Na-
tional Taiwan University in 1958 and
his Ph.D. from the University ol
Michigan in 1969.
Promoted to Associate Professors
were Paul Hartley, Art; Richard
Kerns, Business; Clinton Downing,
Education; Rosalie Haritun, Music;
Anthony Papalas, History; Alfred
Muller, English; Paul Tschctter.
Sociology and Anthropology: and
Larry Bolen, Psychology.
Promoted to Assistant Professors
were Clarence Morgan, Art.
Rosemary Fischer, Selma Gokcen,
Donna Coleman, David Hawkins,
C. Bradford Foley, and Deborah
Chodacki, Music; Helen Everett
and Roberta Edwards, Nursing;
David Downing, Drama and
Speech; and Nell Eutsler, English.
Two Canadians Arrested
Controller Nets Cocaine Bust
Surfing
may be a popular pastime of ECU sstudents during the
break.
WILMINGTON, N.C. (UPI) An
airport controller's suspicions
resulted in the seizure of cocaine
with a street value of about $3
million early Tuesday and the arrest
of two Canadians at the New
Hanover County Airport.
The cocaine was found inside a
briefcase one of the men left inside
the airport's private aviation ter:
minal, said Gil Payette, an official
of the U.S. Customs Service Patrol
Division.
Five nacka�e� containinc a total
of eight to 10 pounds of cocaine
were found inside the briefcase,
Payette said. Preliminary tests in-
dicated the presence of cocaine, but
authorities ordered lab tests to
determine its purity.
The two men were identified as
David Mark Green berg, 44, of
Brome, Quebec, the pilot of a twin-
engine plane that stopped for refuel-
ing, and DiNunno Pasquale, 44, of
Montreal, Quebec, a passenger on
the plane.
They were charged with violation
of North Carolina's 1979 drug traf-
ficking law, which sets a prison term
of 16 to 40 years and a mandatory
fine of $200,000 for possession of
more than one pound of cocaine.
Greenberg was jailed under $3
million bond and Pasquale under a
$1.5 million bond.
Authorities said the airplane land-
ed at the airport around 2 a.m. for
rff'ieling and a controller in the
iuWcf became suspicious about the
actions of the men on the plane.
Payette said Federal Aviation Ad-
ministration personnel at airports
have been asked to report such
behavior to customs and drug
authorities.
"There were a couple of things.
Nothing that anybody could put
their fingers on he said. "The
FAA, we work with them and
they're learning to be observant of
flight patterns and procedures
The controller notified federal of-
ficials who asked the New Hanover
County Sheriffs Department to
send deputies to the airport and
observe the two men until federal
officials arrived.
A.K. Giacoman, a detective with
the county narcotics squad, said one
of the deputies sent to the airport
saw one of the men take a briefcase
from the plane into the private avia-
tion terminal and leave it there.
Deputies detained the two men
Ulltii federal tigcuis affivcu.
Authorities watched the terminal
building for a brief period before
opening the briefcase and discover-
ing the cocaine inside.
Greenberg and Pasquale denied
any involvement or knowledge
about the contents of the briefcase,
but Giacoman said, "We had an of-
ficer eyewitness as to the briefcase
The two men were turned over to
state officials for prosecution
because of the heavy penalties under
the drug trafficking law, Payette
said. The law sets a legal presump-
tion possession of large quantities of
specific drugs, including cocaine,
means a person is a drug dealer.
The seizure was the second in-
volving cocaine in the past two mon-
ths at the New Hanover County Air-
port. In early June, two New
England men were arrested during a
refueling stop and more than 400
pounds of cocaine were found in
their twin-engine airplane.
On The Inside
��nMHHMHMMMMI
Editorials1
Features4
SportsS
Classifieds





THfcFAiT CAROLINIAN H I 2 11 �-
Deans Resign
From Posts
I
Wright Auditorium
is the latest building to undergo renovations.
continued from page 2
shall see a drastic cur-
tailment of continuing
education services
A native of Warsaw,
N. C, Middleton
received his
undergraduate degree
at Duke University and
earned his master's and
PhD degrees at the
University of North
Carolina-Chapel Hill.
From 1958 until 1962
he was on the faculty
and assistant director
of extension at Ap-
palachian State Univer-
sity in Boone.
He was named direc-
tor of extension at East
Carolina in 1962, suc-
ceeding Dr. Ralph
Brimley. In 1967, when
the Division of Conti-
nuing Education was
established, Middleton
was appointed its first
dean.
Middleton has held
numerous state,
regional and national
offices in professional
organizations. Included
are chairman of the
Southern Region of the
National University
Continuing Education
Association (NUCEA),
a member of the board
of directors of NUCEA
for three years and
president and director
of the Association of
Continuing Profes-
sional Education.
He also served on the
board of directors of
the United Cerebral
Palsy of N.C from
1970 to 1980, and for
the last 11 years has
been on the board of
directors of the North
Carolina Rural Fund
for Development, a
special project for low
income rural families.
"Dr. Middleton has
served the university
long and well said
Dr. Robert H. Maier,
vice chancellor for
academic affairs.
"Under Dr. Mid-
dleton's leadership, for
almost two decades the
Division of Continuing
Education has
delivered the univcrsi
ty's academic program
throughout the region
and even beyond la
doing, tens ot
thousands of students
have been given an op
portunity for higher
education
President's Plan Criticized By Some
WASHINGTON
(UP1) Conservative
Southern Democrats a
key bloc of votes in the
House tax cut fight said
today they are about
evenly split between
competing bills and
President Reagan must
look elsewhere for sup-
port.
Reagan and leading
Democrats went on na-
tional television Mon-
day night to argue the
merits of their com-
peting tax cut plans.
The spotlight now
moves to votes on the
Senate and House
floors.
Today, the
Republican-dominated
Senate hoped to com-
plete action on
Reagan's proposal. Its
centerpiece is a
33-month, 25 percent
across-the-board cut in
individual tax rates.
Passage seemed cer-
tain.
But in the House,
Speaker Thomas
O'Neill, who lost the
battle of the budget to
the president, predicted
a narrow victory over
Reagan on taxes and
approval of a
21-month, 15 percent
cut backed by
Democrats. A vote is
expected Wednesday.
Rep. G.V. "Sonny"
Montgomery, D-Miss
said 26 members of the
Conservative
Democratic Forum met
this morning to discuss
the two tax plans. Mon-
tgomery said his own
head count showed 10
of the so-called "boll
weevils" firmly support
the president's plan, 10
back the Democratic-
inspired committee bill
and six remain undecid-
ed.
As of today, with the
swearing-in of a new
Republican, the presi-
dent would have to
hold all 192 House
Republicans in line plus
win over 26 Democrats
to win the tax cut bat-
tle.
Rep. James Jeffords,
R-Vt has announced
he may vote against the
president's tax bill
unless its supporters
drop more than $13
billion worth tax breaks
for oil interests added
to attract oil-state
votes.
Montgomery, who
said he will support the
president's tax cut, said
Reagan "would have to
go outside the forum"
to pick up enough votes
to win.
The president, in a
nationally televised
speech Monday night,
accused Democrats of
playing "political fun
and games" with the
economy and urged
citizens to lobby their
legislators to approve
his plan.
Democratic leaders,
in front of TV cameras
seconds after Reagan
signed off, charged the
president's
'experimental" plan
was geared for the rich
and urged public sup-
port for their "fairer,
safer" proposal.
The Senate, in its
11th day of tax debate
today, agreed 94-1 to
increase tax tax credits
for child care costs.
similar to a provision
approved by the House
Ways and Means Com-
mittee.
O'Neill predicted the
Democrats would win
the tax cut vote
Wednesday by a slim
Margin.
ATTIC
Di and Charles Interviewed
LONDON (UPI)
Prince Charles said
tuesday on the eve of
his wedding to Lady
Diana Spencer that he
expects to "spend half
the time in tears" dur-
ing the ceremony in St.
Paul's Cathedral.
In a British television
interview, Charles said
he always longed for a
musical wedding and
had deliberately chosen
stirring music Elgar's
"Pomp and Cir-
cumstance" march and
the hymn "Christ Has
Made The Sure Foun-
dation
"1 find it very mov-
ing Charles said. "I
shall, 1 think, spend
half the time in tears
He said it was impor-
tant to fill up the
cathedral with music at
the start of the service
when it will take 34
minutes to walk up the
aisle.
"You want
something very stirring
and dramatic and noisy
to carry you up,
because if you have
something rather quiet,
you start hearing your
ankles cricking, you
know what I mean8"
Charles asked with a
smile.
In only the second
television interview the
royal couple has given,
Lady Diana, 20,
described herself an an
"average" cook, then
turned to Charles, 12
years her senior, and
said, "but you haven't
tasted anything because
I won't let you
She said she would
miss the huge eve-of-
wedding fireworks
display in Hyde Park.
"I'm going to be
tucked up in bed, I
TVA Plans Suspension Of Reactor
Construction In Mississippi And
Tennessee; Will Idle Workers
KNOXVILLE,
Tenn. (UPI) TVA's
plans to suspend con-
struction on one reac-
tor and slow building
on three other units will
create economic havoc
and unemployment in
parts of Tennessee and
Mississippi, officials
say.
Tennessee and
Mississippi officials
said Tuesday although
it was hard to gauge the
impact of the TVA ac-
tion at present, one
leader said it "can't be
anything but bad
TVA's planned ac-
tion will idle 6,300
workers. The agency
had planned to pay the
workers $228.7 million
in wages for 1982.
In addition to the
highpaying jobs, of-
ficials indicate the
layoffs will create a rip-
pling effect throughout
the economic sector,
especially in areas close
to the plants.
TVA announced last
week it was considering
deferring a reactor at
the Phipps Bend
Nuclear plant near
Surgoinsville, Tenn
and slowing down work
on two reactor units at
the Hartsville Plant
near Nashville.
The agency also said
it would likely slow
work on a reactor at the
Yellow Creek plant
near luka, Miss.
TVA's three-member
board of directors are
due to act on the
nuclear program ad-
justments in an Aug. 6
meeting.
"There is no doubt
we are going to be
hurt said luka Mayor
Johnny Biggs. "But
not only us, but other
small towns around the
plant such as Savan-
nah, Tenn Corinth,
Booneville, Belmont,
Tishomingo, Fulton
and in Alabama
Cherokee, Florence
and Sheffield
The utility plans to
lay off about 1,346
workers at Yellow
Creek, another 3,012 at
Phipps Bend and 1,962
at Hartsville.
TVA officials said
the action is needed
because the power
generated from the
reactor units will not be
needed when the plants
are scheduled to come
on line.
TVA says by deferr-
ing Phipps Bend and
stretching out work at
Yellow Creek and
Hartsville, the agency
can save $27 million
this year and about
$250 million annually
by 1985.
The nuclear con-
struction program has
shot rates up in the
Tennessee Valley and
caused strong grumbl-
ing among TVA's 2.7
million customers in
seven states. TVA of-
ficials said the savings
will help ease the rate
load and not impact
TVA's ability to supply
power in the region.
Biggs and other of-
ficials said the
economic impact will
run the gamut from
fast-food restaurants to
housing units. He said
any population shift in
a little town like luka
would have an adverse
impact.
"We're going to
have some empty
houses around here and
some restaurants might
close he said.
TVA's plan would
place the entire Phipps
Bend plant on hold. In
1979, TVA had defer-
red one atomic unit at
Phipps Bend. But TVA
said although the plant
will be in a deferred
status, it will still take
about 400 workers to
maintain the facility.
TVA also will spend
millions on the facility
even though it is defer-
red. The agency plans
to spend $122 million in
1982, $69 million in
1983, $86 million in
1984 and $125 million
in 1985.
At Yellow Creek,
TVA must spend $96
million in 1982, $118
million in 1983, $150
million in 1984 and $53
million in 1985.
On the two units at
Hartsville, TVA plans
to spent $125 million in
fiscal 1982, $148
million in 1983, $232
million in 1984 and
$206 million in 1985.
In Tennessee, the
layoffs will have a
strong impact on
several counties sur-
rounding the Phipps
Bend and Hartsville
Plants.
Jim Eley of the state
Employment Security
Commission said
unemployment in a
17-county area sur-
rounding the Hartsville
plant will increase
about four-tenths of a
percent due to the
layoffs.
think, early night she
said.
"Not allowed to see
me anyway the night
before added
Charles.
"We might quarrel
Diana said with a
laugh.
"Even by the light of
an exploding
firework quipped her
husband-to-be.
They both said they
had been overwhelmed
by the more than
100,000 letters of good
wishes that have arriv-
ed at Buckingham
Palace since the
engagement was an-
nounced in February.
"I looked this morn-
ing and there's a cor-
ridor stacked with, I
don't know, 40 stacks
of presents and mail
which we can't get
through. And I mean,
it is incredible
Charles said.
Lady Diana disclosed
she had problems with
her list of wedding
guests.
Remember
Remember to pick
up your cap and
gown from the Stu-
dent Supply Store,
East Carolina
University before
leaving school.
These Keepsake
gowns are yours to
keep provided the
$10.00 graduation
fee has been paid.
For those receiving
the Masters Degree
the $10.00 fee pays
for your cap and
gown, but there is an
extra fee of $11.25
for your hood.
Classifieds
?
Papers typed: Ac-
curate, professional
typing. Good rates.
Call 752-9665.
Papers typed for
students. 1019 E.
Wright Rd. 752-6733.
For Sale - Single bed. 1
year old mattress. Ex-
cellent condition. Call:
758-7773.
Need third female to
share two bedroom
trailer. $50.00 a month
plus one third utilities.
$50.00 deposit.
Available for fall. Call
Diane Saturday and
Sunday until 4:00 and
Monday-Wednesday
after 5:00 at 756-2076.
3 piece living room set.
75.00. Excellent condi-
tion. 758-7773.
Female roommate
needed to share
spacious 2-BedRm
Trailer
(semi-furnished). 65.00
per month plus
utilities. Call 757-1193
(keep trying).
Single Bed.
mattress.
758-7773.
year old
45.00.
TYPING WANTED.
Professional typist with
fifteen years experience
as Administrative
Secretary to top ex-
ecutiv-e.
REASONABLE
RATES. Call after 5:00
p.m. - 756-3660.
Three bedroom
house for rent. Four
blocks from campus.
Call 758-6206.
JUST YOUR TYPE.
Fast, accurate, profes-
sional typing. Research
papers, resumes, let-
ters, etc. WRITE
RIGHT. 756-9946.
Parakeet for sale. Very
friendly bird. Call
William at 757-6366.
WANTED: Writers for
fall semester. Apply at
The East Carolinian.
The East CaroHnian
Semite it campus commumuy
stiKt 1925
Published every Tuesday and
Thursday during me academic
year and every Wednesday dur
ing trie summer
The East CaroHnian is me of-
ficial newspaper ot Bast
Carolina university, owned,
operated, and published for and
by me students of East Carolina
Uni versify.
Subscription Bates
BusinessM yearly
AM othersOS yearly
Second class postage paid at
Greenville, N.C
The East Carolinian offices
are located in the Old South
Building on the campus of ECU,
Greenville. N.C.
TiUahewe: WHWt Us7.43-
S A AD'S SHOE
REPAIR
113 Grand Avt
70-1220
Quality Repair
ARMY NAVY STORE
MfhtOa
WED.
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SON
BAND
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SUITERS
GOLD
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PEGASUS
PLUS
??
ISA
���?�'
ABORTIONS UP TO
WltiWEEK OF
PREGNANCY
$176.00
pregnancy les' txrth con
trol. and problem
pregnancy counst
For farther mtormji.tp
call 837 0S3S 0
number tOO 211 JS8 !�'
ween � A M 5 P M
weekdays
RALEIGH WOMEN S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
�U West Morgan SI
Raleiqn N C
: -�)(� �
The Homing Oenter has been here fbr you sine 1974
providing private, understanding health oare
to women of all ages at & reasonable ooet
The Ikanlntf Center we're here when you need us
Oa Tei-eggQ tn FjOaagi;
u :i
1PrwrW? UeWiaui
t ilTa
Introductory
Specials
Wednesday & Thursday
Shrimp or
Flounder
includes French Fries, Cole
Slaw, and Hushpuppies
3.50
3.95
Combination Shrimp
and Flounder
includes French Fries, Cole Slaw, and Hushpuppies
Tar Landing Seafood -�-4
Cress Tar River bridge �
take left at light �
building located on left
WESTERN
SIZZLIN'
Steakhouse
mmmimmuun�m�nm'
Tuesday and Wednesday
SPECIALS
Lunch and Dinner
Beef tips with onions and peppers or s
mushroom gravy, baked potatoes or French
fries and Texas toast AND SALAD BAR only
2.99
Take Out Service 2903 E. 10th St.
244 By Pass 7M-0040
7SO-2712
Hours: 11:00 a.m. 10:00 p.m. � MonThurs.
10:00 a.mH :00 p.m. � FriSun.
Btl
198J
sent o(
i CCS
The
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Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Paul Collins. �.w��
Jimmy Dupree. ��,�,to,
Chuck Foster, ,�,�, a,�,���, Karen Wendt. � ���
Chris Lichok. ���� M�� William Yelverton. � "�
Alison Bartel. ���, �, Steve Bachner. f�� i��.
July 29. 1981
Opinion
Page 3
Tuition
Notices Mailed Before Vote
Bills for tuition and fees for fall
1981 semester have recently been
sent out bearing increases in student
fees and tuition.
There's only one catch: the tui-
tion increase for East Carolina
University is on the agenda this
coming Friday for the Board of
Governors of the University of
North Carolina system to consider.
Is this some bureaucratic over-
sight? Hardly!
The increase should be approved
without controversy. But the ques-
tion remains: why were notices
mailed before the nod of approval?
The natural first reaction is anger,
but a calm examination of the facts
reveals the logic behind this deci-
sion.
As Vice Chancellor Cliff Moore
explains, many students would not
have been able to meet the August 7
deadline for mailing in tuition and
fees if their notices were not receiv-
ed until after the Friday vote.
Students have until August 14 to
submit their funds in person, but
after 4 p.m. of that date schedules
are nullified and a ten dollar late
registration fee assessed.
Moore further explained that in
the case the governors deny the in-
crease, the balance will either be
refunded or applied to the student's
Spring 1982 expenses. So either
way, there's really no way to lose.
What is disappointing, though, is
that the students have been essen-
tially kept in the dark concerning
the tuition rise.
Once again the cost of higher
education continues to soar, while
students and their (financial) sup-
porters continue to suffer.
Senate Vote Denies Women Privacy
Star Follows Disturbing Trend
The death of a close friend is one
of life's saddest moments, and a
great many people must be feeling
something akin to such a loss with
the announcement of the demise of
The Washington Star. On August 7
the Star, which first appeared in the
nations capital in 1852, will cease
128 years of pubication.
The news is not only sad but alar-
ming, and it has sent shock waves
through the newspaper industry.
The loss of the Star means that the
capital of Western democracy is left
with only one daily newspaper and
that America has lost one of its
great journalistic institutions.
The Star was considered one of
the five best daily papers in the
country and the best published in
the afternoon. It has become
another in a long line of afternoon
papers to fold in recent years
because of financial difficulty.
The Star's circulation has fallen
off continually during the past
decade, and an inevitable decline in
advertising lineage has followed.
The saddest part of the Star's
decline, however, is that the people
of Washington seem unwilling to
support competing newspapers,
long considered an essential part of
democracy. Such an occurrence
does not bode well for the future of
newspapers and the role of the
press.
By KATHARINE KIMBERLY
On July 9, a U.S. Senate sub-committee
voted three to two that human life begins
at conception. This is the first in a series of
steps initiated by North Carolina Senators
Jesse Helms and John East to repeal the
1973 Supreme Court decision which
legalized abortion. This movement, if suc-
cessful, will deprive American women of
their right to choose whether or not they
wish to have a child, and will do ir-
reparable damage to the already tenuous
status of women in this country.
Whether human life does or does not
begin at conception is, it seems to me, a
minor point which is being utilized to the
advantage of the anti-abortionists. The
real matter at hand is a woman's right to
decide whether or not she wants to be a
mother. This decision can be made only by
the individual woman. Only she knows if
she will have the constitution, the time, the
financial ability, and the patience to carry
a fetus for nine months. Only she can
decide whether or not she has the ability to
love and care for that child after its birth
and raise it in an atmosphere condusive to
its happiness and well-being. Or, if the
situation warrents, the strength to give it
up for adoption.
Even now, when abortion is legal, how
many unwanted children exist in this coun-
try alone? Why take away a woman's right
to terminate the pregnancy and prevent
another from being born? Is it not a
greater sin to bring an unwanted child into
existence who will be a drain on society
and its institutions for 18 years, and
possibly for its entire life, because of the
psychological trauma of its origins and up-
bringing? If a woman is forced to carry,
bear and keep a child that she does not
want, how can she help but resent that
child? Or, if she gives it up for adoption,
how can she resist the temptation to, at
some later date, contact and reveal herself
to that child?
Each of these questions plays on the
emotions, as does each of those posed by
the anti-abortionists. But the entire issue is
one that plays on the emotions of every
person who has ever been or had the op-
portunity to be a parent, men included.
The fact is, however, that men do have a
choice as to whether or not they want to be
a father. True, the physical aspect is not
one that can be denied. But after the child
is born, the male can choose to or not to
take the responsibility of a father. The
woman has no such choice. Her only
choice must be made before the child is
born.
And that choice in itself has got to be
one of the most difficult ones any woman
could ever make. Any decision a woman
makes when she finds herself pregnant will
entail hours of agonized thought and
almost certainly recriminations later. The
decision to have an abortion is stress and
punishment enough�why add to the pain
by making it illegal as well?
One idea that was pointed out in a letter
to the editor published in The East Caroli-
nian last year was that abortion is not a
means of destroying an already existing
human life�it is a means of protecting the
personal privacy of an individual, as
guaranteed in the First Amendment. If the
anti-abortionists manage to get this
Supreme Court decision, which guarantees
a woman the right to privacy in at least one
area of her life, repealed, they may as well
rewrite the entire Constitution.
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points oj view. Mail or
drop them by our ojjice in the Old South
Building, across Jrom Joyner Library.
For purposes oj verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature oj the author(s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced, or neatly printed. All let-
ters are subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted. Letters by the
same author are limited to one each 30
da vs.
Helms' Tactics Backfire As Senator Builds Power
By KAREN WENDT
In the past month the senior senator,
Jesse Helms, from North Carolina has
rccieved a lot of publicity. He should be
getting used to it by now. Heaven knows
he fights hard enough to get it.
But the fact that he is in the limelight is
not as important as why he is there. Our
senior senator has come under a lot of
criticism lately, in both the state and na-
tional press. This month's Playboy men-
tions him extensively in an article this
month and he si the lead article in last
weeks People magazine. And in the Sun-
day News and Observer he was refered to
by a fellow congressman as "the worst
liability you have in the state of North
Carolina and recently by another con-
gressman called a "kind of time bomb for
Reagan Why has he suddenley become
the subject of such wrath?
Because Jesse Helms is fighting for you
in Washington. He is fighting for a new
morality for you to live by. He is fighting
for fewer freedoms for you and your
children to live by. He is fighting to change
all of those evil laws that have been thrust
upon you. And who decided they were
evil? Why, Mr. Helms, of course.
Helms, along with his friends in the
Moral Majority, have decided to take it
upon themselves to change your civil
rights, to fight for a government in which,
to use Helms' own words "Principles are
what count And Helms uses his own
principles as a guideline to what a state and
now a nation should, and if he has his way,
will be forced to do.
Helms has been called "maybe the most
powerful politician in America outside the
White House
Yet this man has also voted no on a total
of eleven so-called pro-freedom issues. The
issues in question were those that were
determined by a columnist to be wavering
on citizen personal freedoms and Helms
voting went as follows.
Helms voted yes on the controversial
draft registration issue.
He voted against a bill which would
allow battered spouses temporary shelter.
Conservative Christians said that the bill
was "federal intrusion into sensitive family
disputes that would facilitate, rather than
hinder, the breakup of families
Helms moved to table an amendment
which would allow the use of Medicaid
funds for abortions in cases of rape or in-
cest which are promptly reported to
authorities.
Helms voted against the use of Defense
Department funds for abortions by GI's
and their dependents.
He voted against extending the time for
the Equal Rights Amendment.
Helms began and voted for an amend-
ment which would bring prayers back to
public schools.
Helms began and voted for an amend-
ment which would require schools getting
federal funds to obtain parental aproval
for sex education.
He voted against a bill which would
allow the Justice Department to sue states
on behalf of institutionalized persons,
whether they be prisoners or mentally or
physically disabled.
Helms began and voted for an amend-
ment which would reinstitute the death
penalty in crimes concerning Fedral of-
fences.
Helms has expressed a view that he is
against the voting rights act of 1965.
ITY FOR UNWANTED
CHILDREN STOPS AT THE END OF THE BIRTH CANAL
The Senator voted against a bill which
would allow the Department of Housing
and Urban Development to sue those who
discriminate in housing both in sale and
rental.
The man is no longer a curiosity; he is a
menace to our civil rights. And he has gone
so far that he is damaging a chief industry
in the state; the one he is most vocal about
protecting: tobacco.
Representative Ferderick W. Richmond,
D-N.Y. said of Helms, "Helms has been
so vicious and unbending toward social
programs, and he has so antagonized
members of Congress that they want to get
back at Helms through the tobacco pro-
gram. Helms is the worst liability you have
in the state of North Carolina
The inference is obvious. Helms has
been so violently opposed to social legisla-
tion that his fellows senators are turning
against him. He can no longer work with
the men that he was elected to work with to
govern our country. He is rapidly turning
ineffective.
And not even his position on the Senate
Agriculture Committee will change that.
The controversial Helms-Hyde
"Human Life Bill" would, in effect, make
doctors performing and women receiving
abortions subject to murder charges, ac-
cording to People.
What must be done is obvious. He must
be stopped, before he decides that it is in
our best interest to not be allowed any per-
sonal freedoms. Legislators should not
govtrn by their own morality, but by that
of their constituents' overall beliefs. And
contrary to many beliefs, "Moral Majori-
ty" is a misnomer. They represent minori-
ty and they will stay that way.
The people who put Helms in office are
the ones he is to help and protect. He can
no longer do that. If the people let him
know that they are unhappy, there is a
chance that he can be stopped. A stamp
only costs 18 cents and a letter only takes a
few minutes to write. It may help in the
meantime.
But denying him re-election is the best
deterrent.
h





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
JULY 29, 1981 Page 4
TWNl
" Dereks' Ape Adventure:
A Bungle In The Jungle
By JOHN WEYLER
Stan Writer
The Medved brothers, authors of the The Fifty Worst
Films of All Time, had better revise their book. The new
Bo Derek vehicle, Tarzan, The Ape Man, now playing
at the Buccaneer Theatres in Greenville, is bad enough
to be the fifty worst films of all time by itself.
Some of the film is quite cute: the first 15 seconds, for
example. The picture begins with the standard framing
of the MGM lion. But when old Leo opens his mouth to
roar, we hear instead Tarzan's famous jungle yell. The
movie goes downhill from there.
How could anyone take a premise as exciting as a Tar-
zan jungle adventure and make a totally soporific film
out of it? This is exactly what "director" John Derek
has done . . . probably while popping enough valium to
mollify even the most ferocious of lions.
What could have been (should have been) an action-
packed jungle adventure with epic scope is instead an
agonizingly tedious fiasco. A large portion of the pic-
ture consists of people sitting around talking. The so-
called "action" scenes are only slightly more interesting
and, believe it or not, shot in slow motion (mostly to
disguise the poor stunt work).
Tarzan has a only a couple of accidental strong
points. The Sri Lanka (phony African location) scenery
is beautiful and even more pleasing than Bo herself.
Miles O'Keeffe makes a Greek God of a Tarzan � this
is apparently all the ever-body-conscious Dereks were
looking for in him. Also, some of John Derek's
photography is excellent and inspiring.
However, Mr. Derek should stick to stills. He doesn't
know the first thing about how to tell a story. The film
is, for the most part, full of unoriginal camera
movements and inept editing � one wonders just how
many beginners were called upon to keep this film
underbudget. The script, if it is possible, is even worse.
Cheeta could have written a better screenplay. All
he'd have to do is watch some old Tarzan flicks and
copy or parody them. But this Tarzan doesn't even
aspire to that, becoming instead an unintentional satire
of itself. Tom Rowe (phony screenwriter) deserves the
Golden Elephant Dung Award for his wonderful script.
Let's be frank: The only reason this film exists, and
the sole reason most people are paying to see it, is so
that Little Bo Derek can strut that beautiful body (that's
three bucks for a lousy peep-show).
Since 1 see part of a film critics job as being a cinema-
based consumer advocate, I'll tell you exactly what
you'll be getting if you go to see Tarzan: a few shots of
Bo's bare breasts and buttocks, nothing any more
"erotic" than that.
All the really juicy stuff (about 3 minutes worth), is
on the cutting room floor because Edgar Rice Bur-
roughs, Incorporated, the legal owners of the Tarzan
character, sued MGM for desecrating their hero.
Hey, John Derek, you big ape you, go back to
Playboy magazine, shoot some more pictorials and quit
playing Joe Director, okay?! Burroughs Inc I hope
you win your lawsuit, awright?! Bo baby, our date's off
� now getatahere!
LOS ANGELES, UPI � Composer Perry Botkin has
completed the music score for Tarzan, The Ape Man
starring Bo Derek. Negotiations are ongoing on a possi-
ble soundtrack release from the picture.
Bo Derek swings and misses in her latest film, a sloppily rendered rehash of the Tarzan tale
Cronyn- Tandy Magic Working In 'Gin Game'
Tickets for ECU'S Summer Theatre production of "The
Gin Game '(August 3-8) are now available at $7 each.
Season tickets for both "The Last of the Red Hot
Lovers" (running until August 1) and "Gin Game" are
available at $10 each. Reservations may be made by
telephoning the Summer Theatre box office. 757-6390.
By KENNETH R. CLARK
I'M TV Reporter
NEW YORK, UPI � An interview with Hume
Cronyn and Jessica Tandy, his actress wife of 39 years,
is first and foremost a study of eyes. Hers somehow
never grew older than 18; his are like twin fifties
mounted in a gun turret.
Those eyes glow with special fire whenever they meet
each other.
Perhaps that's what made D.L. Coburn's Pulitzer
Prize winning play "The Gin Game" so phenomenal a
hit both on Broadway and in the Soviet Union. Their
eyes meet a lot as they play out the waning years of two
lonely old people on welfare in a shabby rest home with
only an all engrossing game of gin rummy between
them.
None of the Cronyn Tandy magic is lost by grafting
the vehicle to television and Cronyn has no fear that the
tube ever will do violence to the legitimate theatre he
and his wife love best.
"I'm just praying that 'Gin Game' and others like, it
will give a shot in the arm to theatre he said. "If 'Gin
Game' really works and finds a public � out of millions
of viewers it will be an enormous support to theatre.
Maybe there'll be a resurgence of interest in the classics
for a tiny portion of the television audience, but on a
nationwide scale large enough to make it economically
viable.
"We gave two and a half years of our lives to that
play and were handsomely rewarded for doing it, but
now in one night, the play will be seen by more people
than would fit into the theatre if we played it every night
for ten years
The millions who view the RKO Nederlander televi-
sion version of "The Gin Game" when it airs Tuesday
will be subscribers to Showtime cable TV and at least
they are likely to laugh in the right places. That didn't
happen when Cronyn and Miss Tandy took the play to
Moscow last year. "They had instant translation � car
phones � and that is a bit of a hazard because a line
that's about this long in English is about this long in
Russian said Miss Tandy, thumb and forefinger held
about an inch apart to hands in an 18 inch spread.
"The instant translator had to go hell for leather to
keep up with it and, of course, all the laughs came a lit-
tle bit late
She said the Russians had been rehearsing their own
version of the play for 10 months before the American
staging and that they constantly asked about the script's
symbolic meanings.
"That rather stopped us cold because there was no
symbolism " she said. "I supposed they're used to that
� that it all has to demonstrate a moral point or a
political point . . . but it was tremendously ex-
hilerating
How many dramatic productions have they done
together in a lifetime on the stage and before the
cameras?
"Oh I don't think we have any idea said
Cronyn.
"There were a lot of television productions in the ear-
ly days said Miss Tandy.
"Some very good ones mused Cronyn. "I had my
first professional job exactly 50 years ago in 1931. And
Jess has racked up 54. We have been around a long
time. We'd like to be around a little longer too
What is the special chemistry that makes them the
greatest husband and wife acting team since the Lunts?
With that Miss Tandy's laughter � never more than a
degree below the boiling point � erupted.
"I can't stand him she teased.
"Special chemistry? I don't know. If we knew we'd
bottle it
'Red Hot Lovers' Opens
Summer Theatre Production A Success
'A Itered States' Coming For Fall
Ken Russell's Altered States is just one of 38 big free-flicks coming
to campus this fall. The series, sponsored by the Student Union
Films Committee, is the largest ever and includes Tess, Airplane,
Ordinary People, Raging Bull, Fame, The Elephant Man, Nine to
Five, and many others. Abo scheduled are Sunday Film Festivals
that will feature the films of Alfred Hitchcock, Fred Astair and
more. In addition to the regular Wednesday Special Film Series, the
committee is expanding its weekend popular-films to Thursday
nights for a single 7 p.m. "Commuter Special" showing of the
usual feature film. Wednesday night offerings include the Japanese
epic Kagamusha and Germany's The Tin Drum.
By JOHN WEYLER
Stan Writer
She: Aren't you appalled by all the promiscuity
you find everywhere?
He: I don't find it everywhere. I hear a lot about
it but I never find it.
The above quote sums up Neil Simon's play
The Last of the Red Hot Lovers, an excellent
production which premiered Monday night as
the opener of the 1981 East Carolina Summer
Theatre.
The show will be running through August 1 in
cool, comfortable A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall.
The air-conditioning alone is almost worth the
price of admission, but theatre goers will get
much more for their money- a pleasing, profes-
sional performance of a play from the popular
pen of Neil Simon, the current king of stage com-
edy.
The red hot lover of the title is Barney
Cashman (played by Arthur Hammer), an over-
fortyish, seafood restaurateur with smelly
fingers, who feels that life is rapidly passing him
by. After 20-odd years of a happy, mundane
marriage, he wants to have one wild, final fling
before old age overtakes him. Alas, his choice of
extra-marital partners (or maybe his sense of
decency) prevent him from consummating his
desire.
Barney's would-be lovers range from bad to
worse: Elaine (Catherine Rhea), a wise, witty but
very lonely woman whose life consists of a series
of illicit sexual encounters; Bobbie (Sally Nell
Clodfelter), a pot-smoking, brainless singer with
a habit of waking up in strange places with
stranger people and no idea where she was or
what they were; and Jeanette (Minne Gordon
Gaster), the desperately depressed wife of a
friend of Barney's, each of the above has an act
of the three act play devoted to her and Barney's
amusing attempts at seduction.
All of the actors give expert, almost flawless
performances, with Catherine Rhea being
especially notable. The only real criticisms to be
found are more concerned with Simon's play
itself, rather than this particular production.
The show starts out quite promisingly, with
the writer's usual combination of humorously-
contrived plot, comedic character development,
lots of witty lines and a smattering of slapstick.
Simon seems to try too hard in the second act
however, overloading the scene with references
to drugs, sexual perversion, kinky Nazi vocal
coaches, and the like. It is as if Simon was unsure
of his talent for human comedy so he stuck to the
sure-fire audience-pleasing material. Before the
beginning of the third act, we are wondering
what he could possibly top the second act with.
We expect even wilder escapades but instead
we get a sermon. The play abruptly takes a semi-
tragic turn, talking at length about the lack of
love and caring in modern relationships. Nothing
is wrong with injecting a little meaning into to-
day's entertainment (in fact, our usual
amusements could use much more meaning), but
the effect of the sudden seriousness is somewhat
unsettling after the mostly unrelieved hilarity of
the first two thirds of the show.
Other than these critcisms of Mr. Simon's
script, Lovers makes an enjoyable evening of
entertainment, aided and abetted as it is in this
instance by a fine cast and crew, including direc-
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II11 I s . K�M INI N
Sports
II I V 2lt, IVhl I'agt
Stressing Sport Can Cause Difficulties
VX
overemphasize sport in so
iny ways in our society. Some
j men and women see college
.1 tree ticket to the glamorous
M professional athletics In
I an education, they dream
i e contracts and fast i ars
nake it. but tor one reason ot
other most do not
: "
bile
un
signatet
ion
�5 art
first
unit at orth Carolina Memorial
Hospital in Chapel Hill. He was a
pro prospect.
In reaction to an athlete's death
oi tragic fall, we often say, "I'm so
sorry, he was a great player What
we must learn is that they are
humans first dnd athletes second.
Lane ' Turner, a center-forward
on the University oj Indiana's na
tional championship basketball
team, sujjered some paralysis in
both U . and hands Saturday as a
� an automobile accident.
In examining neurosurgeon was
rtain m hi ther Turner will suffer
parah sis The 6-10 junior
was the team s leading rebounder.
lie is listed in serious but stable con-
dition. He surely would have gone
round oj the professional
next vei
�n increasing number ol col-
lates are passing up
: . -a:ion to turn pro
early, an injury causes their
William
Yelverton
value to go down some scouts say.
What will these athletes do if an in-
jury cuts their career short, and they
don't hae a degree to fall back on.
They're just washed-up athletes
with no job and no money
Steve Streater, an All-Atlantic
("oast Coast Conference punter and
defensive back, was travelling down
a winding road one night when his
car crashed. He is considered per-
manently paralyzed and is undergo-
ing intensive renabilitation at
Charlotte Rehabilitation Center
He had just signed a contract with
the Washington Redskins.
However, he might return lo school
m the Jail.
lsiah Thomas turned pro follow-
ing Indiana's championship season
as did Earvin Johnson, now the $25
million dollar man of the I os
Angeles Lakers. Johnson is coming
off a knee operation that sidelined
him for much of last season, and
time will tell whether he has full)
recovered.
Thoma should have staved in
school. Suppose he is injured and
unable to play basketball any
longer. Chances are he won't return
to school. No diploma, no job.
Not all athletes are like this. Allan
Page, a defensive star first with the
Minnesota Vikings and now with
the Chicago Bears went to law
school during the off-season. Now
he's a lawyer and a successful one
too.
Others have not been as for-
tunate. Skip Wise was the first
freshman ever to be selected first-
team AII-ACHe turned pro afei
that inaugural season only to have
his team, the Baltimore Claws, told
before stepping into a basketball
area. He wound up in prison on a
drug charge but is beginning a com
eback
One young man, however, didn't
let himself be deluded by athletics.
You can sav that cheerfully about
Kenny Wright, even though he is
dead.
Kenny H right, 6'l and 225
pounds, was a football star a!
Ledyard Hinh in Connecticutt. He
loved sports, and his father en
couraged him to go to college to
buy a diploma with four mon years
on the football field. Kenny didn
want to no; he was tired ! sitting in
a classroom�- it was time to net a
job.
Kenny was a playful sort, alwi
tustling with his friends. Bui once
this playing went too far. and Kenny
suffered a cervical cord contusion
He was confined to a wheelchair.
On a beautiful Jail day oj IMO,
Kenn was picked up by two oj his
friends Kennv told his mother they
were going for a ride They drove in
to the woods for the last time
together.
kennv, unable to stand the pain
oj being a quadraplegic. killed
himselj with a sawed off 12-guage
shotgun, after he told his Jnends to
run and net some more beer
Kenny loved sports, but he did
not let them control his life, Even
though he committed suicide, it
wasn't because his dream of being a
professional athlete was destroyed,
it was because he couldn't accept
life in a wheelchair.
He made the decision not to at-
tend college, not wanting to use
school as a ticket to athletic star
dom� unlike some athletes of to-
day who think of college as only
tour chances to excel in their sport
so they can impress professional
scouts.
ECU Students
Lead South Team
Bv W IhMHIMKlON
re u N.Y
think the
ready begun
the
ingle university in
gent as
��
nd P Set
�nding the Festival
?or the
tyed the West Tues-
he bronze medal.
has two
. ives on the South squad:
Haskins from Raleigh, who has
. oals in three games and
(ireei
kn Barrow, who
as much but has
been "�quit
membei
( arolina
that's the
tirst game,
Federation
1
ganw � s �
.need back to de
aker to
.a shot
11 the South
e sj a
Km -
have
round.
aiKcci
5 said,
to the
ith women's team has
t a story up here Ed-
arked Seven ol the 15
m the squad are last
students. "Incredible.
only way to describe
A
lost to the last m their
21-17, but deteated the
in the next contest. In a
on the men's squad
a omen dropped an 18-17
tl i Midwest. I hey
foi the Bronze
Maureen Bv
wing posil
Edv
he t
three mote in
tests
Gail O'Brien is a startei at circle-
also performed superbly,
1 dwards said She has no' scored as
as Buck has because her posi-
tion is primarily tor setting picks
k a starter at the
has done "super
j. She scored two
rst game and added
the next three con-
and screens.
Edwards said the other players,
Donna Eason, Shirley Brown,
Jolanda Clayton, Elaine Davis and
Ginger Rothermel, have had some
playing time.
"I'm so proud oi our kids.
Ihey've worked awfully hard, and
this has been a tremendous ex-
perience for them
Several prominent amateur
athletes are taking part in the
festival. Included are tour-time
Olympic shotput champion Al
Oerter, 110-meter hurdles world
record-holder Skeets Nehemiah and
skater Scott Hamilton. Highly-
touted center Fat 1 wing is playing
basketball at the Festival.
There are a lot of younger peo-
ple here Fdwards said "They are
basically unknown, but we'll be
reading about these kids in the
newspaper in two or three years
Syracuse Univesity has become i
sort ol mini-Olympic Village, Ed-
wards said. There are 36W athletes
participating in the Sports Festival.
Television and attendance have
boosted morale at the festival. ABC
will tape the last 10 minutes of the
men's team handball gold-medal
game. A crowd o 10(H) is expected ecu's John Hallow on the move. His homer against State proved to he the winning run in the tournament
to attend.
Showdown
UNC- W Nips Pirates, 3-2, For Title
Fco Bv �OCM�L BOCAMO
M
. ftgitcy � 'nwiim' ���
I � �OCM�L COCANO
Robert Wells rounds third in North state Summer League action
By WILLIAM YELVERTON
Kelly O'Donnell scored on Rick
Ramey's wild pitch in the bottom of
the seventh Saturday night to the
SeaHawks of Wilmington a hard-
fought 3-2 victory over East
Carolina in the championship game
of the North State Summer League
tourney at Buies Creek.
The Pirates clinched a berth in the
title game by defeating N.C. State in
a 10-7 slugfest, highlighted by John
Hallow's eventual game-winning
home run in the fourth inning.
With one out in the championship
game, O'Donnell reached first on a
single and advanced when shortstop
Tim Whitehead was hit by a pitch.
Paul Murr's infield out advanced
both runners.
Ramey then fired a high inside
pitch to Roger Hudson, and Pirate
catcher Jack Curlings was unabled
to retrieve the ball before it rolled to
the backstop.
"The ball just ran away from
him Pirate coach Gary Overton
said. "But we still played extremely
well during the tournament
Wilmington took an early lead in
the third when O'Donnell singled
and Murr doubled. Another run was
added in the fourth when pitcher
Mike Antle homered.
Controversy developed in the
seventh. With East Carolina runners
at first and second, the umpire ruled
that Murr was interfered with dur-
ing a double-play attempt. Both
runners were called out.
"There were some very close calls
during the game Overton remark-
ed. "We didn't get any breaks, but
by no means did that cause us to
lose the ball game
Antle didn't allow any hits for
five and a third innings, but the
Pirates rallied in the sixth.
However, reliever Jamie McGuire
worked his way out of two jams to
give Wilmington the championship.
The Pirates held off a furious
Wolfpack rally to advance to the
championship round.
The Pirates scored five runs in the
second inning when Todd Evans
walked, advancing on a Charlie
Smith single. With two outs, Robert
Wells doubled home Evans. Mike
Sorrell then singled, scoring Smith
and Wells. Todd Hendley's home
run put the Pirates up, 5-0.
East Carolina built a 7-0 lead in
the third when Evans, Pete Persico
and Smith singled. Wells' single
drove in Persico.
State erupted for five runs in the
fifth, highlighted bv Tim Barbour
two-run homer, cutting the lead to
ne Pirates added their final runs
in the sixth inning when Sorrell
singled, and Hallow reached first
bast on an error. Curlings was in
tent oiiallv walked, and Ivans
belted a double, scoring Hallow and
Sorrell.
Robbie Harper was the winning
pitcher, going four innings and giv
ing up two earned runs
"We got off to a slow start
Overton said of the past season.
"At the end, we were a god club. It
we had had a hit here or there, we
could have won this thing. Our
players had a good attitude at the
tournament.
"We accomplished several goals.
Curlings came a long way. he did a
fine job. Evans gained a lot oi ex
penence at first. We were a much
better team at the end than at the
beginning
Overton added that all the teams
were happy with the inaugural tour
nament, and the attendance was
very good.
� � �
Ramev was the only unanimous
selection to the league all-star team.
He was 7-2 during the regular
season. Pirate second baseman
Mike Sorrell joins his teammate on
the team.
Campbell shortstop Terry
Stnctland, the league batting cham-
pion with a .465 mark, was voted
most valuable player He also
finished tied for the league lead in
home runs with five, was fifth in
stolen bases with sixth, and col-
lected a league-leading 41 hits.
Five other Campbell players made
the all-star team. Campbell was the
regular season champion.
Campbell, the regular-season
champion was ousted by the Pirates,
3-2, Friday night. The Camels had
lost an opening-round game to the
SeaHawks of Wilmington, 6-2,
Thursday.
In Thursday action, the Pirates
were whipped by the Wolfpack of
N.C. State, 7-4. this is the first year
State was in the summer league.
The final regular-season stan-
dings were: Campbell, East
Carolina, N.C. State and Wilm-
ington. North Carolina due to its
last place finish did not qualify for
the post season tournament.





rHfc LAS I CAROLINIAN JULY 29, 1981
,Pgc6.
Bucs Determined To Improve;
Indians Depend On Seniors
By CHRIS HOLLOMAN
AaridaM Sp�c RRfti
These are the last two parts in a series of stories
on East Carolina's 1980 football opponents. This
week will cover East Tennessee State and William
and Mary.
With East Tennessee State coming off of a not-
so-good 2-9 season, optimism abounds that this
year will bring much better results.
But, head coach Jake Carlisle is facing a very
unsure situation at quarterback.
Dinnis Ruis and Scott Nault will b battling for
that quarterback spot, but some of the
newcomers could play a big role.
As far as the offensive line is concerned, coach
Carlisle feels that this will be his team's strength.
Jeff Brides and Jay Patterson bolster that line
while some depth will come from Joe Clement,
Chuck Gibson, Rob Younger and Scott.
At the wide receiver spot, Shelby Cornelius and
Ronnie Horton are set to start, though they may
be pushed by a good group of freshmen.
The running backs appear adequate though not
quite what the Buccaneers need to improve their
running game. They are Earl Parrell and Richard
Dill. Back-up help will come from Ricky Reeves.
Two younger players who could get the starting
nod are Todd Bloomer and Rodney Yeatts.
On the defensive side, a lack of depth hurt the
Bucs last year, and this could continue to be a
problem. Two big problems on defense could be
solved with the healthy return of Jack Lee and
Donnie Cook. Both defensive backs were lost last
season because of injuries.
If Lee and Cook do return they will be flanked
by two other starters, Eddie Lawton and Curtis
Middleton. Most of the depth in the secondary
will be provided by freshmen.
The defensive line returns all of its players from
last season though back-up depth is once again a
real problem. Tripp Hope, Doug Gubbard, Ber-
nie Cook, Mike Hensley and David Carmichatl
all return to the interior, while Kelly Vanover,
Tommy Thompson and Mike Smith are back at
the defensive end positions.
the punting situation should be in good hands
with Phil Wilson. Last year Wilson averaged
more than 39 yards per punt and should get some
all-Southern Conference mention this fall. The
placements will be handled by Phil Hunt.
The schedule for the Southern Conference's
newest member isn't very tough outside of the
league except for games with Lousiana Tech and
East Carolina. Because of this, the Bucs could
well improve on last season's mark.
Overall, it appears that East Tennessee State
should be a better team than last year but, that
nagging depth problem will have to be solved. If
the Bucs run into the kind of injuries they had last
season, it could be a long fall in Johnson City.
When new William and Mary head football
coach Jimmy Laycock took over at the
Williamsburg school he knew a lot of rebuilding
had to be done. Still no one really expected last
year's 2-9 record that included a demoralizing
42-7 loss to a rebuilding N.C. State team.
Things were not all bad though, as the Indians
lost four games by a total of eight points and beat
Rutgers, 21-18, only a week after the Scarlet
Knights had lost to Alabama in the last minute.
This year Laycock feels confident that the In-
dians will be a much improved football team.
"We fully expect to have a successful 1981
season Laycock said. "The upperclassmen
have a year's experience with the new system, and
that should serve as a positive factor. We feel
good about the upcoming year. With the help of a
couple of freshmen we should have a pretty solid
two-deep squad
In all the Indians return 37 lettermen and 12
starters, seven of them on the offensive line.
At the quarterback spot Chris Garrity returns
for his senior campaign where he established
three records last year. This will be Garrity's third
season as starting quarterback. His back-up help
will come from highly-recruited sophomore Dave
Murphy.
The running game has some big holes to fill
with the graduation of tailbacks Tom Franco and
Keith Best, who alternated at that spot.
The only returning starter at tailback is Dave
Scalon, a 5-9,160 pounder. Scalon carried the ball
12 times for 59 yards in a reserve role last season.
At fullback, the graduation of Cornell Cary,
the starter, plus backup Joel Mitik, has left the
position wide open. Ken Martin was expected to
take over the spot but an injury to his knee has
raised some doubt about his future status.
That leaves Doug Granger, who played in just
two games and gained 17 yards on six carries last
year.
The offensive line, however, is in much better
shape since four of five starters return. They are
Paul Sobus and Scott Tofano alternating at
center, two-year starter Doug Martini at one
guard slot and John Stewart at the other. Bill
Wilsey will return to his tackle position.
The other tackle spot will be filled by either
Ray Bisczat or Barry Kilkowski.
Backup help will come from Mario Shaffer,
Jim Connors, Timm Meel, Dave Rosdol and
Mark Sielski.
At tight end, starter John Lisella
returns.Lisella is also the punter on the team.
Depth at this position will be provided by
sophomores Bill Prosser and Mark Krautheim.
The flanker position will be in good shape with
the return of ECAC Rookie of the Year Kurt
Wrigley. Last year Wrigley had 33 receptions for
369 yards.
The defense, which lost four men off the line
and six overall, will have to be rebuilt. Ends Paul
Tyner and David Martin are gone, along with
Neil O'Mara, leaving Drew Sharp and Brian
Black as the most experienced players on the line.
Dan Nass, who used play tackle, has been mov-
ed to the end position.
The nose guard position will be manned by
John Matheson. John Cannon will be at the
tackle along with starter Wayne MacMaster.
Mike Kneidinger, a three-year starter, will be
back after missing last year with an injury.
The linebacker position will be the strength of
the defense with starters Owen Costello and John
Mitrovic back for another season.
Jerome Watters is the only returnee in the
secondary, but help is available from Andre
Hopkins and Guy Crittendon.
The Indians' schedule include Temple, Miami,
Virginia Tech, Navy and East Carolina.
Jeffrey Warren prepares to lower the boom in 1980 against Richmond.
MacMillian Heads Signees
Scharf Announces Swimming Recruits
Jon Rose, former
coach of the East
Carolina University
gymnastics team which
is no longer an ECU
varsity sport, has been
appointed the new
men's and women's
diving coach for the
1981-82 season.
Rose, a physical
education faculty
member and gym-
nastics coach for two
years, will be the team's
first full-time diving
coach since 1975.
"I'm very elated at
the idea of having a
separate diving coach
explained Ray Scharf,
head coach of both
men's and women's
swimming. "Before,
we were giving away 14
to 16 points every meet
because we had no div-
ing. That is like going
into a football game
without a quarter-
back
Rose, a West Chester
(Pa.) State College
graduate, coached
gymnastics on the col-
legiate level at
Southeast Missouri
State University and at
Slippery Rock (Pa.)
State College. He also
coached and taught
physical education at
Marple Newton High
School in Newtown
Square, Pa.
Four of Rose's
former Pirate gym-
nasts, Joanie Ford, a
sophomore from
Washington, N.C,
Ginny Neff, a
sophmore from West
Chester, Pa Jennifer
Bcli, also a sophomore
from Charlotte and
Nan George of
Manassas, Va will
join the diving squad.
Scharf has also an-
nounced the signing of
25 swimming recruits
for the 1981-82 season.
"1 was real pleased
said Scharf. "I feel it
was on of our better
recruiting years. We're
very fortunate
Doug MacMillian, a
butter f ly-medldy
specialist from Raleigh,
NC heads the list of
male recruits. Mac-
Millian is describeds as
"the best high schooler
in the state" by Scharf
and is a former student
of Rich Kobe, an ECU
assistant coach. Gregor
Wray, a freestyler from
Hickory, NC is another
recruit who coach
Scharf is "excited
about" as are
freestylers Wesley
Bryant, also of
Hickory, NC, Joseph
Nelson of Quantico,
VA, and Stan Williams
of Houston, TX.
Scharf also added
John Rathbun, a
breaststroker from
West Orange, NJ,
North Carolina State
diving champion Scott
Eagle, and backstroker
Jokim Svensson of
Floda, Sweden.
Svensson's high school
times are better than
several current Pirate
varisty records.
Highlighting
Scharf's women
recruits is Nancy
James, a freestyler
from Winston-Salem,
NC. James is "one of
the best" according to
Scharf. Other
freestylers include
Marie Grube of East
Petersburg, Pa Sally
Reinhard of
Bridgewater, N.J
Paula and Pam Beery
of Connelly Springs,
N.C, Nancy Rogers of
Bristol, Tenn, and
Joanne Chastonay of
Temple Hills, Md.
Scharf also added
breaststrokers Han-
nelore Koehlcr of
Fisher, N.Y Sharron
Holt of Rockvillc, Md,
and Amy Dilwcg of
Bethesda, Md.
Also signed were
divers Audrey Moore
of Falcon, N.C, Julie
Levie of Charlotte,
N.C, and Tozanne
Wannstedt of Glenn-
wood, N.Y
backstroker Luanne
Peura of Ashabula,
Ohio
Play 'Red Hot'
Continued From Page 4
tor Edgar Loessin and scenery designer Gregory
Buch.
One bit of advice: due to the mirror that serves
as part of the set decoration, certain members of
the audience sitting in the far-right front section
are subject to intense reflection of the stage
lights. This situation should be corrected or the
Summer Theatre may be liable for several cases
of retina burnout.
Tickets for The Last of the Red Hot Lovers
may be acquired from the Summer Theatre Box
Office, 701 S. Evans Street in Greenville, open
Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. � telephone 757-6390. From August 3-8,
the Summer Theatre will present D.L. Coburn's
Pulitzer Prize-winning comedy The Gin Game.
Curtain time for both shows is 8:15 p.m.
�lje last Carolinian
SUBSCRIPTION FORM
Name
ddress
A Special 30-Page
Fall Edition of
The East Carolinian
will be published
on August 25th
Telephone i
)
RATE: $20P ��'�
Brown Hired
Caroline Brown, a 1971 graduate of Fur-
man University in physical education and
former Paladin field hockey coach and ten-
nis star, has been appointed head coach of
men's and women's tennis at East Carolina.
"I am definiteh excited about coaching
both teams commented Brown. "1 will be
able to administer both programs and make
both meaningful
Brown is a former field hockey coach at
Wake Forest University and a former
player on the Avon Future's Curcuit.
Brown announced the recent signing of
New Bern High School tennis star Catherine
Tolson.
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Title
The East Carolinian, July 29, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
July 29, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.140
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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