The East Carolinian, May 20, 1981






Bhe Saat (Earnltntan
.
iL.
Serving (he Last Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 55 No.
6 Pages
Wednesday, May 20, 1981
Greenville, North Carolina
New Theatre And Auditorium
Completion Date Set For July
B Ml K1MBERI Y
Mat! Ytnlrr
rhe sounds and dust o construc-
tion on last Carolina's campus are
destined to come to an end in the
near future as the new McGinnis
Theatre and auditorium nears com-
pletion.
(. onstruction of the new building,
begun in fall 1979, should be finish-
ed by July 10, according to Scott
Parkei, the Business Manager o' the
Drama Department. However, the
new facilities will not be available
tor production until spring 1982.
due to the tact that the lightboard
and stage draperies will not be
delivered until then.
rhe new wing, as well as total
renovations in the other two sec-
tions o! the Drama Building, is part
ol a three million dollar project to
update the Drama facilities. When
finished, the new facility will be one
ol the best in the state, and will have
tour tii . � ice ol the old one.
rhe dai cc id os have been com-
plete! re-done. New floors, model-
ed after those in 1 incoln Center.
and the School of the Arts, meet the
requirements for the American
Ballet Theatres. They are composed
o' a layer of concrete, topped by
wooden struts, plywood, and a layer
of plastic. The layers give the floor
pliability, which "gives" for the
dancers, helping to prevent injury to
shins, ankles and knees.
New metal bars, sturdier than the
old wooden ones, have been install-
ed, as well as new mirrors, heating,
air conditioning, and sheetrock dry
walls. The costume shop will be in
the basement of the new wing; con-
struction on the new scenery shop
has not begun, but is now out for
bids.
Meanwhile, the dance and drama
classes, as well as the administration
and faculty of the Drama Depart-
ment are using the old Wilkerson
Funeral Home building, located on
1 vans Street, across from Margaux
Restaurant.
Dissatisfaction with the tem-
porary facility has been expressed
loudly and frequently by students
and staff alike. The building has
been in use since the beginning of
spring semester of this year, and
costs the universitv $2916.67 per
month.
The building, however, is not
large enough to hold the various
dance, acting, costuming, and stage
scenery design classes that are being
taught in it. The hot, crowded
building has no sound insulation, so
the noise of the dance classes echoes
throughout the structure. The two
rooms being used for dance studios
have hardwood floors, which can
contribute to injuries to the dancers.
The slickness of the wax floors,
splinters, poor lighting, and
makeshift bars and mirrors are
other hazards dance students must
contend with. There are no water
fountains and no dressing rooms.
The other classes are being taught
in various other rooms of the old
mausoleum, and siage scenery is be-
ing built in the garage. The drama
and dance staff crouds into the re-
maining space
Several students in the drama
department were asked to comment
on the facilities. Don Wagoner, a
drama major, said, "the com-
aradene at the old building nearly
made up for the inadequacies, but it
just got too crowded He added
that he hoped the feelings of
fellowship would not end with the
coming of new facilities.
Beth Whitfield, a dance minor,
said of the temporary facilities: "If
you have had previous injuries, dan-
cing on a hardwood floor like that
can just aggravate them. Also, it is
inconvenient if you have a class im-
mediately before or afterwards
Shaun Holliday, another drama ma-
jor, said, "It's better than nothing.
1 feel that the quality of the instruc-
tion is the same
However, Paula Johnson, a
dance instructor who shares a small
office in the temporary building
with two other staff members, sum-
med up the feelings toward the new
facilities, "After seeing the almost
finished product, I think it has been
worth the wait
Pfloto by CHAP GURLEY
Construction Continues
students should he dancing in new studios by fall.
Hopes To Avoid Student Loan Cuts Shattered
B HII INORDES
WASHINGTON, D.C. (C PS) �
When the Senate j ined the House
last week in approving the broad
outlines ol President Ronald
Reagan's budget, hopes for
avoiding drastic cuts in student loan
programs "went down easily with
the rest of the ship mourns Alec
Surkin, aide to education enthusiast
Rep. Peter Peyser (D-NY).
Although a joint Senate-House
committee must still determine the
sped ' the program cuts, most
collegiate lobbyists are pressimistic
that aid will be restored.
"There is so much momentum
from presidential lobbying for the
so-called mandate tor change
Surkin predicted, that cuts seem in-
evitable.
"There's a lot of sentiment in
C ongress that 'students have had a
free ride lone enough agrees
Eduardo WoUe, lobbyist for the
U.S. Student Association.
lorn Asick, for one, looks at the
sentiment as a victory. Asick, an
author of the education report for
the Heritage Foundation, the con-
servative think tank that provided
the guidelines for the administra-
tion's college policies, exults that
student "welfare programs"are to
be cut. "They had just gotten out of
hand
Though the cuts themselves won't
come up for a vote until late June,
the consensus for paring down some
of the major aid programs now in
Congress goes like this:
Pell Grants
One factor that could exacerbate
the impact of cuts in Pell Grants
(formerly called Basic Educational
Opportunity Grants) is the halving
of what was to have been a $661
million supplemental appropriation,
says Joel Packer ol the National
Association of State I niversities
and Land-Grant Colleges. I he
House appropriations committee,
aiming at saving $13.5 billion, cut
the supplemental appropriation,
and lowered the maximum Pell
Grant award to SI650 from SI"50.
Others expect Congress will make
students from families with annual
incomes over $25,000 ineligible for
Pell Grants.
Congress may bypass the ad-
ministration proposal to make
students pay the first $750 ol their
college bills in order to quality for a
Pell Grant. Wolle expects Congress
will approve the measure in 1982 in-
stead.
Guaranteed Student Loans
Reagan administration proposals
for GSLs would "destroy" the pro-
gram, in Packer's judgement. Con-
gress seems ready to approve
Reagan's effort to raise the interest
on GSLs from nine percent to 14
percent, but may balk at the presi-
dent's attempt to abolish the sub-
sidy in which the government pays
interest on the loan until gradua-
tion.
Banks have protested, Wolle says,
because of "excessive paperwork"
involved in collecting from students
instead of collecting from the
government.
National Direct Student Loans
The NDSL program, although
marked for extinction bv the ad-
ministration, is chartered to con-
tinue next year, lobbyists say. But a
$100 million appropriation that has
not been restored since NDSI senti-
ment shifted may cripple NDSI s in
some states, Wolle warns.
Social Security
Wolle predicts strong opposition
to the administration's proposal to
end immediately Social Security
payments to students who are
children of retired, deceased or
disabled beneficiaries. Education
committee members instead seem to
favor a gradual phase-out of In-
payments.
Wolle, Packer and other oppos-
ing the cuts complain Congress has
adopted, in Packer's words, a let
them eat cake attitude. Senate
Education-Labor Committee Chair-
man Harrison Schmidt (R-NM)
"mentioned that (Pell Grant) reduc-
tions would only amount to about
what students spend each week on a
couple of packs of cigarettes
Packer recalls.
Packer adds, �'What it would
really amount to is several cartons a
week
Most college lobbyists estimate
the toll would be higher. Surkin
gloomily predicts as many as a
million students will either have to
alter their eduction plans or leave
college altogether if the cuts are ap-
proved. American Council on
Education President Jack W.
Peltason forecasted that as many as
600,OCX) s'tudents from families earn-
ing between S19,000 and S25.OO0
per year will be affected by the Pell
Grant changes alone.
Increased Costs
Carolina Telephone Raises Rates
For Phone Hook-Up, Long Distance
a
Students Get Reacquainted
summer sessions bring on a glut of hookbuying and friendinding.
Exit Exam Policy Changed
Photo by GARY PATTERSON
B DEBORAH HOTALING
There's still hope for that
freshman who flunked the grammar
exit exam twice and was afraid he
would have to repeat English 1100.
According to Jim Kirkland,
director ol freshman composition,
freshmen who failed the exit exam
twice have the option to write a
300-word essay which is then graded
h at least two English professors.
The essay is graded on a pass-fail
basis and is not averaged in with the
student's class grade.
The policy was initiated last fall
but Kirkland said only a few
students have taken advantage of
the policy. "So far, people have
been scared to death to do it. 1 guess
they're just afraid to try it he said.
At the beginning of each
semester, freshmen receive informa-
tion from the English Department
explaining course objectives,
departmental policies, and the op-
tion to the exit exam. Each student
is required to sign a form stating
they'have read all of the informa-
tion.
Kirkland explained that a student
making a D or F in the course
should not depend on this option to
pass them in the course. He advised
that the student repeat the course in
order to benefit from the material.
Topics for this optional essay are
chosen by the professors who are to
grade the essay. The subject usually
deals defending a hypothetical
point in a "what to do" situation.
Kirkland said that one of the
main reasons the optional essay is
being offered is to help those
students who aren't able to cope
with taking an exit exam. "Some
students just get panicky and they're
under so much pressure that even
though they're doing O.K. in the
course, they mess up on the exam.
Maybe this option will help some of
those students out
By KAREN WENDT
ssislanl Nr�s tdilnr
Students were greeted with a
surprise when they returned to cam-
pus for summer school.
Carolina Telephone and
Telegraph has increased it's charges
in three areas: the primary service
charge, the standard monthly fee
and the long distance rates.
It will also take longer for service
to begin than during the regular
school year.
According to Ty Hart, a represen-
tative of Carolina Telephone, the in-
creases were caused by inflation.
Since the company only offers its
mass-connect service in the fall, it
will take longer for service to begin
during the summer, Hart said.
He added that the initial cost for
on-campus service will be $30.40.
This fee includes two listings in
directory assistance.
This cost is divided into three
areas: local service in advance,
central-office work charge and
primary service order charges.
The local service in advance
charges are $11.40. This fee is
broken down into several smaller
charges, includin $9.40 for the stan-
dard line charge.
This charge keeps the phone
operating and in connection with
other phone svstems, according to
Hart.
The charge for leasing the phone
is $1.25. These amounts are charged
in advance each month.
The central office work charge is
$4 This charge is for the work re-
quired in rewiring campus connec-
tions. Hart e 'mated that rewiring
take about fifteen minutes per
phone.
A Quick Cost
Breakdown
$ 9.40 Line Charge
$ 1.25 Set Charge
$ .75 Additional Listing
$ 4.00 Local Service In
Formerly CTT had charged a
standard three minute charge for
any calls that ran at or below that
length.
Due to the changes. Hart says
that the company can now have a
minimum call length of only one
minute and now can charge a lower
minimum rate.
The rates have gone up, however.
Hart was unable to give exact
figures on the increase but gave the
following example. Formerly an
operater assisted call from Green-
ville to New Bern that lasted three
minutes or less cost the caller $1.20.
With the new rates and smaller
minimum charges, a one minute
operator-assisted call will cost $1.04
and a three-minute call will cost
$1.50.
Hart said that the increase is only
the second ever received by CTT.
Advance The first was in 197
$15.00 Primary Service
Order Charges
The primary service order charge
is $15 and covers the charges of ser-
vice representatives writing out the
orders, entering them into the com-
puter, checking credit and writing
receipts.
Long distance rates also changed
during the break.
On The Inside
Fditorials3
Features4
Sports5
Classifieds6
t






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MAY 20, 1981
t
f
Importance of Link In Slayings Doubted
ATLANTA (UPI) �
Police in a suburban
Atlanta county where
five of the city's 27
slain young blacks were
found say although
"trace evidence" was
found on all but one of
the five bodies, they
now doubt the impor-
tance of the link.
DeKalb County
Police spokesman
Chuck Johnson said
Monday the body of
the fifth victim Aaron
Wychc, 10, was never
searched for fibers or
similar evidence
because his case was
not originally believed
to be linked to the
others.
�' "We at first thought
it was a very good
link Johnson aid.
"Now the fact is that
the fibers apparently
were on so many vic-
tims and that in itself
could be a very good
link, but we're beginn-
ing to wonder � since
they're so common �
if it is a good link
The four victims
found in DeKalb Coun-
ty and linked by the
evidence were Patrick
Baltazar,ll, Curtis
Walker, 13, Joseph
Bell, 15, and William
Barrett, 17.
Bodies have been
dumped in at least six
jurisdictions that help
make up the
metropolitan Atlanta
area and some in-
vestigators believe the
killers were deliberately
trying to confuse
authorities.
The series of unsolv-
ed slayings is entering
its 22nd month with no
arrests. Atlanta
authorities believe,
however, the case will
eventually be solved.
"Right now, as
frustrating as it is, I still
lean to the fact we are
going to solve it said
Fulton County District
Attorney Lewis Slaton.
'T still think that with
the work that's being
done in the case, there
will be a break
But, Slaton added,
he is not surprised that
a break has not already
come because of the
frequency of the kill-
ings in 1981 � 11 so far
this year.
"We have come up
with several potential
suspects, but they've all
been eliminated at this
point said Johnson.
"We have no suspects
at this time
Johnson identified
one of the potential
suspects being con-
sidered as Felt on
Talley, 25, who was
killed May 12 in a
shootout with Atlanta
police. Talley and
another man became
involved in a confron-
tation with police after
Talley was accused of
vandalizing a school
bus.
Johnson said Talley
was eliminated as a
suspect before the
shooting because he ap-
parently was in jail at
the times when the
murders of the young
blacks found in DeKalb
County took place.
:UY
TtM Iteming Oanter has been here for you sine 1974
providing private, understanding health oare
to women of an agee. at a reasonable oost
The Fkaning Center we're here when you need us.
Oaf1
TtlJlgOJpJtolejfe
w:i
FLEMING CENTER
Ku Klux Klan
Tries To Recruit
School Children
V ASH 1 NC. TON
(UPI) � The National
Education Association
is trying to combat
what it says is a moun-
ting recruiting drive by
the Ku K!u Klan �
one aimed at drawing
schoolchildren into the
Klan's hooded ranks.
MA President
Willard H. McGuire
said todaj the NEA is
preparing to distribute
new curricula to its 1.7
million teachers to pro-
mote classroom discus-
sions about the white
supremacist group.
"We do not believe
we are over reacting to
the reports of KKK
youth recruitment
McGuire said. "A
resurgent Klan
represents a threat that
can't be ignored
" The Ku Klux Klan
is back said the NE
Reporter, the labor
organization's
magazine. "In nearl
every part of the coun-
try Klanmen are burn-
ing crosses hidden
under sheets � and
targeting oungsters as
young as age in tor the
new KKK 'Youth
( orps
"Your students
could be among the
next recruits
The article said the
Klan has attempted to
exploit racial tensions
in some schools to
enlist youngsters with
recruiting flyers such
as;
"Are you fed up with
special privileges af-
forded blacks by school
administration simply
on account of their
race?"
The NEA said
students in the Klan's
youth corps are taught
to "hate non-whites,
Jews, immigrants and
homosexuals
It cites a number of
incidents during the
past few years, in-
cluding:
� A group of high
school students in
Oklahoma City claim-
ing membership in the
Klan and wielding
baseball bats attacked a
gay bar.
�Children in
Decatur, Ala wearing
Klan T-shirts set fire to
a school bus during an
anti-busing rally.
� Youngsters are
taught hand-to-hand
combar and racist
ideology at a KKK
camp outside o f
Houston.
Gl Cimoullsfl'Xi Fouques And T-
Shirts Sle�pt-9 Bags Baopacfcs
Camping Equipment Steei Toeo
Shoes Dishes Ann 0�er '00 Dit-
teient New And Used items
ATiTIC ATTIC I ATTIC ATTIC
South's No. 6
Rock Nightclub
WED.&THURS.
MAY 20 & 21
ECU STUDENTS
12 PRICE WED.
Souths No. 6
Rock Nightclub
FRI. & SAT.
; MAY 22 4 23
I JOEBAND

j AFTERNOON
1 DELIGHT ON FRI.
: 25C Admission 4-7
SUN. � NO VACANCY
TUES. � THE X-RAVES
CAROLINA
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417 EVANS MALL
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GREENVILLE
PHONE 757-1237
MON. -SAT. � 10-5:30
Cowboy Boots 136 95
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1974
ilus.
UNG
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�118
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iqe 88'
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Parts
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HPST
THE SEASON
ielon
Bkt Eaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Paul Collins. Uuw,�Ch
Jimmy Dupree. - r,r.gi
Chuck Foster, am A(lverlls,nif Deborah Hotaling. sewsEd�or
C hris Lichok, ���� Mmmm William Yelverton �, �,�
Alison Bartel, Prllducuo'n S1anagfr Steve Bachner, rmmr
May 20, 1981
Opinion
Page 3
ECU Textbooks
Students Pay For Mistakes
It happens every semester and
summer school session and there's
no reason to expect the new term to
change the inevitable � students
buying books that they will only be
able to sell for a fraction of their
original cost once the course is com-
pleted.
The Student Supply Store and
University Book Exchange use ap-
proximately the same system for
buying back used books at the end
of the semester. Students receive
one-half the original price of the
book, and it is later resold for three-
fourths the original list price. Book
stores at many other universities
employ this same system, so there
can be little complaint with this
matter.
The main point of objection with
the book system at ECU is that
some instructors tend to be too has-
ty in their choice of text for a
course. Many times the instructor
decides after a single semester that
the text is ineffective and switches to
a different book.
The book stores cannot be ex-
pected to pay premium prices for
waste paper. So who gets stuck
bearing the financial burden of
change? The students, naturally.
As if we do not already shell out
enough money two (or more) times
a year, we now have to face the
possibility of being stuck with an ex-
otic and out-dated text because of
the whim of some professor.
Let's not forget those visiting
professors who always seem to
prefer a rare book which no other
instructor has used here before, and
probably none will after heshe is
gone. They have a particular knack
for finding unusual material for
their students to "enjoy
Why not try to alleviate this pro-
blem by making the department
chairperson approve only texts
which can be used by future instruc-
tors?
Last, but not least, to all the in-
structors at ECU who insist on
assigning several books, please do
not make us buy something we will
never use. There is nothing more
frustrating than forking over $20
and never cracking the spine of the
book.
Let's try to avoid situations such
as one ECU junior who paid $75 for
new books in January and sold
them all back in May for a grand
total of $18.
Come on, that's ridiculous
Women's Athletics Program
Enjoys Most Productive Year
In any review of the 1980-81
school year of East Carolina the
most obvious and outstanding
highlight would easily be the success
of the women's athletics program.
In particular, the softball and
basketball teams achieved a degree
of success that is often lacking at
ECU.
Last weekend the softball team
captured third place in the national
slow-pitch tournament while com-
piling a 44-7 record.
After being ranked number one in
the nation for much of the season,
Coach Alita Dillon's Lady Pirates
may have been disappointed with
their showing in the tournament but
should not allow it to overshadow
their season-long accomplishments.
What other ECU team in recent
memory has achieved such heady
success?
Well, only this year's women's
basketball team. Cathy Andruzzi's
women finished the year with more
than 20 wins for the second straight
year and earned a spot among the
nation's top 20 teams.
For providing sheer excitement,
Andruzzi's team was unmatched.
Its triple-overtime win against State
in Raleigh is ample proof of that.
One characteristic these teams
have in common is outstanding
coaching. Dillon and Andruzzi
deserve no small measure of praise
for their teams' successes during the
past season.
The players themselves seem to be
the archetypes of a new brand of
woman athlete: dedicated, hard-
working and above all, well,
athletic. As one observer put it, with
no trace of sarcasm or sexism,
"They sure don't play like girls
ECU has long been the victim of a
severe inferiority complex where
academic and athletic pursuits are
involved. The success of these two
teams may indicate that the univer-
sity is finally ready to shed this im-
age.
THE LEBANESE CHRISTIAN V " m & M
MIUTlA PRAYS Foft MACHINE GUNS; "THE JEWS WANT '
PLANES AND TANKS; THE ISLAMIC REVOLUTION
WANTS SPARE PARTS; THE IRISH CATHOLICS PEG
FOR CONCEALABl� WEAPONS; THE BRITISH
PROTESTANTS W�ULD L�KE RW CONTROL GEAR;
THE AMERICAN FUNDAMENTALISTS) REMIND YOU To
KEEP THEM AHEAD OF RUSSIA IN MILITARY
SPENDING. THAT'S ALL THE PRAYERS FoR PEACE.
ijh

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" Ziv? "
Warheads Provide Newest Trend
By DAVID ARMSTRONG
The way I see it, there are two cutting-
edge trends in American life. One is the
push for bigger, costlier, more lethal
nuclear weapons with which to "ream
America The other is the mushrooming
popularity of designer jeans, sales of which
have reached $6 billion a year. To reveal
the true nature of each trend, I suggest tak-
ing both of them to their logical conclu-
sion, producing a devastatingly chic new
product: designer warheads.
An unimpeachable source, who wishes
to remain anonymous (you understand),
told me that this eminently sensible move
is, in fact, in the works. According to my
source, Defense Secretary Caspar
Weinberger is even now preparing an an-
nouncement that the latest nuclear
weapons, "each with its own unique
capabilities will be named after
celebrities and "deployed on the far-flung
frontiers of freedom
"This will accomplish two things con-
fided my source. "One, it will give nuclear
warheads clearly identifiable personalities,
making it easier for President Reagan to
sell the American people on a larger
military budget in his next dramatic televi-
sion appearance. "And two my source
smirked, "it'll completely bamboozle the
Russians. MX missiles in moving boxcars
they can deal with, but compact tactical
nukes in gift-wrapped boxes from
Macy's?"
I had to admit he had a point. My infor-
mant showed me the addance text of
Weinberger's announcement (sorry, I can't
let you see it-just trust me), describing the
warheads being readied by Research and
Development. Her is an abridged version
of the statement, carefullly edited to en-
sure that this newspaper doesn't com-
promise national security. The new
designer warheads include:
The Alexander, a.k.a. The Commander.
This clever weapon is programmed to seek
out enemy sources of power, such as
hydroelectric projects, nuclear power
plants and high-level executive suties.
Planners are worried about the weapon's
tendency to self-destruct under pressure,
but are confident that kinks can be worked
out by the next election. A versatile metal
container, available as an accessory, is
handy for storing precious bodily fluids
when weapon is not in use.
The Warhol. A combination radioac-
tive hallucinogenic agent that causes op-
ponents to drop in stupefaction shortly
after exposure, the Warhol is deployed in
cinemas and at parties of the enemy elite.
For precision strikes only.
The Jackie O. Developed as a stylish
companion to the Warhol, the Jackie O. is
programmed to attach enemy discos, din-
ners, galleries and the embassys of foreign
countries that abuse human rights. Since
Pentagon planners have recently
acknowledged that most such countries are
U.S. allies, this weapon is expected to see
only limited action. Not for use in South
Africa or South America.
The James Watt. Named after the reign-
ing Secretary of the Interior, the Watt is a
variation of the neutron bomb. Kills trees,
birds, fish and animals, while leaving cor-
porate executives unharmed.
The Carter. Orignially prized for its
ability to vacillate and shimmy past enemy
defenses, scientists were forced to
reevaluate the weapon when it failed, in
repeated tests, to explode on impact.
The Pundit. Suggested by political com-
mentator George F. Will, this weapon im-
pairs the reasoning powers of opponents,
leaving its victims able to think only in the
past tense. Effectively foils their diabolical
plans for America's future.
The Nancy. Inspired by the first hdy,
the Nancy is a dainty little atomic device
that exposes enemies to small but sustained
bursts of radiation. Ruffles optional.
The ChieJ. (as in "hail to) The most
popular item of the new season. Slays by
paralyzing opponents with a sense of well-
being, then explodes when least expected,
inflicting maximum damage. Should be the
leading weapon in the nation's arsenal for
four more years. With technical ad-
justments, could be operational
throughout the eighties.
Leaders Warn Of Renewed Racism
By RICHARD REEVES
DETROIT�"The Klan is marching and
black people are being murdered all over
the country thundered Buddy Battle.
"The country is not doing doggone
thing to stop it he said, slamming a huge
fist on his desk. "Racists are being ap-
pointed to the highest offices in the land.
We are sitting on a powder keg, with the
permission of the White House
Robert Battle III is black. He is a
regional director of the United Auto
Workers, the highest-ranking black in the
union, a 300-pound giant who has spent
more than 40 years as a major figure in the
black political takeover of Detroit.
Buddy Battle talks as big � and as loud
� as he is. But other blacks are voicing the
same frustration and fear in quieter voices.
In three days of interviews in Detroit,
blacks, both leaders and the less-exalted,
routinely talked about revivals of violent
American racism.
"They are talking about states' rights'in
Washington said Roy Levy Williams,
director of the Detroit Urban League and a
former executive assistant to Michigan's
Republican governor, William G.
Milliken. "That has always been a code
word to us � the states' rights to
discriminate against us.
"The isolated incidents aren't so
isolated anymore, are they?" Williams
said after talking about the killings in
Atlanta and Buffalo and incidents in In-
dianapolis, Salt Lake City and Mobile,
Ala. "Public officials' positions and
statements set a public toneand we don't
hear any roars of outrage coming from the
national leadership
What Williams has been hearing,
though, is the voices of certain people.
"We'll show you what real nigger-killers
can do said one of the pieces of hate mail
that Williams has received since the Detroit
Urban League begain distributing green
ribbons to remind people of the unsolved
murders of black children in Atlanta.
How strongly do blacks feel about that?
More than 100,000 of the ribbons have
been distributed in this city alone. While I
was waiting to see Williams in his office on
Mack Street, two Detroit policemen, both
black, walked in and asked for ribbons.
"How many?" a receptionist asked.
"Could we have a hundred?" one of the
officers asked. "The brothers in the
precinct house want to wear them and peo-
ple keep coming in from the street looking
for them
Look and see how many black men and
women are wearing the ribbons in any city.
They are a symbol of concern � and of
fear. "It would only take one heavy inci-
dent for a lot of whites to turn on blacks
said Battle. "The pattern of racism is there
and no one is doing anything to stop
itwhat they are doing is reversing policy
on apartheid in South Africa. How do you
think we react to things like that.?"
Genuine fear seemed to be the reaction
among blacks in Detroit � and not just
among leaders. On the streets of the East
Side, people I talked with all equated the
killings and President Reagan. That is cer-
tainly unfair, but that doesn't change the
fact that it is happening. This is a very bad
time for American blacks � recession and
cuts in social programs probably hurt them
more than whites � and it is a very
dangerous time for all of us, black and
white.
Detroit police Inspector Gilbert Hill, the
black chief of the city's Homicide Division
who went to Atlanta to help investigate the
child killings, said: "If I had one wish it
would be that the killers are not white. If
they are, there could be real trouble in
America
-Campus Forum
Stress Article Praised
I just wanted to thank you greatly for
the article on stress and anxiety that you
printed in The East Carolinian last
Thursday ("Classroom Phobias Can
Cause Crippling Effects on Students").
Your article proved to me that there are
others besides myself plagued by stress
and the horrible symptoms that come
with it. I thought I was the only
"weirdo" walking around campus simp-
ly because I have the normal anxiety-
produced feelings. I am now suffering
from depression (mostly caused by anx-
ieties). Other than the professional help
and the support from my family and
friends, your article was my only other
consolation.
The article did a great deal to relieve
me of the misery of stress by helping me
to understand what my anxiety and
depression is and what the inevitable
symptoms are that come with it. Because
of your concern for students under so
much pressure (those like myself), my
faith in people who sincerely care for the
welfare of others has been confirmed. I
began to wonder if The East Carolinian
could ever be informative and iielpful in
the interest of students. I have been con-
vinced that your newspaper staff cares
about more than just Student Govern-
ment meetings, elections, and the other
usual events that were never of much in-
terest to me. Your article proves that
you really care about the students on this
campus.
MARTI BABB
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing alt points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner tihrarv.
-�?� !��





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
MAY 20, 1981
Page 4
Movies, Concerts Highlight
ECU Summer Entertainment
Movies and concerts highlight a
full schedule of programs planned
for the summer by the ECU Student
Union and Mendenhall Student
Center.
MSC Watermelon Feasts will be
held on the lawn by the Mendenhall
Snack Bar at 12 Noon on the follow-
ing dates throughout the summer:
June 15, June 22, July 13, and July
20. All feasts will be held on Mon-
day.
MSC BingoIce Cream Parties
will be held on Tuesdays at 7 p.m. in
the Multi-Purpose Room at
Mendenhall on the following dates:
June 9, June 30, July 7, and July 21.
The Student Union Special Con-
certs Committee will present two
concerts this summer including Split
Image on June 21 at 8 p.m. and Tim
Henderson on July 16 at 8 p.m.
Both concerts will be held on the
University Mall.
The Student Union Films Com-
mittee has 20 movies scheduled for
screenings on Monday and Wednes-
day nights in Mendenhall Student
Center's Hendrix Theatre. The films
will be shown at 9 p.m. on both
evenings and admission is by Stu-
dent ID and Activity Card or MSC
Membership Card for faculty and
staff. Below is a list of the films and
their respective dates:
ROBIN AND MARIAN
Wednesday. May 20. 1981
The tranquility of majestic Sher-
wood Forest turns to a high pitch of
excitement when its legendary hero
Robin Hood returns from 20 years
of fighting in the crusades.
THE NINE LIVES OF
FRITZ THE CAT
Monday. May 25, 1981
CRITZ THE CAT goes tumbling
into the seventies in this new Steve
Krantz full-length animated feature.
NO NUKES
Wednesday. May 27, 1981
A concert film that "does the
impossible! You honestly get the
feeling you're sitting in the Garden
and feeling the floor shake � Joel
Siegel, WABC-TV.
THE BUDDY HOLLY STORY
Monday, June 1, 1981
This film biography traces the
roots of the late Buddy Holly's star-
dom from a small town in Texas to
his international fame as he reached
the top of the record charts.
COOL HAND 1.1 HE
Wednesday, June 3, 1981
When the establishment tries to
put the clamps on a fiercely in-
dependent spirit, the result is ex-
plosive.
THE ATTACK OF
THE KILLER TOMATOES
Monday, June 8. 1981
ATTACK OF THE KILLER
TOMATOES can be called the
world's first "musical-disaster com-
edy
LITTLE BIO MAN
Wednesday, June 10, 1981
Sole survivor of Custer's last
stand at Little Big Horn, adopted
Indian brave complete with braids
and war paint, mule skinner, town
drunk, and gunfighter (The Sodey
Pop Kid) these are just a few of
the amazing characterizations of
Jack Crabb portrayed so brilliantly
by Dustin Hoffman in LITTLE BIG
MAN.
COAL MINER'S DAUGHTER
Monday, June 15, 1981
Singer Loretta Lynn is movingly
portrayed by Sissy Spacek, who
sings more than 30 country-western
songs in this biographical film.
BLLLITT
Wednesday, June 17, 1981
There aren't many cops like
Builitt around; Italian shoes, turtle-
neck pullovers, reports about per-
sonal misconduct, and his
"disruptive" influence.
Gil DA LIVE
Monday, June 22, 1981
Gilda Radner's Broadway concert
show "Gilda � Live From New
York" has been transformed into a
movie.
THE TWELVE CHAIRS
Wednesday, June 24, 1981
Mel Brooks is never better than in
THE TWELVE CHAIRS.
RICHARD PRYOR-
LIVE IN CONCERT
Monday, June 29, 1981
One of the biggest boxoffice
smash hit movies recounting the
1978 concert tour of comedian
Richard Pryor, one of Hollywood's
most volatile, unpredictable and
gifted performers. Cry, laugh and
sit in awe at Pryor's outrageous
brand of comedy as he lashes out a
generous array of expletives to ac-
centuate his social commentary.
Filmed live unedited and
uncensored.
DIRTY HARRY
Wednesday, July 1, 1981
Harry Callahan (Clint Eastwood)
is the kind of cop that is safer to
have on the police force instead of
on the streets.
FLASH GORDON
Wednesday, July 8, 1981
Famous comic strip hero
Flash Gordon (Sam Jones) pits his
wits and the lives of Dale Arden
(Melody Anderson) and Dr. Zarkov
(Topol) against the evil minions of
Ming the Merciless (Max Von
Sydow), evil ruler of the planet
Mongo, in this Dino De Laurentiis
sophisticated sci-fi spoof
guaranteed to spellbind you with its
breakneck pace, cliffhanger
finishes, pulsating music and
sophisticated visual wit.
ALL THAT JAZZ
Monday, July 13, 1981
From the man responsible for
award-winners "Cabaret" and
"Lenny" comes Bob Fosses' razzle-
dazzle autobiographical film "ALL
THAT JAZZ
WOODSTOCk
Wednesday. July 15. 1981
Experience that incredible
cultural happening, that unique
celebration of peace, love and music
which triumphantly culminated the
Age of Aquarius.
Roy Scheider as Joe Gideon in a fantasy variety show sequenee from Bob
Fosse's "All That Jazz The film is one of twenty summer movies com-
ing to Hendrix Theatre.
1941
Monday, Jul 20, 1981
There's absolutely no doubt that
a lot of peopie are going to see
"1941
WAIT l NTH DARK
Wednesday. JuK 22, 1981
Adapted from the New York
stage play and voted one of the ten
best bv Film Daily's critics, WAIT
UNTIL DARK is a suspenseful
movie of an innocent couple who
become involved with a narcotics
gang.
WARHOL'S DRACULA
Monday, July 27, 1981
Based on the famous Transylva-
nian legend, Andy Warhol's
DRACULA follows the giant suc-
cess of his FRANKENSTEIN.
Lending Can Be An Unprofitable Enterprise
By DAVID .NORMS
M�f f W rllrr
At one time or another, all of us make the mistake of
letting other people borrow one or more of our posses-
sions. In "Hamlet Polonius advised, "Never a bor-
rower or lender be (Of course, Polonius was killed in
a rather silly sort of way during the play, so you might
not want to pay too much attention to what he says.)
Although borrowing has its drawbacks, it can be pro-
fitable; at least, it has been to some of the people I've
loaned stuff or money to. Lending, on the other hand, is
often an unprofitable venture.
Pencils and pens are some of the hardest things to
keep up with when it comes to lending and borrowing. I
usually try to remember to keep a pen with me, but it's
not possible to be that efficient all the time. It's terribly
easy to put a borrowed pen back in my pocket after us-
ing it. I have a whole pile of odd pens and pencils at
home that I must have borrowed from people.
Sometimes, 1 loan out pencils or pens, which occa-
sionally are returned. Often, the returned writing in-
struments are in a pretty battered condition. I especially
hate for people to bring back a pen with toothmarks all
over it; if somebody wants something to chew on. 1
could give him a dog biscuit instead of a pen.
Pencils come back in even worse shape than borrowed
pens. People chew on pencils, sharpen them until they
are only a couple of inches long, and then use up the
whole eraser.
People often borrow cigarettes, but almost never
return them. (Most people don't want them back,
though.)
Many people have an ironclad rule against letting
anyone borrow any of their books. Loaning one book
and getting back a cover and most of the pages in return
is enough to discourage one from sharing books.
Book borrowers come in several varieties. Some ap-
parently read only while they are spilling messy Italian
food.
Others enjoy your book so much that they let so-
meone else borrow it. (It gives me a sense of uneasiness
to know that one of my twenty-dollar books is now in
the hands of "this guy I know who used to live in my
dorm instead of the original borrower.)
Some people are rough with books � you know, us-
ing them for placemats, bending the backs, cutting out
interesting pictures and other things that add twenty
years to a book's age in a couple of days.
On the other hand, 1 loaned a new copy of "Babbitt"
or "The Grapes of Wrath" to a friend a couple of years
back. He returned it a month or so later in perfectly
good condition; in fact, the book looked a little better. I
congratulated him on being a considerate borrower, and
he then apologized for not having found time to read
the book.
Records are possessions that should be loaned
carefully. Folks who let just anybody borrow their
albums soon realize that most of their record collection
is scattered halfway across the state, and the remaining
disks sound like scratchy pizzas.
One of the most scary things that people can do is to
let somebody borrow some of their albums for a party,
then go to the party. All night, a mob of crazed vandals
will surge around the stero, tearing albums off the turn-
table and tossing them in the general direction of the
covers. Seeing one's own albums treated in such a bar-
baric way can be a traumatic experience.
'No Room'
Raves For X-Raves
New Wave artists The X-Raves will be performing at Greenville's Attic this Tuesday night. May 26.
Proposed Tuition Increases
Cause The Ultimate Protest
MOSCOW, ID (CPS)-While tui-
tion protests elsewhere have been as
large as the tuition increases impos-
ed for next year, at the University of
Idaho some protestors threatened to
blow up much of the campus if fees
are raised.
Members of a group alternately
calling itself the Socialist Associa-
tion phoned in bomb threats to area
police and media in the early morn-
ing hours of April 27th.
The callers pledged to detonate
five bombs on the campus unless the
legislature and education officials
agreed to maintain fees, academic
programs, and student services at
their current levels, to use funds ear-
marked for expanding the football
stadium for academic programs,
and to make faculty salaries
"competitive" with other schools.
Though the calls and a letter
which buildings would be destroyed,
the student radio station said one
bomb was in the Student Union
Building.
The building itself was closed for
an hour while police searched it.
They found no bombs.
The threats came just a month
after the Board imposed a $100 fee
increase for next year, and as the
legislature debated charging tuition
for the first time.
The state constitution prohibits
tuition at state schools, but budget
cutbacks in the wake of a Proposi-
tion 13-type tax relief measure have
led to drastic fee increases in the last
two years, and to legislative con-
sideration of charging tuition.
Similar increases at schools across
the country have sparked protests.
The most violent have been at Cor-
nell, where marches and a pur-
lines climaxed with a three-hour sit-
in at the president's office.
Many on campus in Idaho now
consider the threat there a hoax.
"Homebrew -Homebrew Bleu Beaver Records (TBS-08)
"The Taj Mahal Presents No Room to DanceBlue Wave Records
(BW-1980)
The Jollowing record reviews originally appeared in the
March 12, 1981 edition oj The Virginian-Pilot and the
Ledger Star. All rights reserved.
By ERIC FEBER
Virginian-Pilot Surf Wrilrr
Most record stores stock compilation albums featur-
ing various bands, usually from Los Angeles, New York
or Chicago, where groups flourish like mushrooms after
a summer rain.
Not to be outdone, Tidewater now has two albums
showcasing this rich motherlode of local rock talent.
Radio stations ZAM llK-94 salute local talent on
their new "Homebrew" album, recorded live in various
area nightspots.
With such groups as Snuff (who have signed with a
major record company), the Super Grit Cowboy Band,
the Home-grown Vigilante Band, Boothill Express and
others, the disc has a definite urban cowboy flavor.
A more ambitious and cohesive effort is the brand-
new compilation album. "The Taj Mahal Presents No
Room to Dance which should be available in record
stores within the week. Featuring the cream of this
area's alternative rock 'n' roll bands, the disc highlights
the styles and approaches of such bands as Tango
Storm, X-Raves, the Noise, the Naros, Citizen 23 and
Rock Bottom.
From the straight-ahead rock blitz of Tango Storm,
one of Tidewater's finest and most underrated bands, to
the frothy pop exuberance of the X-Raves, to the lean
electronics of Rock Bottom, to the metallic Jamearly-
Who sound of the Noise, this record features bands who
regularly appear at the Taj Mahal, that showcase of
modern rock and new talent.
Unlike the "Homebrew" album, "The Tajtp
Dance" record is a studio affair. Most high-energy rock
needs a good "bottom" and dynamic lows to effectively
make its point. Unfortunately this disc doesn't have it.
There could be many reasons. Maybe the engineer
had his own ideas. Whatever, a good boost on the bass
drums end would have made this a perfect record.
It's still a good exercise. Although sometimes rough-
around-the-edges, the album is a fine example of
Tidewater's adventurous, high-energy rock'n'roll.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
MAY 20, 1981 page 5
Lady Pirates Claim Third In Nation
B WILLIAM YE1.YERTON
Sporli t dilfir
Whoever labeled softball as a
came ot inches wasn't kidding. Just
ask East Carolina's Lady Bucs and
Coach Alita Dillon.
Two inches was all that came bet-
ween ihe Bucs and a trip to the
championship game of the National
Slow-Pitch Softball Championship
at Carolina Pines last weekend,
Dillon said. Trailing North
Carolina 3-2 in the bottom of the
seventh, Fran Hooks ripped a line
shot up the middle, but pitcher
Susan Speer leaped as high as she
could to make the grab and end the
game.
The victory sent the Tar Heels in-
to the championship game against
powerful Florida State, and a 4-1
win by the Seminoles, 54-7, gave
them the national title.
The Pirates suffered their first
defeat of the tournament Friday
afternoon when Florida State, with
the score tied 3-3, scored nine runs
in the top of the eighth to win 12-3.
A majority of the runs came when
there were two outs.
"We still had an outstanding
season said a proud yet disap-
pointed Dillon. " We didn't hit
when we needed to, but that hap-
pens sometimes. The times we did
hit well they were going right to peo-
ple The Bucs finished the season
44-7.
The Pirates opened the Raleigh-
based event by defeating tough
:��.
�-t�f i� si"
�MMPtiK .��' i- �AVWfc. r
Lady Pirate First Baseman Shirley Brown stretches
Florida 11-7 Thursday by scoring
four runs in their half of the fourth
inning.
The Bucs, seeded second in the
tournament, defeated nemesis
Carolina in the opening game Fri-
day. The Pirates scored single runs
in the first and second innings to
gain a 2-0 lead over the Tar Heels.
They added a third run in the
fourth, and both teams scored in the
sixth for the final 4-1 margin.
Mitzi Davis led the Lady Pirate
hitting by going two-for-three, and
Kathy Riley added a double. Short-
stop Laurie Bailey led the Heels by
banging out two nits in three tries.
The Lady Pirates then faced top-
seeded and number-one-ranked
Florida State later that afternoon
and found themselves in a defensive
struggle for most of the contest. The
Bucs took a 2-0 lead in the first, but
the Seminoles came back to take a
3-2 lead with three runs in the third.
The Bucs tied the game with a run
in the fourth and defense dominated
until the FSU half of the eighth
when Seminole shortstop Darby
Cottle started the inning with a
walk, eventually scoring.
Florida State literally took the bat
out of the hands of Pirate star
Kathy Riley by intentionally walk-
ing the left fielder three times, and
the Seminole coach said they took
Riley out of the game by walking
her.
"Our defense just broke down
Dillon said of the nine-run outburst.
"We weren't knocking down balls
in the infield so we could make the
play. Our defense was pretty good
until the eighth
The loss put the Lady Pirates into
the consolation bracket of the tour-
nament where they had to face
Carolina once more. The Tar Heels
made it to the consolation finals by
whallopping N.C. State 14-4.
The Lady Bucs were held
scoreless until the sixth when Riley's
run made it 3-1. Mary Powell led off
the Pirate seventh with a jingle.
First baseman Shirley Brown reach-
ed on an error. Melody Ham, pinch
running for Brown, was forced out
at second when Ginger Rothermel
grounded out.
Tammy Parham followed with a
single to score Lillion Barnes, runn-
ing for Powell, and the Pirates trail-
ed by one. That brought up catcher
Fran Hooks, who ripped a line shot
up the middle that pitcher Speer
made a excellent play on.
"I was very proud of the way our
girls played Dillon noted. "I
know they're disappointed that the
team didn't win because they knew
we should have beaten Carolina
The victory moved the Tar Heels,
who finished the season 48-22, into
the finals against Florida State.
The national champions placed
five players on the all-tournament
team, followed by Carolina with
four. Riley, Rothermel and Shepard
represented the Pirates on the all-
star team.
The tournament, sponsored bv
the A1AW, was highlighted by three
players being considered for the
Broderick Award, given to the na-
tion's best slow-pitch softball
player. Riley is in the running for
the award, as is FSU shortstop Cot-
tel and Carolina shortstop Bailey.
The Lady Pirates earned the right
to vie for the national crown when
they finished second in the Region II'
tournament � to the Tar Heels of
North Carolina.
Andruzzi Announces Pirate Cage Signings
B CHRIS HOLLOMAN
tnistasl spun diior
I Pirate head basketball
coach Cath) Andruzzi has announc-
ed the signing of four outstanding
players to national letters o' intent.
1 he signees include two six-footers,
a high school All-America point
guard am
ransfer from
I ouisburg Junior College.
The tour signees are 6-2 center
Darlene Chaney of Jefferson-
Juguenot-Wythe High School; 6-0
-t'd I aura Regal of South
Bend, IN; 5-7 point guard I oraine
Foster ot Spartanburg, SC, and 5-8
junior college transfer Loletha Har-
ris ot 1 ouisburg.
The 6-2 Chane) will be the tallest
player on the Pirate team besides
rising junior Darlene Hedges. While
in high school Chaney led her team
to a tour-year overall record of
65-11. During her senior year her
team went undefeated with a 21-0
mark. Chaney was a three-time all-
district selection and a Converse
All-America nominee. She averaged
16.3 points per game and 10.6 re-
bounds during her high school
career.
"Shan Pickard spent a lot of time
recruiting Darlene (Chaney) and we
are very pleased to be signing her
Coach Andruzzi said. "She selected
Last Carolina over South Carolina,
and we are excited about her playing
for us.
"She has just come back from
trying out for the National Sports
Festival basketball team against
some of the top 1(K) players in her
region Andruzzi continued. "She
is an alternate center for the team
playing behind a sophomore from
Old Dominion and a sophomore
from Syracuse University
Foster was a three-sport standout
at Spartanburg High School. While
averaging 22.5 points and seven re-
bounds per game, she led her team
to a 20-7 record and a regional title
her senior year.
Foster was named all-state twice
and area player of the year in 1981.
She also holds the state record in the
100-yard dash, winning it twice in
state championships, the 220 title
once and the triple jump crown
three times. She was also on the all-
state and all-region volleyball
teams.
"1 oraine (Foster) made the Con-
verse All-America (earn and is also
an alternate on the National Sports
Festival basketball team from the
Southern region Andruzzi said.
"She is a strong, aggressie player
and should contribute a lot to our
program
Regal played her high school ball
at Clay High School in South Bend,
IN. Her senior year she averaged
15.2 points per game. She was nam-
ed all-state honorable mention dur-
ing her senior year.
"Laura (Regal) has a great deal of
quickness and should be a big help
to us in the future Andruzzi ex-
plained.
Harris, who played her high
school ball for the Northern Nash
Knights, averaged 10.4 points and
9.4 rebounds a game for
Louisburg's national championship
team this past season. She was
selected to the all-region team and
was the team MVP.
"Harris is really excited about
coming to East Carolina and we are
looking forward to working with
her Andruzzi said.
"Overall, this was one of our best
recruiting years ever and we signed
some top-notch athletes Andruzzi
continued. "My assistant coach
Shari Pickard did a real good job
for us in seeking out these athletes
and we look forward to working
with them next vear
The Lady Pirates will be trying to
replace four graduating seniors who
made the A11-NCA1AW team and
led the Pirates to a national ranking
and regional bid.
Cathy Andruzzi
Pirate Baseball, Softball Teams Successful
Bill Wilder ran up a 7-6 record in 1981 against the likes of UNC-CH and
N.C. State.
By WILLIAM YELVERTON
Spun- Idiior
When spring arrives, the umpire
shouts "Play Ball And that is ex-
actly what the hardball and softball
Pirates of East Carolina did this
year.
The record-setting Lady Pirates
became the first team in the history
of ECU to reach the 40-win plateau
when they drubbed Louisville, 11-4,
in the second round of the Region II
tournament in Tennessee. The Lady
Bucs went on to finish third in the
national tournament at Carolina
Pines last weekend.
The baseball Pirates, in a
rebuilding year, turned in a 28-15
mark while playing the toughest
schedule in their history. The major
factor in the success was pitching.
Hurlers Bill Wilder, Bob Patterson
and Rick Ramey provided steady
performances for the young team. A
berth in the NCAA tournament was
a possibility, but the Bucs lost their
last four games to spoil the chance.
The pitching staff's ERA of 2.78
is among the five best in the nation.
Patterson, 5-2, led the way with a
fine mark of 1.97. Wilder, the junior
from Tarboro, finished the year 7-6
and had an ERA of 2.33. Ramey
recorded seven wins against six
losses and had a 2.99 ERA.
Wilder set an ECU record for inn-
ings pitched with 112 and moved to
second in strikeouts with 118. He
also pitched 10 complete games for
the second year in a row. He and
Ramey, a senior, moved into a se-
cond place tie with Pete Conaty
(1976-78) for career wins with 20.
His 118 strikeouts moved him into
first on the career list with 213.
Patterson, a leftfhander from
Greenville, S.C struck out 81 in
just 64 innings. He improved his
career mark to 17-6 over three
seasons.
Ramey, a righthander from
Ridgeway, Va fashioned the
team's best record at 7-2 and moved
to first on the career appearance list
with 54 outings.
The entire staff set new records
for complete games with 22 and
strikeouts with 285.
The Bucs had two .300 hitters,
junior third baseman Todd Hendley
and junior rightfielder John
Hallow. Hendley led the team with a
.304 average and 13 doubles, one shy
of the school record. Hallow hit .301
with a team-leading five homers.
The softball Pirates, ranked
number one in the country for most
of the year, broke the school record
for wins in a season. For the last two
seasons their combined record is
81-12.
The Lady Bucs set several school
records. Jo Landa Clayton knocked
in seven runs against North
Carolina, and Mitzi Davis belted
three triples in a game against
Western Carolina.
Mitzi Davis broke two of her own
records by appearing in more than
39 games and going to the plate
more than 156 times. She also broke
her own record for most hits in a
season.
The Lady Pirates came away with
the championship of the N.C. State
Invitational, regarded as one of the
most competitive slow-pitch tour-
naments in the nation. To do so,
they had to come back and defeat
eventual national champion Florida
State twice.
They also vvon the NCAIAW
Qualifying Tournament and cap-
tured second place in the Region II
championships.
m �
. �
Another Lady Pirate scores against heated rival UNC-CIf �






THE EAST CAROl INIAN
MAY 20, 1981
Jones Captures Second Place
In North-South Tournament
By Chris Holloman
Ami. spofiv Milur
East Carolina
University golfer Steve
Jones was defeated in
his bid to clench the
North-South Amateur
Golf Championship
Saturday at the
Pinehurst Country
Club when he was
defeated by UCI A
senior Corey Pvin.
Pavin. of Oxnard,
Calif a former World
Juniors champion, won
eight of nine holds dur-
ing one stretch of the
morning round in the
36-hold event. He
finished with an 11 to
12 victory over Jones.
Jones was able to win
onlv two holes during
the match. He chipped
in from 35 feet on the
first hole of the match
and took advantage o
a double bogey bv
Pavin on the second
hole to win again. After
that point, however, it
was all Pavin.
"All the bad shots 1
aadn't hit all week 1 hit
today Jones explain-
ed after the match.
Jones said that Pavin
was a fine champion
and a great golfer and
also said he was pleased
to get as far as he did in
the tournament.
To reach the final
round the 12th-seeded
Jones had to win six
matches including a
20 hold victory over
Canadian Jon Lrvasti
on Thursday and a 1-ri-
da) victory over Ray
freeman of
Greensboro.
AIN'T NO REASON TO GO
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FOR A PENNEY
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The h as! Carolinian
Published pvc � ruesdai
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CLASSIFIEDS
SHORT TERM LEASES
Available 'or shatmcj house acrosM
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THREE BEDROOM APART
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YOUR MOTHER
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So we knew this college ring sale had to be perfect for you.
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Never calls home Preparing for you was a tough assignment.
But we're as tough as our toughest customer. Our rings are
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- If you're undecided about a college ring, we can make your deci
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You can choose from dozens of styles. We've got something for
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But don't thank us Thank your mother.

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Title
The East Carolinian, May 20, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
May 20, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.131
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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