The East Carolinian, April 7, 1981






She !Eaat Qlarultninn
A
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 55 No. 52
10 Pages
Tuesday, April 7, 1981
Greenville, North C arolina
Circulation 1(1.(MN)
Pepe Asks For SGA Run-Off Election
By PAUL COLLINS
Angela Pepe, the apparent loser
in last week's run-off election for
SGA treasurer, has filed an appeal
with the election committee asking
for a second run-off.
Pepe lost the run-off to incum-
bent Kirk Little by seven votes.
"The election rules don't clearly
state what to do in a situation like
this Pepe said when asked why
she was seeking a further run-off.
"I'm not doing it to anguish the
students or anybody
SGA election rules do not
specifically state if another runoff
is permissible.
The rules state only that "if the
recount shows a margin o two per-
cent (.0200) or less o the total vote
cast, then all candidates that are
within that margin will be eligible
for a Run-off Election
Attorney General Clint Barnes,
who will make the initial ruling in
the case, said, "1 haven't reached a
decision as to what the ruling will
be.
"I need to check and sec if there
are any precedents he continued.
"1 will make a ruling by Wednes-
day
Though they do not specify,
language in the election rules in-
dicate that its writers ma have in-
tended that more than one run-off
be allowed.
The rules contain phrases such as
"last run-off" and "each run-off
If either Pepe or 1 ittle appeals
Barnes' decision the university
Review Board will decide the mat-
ter. Further appeal will be directed
to Vice Chancellor for Student Life
Elmer Meyer and then finally to
Chancellor Thomas Brewer.
"Whatever the) decide I'll go by
it Pepe said. "I've put a lot of
time in. 1 want the office. I wouldn't
mind having a second run-off
"1 think a run-off is a run-off is a
run-off Little said. "It's final if
you win bv one vote or 20.
"It has to come to an end he
added. "It's costing time, money
and resources
Al Patrick, elections committee
chairman, indicated that he and his
committee were of the opinion that
no further run-off was possible.
"But then we have no say-so in the
matter
The committee will be submitting
suggestions to the SCiA I egislature
that it make elections rules more
specific, Patrick said.
In a related development, Barnes
said that charges against SCiA Presi-
dent Charlie Sherrod will be heard
by the University Honor Board on
Wednesday at 7:30 p.m.
Little has charged Sherrod with
four violations of the ECU Code of
Conduct.
Sherrod has been charged with
altering little's campaign advertise-
ment that appeared in the March 3
edition of The East Carolinian.
As a result of these charges, Sher-
rod has filed his own against Little.
He has charged Little with
violating sections A and W of the
student Code of Conduct.
Section A deals with knowlingly
publishing and circulating false in-
formation. The other section con-
cerns giving, with knowledge, false
information to the university.
The preliminary hearing on these
charges will be held Thursday.
See SHKKKOI). page 3
Angela Pepe
Tuition Tax Help Stalled
Credits Postponed
WASHINGTON, D.C . (CPS) �
President Ronald Reagan's pledge
students pay for their college
Dns through a controversial
ia credits plan has been put
ruiton tax credits were missing
the president's first tax
- ige presented to congress the
: week of March. And
Secretary o Treasury
ii promised tax credits
the administration's next
tge, to be submitted in
, t iw? oi earl) 1982, some
rial supporters are wor-
ried the president may not fulfill his
en.
Sen. Robert Packwood (R-C)R), a
long-time advocate of tuition tax
says the White House pro-
Mi! withhold support of tax
until it negotiates with Con-
,s about the sie of the credits.
th v mighl become effec-
et there is considerable support
now for the idea in Congress, which
tceivabl) could pass a tuition tax
edits law on its own.
igress was about to approve a
tax credits Saw in 1978 over the
� ival of then-President Jim-
my Cartel. Carter believed that tui-
tion lax credits were so inefficient
and expensive that he could double
the sie of other student aid pro-
ims, which award money directly
students, and still save the
:asury money.
( ongress eventually chose
C arter's program, called the Middle
Income Student Assistance ActJ
over the tuition tax credit plan,
which Carter threatened to veto.
:e then, however. President
Reagan's proposal unraveling of the
Carter aid plan has given congres-
sional support for tax credits a new
life.
Congress is now considering no
fewer than 16 tuition tax credit bills,
most of which apply to college as
well as elementary and secondary
schools.
Basically, the bills give tax-paying
students or their parents the chance
to deduct anywhere from $200 to
SI 000 of the amount they pay in tui-
tion each year from their tax
payments.
I wo o the bills allow for cash
refunds it a family's total tax bill is
less than the amount o ihe tax
credit.
On the elementary and secondary
levels, only parents of children in
private schools could claim credits.
Consequently, the measure is often
criticized as a way of funding white
flight into "segregationist
academies" that spare kids from
busing.
College students � their spouses
or parents � at both private and
public colleges would benefit.
But the eligibility of public college
students t or the credits worries
many private school administrators.
Tax credits, they claim, would
make public colleges much cheaper
while barely affecting private col-
leges.
lor example, the tax credits bill
introduced last month by senators
Packwood and Daniel Moynihan
(D-NY) allows students to subtract
50 percent of their tuition payment
from their taxes, up to a maximum
of S250 now, and $500 in 1983.
But taking $500 off the 1980-81
median in-state public college tui-
tion of $830 is a lot more significant
than taking $500 off the $3000
average tumon al pnvate colleges.
"Independent college students
pay almost live tunes as much as
public college students grouses
Christine Milliken of the National
Association of Independent Col-
leges and Universities. lax credits,
she adds, "will jusl expand the tui-
tion gap between public and in-
dependent colleges
She tears the tuition difference
will dram students from private
schools, which aie already suffering
declining enrollments, to cheaper
public schools.
Indeed, the Congressional Budget
Office estimates that, o the $6
billion thai would stay in taxpayers'
pockets it tuition tax credits were
approved, about 60 percent would
benefit public college students.
On the other hand, Stanford
University President Donald Ken-
nedy predicts thai all colleges mighl
"immediately up tuition by (the
same amount as the tax credit) upon
enactment o the legislation
Supporters assert thai public col-
leges need the credits because higher
education is often seen as a "luxury
expenditure" by families, who are
more apt to defer il when prices and
taxes rise, as Seattle University
President William .1. Sullivan told a
panel holding hearings on tuition
tax credits in 1978.
But credits, argues Steve Leifman
oi the Coaltion ol Independent and
Private University Stud en is
(COPUS), threaten "to undermine
the whole intent of financial aid
programs if only because they are
See CUTS, Page 2
, M I� " M " '
, il � " '
, il II �l " " '
, II II II � �
I M II II
- �
The Brody Building
ECU Medical School Facility ears Completion.
ECU Medical School Building
Occupancy Expected In 1981
B M1KKDAV1S
Slaff Wnlcr
Where would you put more than
177 faculty members, 400 staff
members, and four years worth of
medical students from ECU?
The answer is on the grounds of
Pitt County Memorial Hospital,
ECU'S Medical School Facility, the
Brody Building.
The 451,000-square-foot facility
cost around $26 million. The
building is scheduled to be occupied
by December of 1981. Complete oc-
Warehouse Robbed;
Refrigerators Missing
By PAUL WHITE
Staff Whirr
C ity police investigated a break-in
at the SCiA refrigerator warehouse
on the corner of Clark and Eleventh
Street, at approxiamtely 1:00 a.m.
Sunday.
I our refrigerators and all SGA
refrigerator contracts were stolen.
(ireenville City Police Officer Lee
reportedly discovered a crack in the
sliding warehouse door, while
patrolling the area late Saturday
night. SGA refrigerator Manager
Ed Walters was notified about 1:15
a.m. Sunday.
Walters then notified Barry
Johnson who works as his assistant
at the warehouse. Johnson noted
that four boxed refrigerators,
valued at $130 per unit new, and all
refrigerator contracts were missing.
According to Walters, the
refrigerators that were stolen were
boxed for repairs.
"Apparently, they thought the
boxed refrigrators were new ones
Walter said.
Walters was concerned that the
refrigerator contracts were stolen,
but would not comment on who
might have wanted the contracts.
"We do have copies of all the
refrigerator contracts Walters
said.
Walters said the warehouse door
was ajar when he arrived at the
warehouse.
"It looked as though someone
had broken the lock off with a
crowbar he said. The lock was
recovered, still intact, on Sunday.
Walters said that a resident near
the warehouse had reported the
door open earlier on Saturday. But
an investigating policeman had not
been able to open the door, and he
had assumed it to be secure.
"Refrigerators were stacked
against the warehouse door making
it very difficult to open Walters
said. "The robbery probably hap-
pened Friday night, and the door re-
mained unlocked all day Saturday
he added.
Greenville city police reported
two other break-ins Saturday night
in the same general location of the
warehouse. The robbery remains
under investigation. Fingerprints
have been taken, but no suspecjs��
have been reported.
SGA President Charlie Sherrod
said he felt the break-in might be
politically motivated but declained
to speculate as to who might be
responsible.
cupancy is set for the spring of 1982.
Many features of Brody Building
and the medical school, will be most
beneficial not only for the surroun-
ding communities of Eastern North
Carolina, Virginia, and South
Carolina.
This maze of a building will con-
tain the standard features of a
medical facility such as clinics,
waiting areas, examining rooms,
consultation rooms, laboritories,
and seminar rooms.
But Brody Building will also con-
tain some new and sepcial features.
It will also have a suspended ceiling
for a microbiology lab, a "floating
floor" which is designed to
eliminate vibrations from electron
microscopes used by faculty
members, and an open air plaza
located in the center of the facility.
Another hot feature of the Brody
Building is the auditorium's flexible
design.
This auditorium can be converted
into three separate halls sealing 126
prsons in each of the two halls, and
256 in the third hall. The total seting
capacity is 508.
This new facility, Brody Building,
will not only house hundreds of
faculty, staff, and medical studnets,
but will offer medical education,
meduca! services, and medical
research to 29 counties in eastern
North Carolina.
Low Turnout Seen In
Residence Area Election
Photo Bv CHAP GURLEY
Lead singer Phil Mogg of UFO struts his stuff for a sold-out Minges Col-
iseum crowd. UFO opened Saturday night for Cheap Trick. See page six
for an additional picture and a review of the concert.
By KAREN WENDT
Aufeiant Nr�x Kdilor
Despite what was termed a
"small" voter turnout by elections
Chairperson Robin Cook, the ex-
ecutive officers for the three
residence area campuses were
elected last week.
A total of 2,424 votes were cast
during the election. When these are
divided by the four votes per ballot
and the West campus voters who
elected house council officers only,
an estimated 400 dormitory
residents voted.
Carolyn Fulghum, dean of
residence life said the turnout was
"not as much as expected in some
areas
The elections were held to elect
executive officers in the three
residence areas.
Cook commented that the tur-
nout was small but not surprising,
citing the low turnouts during stu-
dent government elections.
In the College Hill Campus elec-
tions Steven Bassnight was elected
to the position of president. His vice
president will be Rodney Paul.
Richard Raines will take the posi-
tion of secretary and Douglas
Hamilton will take the office of
treasurer.
On Central Campus, Peggy
Burgess was elected president.
Christine Parker will take offce as
vice president. Kelly Dailey and
Shirley Westeon were elected to the
posts of secretary and treasurer
respectively.
West Campus voted in two elec-
tions. Their area officers will be
Kimberiy Kuhdns, president;
Regina Salter, vice president;
Deidee Dockery, secretary and
Nanette Brett, treasurer.
In dormitory officer elections on
the West Campus five new
presidents were named. Fletcher
Dorm elected Carolyn Newton as its
new president. Marion Phillips was
elected in Clement dorm. Debbie
Basch will take office in Garret and
Patricia McCall will be president of
Greene. Terri Bayles was elected in
White.
On The Inside
Announcements2
Editorials4
Classifieds9
Features5
Letters4
Sports8

. � � �
�I m m NWM tm i �-�





1HI fcASl CAROLINIAN
APRIl 7, 1981
t
Announcements
BOWLING
AM ECU students, enter the
Mendenhaii Student Center No
lap Bowling Tournament todav A
nine pm hit counts as a strike (n
this mixed doubles ana singles
competition
The tournament began March 23
with three weeks of qualifying tor
the mixed doubles roll oft to be
held April 1J Winners in the
singles event will be determined
over the entire three week period
is iiai be enlered tor
games bowieo an ime during the
three week period and you can
enter si any times i
hke
Eight trophies will be awarded
10 the top finishers m the singles
and mixed doubies events
Detailed information and rules
are available at the B.
Vr
FACULTYSTAFF
AH ECU fatuity ana staff
Menoenhail Student Center
members take advantage of your
r�1 day at the Bowling
Center in Mendenhaii Every
S lav from. 5 00 p m until
8 00 p ��. Ultv and stall MSC
Owl two (?i aames
�nd gel c� 3rd game FREI
forgei Wednesday s �
. � g IQ Cef'er
YARD SALE
On Satu'day April 11. from 8
am top m . the Friends . rtv
international House at 306 East
Mmth Street are sponsor,nq a yarn
ale. including clothes, costume
iewelry books household art.cles
and furniture as well r- �
national bake sale Do-
itpOTM
I
CORSO
The Corrections Social Work
� � v will meet tcd
Vendenhaii Room 242 at 5 p m All
��aiors ana .ntended man'
urged to attend1
PHI SIGMA PI
Phi Sigma Pi presents the
original Heart Fund Bikini Contest
Tuesday April 7 at the Elbo
Room The grand priie is $150 plus
a weekend for two at the Ramada
Inn at Atlantic Beach The contest
is sponsored by Domino's Puia
and Heart s Delight Contestants
can register at the student store or
at the Elbo Room Rehearsal will
be Tuesday at 2 00 p m
AMA
The Albert R Conley Chapter of
the American Marketing Assooa
tion will hold its next meeting or
Wednesday April 8 at 5 00 in Raw
130 Elections tor the 1981 '82 of
ticers will be held All members
are urged to attend and bring
money for the AMA cook out
WORSHIP
An Episcopal service of Holy
Communion will be celebrated
Tuesday evening April 7 in the
chapel of the Methodist Student
Center i5th Street across from
Garrett Dorm' The service will
be a' 5 30 p m with the Episcopal
Chapta n tne Rev Bill Hadden
celebrating An international sup
per wil be served following the ser
vice
AED
There will be a meeting of the
Alpha Epsiion Delta Pre medical
Honor Society at 7 30 p m , Tues
day April 7 m Room 307 Flanagan
Building The speaker will be an
nounced at the meeting All in
terested members and citizens are
urged to attend
GAME ROOM
The College M� 11 Game Room,
located m the Aycock basement
features electronic games, pm
ban. pool pmg pong and toosebaM
Hours are Mon Thurs 12 11
p m Friday 12 5 p m and Sun 8
11 p.m All proceeds are returned
to the students through the Student
Residence Association please
support the game room
Cuts Could
Hurt Colleges
ELDERHOSTEL
Persons over 60 years old who
wish to spend a summer week on a
university campus and enroll in
non credit college courses, are in
vited to participate in an
"Elderhostel" program at East
Carolina University June 28 July 4
or July S 11
"ELderhostel" students, who
will be housed on campus, may
enroll in these special courses
"Descriptive Astronomy a
non mathematical approach to
studying the universe, with em
phasis on recent discoveries in the
solar system ana current theories
on cosmology
Folk Traditional America an
introduction to tolklite as an im
portant aspect of American
culture, with a sampling of tradi
t.ons from American regional oc
cupational and ethnic folk groups
"Cultures in Collision The Ar
chaeology and Early History of
the Carolina Coast a detailed
study of English exploration here
between 1584 and 1587 and the
eventual "cultural collision" bet
ween European settlers and the
Carolina Algonkian Indians
No previous background m any
of the subiects to be taught is re
quired Each course will be
enhanced by the use of films and
slides, artifact displays or live
performances Instructors are
ECU professors No formal
homework" is necessary
Elderhostel inspired by the
youth hostels and the folk schools
of Europe is designed to give
retirement aged persons the ex
periences and intellectual stimula
tion of on campus lite
Further information about the
program and application
materials are available from Dr
Ralph Worthington, Division of
Continuing Education. ECU
Greenville. N C 27834
WORK
Part time work available A
position is open tor a student to
work on Sundays in a near by
church with a teen age group The
salary is a minimum of ilOO per
month The position begins im
mediately and continues through
the summer. If interested, contact
Dan Earnhardt at the Methodist
Student Center
Continued From Page 1
perceived as substitutes
tor the direct-payment
programs the Reagan
administration wants to
cut.
Jerry Roscrmalb of
the American Associa-
tion of State Univer-
sities and Land-Grant
Colleges, argues thai
the $6 billion the tui-
tion tax credits would
drain from the treasury
will affect other student
aid programs "if not b
causing actual reduc-
tions, then at least b
preventing increases
"That's a fear
among Catholic col-
leges as well adds
Patrick Murphy of the
Campaign for Educa-
tional Assistance, a
group formed to cham-
pion tuition tax credits.
"But we're insisting
that schools get every
bit of financial aid and
tuition tax credits.
There can be no trading
off
Other supporters of
tax credits, like Bishop
Thomas Kelly of the
Council of American
Private Education,
"would hope that
enactment of tuition
tax credit laws would
not result in reductions
of the overall level of
federal assistance to
low-income families
While critics call the
plans elitist because
those who would
benefit most would be
in the highest tax
brackets, supporters
say they can solve the
problem by installing
"refund clauses" in the
bills. The clauses would
allow the government
to return cash to the
taxpayer whose tuition
tax credit exceeds the
total tax bill.
"We strongly sup-
port the (refund) provi-
sion, but it's still not a
rich man's bill even
without it swears
Frank Monahan of the
U.S. Catholic Con-
ference.
rhough tuition tax
credits would cost the
government an
estimated $6 billion in
lost tax revenues �
compared to the cuts of
$9.2 billion in direct
student aid programs
proposed by the
Reagan administration
� educators hope a
delayed response will
balance the federal
books.
The "impact on the
budget will not be felt
until 1983, by which
time, we hope, the
Reagan economic pro-
gram will have given us
a balanced budget
explains Larry Katz of
Agudath Israel of
America, which sup-
ports credits.
Supporters think
their political chances
of getting tuition tax
credits may even be
helped by the proposed
Reagan cuts. "If the
budget cutting of stu-
dent loans continues
posits Robert Smith of
the Council for
American Private
Education, "tuition tax
credits are going to
look better and better"
to Congress.
DOG DAY
DOG DAY A new program of
tered at the Methodist Student
Center will be lunch on Thursdays
Hot dogs (50 cents) and soft drinks
from 11 30 until 1 30 Address 501
East Fifth Street
PAGEANT
Applications for contestants tor
Miss Black ano Gold Pageant are
now being accepted If interested
contact any member of Alpha Ph.
Alpha fraternity or calll 752 9875
HEALTH LAW
Physicians, hospital ad
mmistrators and truslees ano
health law attorneys will gather in
Greenville April 10 when the East
Carolina University School of
Medicine holds its Third Annual
Health Law Forum
The theme ot this year's con
ference is "Update on Malprac
tice Crisis m North Carolina "
Health law attorneys and phys'
cians practicing m North Carolina
will present the views of patients,
iawyers, doctors and insurance
represrentati ves involved in
malpractice litigation
il Careers
Don't Just
iii:
At the Institute for Paralegal Training we have prepared
over 4,000 college graduates for careers in law business and
finance After iust three months ot intensive training we will
place you in a stimulating and challenging position thai offers
professional growth and expanding career opportunity As
a Legal Assistant you will do work traditionally performed by
attorneys and other professionals m law firms corporations,
banks government agencies and insurance companies
Furthermore, you will earn graduate credit towards a Master
of Arts m Legal Studies through Antioch School of Law for all
course work completed at The Institute
We are regarded as the nation s finest and most prestig-
ious program for training legal specialists for law firms
business and finance But as important as our academic
quality is our placement result The Institute s placement
service will find you a job in the city of your choice If not. you will
be eligible for a substantial tuition refund
If you are a senior in high academic standing and looking
for the most practical way to begin your career contact your
Placement Office fot an interview with our representative
We wilt visit your campus on APRIL 13, 1981
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RED CROSS
The American Red Cross will
hold its annual Spring Blood Drive
April 7 and 8 The event will be
held in Wright Auditorium bet
ween 10 00 am i 00 p m both
Tuesday and Wednesday The
blood drive is sponsored by the
Inter Fraternity Council The
fraternity with the largest percen
tage of its members giving blood
will receive a plaque Give the gift
of Life
COOP
The Co op office has Co op air
traffic control specialist positions
available m Raleigh interested
students should contact Jane
Maier, 310 Rawl Building. 757 6979
or 6375 immediately Acceptable
maiors include mathematics,
geography, computer science
communications, physical
science, and cartography
RUNNING
The ECU Intramural Depart
ment will sponsor two Cross
Campus Fun Runs on Wednesday
April B at the ECU track There
will be a 2 5 mile race beginning at
S 00pm and a 5 mile race star
ting at 5 30 p m Entry blanks are
available at the Intramural Office
and are open to all ECU students,
faculty, staff, and alumni.
DISCOUNT DAYS
Mendenhaii Student Center's
discount days are Wednesdays
and Fridays Every week you can
save one third on the cost ot bowl
ing, billiards and table tennis at
Mendenhaii Bowling is one third
oft each Friday from 3 00 until
5 30 p m and billiards ana table
tennis are one third oft each
Wednesday from 3 00 p m until
5 30 p m Don f miss it1
FOOSEBALL
Mendenhaii Student Center m
vites all ECU students to par
ticipate in the Fooseball Tourna
ment to be held on Wednesday,
April 8 at 6 00 p m. This team
competition will be double
elimination with trophies awarded
to the first and second place
teams
All participants must register
by Monday, April 6 at the MSC
Billiards Center The entry fee is
00 per team to be paid at the
tournament
STUDENT UNION
Applications are now being
taken for the positions of Day Stu
dent Representative to serve on
the Student Union Board of D.rec
tors Interested individuals are re
quested to submit their apphca
tions by April 6 Applications can
be obtained from the information
desk at Mendenhaii Student
Center or the Student union office
Any questions should be directed
to the Student union office.
757 6611, ext 210
SOULS
Graduating seniors of the spr
mg, summer or fan ot 1981, and
who are members of SOULS
are asked to pay S5 00 for the
senior social to be held April 25 at
Lake Ellsworth Club House from 9
until Each senior is allowed two
guests who are not seniors
Seniors will also have a voice m
deciding the menu Your coopera
tion is ot utmost necessity
Signatures ana fees will be taken
in the lobby of the Student Store
from 10 until 1 on Tuesday,
Wednesday and Thursday
YARDSALE
The International House at ECU
is collecting materials tor a yard
sale fund raiser If you have any
books, clothes, costume jewelry,
household articles, or pieces of
furniture you would like to donate,
please deliver to the International
House at 306 East Ninth Street by
Friday, April 10
SOUTH
What is happening m the South
today and what problems and op
portumties the change presents
will be studied at a conference on
"The Changing South' al East
Carolina University on April 13.
Directions ano dimensions of the
currents of change in the South
will be discussed by the main
speakers The interested public is
mvitesd to the confference which
opens at 10 30 a m at ECUS Willis
Building
Keynote speaker wil be Dr
Merle Prunty, Distinguished
Alumni Professor ot Geography,
University ot Georgia, whose topic
will be "Current and Pending
Pressurers on Southern Land
Resources " Demographic
Trends and Urbanization" is the
topic ot an address by Ms Pat
Dusenbury, Associate Director of
the Southern Growth Policies
Board, Atlanta
A concluding presentation will
be "The Changing Employment
Structure of the South" by Dr
Clyde BRowning. professor ot
geography, University of North
Carolina Chapel Hill
The event is the third Land Con
ference sponsored by the ECU
Department of Geography ano
Planning
CARICATURES
Come out to "Barefoot On The
Mali' Thursosay April 9, and
have a caricature done by John
Weyler, "East Carolinian"
editorial cartoonist and former
Carowmds portrait artist
Caricatures will be Jl 00. with all
proceeds going to the 1981 walk for
humanity While we stuff
ourselves with piiza, 'here are
babies dying ot starvation Come
out and do a noble deed for
humanity and nave yourself a nice
cartoon at the same time See you
there!
HOLY TRINITY
"Holy Trinity United Methodist
Church, located at 1400 Red Banks
Rd m Greenville, directly across
from Aycock Junior High School,
will be hosting The New Direc
tions" April 11 12 "THe New
Directions is an ,nter racial, in
teraenommationai group of young
adults head quartered in Burl
ington. N C Their specialty is con
temporary Christian Mus.c
"The New Directions will be m
concert at Holy Trinity Saturday,
April il. at 8 00 p m Then they
will be m charge of the worship
service. Sunday Aor.l 12 a' 11 00
a m Come early to assure
yourself a seat ana plan to stay
after the worship service on Sun
nav for the covered dish dinner "
ART
Two omensional art works by
Allen Jones McDav.d ot Sanford
will be on display April l? 19 ,n the
gallery of the Baptist Student
Center on Tenth St
The exhibition will include
woodcut ana intagl'O prints
photographs illustrations and
mixed media items
McDav.d 'S a candidate for the
BA degree m communication arts
at ECU and the son ot Mr ana
Mrs Philip H McDavid of Route
I Sanfora
:Ti
The Planning Center has been here for you slnoe 1974.
providing private, understanding health oare
to women of an ages at a reasonable cost
Saturday abortion bourn
TheFlcml
nlng Center we're here when you i
Can 781-aeao m�Alrigh anytime.
�f IM III I ��, �������� �I��JaT JLm�lll
need us.
Downtown
Pitt Plaza
Enjoy summertime
fun in Ocean
Pacific pinwale
corduroy shorts.
They come in an
array of colors.
Violet, Geranium,
Royal Blue, Off-
White, Navy,
Honey Tan, Black,
White, Pink. Sizes
XS-L.
$900
Also choose from
a great selection of
Ocean Pacific
swimweor and
shirts.
for a walk
down those sandy
beaches
I
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is required to be readily available for sale at or
ibelow the advertised price in each A&P Store, except as specifically noted
in this ad
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT Aj�RIL II, AT A4P IN GREENVILLE, N C
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER
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Highway 264 By-Pass � Greenville Square
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Breyers Ice Cream
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or twin
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79
c
Coca-Cola, Tab, Sprite
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J only I

D
A S H I
(UPI) I
Court agreec
ider wh

imposed
wh
a capita I
The I
review the
appeal.
Bu
Of
V
(UPI)
shootii j
.
I
J
I

the
the B
Sow
Pola
-RSAW
(UPI) -
-
pouring
araw
around 1
and were
ready to "purl
the activil I
enemie I
-
I
tended
mun
in Pr
whic
arc
"disrup;
an
anythii
The 1
new
in Berlin
and I
tore
a
mat
dieted b) l
Hoffmann,
Sherr
Four
Continued r r�H
e r r o d
w ednesday's
� king
elightful
"H
iud
pa
slept with
Jenrette he �
The SGA L
8 oi.





I HI 1 AM ROLIN
APKI1 7, 1981
0
iC
AM
83
c
Sprite
Pibb
109
Irisp solid
ibage
100
Death Penalty Considered � QM f .
0

WASHINGTON
tl PI) I he Supreme
c ourt agreed toda) to
consider whether the
death penalty may be
imposed on a pet son
who was youngei than
18 when he committed
a capita) crime.
I ho justices will
ie. lew the ease o! a
Missouri youth who, in
his appeal, cited the
Constitution's prohibi-
n aeainst "cruel and
unusual punishment
and the 1977 Interna-
tional Covenant ot
Civil and Political
Rights I hat covenant,
signed by the United
States, declares, "The
sentence of death shall
not be imposed tor
crimes committed bv
persons below 18 veais
of age
The youth, Monty
Lee Eddings, then 16.
left his Missouri home
in April 1977 and was
driving on an interstate
highway in Oklahoma
when he was pulled
over b v Highway
Patrol lrooper Larry
Crabtree.
Eddings loaded a
sawed -off shotgun and
fired it at the trooper,
killing him. After he
was arrested. Eddings
told authorities, "If 1
got loose, I would
shoot you all. too
Bush Calls Action
Of Hinckley Tragic
SHINGTON
(I PI) Vice President
George Bush today
ned last week's
shooting ot President
Reagan and three
others as the "violent
one man who
hush the
voice o the nation
No less tragic "mc
olenl acts in-
m our citizens
bv a criminal few
lid in a White
Hoi emony pro
claiming May 1 as 1 aw
Oav.
1 he theme of this
vear's 1 aw Day is "the
guage ol liberty" in
the Declara-
Independence,
Constitution and
B I of Rights. In a
B :i said it
significance" by calling
to mind "the problem
ol violent crime
"Violent crime is the
uncivilized shout that
threatens to drown out
and ultimately silence
the language ol liber-
ty Bush said.
" 1 he events of last
Monday were a tragic
reminder as the violent
act ol one man who
sought to hush the
voice ol the nation as to
who its leader would
be he added.
Bush noted that At-
torney General w illiam
1 rench Smith, who was
present at the
ceremony, has stated
"the reduction ol
violent crime is hi No.
1 priontv
I he vice president
also noted that Reagan
has created a task force
with federal, state and
local representatives to
discuss ways to fight
v iolent enme.
"Our founding
fathers k new our
freedom depended on
the virtue ot the
American people
Bush said. " This is no
less true today
Our laws cannot
make us good and de-
cent people he said.
I o ;lie contrary, we
must be good and de-
cent people it the law ol
liberty is to survne
American Bar
Association presideni
William Reese Smith
and several U.S. and
s'ates attorney attended
the ceremonv.
He was convicted ot
fust-degree murdei in
Creek County, Okla ,
District Court. During
the sentencing phase of
his trial, the state
presented evidence
showing Eddings had
been convicted as a
minor for offenses that
included vandalism.
burglary, stealing, tarn
penng with a motor
vehicle, assault, and
assault with intent to
do gteat bodily harm.
He was sentenced to
death and the
Oklahoma Court of
Criminal Appeals
upheld the verdict.
On appeal. Eddings'
attorney argued the
Eighth Amendment's
bar against "cruel and
unusual punishment"
prohibits the execution
of a juvenile, or an
adult who committed
the crime when lie was
a juvenile.
i his petition laises
the question of
whether, in light of the
evolving standards ot
decency that mark the
progress of a matui
societv. a state may
con t i nu e
countenance tire im
position ot the death
penalty upon a . hild
Eddings' lawyei
asserted
He noted that at least
four slates specifically
prohibit the imposition
of the death penall
persons "under 16. 17
or 18 years
And over 1 states have
specified a defendant's
youth as a mitigating
factoi in detei mining
whether to impose a
death sentence.
I lien- have only been
13 executions ot
anyone 16 years or
v ou ngei i n 1 s
history. he said
Eddings1 attorney
also noted that in il
Presideni Cartel signed
the International � ove
nant ot Civil and
Political Rights, as pail
ol an "Internati
Hill ol Human Rigl
Part ot the pact pro-
vides that nations sign-
ing the document
not to impose the
sentence 'or crimes
committed bv pei
younger than 18.
.this Calypso group will be appearing at "Barefoot
4:15 p.m.
(' I hi Mall" Thursday at
American
Red Cross
I lu- fast Carolinian
i �
. !ur
�� e 0�

Subset iption Rates
. ,
. - . H �
� j� p a a'
� Soutfi
' ' 6366 6367 6309
WED. (pKT HM
WED. 15th
(ACROSS H
WED. 22nd
Foosball
Tourney
Come
Reg.
Soon!
"PtotThe pens you
have to hold onto
iwo hands.
THE PLACETC
AFTERNOONS
Soviet Troops Maneuver Near
Poland While Leaders Meet
r

tM gvf s "vsWng o �rf��uwc
WARSAW, Poland
(Is: Soviet motoriz-
ips were reported
pou ied
w Pa
around Poland today
and were told to be
readv to "put a stop to
the activities ol the
� socialism
s the Russian forces
moved in, Soviet leader
d Brehnev
I a Czech Corn-
Party meeting
; day
a hich ; '� vv as
warned its neighbors
prepared to stop
h
�'disruption
.bodv an d
anything
I he Past German
news agency ADN said
in Berlin that Soviet
and last German
es taking par; in the
Wars a w P a C
maneuvers were ad-
dressed by Gen. Heinz
Hoffmann, the 1 as;
German defense
minister, who brought
the troops a message
from Pas; German
leader Erich Honecker.
Honeckei thanked
them toi their skill ill
defending the
achievements of
socialism. ADN
reported.
"It is one of the tasks
ol the soldiers to put a
stop to the activity ol
all enemies o t
socialism ADN
quoted Honeckei as
saving.
In Washington, a
I I.S. intelligence source
-aid Soviet military
preparations have been
raised to the highest
possible levels and the
"next step from where
thev are now is to go to
war The situation is
at a "decisive point
tie said.
"We are not hiding
the tact that our people
are following the events
in fraternal Poland
with disquiet C zech
communist leader
Ciustav Husak told his
party congress in
Prague. "The situation
in Poland continues to
disturb us greato
Brehnev sat in the
place ot honor directlv
behind the rostrum,
lis ening intently as
Husak warned that
those creating unrest
must understand "our
II�����
clear standpoii
Although Brehnev
was present. Po
Prime Minister W
jciech Jaruzelski was
absent and the official
news agencv PAP
he was sulfering from a
severe throat infection.
I; had been announced
earlier that the
premier's illness had
forced postponement
ot a Polish parliament
session scheduled foi
today
PILOT
fine point nxrtef pens
Fosdick's Seafood
N,ght!v 5HJO-9HX)poi
Tues. Fish Fry- All The Kdh i'ou Un I With A Mug
Ot Your Kavorite Bev J.99
Wed. Shrimp Treat- Delicious CVfbash Shnmp With Vrench
Hies,ole Slaw and Our Famous 1 luthpu -V9
Thur. Family INight A Seafood Sampler
Shrimp. Fried Fish, Oysters and Deviled Crab$4.99
Tue�,Wed,Thur(Oyster Bar Only) l Doz. HalMiell
Ovsters (Steamed or Raw) .And A Mub Ot ite Beverage
$2.99
7 56-20 U
Sherrod To Face
Four Charges
Continued From Page 1
Sherrod said 01
Wednesday's hearing,
"I'm looking forward
to a delightful evening.
� charges are as
ludicrous or com-
parable to m having
slept with Rita
Jenrette he added.
The SGA Legislature
voted M ndaj to
amend the elections
rules to state that it a
second run-off is held it
will be April 15 and
that a simple majority
will be needed for vic-
tory .
Pepe defeated 1 it tie
in the first election by a
margin ot 49 votes.
PRE-MED?
Current undergraduate pre-
medical students may now
compete for several
hundered Air Force scholar
ships are to be awarded to
students accepted into
medical schools as freshmen
or at the beginning of their
sophomore year. The
scholarship provides for tui
tion, books, lab fees and
equipment, plus a $400 mon
thly allowance. Investigate
this financial alternative to
the high cost of medical
education.
Contact:
TSgt. Bob Payne
U.S.A.F. Health Profes
sions Recruiting
Suite Gl 1, 1100 Navaho
Dr.
Raleigh, N.C. 27609
(919) 755-4134
t AIR FORCE
The 4th Annual
Phi Kappa Tau

� �
SPRING

i �
LING
, "
KEG RALLY WAS A GREAT SUCCESS
THANKS TO OUR SPONSORS
AND THOSE WHO ATTENDED
AvO'loble
AflOoy
Every Day
Ope"
11 o m 9 p m
Sun thru Thuf
I 1 O m lOp m
Ft. &Sot
A
Western Steer
STERKU0VSC
3005 E
10th Street
Greenville, N C
Take Out Service
Available
758-8550
Sponsored By Our Friends At:
DELICIOUS 30 ITEM SALAD BAR
Monday
Beef Tips
$2.49
Thursday
8 oi. Chop Sirloin
Tuesday
8 oz. Chop Sirloin
$1.89
Wednesday
Beef Tips
$2.49
Friday � Family Night
Petite Sirloin Filet
Salad and Drink
$4.75
Saturday
8 oz. Rib Eye
$4.69
Monday-Friday
11:00-2:00
4 oz. Chopped Sirloin
Baked Pototo or French Fries and Toast
99C
Marathon
Stereo Village
Apple Records
The Pipeline Restaurant
Hallow Distributing Co. Inc.
The Happy Store
General Heating Inc.
AAalpass Muffler Shop
Southern Pride Car Wash
Chapter X
Sports World
Arbor Room at Ramada Inn
Overton's Supermarket
Papa Katz
Alligood Motors
Shirley's Cut & Style Shop
Elbo Room
King's Sandwich
Jolly Roger
California Concepts of Greenvi
Pizza Inn
Bissette's of Greenville
University Book Exchange
The Pirate Pit Stop
Domino's Pizza
The Tree House Restaurant
Pepsi Cola Bottling Co. of Greenville





�tie ?Ea0t (Kar0ltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
PAUl LlNCKE, Mwrmrqf Advertising
Dave Sevkrin, gwinm i�miw
Anita Lancaster, noArtiM ianage
CHRIS LlCHOK, General Manager
Jimmy DuPREE, vwwnr ���
Paul Collins. � emm
Charles Chandler yu ewm�
David Norris, Ft�e&o
April 7, 1981
Opinion
Page 4
Sexual Assault
N.C. Press Balks At Assembly Plan
In January of this year, a man in
Onslow County, North Carolina,
was convicted of taking indecent
liberties with his nine-year-old step-
daughter. The Jacksonville Daily
News, in covering the incident, did
not include the name of the victim
in any of its stories until "the day
after her first day of testimony in
court according to the paper's
Editor, J.K. Burns. The child was
"fully identified when she took the
chair in the courtroom stated
Burns. Therefore, her name as the
victim in the assault was a matter of
public record.
As a result of the media's
coverage of this case, however, a
joint resolution was introduced to
the General Assembly of North
Carolina on March 27, 1981,
"urging newspapers and radio and
television stations in North Carolina
to adopt a policy prohibiting the
publication or broadcasting of the
name of a minor who is the victim
of sexual assault The North
Carolina Press Association,
however, has declared this resolu-
tion to constitute a "serious and un-
warranted affront to press
freedom
This resolution infers that to ac-
curately relate the details of a crime
such as sexual assault to the public,
the media does not necessarily have
to include the name of the victim or
details that will directly indicate the
victim's identity. The resolution
states that this type of coverage
"subjects the victim to a lifelong
undeserved punishment and
"discourages the reporting of sexual
assaults by victims and their
families for fear of adverse publici-
ty
However, Mr. Burns explained
that his newspaper refrained from
printing the nine-year-old's name
until some kind of courtroom action
had been taken. In this case, the in-
cident was first reported in
September, but the child's name did
not appear in the paper until she
testified at the criminal trial in
January. This allowed a five month
adjustment period for the child and
her family to adapt to the situation
and prepare for the minor's ap-
pearance in court.
"Anybody who can walk can go
to court and see who is testifying
stated Burns. It seems, then, that
the printing of this information
would not constitute the "invasion
of the privacy of minors as the
resolution tries to establish.
The North Carolina Press
Association has made it clear that it
"has neither the desire nor the
authority to establish or recommend
news and editorial policies or stan-
dards for its members However,
the discretion of every aspect of the
media should be used in handling
information of this sort.
"We're not afraid to tell the truth
in all situations stated Mr. Burns.
Nevertheless, it must be determined
in each case whether the divulging
of information that will directly
identify the victim of a criminal act
such as sexual assault, especially in
the case of a minor, could make "an
already terrible ordeal even worse
for the victim and the victim's im-
mediate family as the resolution
suggests.
A discretionary policy such as this
would show a compassionate con-
cern on the part of the media for the
individuals involved in such agoniz-
ingly painful situations, and would
certainly not constitute an infringe-
ment upon the provisions for
freedom of the press.
Election Rules
Deserve Scrutiny
We've been through one SGA
election in 1981 and even a
"run-off but it seems our officers
may never assume their duties. The
decision by Angela Pepe to appeal
for another run-off is sketchy, at
best.
There is no clear provision in the
rules of the ECU Student Govern-
ment Association for a second run-
off, but at the same time there is
nothing proscribing one either. This
is a vivid example of the ambiguity
of the guidelines our SGA follows.
Lengthy parliamentary debate
may evolve from such trite matters
as where to hold the SGA banquet,
while the vague nature of their own
rules (such as elections) goes
without attention.
Surely no one expects this body to
emulate the Unites States Senate or
other great debating bodies, but
such false intellects as these should
find more important outlets for
their energies.
OUR GOVERNMENT TRIED
To SAVE THEM, BOT BY
TtitH THE JAPANESE
fleets hap decjmated
Them, anp it was too iATe.
Wmmmmmmmmm.
A LOOK INTO THE FUTURE
3
Fiscal 1982 Plans Reflect Reagan
WASHINGTON � One of the many
difficulties in explaining the operation of
the federal budgetary process is the fact
that Congress appropriates funds on a
"fiscal year" basis. Thus, this year's spen-
ding budget of the federal government was
adopted last year, and went into effect on
October 1, 1980. President Carter was still
in office then. So the federal government is
today operating on what is known hero as
the "Carter budget
Congress is now working on the budget
for Fiscal Year 1982, which will go into ef-
fect on October 1 of this year. President
Reagan, and some of us in Congress, are
trying to reduce the actual amount of spen-
ding between now and October 1 � but it
is the Fiscal Year 1982 budget that will
really reflect the spending reductions re-
quested by President Reagan.
FOOD STAMPS � Last week 1 discuss-
ed the enormous increase in food stamp
spending. The Fiscal Year 1978 budget for
food stamps was $5.7 billion. (Remember,
that budget went into effect on October 1,
1977). That year, 16 million people reced-
ed food stamps.
Before he left office in January, Presi-
dent Carter proposed that, beginning Oc-
tober 1, 1981, the American taxpayers be
required to provide $12.4 billion for food
stamps for 22 million people. Thus, during
his term as President, Mr. Carter proposed
that federal spending for food stamps
more than double.
Incidentally, about ten per cent of the
food stamp program goes to Puerto Rico,
where 59 per cent of the people receive
food stamps. There is widespread corrup-
tion reported in the program there.
Jesse
Helms
SPENDING � Federal welfare spen-
ding � indeed federal spending of all types
� has increased so rapidly during the past
two decades that the situation simply will
never again be manageable unless and until
a strong President and a courageous Con-
gress take the bull by the horns.
Everybod professes to favor cutting
federal spending. But most of the pressure
groups want the cuts to be made in
somebody else's program. I think all pro-
grams should be cut, except national
defense. We have fallen farther and farther
behind the Soviet Union in our ability to
defend America. Therefore it is essential
that we "catch up But even in the
defense program there undoubtedly is a
great deal of waste, and I am insisting that
defense spending be examined carefully,
along with all the rest.
Today, the national debt stands at near-
Iv a trillion dollars. The interest on that
debt will cost the taxpayers in the
neighborhood of 100 billion dollars �
which is what it cost to operate the entire
federal government less than two decades
ago.
'INDEXING' � A lot of bureaucratic
terminology (and a great many aspects of
federal budgetary practice) are beyor.J the
common understanding of many
Americans. No doubt, they hear the word
"indexing" fairly frequently. They do not
realize that this is a practice that
automatically increases federal spending
every year � and by enormous amounts.
Various federal programs are � "indexed"
� to be automatically increased in cost.
presumably to compsensate for inflation.
This past year, "indexing" accounted for
30 per cent of the federal budget. I sau. an
estimate the other day that by 1986,
"indexing" will account for 33 per cent of
the federal budget.
Moreover, each additional one per cent
of "indexing" triggers an additional $2
billion in federal spending.
MONSTROUS � Dealing with such
monstrous Figures, and such a complex
mechanism as the federal budget, is ex-
tremely confusing to a great many
Americans.
1 am convinced that there is no easy way
to reduce federal spending. Yet it has to be
done, or our economy faces certain col-
lapse. That is why 1 have consistent tried
to reduce federal spending.
I have always been greeted by howls of
protest and criticism fro n those who have
enjoyed that "free money from
Washington But it certainly isn't "free"
for the hardworking taxpayer v. ho has to
pay the bill. 1 think it's long overdue that
Washington give some thought to the tax-
payers. America's survival depends upon
it.
Weapons Produce Most Waste
By DAVID ARMSTRONG
While the second anniversary of the
nuclear accident at Three Mile Island
preoccupied much of the nation, a little-
noticed report issued by a Washington,
D.C. public interest group laid respon-
sibility for nearly all dangerous nuclear
wastes at the doorstep of the Pentagon.
According to the Center for Defense Infor-
mation, a whopping 99 percent of high-
level nuclear by-products come not from
commercial nuclear reactors, but the pro-
duction of atomic weapons and propulsion
systems for nuclear warships. Another 75
percent of low-level wastes is also produc-
ed by the military.
"Seventeen thousand new nuclear
weapons will be manufactured in the U.S.
'over the next 10 years according to The
Defense Monitor, CDI's newsletter.
"Meanwhile, the federal government has
still not been able to decide on how and
where nuclear wastes will be stored Even
if we had a foolproof storage plan, The
Defense Monitor continues, and "all
nuclear reactors were shut down today and
not another hydrogen bomb produced, we
would still have a mountain of nuclear
wastes that must be kept from harming
future generations
Radioactive wastes emit gamma rays. In
high dosages, gamma rays kill people very
quickly. In lower doses, the rays can cause
cancer, sterility and birth defects. Most
scientists say there is no known safe
threshold of exposure to nuclear radiation.
In addition to near-meltdowns like the one
at TMI, radioactivity can harm people by
contaminating water supplies or getting in-
to the food chain.
According to The Defense Monitor,
most nuclear wastes are stored at six major
processing plants. At one plant � Savan-
nah River, in South Carolina � "two
nuclear production reactors and three ex-
perimental reactors" have been shut down
"and will sooner or later" have to be
treated as nuclear wastes themselves, since
American
Journal
they are contaminated from years of use.
Other kev plants are located at Idaho Falls,
Idaho, West Valley, N.Y Oak Ridge,
Tenn. and Los Alamos, N.M.
Perhaps the most controversial of the six
is the Hanford Reservation facility at
Richland, Washington, where the
plutonium in the atom bomb that leveled
Nagasaki was made. Last year, the Depart-
ment of Energy reported that 24 of the 149
storage tanks at Hanford were leaking,
and another 34 were considered of
"questionable integrity Back in 1973,
422,000 gallons of liquid waste leaked into
the soil near the plant � even though the
U.S. Geologic Survey warned back in 1953
that the tanks, then newly installed, were
likely to prove unsafe. The warning was ig-
nored.
Hanford and the other storage dumps
are considered temporary sites, while Con-
gress and regulatory agencies try to figure
out what to do with our ever-increasing
stockpile of nuclear wastes. The sheer
amount of the stuff is staggering. It in-
cluding over 10 million cubic feet of high-
level wastes; 13 million cubic feet of tran-
suranic wastes (contaminated gloves,
clothing, etc.); 62 million cubic feet of low-
level wastes; 83 decommissioned � and
still hot � military reactors; and 79 million
tons of radioactive uranium mill tailings.
Proposals to turn salt beds in Kansas and
underground caverns in New Mexico into
permanent dump sites were rejected when
scientists and local residents objected on
safety grounds.
The CD1 � headed by an ex-admiral
and supported by former Army and CIA
officials, as well as celebrities such as
philanthropist Stewart Mott and actor
Paul Newman � cites military-produced
nuclear wastes as one of the nation's most
pressing problems. For years, that problem
was ignored, as the nation pushed the
development of nuclear weapons and
nuclear power, on the assumption that so-
meone, somewhere, would eventually
figure out what to do with the lethal by-
products. Today, this dilemma is reaching
crisis proportions. We are running out of
room for our deadly creation.
"The danger now warns The Defense
Monitor, "is not that the problem will be
neglected, but that the government will
rush into a decision before all the facts are
in. Any new schemes for nuclear waste
disposal must be thoroughly studied,
tested and debated before we go ahead
One wonders whether, this time, the
powers-that-be will heed informed warn-
ings, and whether the Reagan administra-
tion will give this kind of government
waste the same close scrutiny it has given
to programs for parks, libraries and kids.
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the authorfs). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced, orneatly printed. All let-
ters are subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted. Letters by the
same author are limited to one each 30
days.
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Formed warn-
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ind kids.
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Welcomes letters
view. Mail or
the Old South
yner Library,
Uion, all letters
e, major and
ihone number
thorfsj. Letters
'written pages,
ninted. All let-
ig for brevity.
jo personal at-
I etters by the
to one each 30
I Ht t M t AKOI IN1AN
Features
Al'KIl 7, 9H1
t'ajic
Cabinetmaker Visits Symposium
Furniture maker Wright Home,
clad in knee breeches and buckled
shoes, constructed a Chippendaie-
style mahogany table carefully
titling each pan with mortises and
tenons, dovetails or wooden pegs.
1 his was not the long-ago birth o
a now prized antique, bin an in-
triguing reenactment of how antique
furniture was made. Home, master
cabinet makei ai Colonial
W illiamsburg's An t hon y Hay
Cabinet Shop, demonstrated his
itade tor 170 participants from 17
states in the 13th annual IYyon
Paiace Symposium here.
rhe symposium, foi professionals
and lay persons interested in the
decorative arts oi the colonial
period, is co sponsored bv the
rryon Palace Commission and
Restoration and the East Carolina
I mvetsiiv Division of Continuing
1 ducation, in cooperation with the
N i Division ot Archives and
Furniture making is not really an
"art a "craft" or a "service
Home explained. "It's a way to
make a living, a business like any
other
Colonial furniture makers, like
their modern counterparts, produc-
ed furniture to please their
customers. And since not every fur-
niture maker is a good designer,
makers have always relied upon pat-
tern books, such as Thomas Chip-
pendale's "Director
lo maintain a profitable shop.
makers traditionally used tine
woods "where it shows and less
expensive woods for the backs and
undersides which aie left unfinish-
ed.
Makers sought to please, and
sometimes spent most of their time
pointing out possible designs in the
pattern books to prospective
customers. "Anthonj Hay probablv
spent 30 hours a week just talking to
customers Home said.
Advertising as a means o attrac-
ting notice is not at all new. Home
showed several early printed adver-
tisements for "carpenters
"joiners "turners" and
"cabinetmakers including owe tor
the London film of "Elizabeth Bell
and Son
Furniture makers in the colonies
borrowed ideas from the famous
English designers � Chippendale.
Hepplewhite and Sheraton � as
well as from each other.
"A piece made in Williamsburg
might show design elements typical
of Boston or New York, because the
maker admired the style, or because
a customer wanted it this way; a fur-
niture craftsman doesn't work in a
vacuum
Home showed photographs oi
good and better furnishings made
on both sides o the Atlantic, and
singled out characteristics often seen
but seldom noticed � the octagonal
forms in "13-pane" glass cupboard
and bookcase fronts and the bird
profiles formed by the cut-out
spaces of splat-backed chairs.
V anations on the same design arc
numerous, a fact illustrated with a
senes of photographs of cabriole
legs. "slipper" t e e l and
"ball-and-claw" feet.
"Before a piece is made, the
maker should be sure the plan is a
good one � the parts of a piece
should blend together to make a
unified whole.
"After the design problems are
solved, the maker can construct the
piece
�s Home assembled his table, he
explained how iioK pieces are made
to allow for the inevitable
"shrinking, swelling and warping"
of wood.
"Drawer bottoms should have a
little overlap at the back so there
won't be a crack running across for
bobbv pms to tall through he said
with a grin.
Alter a piece is made. Home and
his assistants (three full time appren-
tices who work toward the
"journeyman" level up to
"master") stain it with artist's
pigments, usually a mix of VanDyke
brown and raw under thinned with
linseed oil, and finish it with many
coats of orange shellac, carefully
rubbing between each coat.
The result is Home's favorite fur-
niture color � "a nice medium
brown
"We don't recommend that you
wax furniture he said. "Wax
eventually builds up to a thick coat
that will have to be removed
The boiled linseed oil method of
furniture finishing ("once a day tor
six days, once a week tor six weeks,
once a month for six months and
once a year for the rest of your
life") has also been discredited by
most museum conservators, he said.
"Oil can soak into the fibers of
the wood and leak all the way
through after the wood is
saturated he warned. "It also at-
tracts dirt
If furniture must be cleaned.
Horned advises a rubdown with
mineral spirits. Otherwise, just
regular dusting and polishing with a
soft cloth should suffice.
During his tenure as master of the
Hay Cabinet Shop, where
Williamsburg visitors can observe
the making of furniture and order
custom-made pieces, Home has
honored some rather strange re-
quests.
"1 have had an order for
'Princess Anne' furniture he said.
"And if you ask me, as someone
already has, I'll work in the
'C'hickendale' style too
Other symposium speakers were
Peter Sandbeck, director of the
Craven County Architectural Inven-
tory; Betty Ring. Houston, Tex, col-
lector and researcher of earlv
needlework; Carolyn J. Weekly,
curator of the Abby Aldrich
Rockefeller Folk Art Center; Louise
Belden, research associate at the
Henry E. duPont Winterthur
Museum, Delaware; and Mary
RevnoldsPeacock.
Drinks And Munchies
For Warm Weather
Pegasus Plus Concert
Photo by GARY PATTERSON
Rock hand Pegasus Plus plas for the Greeks at Moser's Farm last Saturday
Spring Festival Of Music
Includes Opera, Jazz, More
ECU News Bureau
GREENVII 1 E � An impressive
a ot musical talent � ranging
from opera to chamber music and
jazz � will be presented at Fast
C arolina I niversity's annual Spring
� Music, April 5-12.
rhe festival, coinciding with the
I astern Carolina Arts festival, will
feature performances b v
Metropolitan Opera baritone John
Reardon, N.C. Symphony flautist
Martha arons, the Billy Taylor
Trio, concert violinist Sidney Harth
and the ECU Symphonic Wind
1 nsemble with faculty baritone Ed-
ward Glenn.
Baritone John Reardon will ap-
pear Monday, April 6. at 8:15 p.m.
in the Fletcher Music Center Recital
Hall.
Renowned as a performer in
opera as well as a recitalist, Reardon
has performed throughout the U.S.
and in Europe and the Far Fast. He
starred in the award-winning Na
tional Educational Television pro-
duction of Tchaikovsky's "The
Queen of Spades
The FCC' program will include
works of Beethoven, Duparc, Verdi,
Strauss and Moart. Accompanying
Reardon will be ECU faculty pianist
Henry Doskey.
I nst flautist with the N.C. Sym-
phony, Martha Aarons is a Los
Angeles native and graduate of the
Juilhard School. Her ECU ap-
pearance is scheduled Wednesday,
April 8, at 8:15 p.m. in the Fletcher
Recital Hall.
She has participated in the
Marlboro Music lestival and has
been soloist with the Cleveland Or-
chestra. Her ECU recital will in-
clude works by Bach, Poulenc,
Enesco and Mesiaen.
Violinist Sidney Harth will return
to ECU Thursday, April 9. at 8:15
p.m. in Fletcher Recital Hall. He
will be featured in a chamber music
ensemble which also includes violist
Rodnev Schmidt, cellist Selma
Gokcen and pianist Paul Tardif, all
of the ECU School oi Music facul-
ty .
Harth has won critical and
popular acclaim tor his recital and
concert appearances with the
Boston, Philadelphia, Chicago,
New York and Cleveland Orchestas.
He is a frequent guest conductor
with European and U.S. orchestras
and has been concertmaster of the
Chicago, New York and Los
Angeles Philharmonic Orchestras.
The final festival event, an ECU
Wind Ensemble Concert, is set for
Sunday, April 12, at 8:15 p.m. in
Wright Auditorium. Works of
Hindemith, Hoist, Mahler, Dello
Joio and Virgil Thomson will be
featured under the baton of conduc-
tor Herbert Carter.
Soloist is baritone Edward Glenn
of the ECU voice faculty, who has
appeared in various types of musical
programs in Washington, D.C. and
the Carolinas.
All events are free and open to the
public except for the Billy Taylor
Trio Concert, which is a benefit per-
formance for the ECU Honors
Scholarship Program. Tickets are
available in the ECU Central Ticket
Office, telephone 757-6611.
B kVim WEYLER
When the mercury soars to the
80s in the daytime and short-sleeved
shirts can be worn at night without
contracting pnemonia, a curious ail-
ment strikes young and old alike.
C ommonlv known as Spring lever,
this malady manifests itself most
often in uncontrolled partying.
Doors are open, stereos blare at all
hours o the dav and night, and
orgies o drinking take place.
licet and pretei saies must
skyrocket at this time of vear, for
these are the tried and true staples of
springtime partying. Sometime,
though, beei and pretzels just won't
do. You're going to want to have
some people over dv.d you want
something different. For those
times, special drinks and special
snacks are in order. You might want
to keep the following recipes and
tips in mind.
A blender comes in handy when
preparing cooling hot weather
drinks and is definitely necessarv for
smooth STRAWBERRY DAI-
QUIRIS Combine two pints oi
strawberries (hulled and rinsed) with
1 4 cup sugar in a bowl and
refrigerate for two hours. You
might opt for two pints of pre-
sweetened froen strawberries, in
which case vou shouldn't add the
extra sugar or refrigerate. At serving
time, place the strawberries in a
blender with 1 4 cup lime juice and
one cup light rum. Blend until ber-
ries are pureed; then serve over ice.
Similar to the daiquiri is the
ORANOF SUNSET. Hull and rinse
one cup fresh strawberries: puree in
the blender until smooth. Add two
cups orange juice, one cup pineap-
ple juice and one-half cup light rum.
Dance Theatre Tours
The Fast Carolina Dance Theatre
is touring eastern North Carolina
this spring, with performances and
lecture demonstrations to audiences
and dance students in Tarboro, New
Bern and Morehead City.
A program of dances
choreographed bv ECU dance facul-
tv members Patricia Pertalion,
Paula Johnson, Petrus van Muyden
and Patti Weeks will be performed
in Tarboro April 10. in New Bern
April 14 and in Morehead City April
28
I he pieces represent the modern,
jazz and ballet idioms, and are
highlighted with a special homage in
dance to the late ballerina Anna
Pavlova in her centenary year.
See DANCE, page 7. col. 7
Phofo by GARY PATTERSON
Blend until frothy, then stir in one
cup oi sparkling mineral water or
club soda. Serve over ice.
For a taste of the tropics, cool off
with FROZEN TROPIC CREAM.
Combine one six-ounce can limeade
concentrate, two cans cold water,
one-half cup each cream of coconut
and crushed pineapple, one-half cup
vodka and one cup ice in a blender.
Blend until frothy and ice is finely
crushed. Garnish each glass with a
slice of pineapple before serving, if
desired.
An economical drink with the
taste of pineapple is the PINEAP-
PLE SPRITZER. In a large pitcher,
combine two cups pineapple juice,
three cups Rhine wine and one cup
sparkling mineral water or club
soda. Add ice and orange slices. Stir
and serve. A great drink to make in
a hurry!
For a larger crowd, there's
nothing like fruity PLANTER'S
PUNCH. In a one and one-half or
two gallon container, mix: two cups
dark rum, two cups curacao, eight
cups light rum, one six-ounce can
each of frozen pineapple juice con-
centrate, frozen orange juice con-
centrate, frozen limeade concen-
trate, ten ounces (from a twelve
ounce can) frozen lemonade concen-
trate. Test for sweetness, then use
the remainder of the lemonade, if
desired. Serve in tall glasses three-
fourths filled with crushed ice. For a
decorative touch, garnish with fruit
slices.
When planning party munchies,
remember that you don't want to
spend all your party time fixing
food. Make your edibles ahead o'
time and refrigerate.
Chips and dip are always party
favorites. Instead of store-bought
dip, try low calorie SPICED
CHEESE DIP with vour favorite
chips. In the blender, combine: one
cup lowfat cottage cheese, three
tablespoons plain yogurt, one
tablespoon chopped chives, one
tablespoon chopped parsley. 1 4
teaspoon thyme, and black pepper
to taste. Blend thoroughly and chill.
Makes about one and one-fourth
cups at a mere ten calories per
tablespoon.
If cheese and crackers make your
mouth water, try the surprisingly
easv-to-make CYNTHIA'S
CHEESE BALL. Allow an eight
ounce package of cream cheese and
two ounces grated sharp cheddar
cheese to soften to room
temperature. Place in a bowl or
shallow dish and add one tables-
poon each grated onion, chopped
bell pepper and Worcestershire
sauce, and one small jar pimentos.
Mash all the ingredients together
thoroughly and shape into a ball.
Refrigerate, but allow to soften
slightly before serving.
Instead of chips or crackers, try
healthy crudites with dip. Simply
slice raw carrots, mushrooms, celery
(washed, of course!) � whatever
vegetable you like � and serve on a
trav with din.
MARINATED MUSHROOMS
are another spicy, simple choice.
Wash a pound or so of mushrooms,
slice each in half and place in a
bowl. Prepare one package Italian
dressing mix according to package
directions. Pour over mushrooms
and refrigerate approximately two
hours. Serve with toothpicks or
cocktail forks so your guests won't
have drippy fingers!
Rock Trivia Quiz:
Find Out How Much
You Can Remember
Chugging Contest
hathv Murenskv helts one down for Delta eta in the finals of the kappa
Sigma Funky Nassau chugging contest. The Chi Omegas won first place in
the sororit division.
1. What is Ringo Starr's real
name?
2. Nanker Phelge was an early
penname for whom?
3. Name the ex-girlfriend of Mick
Jagger who made a critically ac-
claimed comeback album last year.
4. Who plaved drums for the
Doors?
5. Name the Monkees' only
feature film.
6. What was the Beatles' first
feature film?
7. Robert Zimmerman is better
known by another name. What is it?
8. Who sang background vocals
for Carlv Simon's hit "You're So
Vain"?
9. Waylon Jennings played in the
band of what famous 1950's rock
band?
10. Name B.B. King's guitar.
11. What town does the Marshall
Tucker Band come from?
12. Name the North Carolina town
where James Taylor spent most of
his childhood.
13. Who is the new drummer for
the Who?
14. What band starred in the movie
"Rock'n'Roll High School"?
15. Name the members of Kiss.
16. Name the old and new bass
players for Cheap Trick.
17. What band did the song
"Henry VIII"?
18. "The House of the Rising Sun"
was a hit song in 1964 for what
band?
19. What song did Ringo Starr
write on the Beatles' White Album?
20. What was Jackson Browne's
first big hit?
Trivia Quiz Answers
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nil i si i i

Entertainment
Le
i
Barefoot On The Mall
Scheduled Thursday
The East Carolina University Studeni Union in-
vites you to (heir third annual BAREF 1 IHE
MALI extraveganza rhe Festival was an over-
whelming success ti and promises to be an
even more exciti i ; I nion
committees combine theii eft rt into one spec
tacular production ol fun on the Mall, April 4. ls81
from 12:00
BAR I FOOl ON I1M MAI
.ear b of 1
pro isatiot .
and de elo
one comedy I
form
Once aj
taining at HA HI I
1981. How
! 2:1)0 noon i
Dr. George Bums
I ' rig musit
IAZZ ENSI MBI t exhibi
hit ol clow
enthusiasm
of traditional s
their own
Basic. May
pe: former in tl
Whenever the IAZZ ENS
pus. the house
treat yout
Sassy and
has con
esoi
& t Int
�tontine
Aill pe.
. Vpril 9,
the d
rection ot
i impus, 1 tic
Ot
tm-
tnd
ime
MIME hunt down the mind behind the mannerism
and the imagination behind the image. From
dowager dump turned disco-queen to cla; i ;gleat
a dinner party foi six, k A ! i mi N 11 and i s
OUE1 1M W 11 DAU canture the themes ol today
MAIM Y MIME will present two performances
on April 9, 1981, as part oi BARM OOl ON I 111
MAI I . Come on out at 12:45 p.m. and 5:30 pm. to
experience this contemporary twist ol the ancient art
mime.
FAN! SV is a group ol people, primarily
students, who use sign lang
ol song lyrics to the deal. Theii
peals t o those who arc hen ing
;e w ho have no hearing problem Mike 1 -t
structoi ol ign language ai I .1 memb
FAN 1 S , states that part p the au: ol FAN I AS
is to show sign language "not only a a foi m
munication" hut also to show "how beautiful
artistic sign language can b
�w know signinj
htly risque.
Members ol FANT
i HI MAN to show
p.m pel forming a at iet;
k to rhythm and
rRINlDAD I RIPOI I S
is Carribbean, calypso
! he 1 rinidad 1 rip
on the University Mall
t
at 1:30
'Riders In The Sky' Performing This Thursday
I he renowned western revival hand "Riders in the Sky" will gives! ist( ot their patented blen
harmony ami yodeling this I hursday night from 8 until 9:30 al Hhs year's Studeni I nion sponsored
Barefoot on the Mail. I he group has played at V ashington, D. s lohn I Kennedy enter tor Perform-
ing rts with the Houston Pops Orchestra.
Ifrfe 'Riders' Giving Mall Concert
s7 �S5
i
issut '
By Rl( K Mil I ; K
Ranger" ireen, I
" 1 ooSlim" I aBoui .J w oody
'Woody Pan Paul returned to the
Cat and IS
1' � ne s
pie
Film Explores Puerto Rico
Sugar cane cutters are shown above in a scene from John Roberts
�Puerto Rico 1 he travel-Adventure Film will be shown tins
Wednesday night at X in the Hendrix fheatre.
These thi
The Sk are p
Guitai R
modct n i imes
cherub-fac
voice and
sih
I 01
nigl '
a love
rs In
D
A i
boy with a
. ell a
I
itely
Ins kit sparkle
�� stops
ed by an overpower-
;e to Rabbit Dance. "I've got-
do it 1 oo Slims resigns ' II
. you go right
es, over
irteou: roo � Rabbit
kin to leg-
ips, and you can
howling
ist the
lerloin.
o' s pi a
.files
�I the lal
ts down hi
to grab hi- a
elal �
pulled throng:
lone AVi and out fell th
squeezebox in brig
toih oody I
with his hands, sq
him along with hi
dry . And he's lean
prairie polka follows, flawlc
everything else Riders In rhe
nd the n s on,
getting brightei.
Riders In I he SI;
struments on stage b
npfire, picl
sent "Rideis rheater spo
by " I riple X I onic, made from
juice ol a dozen dawgies 1 ues
night's episode concerned a .
ment dam flooding I
ex-
r -in
and
'will
law
d I ru tiinbet industry and
Slim
!
an en-
at1
his
itself
� �
-
Students Get
Cheap Trick
Jazzist Billy Taylor
Dazzles ECU Audience
By PAi I Ol I INN
and.ION SWK LER
Hot, � � led I oul
Minges (. oliseum mis-
ed the be:
y '� vidently is
not the sort of
such a promise
When he;
Minges I iliseum
seemingly was with the intention oi
showing Greenville what high-class
rock and roll is all ab
In the past several years this
group has reached foi the pinnacle
ol pop stardom. With hits like
"Surrender "Ain't f hat a
Shame" and "I Want You I"o V.
Me" (heap ick has truly
established itsell as one ol the I t
purveyors ol pop in A me
"Special guest" UFO opened for
Cheap luck with a 50-minute set,
but the less snd about that the bel
ter.
UFO follows in the footsteps ol
countless heavy-metal bands whose
philosophy seems to be that it you
play loud nothing else matters
Group members jumped up and
down, wiggled then hips and shook
their mop tops in time to the music,
but it was all in vain as one song was
virtually indistinguishable trom
another
Lead guitarist Paul Chapn
Pete Townsend imitations were
amusing, but unfortunately he has
all the charisma ol month-old pan-
cake batter.
The best that can be said tor I FO
is that it made (heap I rick look
that much better While UFO rush-
through eight songs, Cheap Trick
ed its nd-f if teen-minute
' i near pet fection.
�ning with a winsome ballad.
op I tus Game the band mov-
i W am You 1 0 Want
Me a number that had the crowd
of 6.(XX) on its feel and screaming
more.
I he crowd was an oddball assort-
ment ' preps, punk rockets,
Marines and high school students
I he crowd was familiar with
ugh ol the songs to keep atten-
tion at a constant high, and the
hand showed good sense in in-
troducing some of its lesser known
tunes
Zany guitarist Rick Nielsen kept
the crowd roaring by throwing
guitar pick alter guitai pick in to the
audience At one point he amused
the tans by wiping his brow with the
back ol his hand ad flinging the
sweat oul across the people in the
first few rows.
Music, however, was the order of
the day, and Robin Zanden's vocals
were one of the show's highlights.
His singing was particularly im-
pressive o n t h e m e 1 o d i c
"Surrender" and "Ain't That A
Shame a rousing rocker with a
titties beat Elvis would have been
proud of.
Bun E. Carlos drumming was
tight for the most part, and his only
solo, in "Gonna Raise Hell was
well integrated. For his patt, Pete
Comita seems to subscribe to the
Bill Wyman-John I ntwistle school
of bass playing: Just let me stay
m corner, and I'll pla my pan
All in all.heap luck was
superbly professional. The group
had everything trom playing to
banter with the audience honed to a
fine edge.
The evening's absolute highlight
came with "Surrender one ol the
bands biggest successes.
"Surrender as much as any hit in
recent years, has become a theme
song tor today's youth. "Mommy's
all right Daddy's all right They just
seem a little weird Surrender But
don't give yoursell away
I hese lew minutes alone were
worth the price ol admission, and
an encore version of "Day I upper"
pul the show over the top. I hese
moments were rock and roll magic
as both the band and the audience
responded by kicking into high gear.
In choosing "Day Tripper" as an
encore, (heap Inck was paying
homage to the Beatles, source ol the
masters from whom this
derives many ol its toots
Billy Taylor
Mellows Out
While "Cheap Trick" rocked a
crowded Minges Coliseum Saturday
night, last Sunday night (April 5) a
smaller but enthusiastic audie
was treated to a pleasmable evening
See 1 AVI OR. page 7. col. 1
Pictured above, heap
I rick lead guitarist Rick
Nielsen spreads his wings
at MingesoKseuin. I he
group performed to a
sellout crowd on Satur-
day night.
I
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HI EAST! ki IMAN
APK1I
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Dance
Theatre
Tours
CARICATURES C0ef (or
Taylor Gives Concert
Continued from page 6
of fine classical jazz at Wright
Auditorium. The Bill Ia!or Trio.
auied by the ECl Jazz Ensemble,
put on an excellent three-hour con-
cert. Further entertainment was pro-
sided by stand-up comedian George
Broussard.
Billy raylor, who was born here
in Greenville, is one of America's
most noted and respected jazz
pianists. His trio is completed by the
bass fiddle of Victor Gaskin and the
exciting percussion of Keith
Copeland. Their masterful and
mellow music, drawn from a variety
of scores and styles, contrasted with
the big band, swing sound of the
twenty-man, student Jazz Ensem-
ictions for the evening includ-
ed "This Bass Was Made for
Walkin' " (b Thad Jones).
"Charles Christopher" (a memorial
to Charlie "Bird" Parker by Phil
Woods). "Can't Be Scared"
(written by and spotlighting Ensem-
ble member Rich Moncure), "Niles
Blues" (by Bellson. Hayes and
Dimaio), "1 Believe in You" (by
Oliver Nelson) and "1 Wish 1 Knew
How It Would Feel To Be Free
"Suite for Jazz Piano and "I'm
In Love With You" (all composed
by Taylor). A special standout was
"Caravan a tribute to Duke Ell-
ington featuring the dazzling drum-
ming talents of Copeland.
Billy Taylor is a pianist, com-
poser, recording artist, arranger and
conductor, with a doctorate in
musical education from the Univer
sity of Massachusetts. He started
studying music at the age of seven,
in Washington D.C. After
graduating from Virginia State Col-
lege, he moved to New York and
became involved in the "be-bop"
movement that was revolutionizing
jazz in the 1940's and 50's. Taylor
has performed with such talents as
"Bird" Parker, Dizzy Gillespie,
Billie Hollidav, Miles Davis, Mill
Jackson and even Bing Crosby.
Currently a faculty member at
Howard University, Taylor has
brought jazz into classrooms and
colleges across the country and was
elected to the National Association
of Jazz Educators Hall of Fame. He
has served on the National Council
on the Arts, the New York State
Commission of Cultural Resources,
the American Society of Composei s
and Publishers and the New York
City Cultural Council. He recent 1
released a new album. "Where've
You Been some selections from
which he played Sunday night
The Jazz Ensemble was pleasing
and professional-sounding. The
concert was a presentation of the
Spring Music Festival ot the 1 Cl
School of Music and co-sponsored
b) the ECl Foundation, the Stu-
dent Union Special Attractions
Committee and the Greenville-Pitt
Counts tts Council, in conjunc-
tion with the Eastern Carolina Arts
Festival Ml their efforts were well
worth it as the concert was quite a
success.
I he mostly well dressed, and
dignitary-filled audience was ap-
preciate and responsive, giving
much applause and a couple of stan-
ding ovations. The concert was a joy
to the cats but unfortunately a pain
in the ass due to Wright
, ii ri im's hard wooden seats.
Otherwise the show was exquisite.
Continued from paje 5
The ballet is van
Muyden's reconstruc-
tion of Pavlova's
famous solo, "The Dy-
ing Swan
Van Muyden also
served as guest
choreographer for a
Beaufort County Arts
Council program
scheduled for April 4 in
Washington.
On April 5, van
Muyden conducted a
masterclass for advanc-
ed ballet students of
Melanie Galizia ol
Morehead City and
I inda Huffman of
Jacksonville, at Ms.
Gahzia's dance school,
Melanie's Ballet and
Stage Arts Centre.
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Mitchell's
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SIGN-UP LOCATIONS
Mendenhall Center Evans St. Mall
Wright Auditorium
Allied Health
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Wednesday April 8
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Monday
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II I SI Ki � 1
Sports
APRll Pa8
Bucs, Heels To Battle It Out Tonight
Both doing With Ace Pitchers
To doin It'in, Bragging Rights
b� �� I m i-r
V
I
you. His pitching will cei
ade h tough on us
lik ildei. also was
lu
1 v. i
I t! Overton said " e
a it we'd see him 01 i
We definitely have the utmost
peel foi his abilitit
1 he ch i i ah appear to be
tded in separate dii et, tions entei
the game, the Heels h lost
Maryland Saturday ie Bucs
a inning five of th
"We'n not playing now as well as
able Scall commented.
�� ake some changes
the field a �ung
I he Bucs, a younj
u : are beginning to develop,
Ml.
" rhe team seems :
he said. "e've n
peak yet but i bet-
W all
both e and
� "
I are
. ,i- a
tperiei
(Hal)
game
In Effort
From Rival
to us said Scall "We realize we
ild be competing with ECU,
South v arolina and sonic othei in-
dependents tor an N A bid at the
end ol the year, supposing we don't
win the A ' Hue lose these games
thai could shut us out of an at-Iarge
bid.
"I think our guys will be verv
keyed Stall continued. " 1 his
should be the son ol game that you
don't have to say anything to them
beforehand
I he Hues realize the importance
ol the contest also, not only from
ii standpoint but from thai ol
Pirate followers.
"No doubt, this a very big game
tor us Overton said. "It's not like
this is a one-game season or
anything but it does mean a great
deal. It's a big came because it's
North Carolina and that's impor-
tant to our tans and oui students
Overton sees the 1 ar Heels as a
major challenge thai stands in the
way ol the Bucs' 18th win ol the
season.
"To say Ihalarolina has a great
ballclub is an understatement. I he
can explode at any time, "hey're a
with (chal or without
him
So it's EC! v - arolina
Wilder s Ochal with remem-
brances ol a ear ago mixed in to
spice up what should be something
else
ECU pitcher Rick Ramey displays the form that gained him
his fifth win of the season against a lone loss Saturday as the
Pirates downed Campbell 7-5 in the firsi game ol a
doubieheader. I he team came hack and won the second
game also, 13-2.
ECU Sweeps
By Campbell
lastarolina's baseball team
geered up for its ruesday home mat-
chup with Northarolina by sweep-
ing a doubieheader fromampbell,
and P 2. Saturday to improve
its record to 17 6.
I odd Hendley's two-run homer
in the top ol the seventh inning
ike a 5-5 tie and turned out to be
the winning blow tor the Pirates in
the opener.
Pitcher Rick Ramey got the win,
improving his record to 5-1 in the
.ess.
In the nightcap, the Bucs explod-
ed with five first-inning runs and got
six more in the seventh in coasting
to a 13-2 win.
Kirk Parsons picked up the win as
he raised his record to 4-2.
I he highlight ol the game game in
the seventh. Outfielder Charlie
Waynick, who had entered the game
in bottom of the sixth inning, crack-
ed a grand slam home run in his on-
ly a back ol the day hall an inning
later. I he homer was the first ol
W .muck's collegiete career
1 arlier in the week, the Bucs
bombed 1 NC -Charlotte on Friday,
11-0, following a heartbreaking,
4 J, loss to State on Thursday,
following the game tonight with
( arolina, the B - to the road
three contests. A Thursday n
chup at N.( . Wesleyan is followed
mes on both Saturday and
Sunday ai I N -Wilmington.
'The Best I've Seen'
Scrimmage Impresses Emory
BHARI ESCH M)I lR
"I feel like we had one hell ol a
It's the best one we've
e I've been here
The words flowed happily from
Ii head football coach 1 d
Emory. He spoke highly of his
g this past
immage, sounding as
thou pes ol turning around
the Pirates' disappointing 4 7 1980
record were hig
tm practiced for an hour
urday morning be:
ernoon scrimmage 1 he latter
saw e ol fensive perfoi -
mance, 1 mory said.
"it was the offense's day Satur-
: the second-year mentor.
"1: ffense completely dominated
1(1 def�
dei
Norm Parker directs some Pirate
ng i ek's spring drills.
The most impressive area for the
Hues, Emory said, was the offensive
line � a much-maligned area during
the disappointing season past.
hue has made
ncrit than any area
a i up is a fai cr
�k the field
� last season
Emory and his stafl are so im-
I with the offensive line's play
that two starters from last year have
defense � tackle
: rvin a; i d bee Griffin.
En in is chall i defensive
, now w rule Griffin is
.everal nose guards vying for
me fall.
i moved due to the
) ol a number of gifted
30 redshirts. Among them are
I a.re ; l ke roles
romarnes, Johnny Robertson,
Norman Quick and Jefl Autry.
1 en y 1 mer noseguard
: the team's strongest member,
also is a newcomer to the offensive
from that is threatening to start
e the fall.
Holdover starter - loin Hensley,
Hud 1 a( oc i- and I iotie R bbins
are all listed numbei at their
positions on the Buc deptl H
them, Robbins ha ;n.s;
pressive.
" 1 ootie has jusl :rim-
mag - i Ad 1 i. "He
uist keeps getting better and ber-
In the offensive back field, Greg
Stewart is still running at number
one an ie quarter back- 1 as!
s starter. Carlton Nelson,
still home in Portsmouth. Va
recovering from a neck injury but is
now almost a sure bet tor action this
fall.
A blow came to the starting
backfield when Marvin Cobb rein-
jured liis i the same leg thai
kept him out of action all ol lasl
season. Cobb may be i the re-
mainder of the spring drills.
Rising sophomore Ernesi Byner,
Rov Wiley and Harold Blue make
up the current number one
ckfield. last year's leading
her, Mike Hawkins, is waiting
word from the administration con-
cerning his eligibility.
Emory, Hawkins and the Buc
ff say that the Henderson native.
a would-be fifth-year senior, did not
compete in his freshman year. There
�ome doubt on the issue, though,
and ECU faculty representative Er-
nie Schwarz is currently handling
the mattei.
Despite the impressive offensive
showing at the scrimmage, Emory
was not distressed with his team's
defensive play.
"We had some injuries that
didn't help anything he claimed.
"We've got some good defensive
people, though, that we aren't
afraid to go to war
The 1(1 spring practices will
rttinue four days weekly until the
annual Purple-Gold game
culminates the routines on Satur-
day, April 25.
Lady Pirates Sweep State, Now 23-2
Bv v,
Si �
I
vilte, not the si burgh.
i asi Carolina1 La ites eon
opponents over
� . swepl
from
Raleigh- the N.C V ask.
the
j. 11
l he
:
ate
weep uppe
while the
I4-6
mpir
their
osses
I ive ol their
ie defending
rates.
The Hues pounded out 24 hits m
the double-header compared to oniv
�,t for the Wolfpack. East
Carolina also played good defense.
,t they commuted only three errors
on the afternoon.
"These games were easier than we
expected said head Coach Alita
Dillon. "State didn't hit the ball as
well as they usually do, but I think
our defense had a little something to
do with that. We should have scored
more runs
In the first game, the Bucs put
Thinclad Relay Team Takes First,
Sets New Meet Mark In The Process
Rv Wll I ll XtRJON
B (

" .We
anyth Well on
mayl
couni squad
1 he Bu
(49.7), Ci 1 im
Cephus (4 ' � Bell
(47 i . e in
meet with a r, a new
Colonial
"We be i ' teams
the Pii "It was a
really goo I Bell did an
outstanding realrj win-
dy, and we probably could have
done even better if it hadn't have
been so windy. As it was. we beat
Howard University, who was fourth
in the nation indoors
I he old 1600 relay record was set
by Hagerstown Junior College in
1978 with a time o 3:13.2.
The Pirates finished fourth in the
sprint medley relay with a time o
3:27.5. but Carson felt the club
could have done better if Carlton
Frazier was not injured. "We could
have won the race (without the in-
jury)" Carson said.
"Frazier pulled a hamstring, but
continued to run Carson said. "1
tried to get him to stop, but he
finished his leg, and we still did real
well. "
"The lasl foui times Bill Miller
has run anchor, our second leg has
pulled a hamstring Carson noted.
The Pirates finished sixth in the
two-mile relay, but the team of
Shawn Lanev (1.56.5), Ray Dicker-
son (1:53.3), Craig Rainey (1:55.0)
and Bill Miller (1:51.6) did set a new
school record with a time of
7:36.45. The old mark of 7:37.2 was
set in 1972.
The Pirates ran in the event for
the first time in five years, and for
Lanev, Dickerson and Rainey the
legs they ran were their first half
miles ever at a collegiate meet.
Carson was impressed with the ef-
fort. "We tried running it and broke
the school record with the first try. I
think we can break a 7:30.0. We'll
continue to run it from now on he
said.
The Bucs' Russell Parker tied his
own school record in the high jump
with an effort of seven feet. His per-
formance was good enough for
third place.
The Pirates are scheduled to go to
Knoxville, Tenn for the Dogwood
Relays this weekend, but Carson
said he might take his team to the
Carolina Relays in Chapel Hill in-
stead.
two run innings back-to-back in the
fourth and fifth to seal the victory.
I ydia Rountree was the offensive
star tor the Pirates as she banged
out thiee tuts in four appearences.
1 reshman Jo Landa Clayton and
Mitzi Davis also chipped in with fine
performances at the plate by going
2-4.
leanette Roth hurled the shut out
or the Pirates, who are off to their
best stau ever. Roth's win boosted
her record to i2-l.
The bast Carolina defense limited
state to only two hits in the after-
noon's opener.
Mitzi Davis provided offensive
fireworks tor the Pirates in the se-
cond game by hammering out four
hits in four tries as the team put
together a pair of four-run innings
in the 8-2 win.
The Pack jumped out to a quick
2-0 lead in the first inning, but the
Pirates bounced back with four in
the second and four more in the
fifth.
Pirate second baseman Ginger
Rothermel belted a three-run homer
to led the assault, and left fielder
Kathy Riley added a three-run tri-
ple.
Freshman Tammy Parham also
had three hits, and Shirley Brown
added two more to lead the 13-hit at-
tack.
Roth picked up her second victory
of the afternoon in the second game
and her 13th overall.
Again, good, solid defense paid
off for the Lady Pirates in the
sweep. "I'm real pleased with our
defense this year. It is remaining
stable. We have had good games
back-to-back defensively, and good
defense can save vou in a low-
scoring game. You have to have
good defense to win
The Lady Bucs have not lost since
the first weekend of the season in
Florida when dies lost close contests
to Florida and Florida State. One
big reason for the Pirates1 current
hot streak is the pitching Roth and
Humphrey have supplied
A new rule thai allows the batter
to be called out after a third-strike
foul not only speeds up the game,
but adds more defensive strategy.
This is where good pitching comes
in, Dillon says. "If oui pitchers get
two strikes on the batter and keep
good control, then we might be able
to get someone to foul out. It
depends upon the location oi the
pitch
She added thai some o "our
good hitters have suffered from the
new rule
Depth, says Dillon, is the main
difference between this year's squad
and last. "We had Flea Williams on
the bench at State. She was injured,
but we could have used her. So, we
started Rountree, and she was
outstanding. On defense, she didn't
make any errors.
"We also have Tammy Parham
and Melody Ham, two freshmen,
who have never played on our team
before. The new players have made
a difference on our team. We can
count on them
"If any of our starters were in-
jured last year, we were in a bind,
but this year we have people who
can take their place.
This weekend the Lady Pirates
travel to Raleigh to play m the N.C.
State Invitational. Included in the
field are the Pirates' victim in the
Region II tournament last year,
ECU'S
Flea Williams
Northern Kentucky, and the teams
that have handed the Bucs their only
losses this season- Florida and
Florida State. v-
So, with the Gators and the
Seminoles coming to Raleigh, the
Lady Pirates should have revenge
on their minds, right? Nope. It's the
other way around. "Northern Ken-
tucky should want revenge on us
Dillon quipped.
Before the weekend competition,
the Lady Pirates host Campbell at
the ECU softball field right beside
Harrington Field.
Gametime for the double-header
is 3:00 p.m.
Jel.
Off
GR1
AC
Bes
v V s'
Hosi





I HI I AS IAROl IN1AN
APKIl.7, iS�Hl
ht
veeps
nhell
0�
o
;
it . There
imed.
A
I
y
ms
nd the teams
ucs their only
Florida and
i and the
Raleigh, the
evenge
1 pe. It's the
rxrthern Ken-
.nge on us
competition,
ampbell at
right beside
louble-header
Nelson Pulls
Off Miracle
(iRt-l NSBORO, N.C. (UPl) � I arry Nelson,
who made what he calls one of the best shots of
his career to give him a playoff spot and eventual-
K the Greater Greensboro Open title, hopes the
momentum of the victory will carry him to a good
showing in the Masters.
Nelson trailed Mark Hayes bv two strokes go-
ing into the 18th hole Sunday.
Nelson's second shot landed in a bunkei i" the
right of the green while Hayes' shot landed on the
Fringe of the green.
"1 was thinking about which way was home
Nelson said. "There was not much else 1 could do
but try not to finish third
When Nelson stepped into the bunker, he
couldn't even see the hole.
"I just wanted to get it out of the bunker and
try to laud it as close to the green as possible he
said. "It was wet, coarse sand and 1 had to carry
u ovei a lip that was taller than 1 was. It was
eight feet high 1 couldn't see but the top of the
pin
Nelson blasted out of the bunker and the ball
went right in the hole.
Hayes three-putted, setting up (he playoff.
Nelson then sank a two-foot birdie putt on the
second playoff hole so defeat Hayes and claim
SM.tMMX).
Nelson said he was surprised at his own play
after having to change his swing because ot a
back problem.
"I really felt like 1 was trying to get ready for
ugusta NeKon said. "I didn't expect to win
here because 1 had to change something in my sw-
ing. 1 may have peaked a week earlier. 1 hope
not
Nelson and Hayes are good friends off the
course.
'�I'm sorr lor Mark thai it had to be this
way Nelson said. "I know how it feels. But if
you're out here long enough someone is going to
hole ii out or hit a long putt to win in a playoff.
That's the way the game is but it's not fair
ACC Stars Get
Best Of SEC
PIRATE BASEBALL
Tonight at 7 p.m. � Harrington Field, ECU
ECU vs. UNC
Pirates �
1980 NCAA
Tourney
Participant
:
Tar Heels -
Preseason
ACC title
Pick
Come and watch these two arch rivals battle it out
Classifieds
Buy Classifieds
NASHVILLE, lenn.
11 PI) � Both Hale
Brown ot I SI and 1 ef
! Driesell of Maryland
said the players trom
the Atlantieoast and
Con
ferences played hard
and well Sundav.
1 he ACC all-stars
wound up 97 9(5 win
ners m overtime in the
Southern Shootout at
Yanderbilt'v Memorial
gym before 3,400 peo-
pie.
ba I lea me.
said. �" rhe played the
game hard, h was a
good game for the
players
Brown, who led 1 SI
to the SIC title, praised
the players trom both
teams.
"1 though i both
teams played very well.
There were a lot of
good players out
there he said
li was the fourth
straight win for the
ACC over the SEC.
Terry Gates of the
Virginia hit two free
throws w i t h five
seconds remaining in
overtime to provide the
winning poinls for the
ACC stars. The final
margin was cut to one
point with a SEC
bucket at the buer
1 anv Nance o
( lemson led the A C
with 25 points. 7am
Irick of South
('arolina pumped in 18,
Kennv Matthews of
North Carolina State
added l7, Kenny Den-
nard of Duke had 13
points and 12 r e -
bounds.
The SEC was led by
Earl Hanks of Auburn
with 28 points. Charles
Davis, making his last
appearance at Vander-
hilt's gym, had 26.
Howard Wood of
rennessee had 12
points but a game-high
11 rebounds for the
SI C stars.
COPIES
Tke Hflq ('S) Ski
Copy Center
Copies
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up in Raleigh at Stony Brook
North. 12x65, 2 bedrooms central
air storms, new carpetinq
S7.6O0 Call 756 1623.
FOR SALE: 1978 Jeep Wagoner
Fully equipped, excellent condi
tion. 45,000 miles Call 946 3B62
FOR SALE Yamaha 650. 1977,
good condition, 3.200 miles Good
price Must sell Call Henry at
752 1946 between 5 7pm
FOR SALE: 1977 Camaro Type
LT Excellent condition. $3995
Call 756 4936 or 756 1311 (Work)
FOR SALE Surfboard 7 2' Mar
Bravo balsa wood Call 756 5373
leave message anytime.
FOR SALE Guitar Alvarez Yain
model DY 78, Grover machines
heads, herring bone inlay inlayed
pickguard hardshell case. Ex
cellent condition Call 756 5323
leave message anytime
FOR RENT
FOR RENT Large house 12
rooms, 7 baths Ideal tor student
group S500 plus utilities. 752 5296
WANTED 2 male or female
roommates wanted to share
spacious 3 bedroom house during
summer and! orfall Convenient
location to Carolina East Mall and
Pitt Community College. S80
month during summer, one third
utilities and $60 month, one tourth
utilities during the fall Call
756 9011 after 5 pm.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED 2 bedroom apt in
Wilson Acres, 4 blocks trom cam
pus. IMS mo plus one half
utilities. Call 752 9194 after 4 30.
RIVER BLUFF APARTMENTS
has temporarily reduced its rent.
Call now tor details 758 4015.
FOR RENT 2 bedroom
townhouse apts 1 and half baths,
appliances, cable TV hookups, 1
locations. River Bluff and E. 11th
St No pets J280 and $300 units,
lease and security deposit re
qued J.L Harris and Sons, Inc ,
REALTORS, 204 W 10th. St
758 4711.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED 2 bedroom fully fur
mshed trailer. Central air,
fireplace and 2 baths. Ml.50 per
month plus half utilities. Call
752 2898
APT FOR LEASE: 600
Georgetown Runs from mid May
to Mid August Call 758 0323.
FOR RENT Furnished 2 bedroom
apt available for the summer
months Call 758 4438.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED: To share 2 bedroom
apt summer or fall at Tar River
Estates rent, utilities, plus
deposit. 752-4487, Irene .
FEMALE ROOMMATE: Wanted
to share 3 bedroom duplex near
campus Washer, dryer 167 00
per month plus one third utilities
Call 752 5977.
PERSONAL
BANDS UNLIMITED BOOKING
AGENCY Is now booking bands
for the spring, summer, and fall
We cater to every difterent
musical need and price range We
provide bands that range from
Beach, Top 40, to easy listening
and country The quality of a band
can insure the success of your par
ty. Let the Pros at BANDS
UNLIMITED get the right band
for your next party Call 757 3210
JIMMY (alias JamesThanksfor
the birthday wishes Your other
message was clever yet quite
misleading Who are you trying to
fool????
WANTED EXOTIC DANCER
FOR PARTY. Call 752 4502, ask
tor Mike Lawrence.
LAST CHANCE DIET EXER
CISE WORKSHOP An intensive
program lasting 2 wks Daily diet
and exercise class will be enforc
ed Qualified instructor Diet
tested in New York and California
5 7 Lb weight loss expected plus
overall firming and improvement
m mind and body. Only one session
m Greenville To register call
758-0736.
NEAL Happy Birthday! Love
Sharon.
PLAN AHEAD
Cypress Gardens
Apartments
E. 10th Street
Cannon Court
Apartments
Greenville Blvd.
. . . 4.25c
100 OR MORE
5C 1 TO 99
�p -i$t� Pfk:�
on Be' t �"
'ioi�i�i l �� n ic� Salts SO t b Bag
- eg ot ice Dpmvv y -24 Hrs
ffl
Make arrangements NOW for
next year's apartments. Im-
mediate one bedroom vacancies
at Cypress Gardens. 60 new two
bedroom townhouses available
September 81 at Cannon Court.
'apei h
752-877; 967-9791
V.I
COPIES
PIRATES SPECIAL
Bouquet of Flowers and
a Bottle of Wine
$14.96
Call Flowers 'n' Frames
752-5330
Corner of 5th St. &
Hospital Emergency Entrance
FREE DELIVERY!
VISA MASTER CHARGE
Remco East, Inc. for Details.
758 6061
ALLIGATORS
FOR SALE
LOCATED AT
GREENVILLE C.C
OPEN EVERY DAY
8:00 A.M. TILL
DARK
'�1
Glossy or silk finish
is available
COME TO THE STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
FOR FAST, QUALITY PHOTO FINISHING fIT
EVERY DAY LOW PRICES
12 exp. color film 2.99
20 exp. color film4.55
24 exp. color film5.46
36 exp. color film 7.84
We offer complete film processing services:
Black & White, Color Slides, Movies, Enlargements, Reprints
Satisfaction Guaranteed
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
WRIGHT BUILDING
owned and operated by East Carolina University
PARTTIME AND FULLTIME
HELP WANTED Apply in per
son Hatteras Hammocks 110
Clark St GieenviMe
TYPING DONE Term papers
thesis, resumes, etc Call Jane
Pollock at 7S? 971?
S
Technical
Electronics
And
Maintenance,
Inc.
756-1387
Audio,Video.
2 Wa
Communications
Maintenance
(Preventive to
Overhaul)
Services directed b a Is!
(lass K (. licensed techni-
cian. Student of Applied
I'rnsics at Fast (arolina
I nisersits.
( onvcnieter Located
1 j Hlock Off Campus
Pick-Up and Deliver.
Available
90 Da Warrant
Period
PANTANA
BOB'S
WED. NITE
IS THE PL A CE
Come on
down and
PARTY W
THE QKT's
AND THEIR
LITTLE SISTERS
TOBE
Prizes to begiven awayThanks,
Hallow Dist, NewDeh& Apple
Records!
WESTERN
SIZZLIN
STEAKHOUSE
"The Family
Steak House"
55
item
Salad Bar
TAKEOUT
SERVICE
2903 E. 10th St.�
758-2712
264 By-Pass
756-0040
20
OFF
ALL MENU ITEMS
3:00 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. ONLY
MON.thruFRI.
PLUS
FREE TEA
with college I.D.
20 OFF ALL MENU ITEMS;
MON. thru FRI. from 3:00 p.m. to6:30p.m.
FREE DRINK with college ID.

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Title
The East Carolinian, April 7, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 07, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.124
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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