The East Carolinian, February 24, 1981






o
She lEaat Carolinian
Serving (he East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 55 No. 44
12 Panes
Tuesday, February 24, 1981
(.reenville. North Carolina
Circulation 10,000
Man Injured Slightly
In Fall From Minges
B PAl LCOLLINS
A Rock) Mount man who fell
from the tatters al Minges Coliseum
during the Jimmy Buffetl Saturda
night was apparently injured onlj
slighiK .
According to Paul Breitman,
associate adirectoi oi Mendenhall
Student Center, Joseph I Bass, 18,
fell from a ledge about 12 feel above
the highest bleachers in the col-
iseum.
Bass was treated for a broken
wrisl and linger at Pitt County
Memorial Hospital and released
Sund
Bass fell two stones (about 35
I to the ground outside Minges.
i he ledge he and a group of people
were sitting on was an overhang.
Breitman estimated the damage to
be at least $5,000. "When similar
damage occurred two and one hall
yeai � I cost $3,500 to repair the
Breitman said. With m-
on I'm sure it will probablv cost
tween $5,000 and $7,000
I here is no insurance to pa for
the damage and money for repairs
will come from concert profits.
Similar damage occurred two
years ago at the Outlaws-Molly Hat-
chet concert, but no one was in-
jured.
The ledge was not designed to
support an weight, Breitman said.
The Student Union Major Attrac-
tions Committee, which sponsored
the concert, is liable for the
damages, Breitman said.
A rescue squad team was at the
concert and reached Bass within a
minute oi the fall.
"It was a lucky thing we had a
rescue squad there said Breitman.
1 t. Jay Pennell of campus securi-
tv was stationed in the lobby of the
coliseum during the concert.
"I heard a loud noise, and 1
thought somebody had run through
the glass doors he said. "1 saw the
ceiling and a bunch of insulation ly-
ing on the ground and ran out
there
Pennell said that rescue squad
members were already there by the
time he got outside.
Pennell said (hat security officers
were not even aware that people
were up in the rafters.
"With that big crowd and the lights
out we couldsn't tell anybody was
up there
Major Attractions Chairman
Charles Sune said that more than 50
ushers and security officers were at
the concert.
"We try to protect people from
each other Sune said. "How are
supposed to protect them from
themselves too? It's just really an
unfortunate incident
Sune said that Bass' fall was the
only incident at the sold-out con-
cert. "It's too bad he said.
"Otherwise the concert was a total
success
Bass said he remembered little of
what happened. "1 was in a dae
he said. "One minute 1 was listening
to the concert, the next thing 1
remember is some people putting me
in a rescue truck
Bass said he was on the ledge
because there was no place else to
sit.
KO�N
Joseph Bass, 18, of Rocky Mount fell through this hole in the roof of Minges Coliseum. The accident occurred dur-
ing the second half of the .limmv Buffetl concert Saturdav night.
Housing Costs, Student Fees To Rise Next Year
Bv Oils ROBINSON
Mall Wrilrr
A I el proposal tor the
1981-1982 academic yeai is schedul-
ed to be submitted to the ECU
hoard ol trustees on March 16. and
students can expect increases in
several areas
According to Dr. Elmer Meyer,
vice chancellor for student life, the
proposal is tentative and would
result in an increase in student fees.
"We ate intending to keep fees
low said Meyer, "but we have to
pick up in utilities. Inflation is the
major problem
He added that the fee increase
would allow "services to be main-
tained, not increased
The proposed increase for fees
and room rental is SI92. Of this
total, SI66 would be used for on
campus housing. The remaining S26
would be used for other university
tees, such as athletics, intramurals,
and student activities and university
unions.
The $166 for room rent is a 28
percent increase from the $590 fee
of 1980-81. Dan K. Woolen, direc-
tor of housing operations, said this
amount includes a $60 fee for
telephone service.
"When the student moves in the
room explained Wooten, "there
will be a 'live' phone there. There
will be no installation charge or any
monthlv phone bill unless the stu-
dent makes a long distance call. This
is to offset the telephone cost. The
difference is the student doesn't
have to pay out o his pocket
Wooten stated that in the lobby
of each dormitory there will also be
a telephone. This telephone would
be used to call to a specific room.
This, Wooten explained, would
eliminate the noise on the floors of
the women's dormitories. Also, it
would prevent the women from hav-
ing to walk upstairs in the men's
dormitories.
Wooten said that the proposed
S756 total for room rent is con-
siderably less than most universities
in North Carolina.
He noted several estimated costs:
UNC-C Tiarlotie $822, UNC-
Greensboro $781, UNc
Wilmington S960, Western Carolina
SHOO. Each has a telephone system.
"The telephone is new and
something the students want he
concluded. "The system is not ef-
fective without 100 percent pat
ticipation
The remaining $106 would in-
clude: $52 for utilities; $26 for stu-
dent salaries; SI2 for dormitory sup-
plies, such as office material and
toiletries; $6 for capital out-lay,
such as chairs, mattresses, and other
furniture; and $10 for the an-
ticipated deficit.
Dr. Ken Karr, Director of
Athletics said a Si5 fee increase is
Situation Compared To Vietnam
California Pot Industry Sets Off 'War'
WILLITS, Caht (UPI) Califor-
nia's divisive, expensive and
escalating offensive against its mari-
juana growers often is compared
aptly to the Vietnam War.
The rhetoric and tactics of both
sides recalls the bitterness oi the
mid-1960s when the Indochina con-
flict polaraied the nation into
hawks and doves.
Professing to see light at the end
oi the tunnel, law enforcement of-
ficers and narcotics agents call tor
more money and manpower to wipe
out one of California's biggest cash
crops, estimated by some to be
worth SI billion.
The self-styled "guerrilla
farmers" contend the war against
them cannot be won.
As in Vietnam, front lines are dif-
ficult to pinpoint, but in the
forested hills of Mendocino County
the commercial growing of mari-
juana is rampant.
It also is risky. Local, state and
Profs To Be Selected
During the week of preregistra-
tion for the summer and fall
semesters (March 2-6), ECU
students will have the opportuni-
�. to vote for the outstanding
teachers they have had for at least
one undergraduate course for
credit during the fall or spring
semester o the 1980-81 academic
vear.
A computer processed voting
card with the student's name and
ID number will be available,
along with other preregistration
materials, from the student's
faculty advisor.
The voting card should be
deposi-cd in a ballot box located
in the Registrar's Office in
Whichard Building, in the same
area where the preregistration
course sheet is to be returned.
A student not preregistering
can also obtain the voting card
from the faculty advisor. A stu-
dent practice teaching away from
the campus will be given the
voting card and instructions by
the faculty supervisor.
The student may vote lor up to
three undergraduate course
teachers and is to assign each
nominated teacher a weight of 10
(highest rating), 8, or 6, depen-
ding on the intensity of each
nomination. Each student will
use the four digit code number
assigned to a teacher instead of
the faculty member's name. The
list of names and code numbers
will appear in the issue of The
East Carolinian.
Students should bear in mind
that the vote is for teachers whom
they feel are outstanding. It is not
a vole to find the most popular
teacher nor a vote to indicate
course preference.
The student vote will be
analysed by the Committee for
Teaching Effectiveness in order
to minimize any possible bias in
the vole due to differences in
such factors as class, size,
number of students who have had
the same instructor more than
once (yet, who have only one
vote), number of courses taught
and the grade distribution of the
instructor, etc. Announcement of
the results of the vote will be
made early in the fall of 1981.
Lab instructors who do not
assign final grades or instructors
of zero-credit courses are not
eligible for votes. Graduate
students are not to vote for any
faculty member on the basis of
graduate level courses taken in
which a graduate level grade was
assigned.
federal officers employ planes,
helicopters and raiding squads in an
effort to halt the cultivation of
marijuana plants that grow 12 feet
high and produce some of the
world's most potent pot.
Bert, 36, blond and bearded, is a
grower whose name is no really
Bert.
He owns 40 acres of remote land
in the foothills of the Coast Range
not far from Willits, a bustling town
140 miles north of San Francisco on
U.S. 101, otherwise known as the
Redwood Highway.
"This is a cottage industry said
Bert, who majored in journalism in
college before turning to pottery
making and then to growing mari-
juana.
"I grew 30 plants last year he
said. "They vielded an average of
three quarters of a pound each
He figures that at an average of
See POT, Page 3
being recommended for the sports
program. "The tee is needed tor the
basic cost of doing business and
conducting our 1" sports said
Karr. " This concerns housing,
travel, and food n the road Karr
stated that inflation has had an ef-
fecl on the teams' awav schedules.
He added thai athletes receiving
financial aid has also caused a need
for the increase.
According to Rudolph Alex-
ander, director of Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center, the center emplovs
more than 50 students whose
salaries are paid out oi the S43 each
full-time student pavs tor the center.
"We had to let a secretary and a
housekeeper iio said Alexander.
"If it wera not for inflation, we
could operate with little or no in-
crease. It just cost more money for
books, recreation, films and enter-
tainers The center is requesting a
S4� fee increase.
Dr. Wayne I dwards, director of
Intramural-Recreational Services,
said the department ol intramurals
is requesting a Si increa e. The cur-
rent fee is S20. "Primarily, there are
three reasons tor the proposed tee
increase explained Idwards.
"First, inflation is the major
reason. We are requesting a five pe;
cent increase. This is well below the
inflation level. Second, there has
been an increase in sports clubs
from six in September to 1? at the
present time. Third, we are respon-
sible for safeguarding the students
while they are participating in the
intramurals. Therefore, some o! it
would go toward sports medicine
The Media Board is requesting a
S4 increase. This increase would
result in a S16.75 fee.
David Creech, chairman of the
Media Board said the fee would be
used to cover the cost oi printing,
photography and electronic equip-
ment for the campus radio station.
He added that this is (he first in-
crease since the Media Board was
formed in 1978.
The SGA, the SGA Transit Ser-
vices, the Student Fund Accounting
Office, and Student Health Service
did not submit requests for an in-
crease for next vear.
ECGC Bill Passes
Despite Opposition
Photo By AENOY RUSSELL
The Jimmy Buffett concert Saturday night at Minges was a sellout.
By PALI COLLINS
Nrs I dititr
After 40 minutes of debate, the
SGA Legislature voted Monday to
give the East Carolina Gay Com-
munity $75 to pay for the cost oi
pamphlets the group makes
available to students.
In its busiest and longest meeting
oi the semester, the legislature voted
$750 to extend the present contract
of the SGA Legal Service for five
weeks, defeated a measure recom-
mending that executive officers in
the legislature resign if they are run-
ning in the upcoming election and
changed the date for any run-off
election that might be held this year.
Debate on the ECGC bill centered
on whether or not the SGA should
give support to the group.
Speaking against the bill, Jess
Yates said that he could not con-
done giving money to the group.
"We shouldn't give money to a
group that supports such a
lifestyle he said.
Taking the opposite view, Mary
Goold said, "We've already
recognized the group. I'm sure that
for the money ($75) the group does
a lot more good than harm
After debate ended the bill passed
on a voice vote.
The SGA had ratified the ECGC
Constitution the week before by a
13-12 vote.
In another controversial matter
the legislature voted $750 to
replenish the fund for its legal refer-
ral service.
A number of legislators question-
ed the route the bill took since it did
not go through committee. Others
felt that a cheaper referral service
should be sought.
Garv Williams introduced the
resolution that would recommend
that executive officers running in
the March elections resign.
Williams felt that a conflict ot in-
terest could arise in the legislature it
some oi its members were running
for office.
If the motion had passed it would
have affected SGA Speaker Peggy
Davison and Appropriations Chair-
man Ben Singleton.
Davison is a candidate for vice
president and Singleton is running
for president.
In a related move. Rules and
Judictary Chairman Russell Over-
man resigned. Overman is also a
candidate for president.
Eleven candidates have filed for
the March 4 election.
In addition to Overman and
Singleton, Lester Nail and Guy Dix-
on are running for president.
Davison will be up against Andre
Nickens and Marvin Braxton for
vice president.
Incumbent Kirk Little will face
Angela Pepe in the race for
treasurer. Lou Anne Forbes and
Denise Phthisic are the candidates
for treasurer.
Elections Chairman Al Patrick
told the legislature that a can-
didates' debate may be held next
Monday.
?
r

!





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 24, 1981
-
T
I
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
The deadline for submitting an
nooncements is Pnday at 5 p m
c.tor the Tuesday issue and Tuesday
at noon tor the Thursday issue An
nooncements submitted atter
these deadlines will not be printed
All announcements should be dou
ble spaced and typewritten or
neatly printed on 8 by 11 inch
paper Messages should be Kept as
short as possible and contain only
essential information The person
submitting the announcement
should include his name and
telephone number at the bottom ot
the page
BIBLE STUDY
Bible Study at the Methodist Stu
dent Center has been changed
trom Sunday nights It will now be
held on Tuesday night at 8 00 p m
in the Chapel Visitors are
welcome
SOULS
There wl be a SOUL S
meeting on Thursday, Feb 26 Im
portant business will be discussed
Please plan to attend The meeting
will be at 7 p m in the Cultural
Center
CITY COUNCIL
Notice is hereby given that the
Greenville City Council will con
duct a workshop meeting on Mae
day. Feb 23. 1981 at 8 00 a m at
the Public Works Facility. 1500
Beaty Street tor the purpose of
discussing goals and obiectives
AMBASSADORS
There will be an Ambassadors
meeting Sunday March 1 at 7 00
in Mendenhali Student Center
room 244 Elections and amend
ment changes will be discussed
AFRICAN MUSIC
"African Music' (MUSC 54761
will be offered Fall 1981 The
course is open, with permission of
instructor, to non music students
as well as music students, non
music seniors receive General
Education Fine Arts credit and
non music graduate students
receive credit toward free elec
lives The course stresses the
history ano geography, society
and culture of Africa, and surveys
African music within this context
Classroom opportunities tor per
forming some of the music are m
eluded m the course
STD
Sigma Tau Delta, English honor
society, will have a meeting
Thursday. Feb 26, at 700 p m in
Austin 132 Susan Donaldson and
Beruta Erdmann of the English
and Art History Departments
respectively will present a pro
gram on "Seascapes in Melville
and Whitman " A short business
meeting will precede the program
Any interested person is invited to
attend
HELP WANTED
Interviewers are needed for a
study of recreational tishing in the
Sounds ot North Carolina The pro
ject will be m progress trom
March l to Nov 30. 1981, and will
involve interviewing recreational
fishermen at designated launching
sites m eastern North Carolina
Training will be given Applicants
must be of sophomore, lunior,
senior, or graduate standing and
own or have access to a car For
further information and applica
tion forms, contact Peter Fricke
or Marcus Hepburn, Institute tor
Coastal and Marine Resources,
East Carolina University,
telephone 757 6220
BUSINESS MAJORS
The Max R Joyner Alomn.
Scholarship will be awarded dur
ing the spring semester to a full
time student who is pursuing a
degree in the School of Business
The scholarship will be tor the
amount of tuition and fees tor a
resident student
Students interested m making
application may secure forms
from the Financial Aid Office or
trom the following department of
fices m the School of Business
Accounting Department, R325
Economics Department R238
Finance Department R343�
Marketing and Management
Department R137
Ail applications must be submit
ted to Ruth Jones (Raw! 334;
Chairman of the School of
Business Scholarship Committee,
by March l
Recipients will be selected on
Hie bass of scholarship and
� :enshp Final selection will be
made b� April 1 by the ECU Stu
dent Scholarships, Fellowships
ano Financial Aid Committee
from candidates submitted to the
Commiee b. the Dean of 'he
School of Business
PERCUSSION RECITAL
wo percussion students in the
School ot Music Eric Okamoto
ano James Ray Roberts jr . will
present a iomt senior reictal at
7 OOP m Monday, March 2. in the
A j Fletcher Recital Han
The program is open to the
public free of admission charge
MUSIC
Students preregistering may
enroll for Fine Arts General
Education credit in Music Ap
preciation (2208), Music of the
Theatre (2228), History of Jan
Music (22581, Orchestral Music
(2218). African Music (54760) Per
formance groups accepting many
non music maiors are Marching
Band, University Chorale, Men's
Glee Club. Women's Chorus,
Women's Glee Club Limited
spaces may exist for private and
group lessons on some in
struments
TWIG FELLOWSHIP
People learning the Bible, so we
will know the principles of living
the Word ot God sets forth Then
as we apply these principles to our
lives, we learn how to help people
help themselves and enjoy life
John 10 10, I Tim 6 17 jom us in
our quest to learn the Word of Goo.
which is the Will of God Monday
and Thursday (23 Feb and 26
FebMendenhali Student Center.
Rm 212 at 7 30 p m (Also Tues
24 Feb and Thurs . 26 Feb 8112
noon, Rm 212 )
MANAGER WANTED
Anyone desiring to be a
manager for the baseball team
should contact the baseball office
m Scales Field House at 757 6471
Experience in some type of
athletics is helpful, but not re
quired This employment will
start immediately
AED
On Tuesday Feb 24, Alpha Ep
s lor Delta preprofessionai society
wilt conduct a business meeting at
7 30 p m m Flanagan 307 Dr
James L Smith of the philosophy
department wn discuss bioeth.es
Also a bake sale will be held on
Wednesday, Feb 25 in front of the
Students Supply Store All
members and interested persons
are urged to attend the meeting
and brmg baked goods tor the
bake sale
TWIG FELLOWSHIP
People learning the Bible, so we
will know the principles of living
the word of God sets forth Then as
we apply these principles to our
lives we learn how to help people
help themselves and enjoy life
John '0 10. I Tim 6 17 Join us in
our quest to learn the Word ot God.
which is the Will of God
(Thursday, 26 Feb . at 12 noon and
7 30 p m , Rm 212 (next to the
music listening room) Mendenhali
Student Center
SCHOLARSHIPS
The Latney W Pittard, Jr
Memorial Scholarship and the E
A Thomas, Jr Accounting
Scholarship will be awarded dur
ing spring semester The scholar
ships will be tor approximately the
amount of tuition for resident
students
Students interested m making
application should secure forms
from the Accounting Departmen
tal Off'ce iRawi 325 or the Fman
clal Aid Office All applications
must be submitted to Ruth Jones
Rawl 3341, chairman of scholar
ship committee in the Accounting
Department, by March 1
Recipients will be selected on
the basis of scholarship citizen
ship and need, n that order in
addition, the permanent residence
of a candidate for the Latney W
Pittard, jr Memorial Scholar
ship should be m Eastern North
Carolina (East ot Highway I 95) or
any county west of Highway I 95 m
which Pittard and Perry inc .
maintains an office
Final selection will be made by
April 1 by the ECU Student
Scholarships Fellowships and
Financial Aid Committee from
candidates submitted to the Com
mittee by the Dean of the School of
Business
TUBARECITAL
Bruce Mosier. graduate
teaching assistant m the School of
Music, will present a tuba reictal
at 9 00 p m , Monday March 2, in
the A J Fletcher Recital Hall
Assisting m the program will be
music students vai Parks, piano
Angela Boone, flute. John Jones.
Joe Alexander, and Bill
Chamberlain, tuba, Billy Stocks.
Mike Rogers, trombone ano
faculty member George
Broussard, trombone
The program is open to the
public No admission will be
charged
INTERNSHIPS
The Co op Off'ce has intorma
tion concerning summei tern
ships for both graduate and
undergraduate students who have
backgrounds m computer science
Students should review internship
descriptions posted outside 313
Rawl 'f interested and should con
tact the Co op Office tor additional
information
CORSO
Attention all social work and
corrections maiors and intended
maiors There will be a Corso
meeting on Tuesday Feb 24 at 5
p m m Mendenhali room 248 All
members are urged to attend'
New members are welcome!
UNITED WAY
Dr Rosalie Ann Maritun. cam
pus Chairman for the 1980 United
Way Campaign, is pleased to an
nounce that East Carolina Univer
sity contributed a total of 113 per
cent of its established goal The
actual dollar representation was
over J22.700 This amount surpass
ea the 1979 contribution by 30 per
cent! Dr Haritun would like to
take this opportunity to thank all
those who contributed to this sue
cessful effort The university com
munitv can be proud ot con
tnbuting its fair share to the
United Way Campaign
GENERAL COLLEGE
The General College has chang
ed some preregistration advising
procedures Students should see
Official Announcements No 6 and
No 7 for information on advising
appointments and on procedures
for completion of preregistration
advising
AP
East Carolina university will
host and co sponsor a regional
seminar March 19 on Advanced
Placement, a program by which
high school students earn college
credits tor successful completion
of advanced courses
The seminar is for secondary
and collegiate faculty and school
administrators at the secondary
and postsecondary level �
superintendents, principals,
guidance and curriculum person
nel, deans, admissions and
registration officers
Individual sessions by discipline
will be led by experienced Advanc
ed Placement teachers and ad
ministrators and will include Ad
ministration. American History,
Art. Biology, Calculus, Chemistry.
Classics, English, Eurpopean
History. French, German, Music,
Physics and Spanish The seminar
is one of nine being sponsored
lomtly by institutions and the
southern regional office of the Col
lege Board, according to Walter
Bortz ECU director of Admis
sions
INVENTORY
MANAGEMENT
"Inventory Management a
one day seminar to help
managaers develop inventory
planning and control systems, will
be sponsored by the East Carolina
University Division of Continuing
Education March 6
All sessions will be held in the
Greenville Ramada Inn
Seminar director is D� Carl W
Goodmg of the ECU School of
Business Department of
Marketing and Management and
former Clemson University facul
ty member
THe program's topics are "The
Inventory Management Func
tion "Nine Key Results Areas
for improve Inventory Manage
ment "inventory System Con
cepts" and "inventory Control
Concepts "
The seminar is particularly
recommended for purchasing
managers, stock supervisors, pro
duction control managers, small
business proprietors, parts
distributors and management
trainees
Since only 40 persons will be ac
cepted for the seminar, early
registration is advised
Further information and
registration materials are
available from "Inventory
Management Division of Conti
numg Education ECU Green
ville. N C 27834
WORKSHOP
Careers for North Carolina
women interested m science,
mathematics engineering and
social science are Jhe topic for a
one day workshop at Meredith
College m Raleigh on Saturday.
April 4
Resarch Triangle institute is
conducting the workshop under a
grant from the National Science
Foundation
Applications should be made as
soon as possible by calling collect
to Research Triangle institute
staff members Mary Ellen Taylor
at 919 541 6324. or Carol Place at
919 541 6318
SIGN LANGUAGE
The Sign Language Club will
have its regular bi monthly
meeting on Sunday, March l
beginning at 6 p.m in the multil
purpose room of Mendenhali Stu
dent Center There will be a
covered dish dinner before the
meeting and a captioned film
afterward This week's film is
"The Sound of Music " An
members are urged to attend and
any interested persons are
welcomed You need not be a
member Hey, check us out!
HARASSMENT
HOTLINE
Sexual harassment is a
widespread student faculty pro
blem at ECU. affecting 33 percent
of the female students A
telephone line is now open to
receive calls from students who
have been offended by unwanted
sexual looks comments sugges
tions, or touches from faculty
members It you have been offend
ed. please call Your confidential!
ty is guaranteed Statements will
not be used to file complaints
against faculty members, our pur
pose is to gather information only
The hotline is in operation Mon
Thurs 2 10, Fn Sat 12 4. Sun 4 10
We need to talk with you Please
call Lmda an ECU student, at
752 3484
ADVISOR
Any faculty member interested
m advising a newly forming cam
pus organization whose purpose is
to promote the consciousness of
world citizenship please phone
752 4483 or 758 9530 as soon as
possible
GENERAL COLLEGE
The General College has Chang
ed some preregistration advising
procedures Students should see
Official Announcements no 6 ano
no 7 for information on advising
appointments and on procedures
for completion of preregistration
advising
ELECTION
Anyone interested in running in
SOULS election, contact
Gracie Wells at 752 9802 or Eula
Moore at 752 8981 The deadline is
March 12, 1981 The positions
available are president, vice
president secretary, treasurer,
parliamentarian and historian
PHOTOGRAPHY
Two photography courses will
be ottered on Tuesday evenings at
East Carolina University this
semester
Camera I the basic course,
will meet Feb 10 March 17. and
"Camera II meets March 31
April 28 Class sessions in each
course are set for 7 9 p m on
campus
Participants m each course
should have their own cameras,
preferably 35 millimeter or larger
information and registration
materials tor these and other
evening course offerings are
available from the Office of Non
Credit Programs. Division of Con
tmumg Education, ECU, Green
ville, N C . telephone 757 6143
AMA
The Albert R Conley Chapter of
the American Marketing Assooa
tion will hold its next meeting on
Wednesday Feb 25, a' 5 00 in
Rawl 130 The�guest speaker will
be Mr Davd Joyner. a sales
representative from Harrington
Manufacturing All interested per
sons are urged to attend
SLAP
The Eleventh Annual Speech
and Hearing Symposium located
at the Belk Building Auditorium at
ECU will be held Feb 26 and 27
The Symposium will augment the
professional growth and
knowledge of those who provide
services to the language
disordered child The Sym
posium's mam session concerning
"The Language Disordered Child
Clinical Applications ot
Pragmatics" will be given by Lyn
da Miller, Ph D Mini sessions will
include "The Language Station
Approach to Language Therapy"
given by LaRose Daniels. M S .
CCC SP. and Larry Livengood
M A Ed as well as Tom Hawley.
R M T , who will be speaking on
"Music as a Facility, ig Modality
m Speech and Language Develop
ment " All interested persons are
invited For further information
contact the ECU Speech and Hear
mg Clinic
TUTORS
The Accounting Society will
tutor accounting 2401 ano accoun
ting 2521 every Tuesday and
Wednesday in Rawl 341 from 4 00
5 00
BSU
The Baptist Student union will
have its fellowship supper this
evening at 5 30 Cost for the meal
is $1.75. Following supper, Kent
McCuUough, guest speaker, will
talk on "Vocations" Join us at 511
East 10th street, (next to Wen
dy'si
Financial Aid Faces 20 Percent Cut
(CPS)�Fully half the
nation's college
students might have to
change their plans for
next year if Congress
passes President
Ronald Reagan's plan
to cut federal financial
aid by 20 percent,
financial aid ad-
ministrators warn.
The cuts recom-
mended by the Office
of Management and
Budget have private
colleges in particular
scurrying to devise
methods to compensate
for the loss in grants
and loans. But all col-
lege administrators
contacted by College
Press Service feared the
proposed cuts would
destroy their
enrollments.
Don Mullen, head of
financial aid at the
University of Montana
and the president of the
Rocky Mountain
Association of Student
Financial Aid Ad-
ministrators, predicts
that if the cuts are ap-
proved, "Aid to part-
time students will be
the first eliminated.
Then we'd probably
have to make aid
dependent on grades
Even then, Mullen
estimates that Montana
still would have "about
500 hurt students
which would
"unquestionably have
a significant impact on
enrollment
Of major conse-
quence to Mullen and
other financial aid ad-
ministrators are the
recommendations
made concerning Pell
Grants, National Direct
Student Loans, and
Guaianteed Student
loans.
Specifically, Office
of Management and
Budget (OMB) Director
David Stockman wants
to cut 286,000 students
froam the Pell
(formerly BEOG) pro-
gram bv restricting the
grants to students from
families making less
than $25,000 a year.
Mullen frets such a
move would "cut off a
couple hundred
students" at Montana
alone, while Donald
Chenelle of Case-
Western in Ohio asserts
"it would be an incredi-
ble hardship" for those
families with more than
one child in college.
"If you've got two or
three kids in graduate
and undergraduate
school, even if you earn
a higher-than-average
income, you're going to
have trouble putting
those kids through
school unless you can
pay in installments over
a long period of time.
Pell Grants gave people
that opportunity
Chenelle says.
Stockman also wants
to eliminate the Na-
tional Direct Student
Loan program over the
next four years. The
loss would pose addi-
tional problems for
students hoping to
"make up for the loss
of a rant with a loan
says Paul Chrisman of
Wichita State.
Chrisman's financial
aid office manages $1
million yearly in
NDSLs, some of which
is used to fund other
programs, like
workstudy.
The Guaranteed Stu-
dent Loan plan,
however, is the largest
federal aid program,
and administrators
predict thai
Stockcman's recom-
mended changes in the
GSL program could
cause the worst pro-
blems and most
drastically affect
enrollment.
Stockman proposes
the elimination of the
"in-school interest sub-
sidy" program of
Guaranteed Student
Loans. Under the cur-
rent system, students
repay bank loans for
tuition at nine percent
interest rates, while the
government pays the
difference between nine
percent and the regular
interest rate. Under the
new plan, students will
have to pay the regular
market rate, which now
hovers between 17 and
20 percent.
Benjamin CuUey of
Occidental College
mourns that the loss of
any part of the GSL
program "would be a
very heavy blow" to
schools. Nationally, it
provides $4.8 billion to
students yearly.
Over 600 students get
$1.25 million in GSLs
every year at Occiden-
tal, and CuUey warns
that many of those peo-
ple would have to
transfer to a public
school if that money
dried up.
"We simply don't
have the resources to
make up for that
money Culley says.
"One-third of our
students would be af-
fected by such a thing,
and they'd have to get
the money somewhere
else in order to stay at
Occidental
Almost half the
students enrolled at
Maine's Babson Col-
lege are dependent on
GSLs, according to Ed-
wina Middleton of the
financial aid office.
Any change in the pro-
gram would "pose a
threat" to private
schools, she says,
because students simply
couldn't afford the
high tuition costs of
such colleges.
But if GSLs provide
for 30-50 percent of
undergraduates, Emory
University's Herman
Reese estimates that at
least 60-75 percent of
the nation's graduate
students rely on the
program.
m
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each ot these advertised items is required to be readily available for
I below the advertised price in each A&P Store, except as specifically
in this ad
sale at or
noted J
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT FEB. 28, AT A&P IN GREENVILLE, N.C.
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL
DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
GRADE"A"
2 LowfatMilk
ANN PAGE m m Qa
1 Lowfat Milk Gal $1.89 � OJ
Gal. Jug J
Great Steak Giveaway
Register to Win s10000 Worth of
Steaks or Meat Of Your Choice!
Drawing Will Be Held Saturday Night At 6:00 P.M. To Determine
100�� WINNER In Each A&P Store In North And South Carolina
(Except Aiken & Beaufort). Winning Ticket From Each Store Will
Be Forwarded To A&P Charlotte Office. Winner Will Receive By
Mail A 10000 Gift Certificate For Steaks or Meat Of Your Choice.
No Purchase Necessary. You Must Be f.
16 Years Of Age To Enter A&P
Employees And Dependents Not
Eligible To Win
ENTRY BLANK-GREAT STEAK GIVEAWAY
NAME
STREET ADDRESS
CITY
STATE
TELEPHONE
ZIPCODE
ENTER OFTEN � NO PURCHASE NECESSARY
HOLLY FARMS GRADE "A"
Mixed
Fryer Parts
JUMBO PKG (6 LBS OR MORE)
Whole Fryer Legs it
89�)
lb.
A&P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
Ground
Chuck
(3 lbs. or more)
Ib.
LUNDY FRESH
Pork Roast
99�
Boston Butt
SOUTHERN STAR
Turkey Hot Dogs
59c
WHITE HOUSE�SAVE 45'
Apple Sauce
- 100
WHITE HOUSE
Apple Juice �iC
bti y7v 0 cans
12oz.
pkg.
ANN PAGE
Orange Juice
99c
ANN PAGE
Potato Chips
8oz.
twin
pack
V2 gal.
ctn.
30 COUPON
ANN PAGE�REALLY FINE
Mayonnaise
LIMIT ONE WITH THIS COUPON
GOOD THRU SAT , FEB 2$, AT A&P IN GREENVILLE N C
1qt.
jar
� SI-
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I
I
LIQUID iftf
Clorox Bleach �M- OiT j
LIMIT ONE WITH THIS COUPON
GOOD THRU SAT FEB ?B AT A&P I N GRE E NVILLE . N C
I
'665!
45� COUPON
CONTAINS RICH fet d � �
BRAZILIAN COFFEES � . . Mm 1 wA 1
Eight0dockffi3?j
LIMIT ONE WITH THIS COUPON
GOOD THRU SAT FEB 28 AT ASP IN GREENVILLE. N C
zzETARr
FLORIDA SWEET & JUICY
Oranges
SAVE 65�
125
size
WINESAP
IMPORTED DIRECT FROM SOUTH AMERICA
Green Grapes
99�
eco less
Co
Th
t fyl
ecu rive
I
PC
b
i tinl

i:

pa
on his!
ot life,
alkms
woods
tie
im i
IV
lumhtl
green!
the g
I've pi
Bartlefl
trees.





I
I
I
I
1
I
I
I
I
I
I
I! I M K'il IM
I I ItKI k 24. IWI
Petro Explains His
Powers To Audience
Robert Petro
�ON JORDAN
Congress Different World
Than That Of Presidency
W S H 1 N (
wit
a
only
lenu.
a
w hile
1 v
iouse,
the
ninion
;m am
H
IUS,
ecutive what the news is
I to determine how
andle il.
i
iU5
iblt
ar
information,
always is
to the presi-
consistent
� v iev.
ei W hue
illustrated this
Jody Powell was
.11 m C arter's
- � � . for a
1 in oneti
iw n strengths,
p a tight rein
I e information
. from the White
House and he shaped il
well. He was an
and dedicated
ot c arter's
a ell was
thai
a heller
tides
he was closer
and the
s knew il. In his
briefings or the
frequent tete-a-tetes in
his office, he often
ff a news
bj refusing to
ti mining aside
questions. Or, it he
through expan-
sive answers or his
oice o t poi n I�. d
words he was able to
generate news.
c apitol Hill is the
opposite ol all 'his.
S o m e w h ere,
somebody has the in-
formation on almost
am subject imaginable
thai he is more than
willing to share with a
reporter.
There are 100
sen a!ors and 435
representatives many
ol w horn are gari ulous
and not at all modest
about expressing their
opinion. I hese also are
times when they do noi
feel especially bound to
adhere to their party's
official stand.
It they are reticent,
many oi then 20,000
stafl members are not.
1 he same traits thai ai
tract thest aides many
of them young and
eager to the political
intrigues and environ-
ment of Capitol Hill
also make them
vulnerable to spilling
the beans about almost
any thing.
Many of these aides.
particulai ly committee
staff members, also are
bona tide experts in
their fields. Congres-
sional aides almost
always have an edge
over their hue House
counterparts in mastei y
on an issue.
I 11 eie also are
log i si ieal handicaps
that make the White
House a more difficuli
reporting assignment.
Reporters have access
only to the White-
House press area. So
they must rely on the
telephone. There are
only a handful ol aides
to call on am one
topic, and the reporter
is at the mercy oi their
willingess to return
calls.
r h e r e are t ew
physical restraints at
the Capitol. 11 a couple
members of Congress
men auk's
unavailable, there
umpteen others to
a r e
are
call.
reporter can drop in
on offices or linger in
the corridors to nab a
congressman for a mo-
ment's com ei sation.
Somevi there
aie those aides oi con-
ssmen w ho w ill talk
and it's not
find thei
Maid to
AftMY MAW STORE J
ti(N(tl � IS Bom-er
0 lil 6. Fl.t�t Snorkel �
Jackr't Pf�cots P'ks
SHoes. Combat Boot Plus
(11 S E vni S'rp�' �
i
By CHAD BUFFK1N
Wistani News 1 ditor
Psychic Robert Petro
"set minds to wonder-
ing during a press
conference last Mon-
day afternoon at
Mendenhall Student
Center.
Petro, a nationally
k now n New York
psychic, held a lecture-
demonstration earliei
that afternoon at Rose
High School before
returning to Durham
where he is currently
assisting police in an in-
vestigation.
Petro said he first
realized his ability
when he was 5 years
old. "Teachers noticed
something different
about me and sent me
to the school
psychiatrist he said.
"In later years I
withdrew completely
and went into my ow n
world
At the age of 33
Petro gave away his
flower shop in Manhat-
tan to become a
psychic. "My pur-
pose he explained,
"was to help people
Petro's ability as a
psychic has brought
him into the public eye
on many occasions.
Considered by many to
be one of the top
psychics in the country,
he has worked with
federal agencies and
4
with police in several
slates.
He has been called
on to assist in murdei
cases, bank robberies
and to help locate miss
ing persons. Although
Petro's lees foi
assisting private in-
dividuals is rathei high,
all Ins work foi law en-
forcement agencies is
voluntary.
In addition to woi k-
mg with the police,
Petro frequently lights
up the switch boards ol
broadcast si at ions
across the nation while
COn dllCting 1 ad 1 o
shows.
lie recently did a
show toi radio station
WITN m Greenville.
"1 have never seen
the audience gel so ex-
cited over any of my
guests the way they did
w lien Robert Petro was
on the an said Allen
Handel man. a disc
jockey at WITN. "In
the si years I have
done the show, no one
lias ever proved the �ay
Robert Petro did
Petro stated a the
press t � ;
day a!lei noon that he is
tired of having to prove
luniselt everywhere he
goes. "I regrel that
people often see me as a
performei and as an
oddity he said. 'Tin
no! a cuckoo. I have a
vast a in ouni oi
knowledge
On several occasions
Petro has attempted to
wain prominent figures
of forthcoming danger.
"I think I could have
com meed John 1 en-
non of his personal
danger fie told Globe
reporters recently.
Petio gave Globe a
copy o! a. letter he sent
lo I ennon 10 day s
before he was killed.
pproximately 40
students and visitors
were present at the
press conference. Petro
answered quest ions
posed by the audience
bu I iet used t o
demonstrate his
abilities in other than a
general nature.
What does Petro say
about the future?
He feels thai people
will see more money
now that Reagan has
been elected. "Many of
Reagan's tactics will be
opposed Petro said.
"but in tune, people
will realize the changes
were necessary.
SUMMER JOB OPENINGS FOR CAMP COUNSELORS
at Camp Sea (jU (boys) and Camp Seafarer (girls) Serving as a
camp counselor is a challenging and rewarding opportunity to
wort- with young people, ages 7 16 Sea Gull and Seafarer are
health and character development camps located on the coast
of North Carolina and feature sailing, motor boating, and
seamanship plus many usual camping activities including a
wide variety of maior sports Qualifications include a genuine
interest in young people, ability to instruct in one phase of the
camps' programs, and excellent references For further infor
mahon and application, please write a brief resume of training
and experience m area(s) skilled to Don Cheek, Director.
Camps Sea Gull i I rer, PO Box 10976, Raleigh, Not
Carolina 2760b
SAAD'S SHOE
RLPAIR
! 1 ijr.tnrlo w
7SS 1228
Qualitv Repair
Rip
& Sew
Alterations
20 years of
Experience
Reasonable
Rates
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757-1136
Tfc Ham @ s�
OMM 1 HOUtl
$��m Copf �� ' ' :
Oi L�i �lt� S
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'Of 4 �"� :
Green,
RIGGAN
SHOE
REPAIR
Across From
Bount Harvey
Parking In
Front & Back
O Shoo
PHONE
758 0204
i I W �th S'
Taco Bell
Daily
Special
2.00
Monday P'uS tax
Enchirito, Bean Burrito - Small Drink
Tuesday
Burrito Surpreme, Tostada - Small
Drink
Wednesday
Beefy Tostada, Taco -Small Drink
Thursday
Beef Burrito, Pintos 'n Cheese - Small
Drink
Friday
Combo Burrito, Taco
Saturday
Two Taco Surpremes
Sunday
Two Tacos, Pintos 'n Cheese - Small
Drink
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OYSTER BAR
NO W OPEN!
"A Great
Seafood
Restaurant
CALL FOR OUR
NIGHTLY SPECIALS
'REDUCED PATES IN OYSTER BAR (TUES. THURS.
TUES , WED, THURS. � (OYSTER BAR ONLY) 1 DOZ
HALFSHELL OYSTERS (STEAMED OR RAW)
ANDAMUGOFYOUR FAVORITE BEVERAGE
S099
FOSDKKS
1890 Seafood
PAOTY ROOMS AVAILABLE
CALL FOR INFORMATION
ALSO WE LL DO ANY CATER
ING FOR YOUR SCHOOL
FRATERNITY OR FUNCTION
2311 S. EVANS ST. EXT GREENVILLE
CALL
756-2011
ust tell us ,
at you want.
Your ArtCarved representative will be on campus soon to show you the
latest in class ring design: JCitl z I vies to choose from, you'll be proud to select
your one-of-a-kind l tell us what you want And be on the
lookout for f pus to get you where you want
OFFICIAL ECU CLASS RING
Feb. 25 26, 27
ECU Student Supply Store Lobbv
Pot Industry
Faces Battle
( ontinucd Frow Pane 1
$2,000 a pound, his
crop grossed about
5,000.
I here were heavy ex-
pense He paid
$10 .in hour
inicure1 t he
plants while the) were
maturing to a height of
12 feet. He spent about
$600 on fertilizer and
special soil which he
packed into the woods
on his back.
"It's a very nice way
of life Bert said. "It
allows you to live in the
woods. Bv having a lit-
tle ca h crop you can
improve our propert).
I've just bought some
lumber to build a
greenhouse. It shortens
t lie growing season.
I've put in an orchard
Bartlett pear and apple
trees. I hope to raise
some wine grapes. I've
spent some money to
ti up mv pickup
truck
Bert said he did not
worry much about
"narcs
The Kast Carolinian
Published ever Tuesda, ana
Thursday aufng the academic
year and eve'i Wednesdrt.
ing the summer
The East Car . "e o
fioal newspaper ot East
Carolina University owned
operated and published tor and
by the students ot Eas' Carolina
University
Subscription Rates
Business S3S earl
All others 135 ean.
Second class postage paid t
Greenville N C
The East Carolm.an ott tes
are located m the Old South
Building on the campus ot ECU
Greenville, N C
TelehcjnjSMJO
THE HUM? IS COMING
Wednesday Night February 25th
A New Nite Comes To The
huMp nite:
So to help you get over the HUMP on Wednesdays
There is NO COVER CHARGE
A quarter buys alot until 11:00
Fifty cents buys alot from 1 l:Oo
THURSDAY � THE ORIGINAL COLLEGE NITE
IS BETTER THAN EVER!
No cover charge all nite for students with LD.
and fifty cents buys alot until 11:00!
A BRAND NEW NITE �
AND A TRADITION MADE BETTER
DON'T MISS kEM!





�tre iEaat (Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Chris Lichok. ��,�� tfemw
Jimmy DuPREE, nanag,m
P.AUl LlNCKE, Dirtctorof A4vrust�t
D.Wl SEVERiN, Btamtss t
Anita Lanc:aster, �, m
Pal i Coi i ins. v�w �
CHARI IS CHANDI ER sporisBdu
David Norris. �,�&���
Februar) 24, 1981
Opinion
Page 4
Civic Center
Benefits Campus And Community
It would be fabulous if top-name
acts like Bruce Springsteen and Pat
Benatar would perform here in
Greenville. If the annual com-
mencement exercises could be held
indoors, they could not be ruined by
the heat or rain. The metis' and
womens' basketball teams could
really shine playing in a more pro-
fessional atmosphere. All of these
possibilities may become reality if a
new coliseum is built here in Green-
ville.
The proposed major arena would
be an eastern regional center. The
facility could draw top-name per-
formers, acts that people would
travel from all around the state to
see. Information from the Student
Union indicates that there was a
good profit made on the sold-out
Jimmy Buffet concert this past
weekend at Minges. If there was a
facility here that would house
enough people for a major concert,
the profits could be tremendous.
Commencement, which at present
can be a disaster if the weather is
bad, could be held inside the new
facility. There would be adequate
seating for observers, and perfect
weather conditions every year.
What about our up and coming
basketball program? What a
fabulous incentive for the players it
would be if the games were held in a
major arena. It would also en-
courage more attendance and en-
thusiasm on the part of the student
body and area residents.
Greenville, with East Carolina
University right here, is the perfect
location for this coliseum. It would
not only benefit the university and
the city, but the entire region.
Plans for this coliseum are
another step in the growth and ex-
pansion at the University and in the
community as well. With all o' the
positive benefits it would bring, this
dream will surely become a reality in
the very near future.
Concert Is A 'Major' Success
Concerts are back at ECU.
With last Saturday's Jimmy Buf-
fett concert sell out, it appears thai
the Student Union Major Attrac-
tions Committee has things again
under control. All tickets to the con-
cert were gone by 5 p.m. Saturday,
leaving hundreds from as far away
as Greensboro out in the cold.
Credit should be given to the Ma-
jor and Special Concerts Commit-
tees who as volunteers, worked to
provide the campus with
first-rate entertainment.
After the Pat Benatar
fiasco in December, the
committees regrouped and
worked to pull in acts for
early spring semester.
Again their work was in
vain, though it was no
fault of anyone on campus
along came Jimmy Buffett.
Within days of learning of the
Jimmy Buffett concert possibility,
the committees booked the act and
began working to promote the
show. Their hard work paid off to
the tune of 6,138 tickets.
There was an unfortunate inci-
dent that involved a patron who
decided he would climb onto the
m
mm
STUDENT UNION
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
Then
(
1

MHMMYOU PON'T DRINK, YoTRE
NOT 0V�rWP6HTi Your CHol�.cJeRol
LtvEL b VEftY LOW. IN gWGRT
N VIEW OF R�C�NT MEDICAL
FINPING&�YOU'RE A wreck!
STLiN'fli
j hPF thev'do wZdJTneu coliseum soje can jj
GET SOVE GOOD CONCERTS AROUND HERE! �
Citizens Cooperate On Spending
rafters of Minges Coliseum for a
better look at the show. After mak-
ing his climb, he laved down on an
area not intended to support
anyone's weight and it collasped
sending him approximately 35 feet
to the ground. He was released from
Pitt Memorial Hospital the next day
with a broken wrist and finger.
Though it was unfortunate that
the accident occured, this should
not prevent future Major Concerts
in Minges Coliseum.
Precautions can be taken
to proteel such patrons
from themselves.
Many skeptics have rais-
ed questions concerning
the safety of the design of
Minges, but the ledge the
ardent concert fan climbed
to is nearly 10 feet above the max-
imum level approved for seating.
This accident certainly cannot be
blaimed on the design of this struc-
ture. It is impossible to foresee such
antics when a structure is conceived.
Rumour now has it that the Com-
mittees are already working on
another concert for early spring.
With this newly-acquired track
record, we look forward with excite-
ment to the next Major Attraction.
WASHINGTON � It has been both in-
teresting and gratifying that the vast ma-
jority of North Carolinians from whom 1
have heard have expressed a willingness to
cooperate, and sacrifice, in order to reduce
federal spending.
I have talked with doens ol citizens all
across North Carolina, Many of them are
involved in what they call "pet projects"
which have been receiving federal funds.
In every instance, the word has been, in ef-
fect: "f the spending cuts are made fairly,
and across the board, you won! hear any
complaint out of me
REALITY � Most thinking citizens
realize thai it is absolutely imperative thai
all of us face the reality of our nation's
economic woes. They realize that excessive
federal spending is the major cause of the
inflation that now plagues all Americans.
They understand the implications of a
federal debt th at now approaches one
trillion dollars.
1 have heard very tew criticisms of Presi-
dent Reagan's proposals to reduce federal
spending. Ironically, some citizens have
concluded that the President may not be
proposing enough recution. They may be
right. In fact, I am inclined to believe they
are.
The problem, of course, is how to
eliminate the enormous waste, fraud and
extravagance in almost all of the federal
programs.
FOOD STAMPS � At the risk of ap-
Jesse
Helms
pearing to single out one program, 1 think
you may be interested in comments I
received in a letter the other dav from a
local stamp administrator in one of Ninth
Carolina's counties.
She listed four things which she sees
happening every day � and which she is
powerless to stop because she is locked into
rules and regulations sent down from
Washington by the food stamp
bureaucracy.
She mentioned one rule which required
her to give $317 worth of food stamps to a
man for the month of December � even
though he did not even apply until the
afternoon of December 31.
Then she asked: "Do you realize how
many food stamp cards can go into one
household?" Her point was clear: Some
"households" have so many food stamp
recipients that they can't possibly use all ol
the stamps. Therefore, many of the stamps
are traded in for money, which is then
spent on non-essentials.
She also told of a food stamp recipient
who had clearly defrauded the govern-
ment. She made the point that there should
be no more food stamps tor that recipient
until restitution is made. But, she said, "I
have no choice but to go ahead and issue
the new food stamps
Finally, she commented: "A person who
voluntarily quits a job, without good
cause, should not be allowed to receive
food stamps. I have an appeal pending on
a case; 12 household members, six above
the age ol 1, none 60 years of age � and
nobody is working
One ol the adults had a job, she said,
but he quit it because "he got mad at his
foreman The foreman offered the man a
week's vacation to give him time to "cool
off" � but the man refused.
FEEI INCiS � She concluded: "All the
workers in our office have somewhat the
same feelings
As 1 have said many times, the strongest
criticism of the food stamp program has
come from the people who are trying to ad-
minister it one the local level. They see,
every Jay. how the taxpayers' money is be-
ing wasted � and they don't like it.
If 1 have my way, we're going to tighten
up this program, and all other welfare pro-
grams, so that only the truly needy will
receive help. The freeloaders will be
eliminated, and 1 suspect this will save the
taxpayers billions of dollars.
"Know Nothings' Revisited Today
B DAVID ARMSTRONG
Manv people were appalled recently
when William Clark, President Reagan's
choice for deputy secretary of state,
demonstrated almost total ignorance of
foreign affairs in Senate confirmation
hearings. In quick succession, Clark, a
California Supreme Court judge,
established that he: (1) didn't know who
the prime minister of South Africa is; (2)
didn't know the prime minister of Zim-
babwe; (3) didn't know there was a bitter
split in Britain's Labor Party; (4) didn't
know that many Western Europeans op-
posed having American nuclear weapons
in their backyards. An Amsterdam paper
headlined its report of the hearings
"American Minister Knows Nothing
Knowing nothing, unfortunately, is
nothing new in American politics. There
was actually a popular political party
known as the Know Nothings in the 1850s,
whose claim to fame was that its members
knew nothing about foreigners save that
they didn't like them. The Know Nothings
tried to restrict America to people like
themselves: white, Protestant, native-
born. The rest of the world, they were con-
vinced, was up to no good � especially
Roman Catholics, who, obediently carry-
ing out the Pope's orders were scheming to
seize America's riches for the Vatican.
Like today's Moral Majority, the Know
Nothings seemed to come out of nowhere
to wield political clout. Founded in 1849 as
the Order of the Star Spangled Banner, the
Know Nothings had all the trappings of a
fraternal order � secret handshake,
passwords, rituals. Their original purpose,
like that of the Moral Majority, was not to
run candidates of their own for public of-
fice, but to endorse politicians who shared
their aggressive "nativism
The Know Nothings organized quietly
and effectively. They shocked veteran
political observers in 1854 by putting
several nativist candidates over the top in
the New York City elections. Journalists
speculated on the identity and size of the
semi-secret organization. When suspected
members were asked to talk about the
Order, they denied belonging, saying only
"1 know nothing" � hence the Know
Nothing nickname.
Soon after their New York triumph, the
Know Nothings publicly formed a political
party called the American Party. Then, as
now, the two major parties were in flux;
the once-powerful Whig organization was
simptv falling apart. The new party filled a
political vacuum, attracting prominent
Americans such as Sam Houston and,
briefly. Ulysses S. Grant. The Know
Nothings elected several U.S. Senators
(including Houston) and won control of
state legislatures in Massachusetts.
Californfa and Connecticut, among
others. For a while, it seemed possible that
the American Partv would sweep the
presidential election of 1856.
The American Party platform was one
of punitive ignorance. The Know Nothing
governor of Massachusetts proposed that
political office be placed off-limits to the
foreign-born, and that the naturalization
period be extended to 21 years. (Those pro-
posals passed, but were reversed by a later
legislature.) When changing laws didn't
adequately punish immigrants. Know
Nothing thugs took over, sometimes for-
cibly preventing foreign-born voters from
casting their ballots.
The heyday of the American Partv was
shortlived. An investigative reporter for a
Virginia newspaper revealed the partv
secret rituals, dispelling its aura of
mystery. Satirists made ceaseless sport of
the Know Nothing nickname. And, more
seriously, the party's failure to take a
strong stand on the overriding issue of
slavery endeared them to neither
slaveholders nor abolitionists. In addition,
the party made the mistake of nominating
the unpopular former president Millard
Fillmore to have another go at the White
House in 1856. Fillmore finished a distant
third, and the momentum of the Know
Nothings was broken.
The virulent nationalism that fueled the
Know Nothings is, however, still with us.
It is rekindled in times of crisis, such as the
present, when simplistic solutions to socie-
ty's problems are sought and scapegoats
are needed. As always, it is rooted in fear
of The Other � those strange, threatening
persons, often with dark skin and dark
hair, who call themselves Vietnamese or
Cuban or Iranian.
Know Nothingism, then, is more than
not knowing important facts, as William
Clark did. It is an attitude, fed by fear and
ignorance, and given form bv political
organizations, such as the Moral Majority,
Like the original Know Nothings, the
Moral Majority have attempted to wrap
themselves in the flag to gain the
legitimacy they need. And. like their
predecessors of a century ago, today's
Know Nothings will � it given their way
� destioy the nation's tradition of civil
liberties in order to save it.
David Armstrong, author of "American
Journal. " is a syndicted columnist jnr col
let newspapers.
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office m the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced, or neatly printed. Alt let-
ters are subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted Letters by the
same author are limited to one each 30
days.
�)
t
r





Ht 1 AS I v xROl INI W
Features
1 1 likl K 24, 198
Page
we.
ECU Faculty Member
Defines Dance Art
Petrus van Muy
dancer who has
the audience
den, professor o
it is very sensith
I he Dutch-horn
It's a long, long way from
Amsterdam to eastern North
Carolina, but Petrus van Muyden
has traveled in the world o dance.
moving easily across social and
geographical barriers.
Now 61, van Muyden continues a
career that has spanned every phase
o dance student, performer,
choreographer and teacher- in
dozens of cities on both sides of the
Atlantic.
Since las) fall, his latest role is
assistant professor o dance at East
Carolina University, where his skill,
sophistication and friendliness have
earned the respect of students and
colleagues alike.
Van Muyden confesses that his
decision to come to ECU from Pitt-
sburgh. Pa where he gave up a
tenured leaching position at Point
e. He fills the stage with his personality it comes over the footlights and touches Rark College, was mote climatic
dance instructor finds his students at ECU "a teacher's dream (hal artjstjc.
t dance at EC I . says charisma is necessary before a dancer can be first-rate. "A
Survey Shows Religious Affiliations
lE I NewsB �ureau . lina lents does
rek. ac m the
S'
: or from a ich fall
.i
1 (i preferei ild not be taken literally iuch a large proportion
ol students have no formal religious
"Some students simply choose
not so reveal this information he
explained. "We are run sure just
how main students actually replied
'no preference1 and how main
deliberately omitted an answer to
questions regarding their religious
11
I he 20 per cent who did not claim
church membership is up one per-
� from last year, and sharply up
from campus religious tallies in
previous years.
In IM2. the "no preference"
percentage was 10 per cent, and in
;S 3, only 3.8 percent.
Of those students who do declare
denominational preference, the
largest number claim affiliation
with the nation's largest Protestant
denominations � Baptist and
Methodist. Baptist students at ECU
total 4,021 this year, and
Methodists, 2,110.
The third most numerous
religious group among ECU
students are Roman Catholics, who
total 1,2 34. Fourth are
Presbyterians, at 867.
Mainline Protestant denomina-
tions follow: Christian (639),
Episcopal (519) and Lutheran (307).
Jewish students at ECU total 73.
Earnhardt said ECU plans to use
a more detailed data gathering
device in future, listing a larger
number o religious faiths, which
though small in the southeast, have
included East Carolina students in
previous years
Among these are Christian
Science, Free Will Baptist, l.atter-
Day Saints (Mormon), Friends
(Quaker). Unitarian, Pentecostal
Holiness and Moravian.
Data received on religious choice
is furnished to campus chaplains at
E I for use in planning religious
programs for university students.
At present seven campus
ministries are maintained at ECU.
"I love the South, the warm davs
even in winter, the blue skies. 1 he
weather in Pittsburgh- the
snowstorms, the cold-
depressing foi me
After settling here, van Muyden
was pleased to find ECU "very pro
gressive" and his students to he i
"teacher's dream.
'T am amazed in such a little
town to find so many good bodies
hesavs. "They are intelligent. I he
don't tight back; they follow what I
tell them. When the situation in
class is tense, 1 trv to joke a lot so
thev relax and laugh. F"his way, Ihey
don't get siitt
The human body, van Muyden
says, is the "instrument" with
winch the dancer practices his
an ait as old as the human race
itself.
"The proper placement, the pro-
per ahgment, is essential. A lot ol
kids don't know how the body
works� they don't understand
'instrument
"The limbs have to move
separately; the arm moves from the
shoulder, not with it. Movemen
the tec! is ocn the most difficult
part ot ballet. They should be as
graceful, a- flexible as the hands.
"1 often sav a good dancei i like
a monkey. He has fout hands
Petrus van Muyden is very
qualified to recognize good bodies
and good dancers, for 30 years he
performed in Europe with majoi
Dutch ballet companies, receiving
praise from critics, tans and roy ally.
He was "premier danseur etoile"
(star dancer) with the Nederlandse
Opera Ballet and received the
Netherlands "Silver Medal" award
ui 1943
During the five-yeai Nazi occupa-
tion ol Holland, van Muyden and
other artists suffered harassment
and deprivation along with the rest
ot the populace, but thev continued
lo pet tot m. 1 lie opp-
during the wai yeais was trai
into dance by van Muyuden in
original choreography, "I he Cap-
tive first pei' �rmed in Am?
dam m 1943.
I wenty yeai Muyd
emigrated to the U.S be ome
d i r ec t o i ol the New M e
ademy ol Ballet, and later, ballet
master ol the San Fi Ba
C ompany.
Since i ht nhi ncentrated on
teaclun. erm and guest
ppoinlments at the N.
Scho V' , Intel lochei V
ademy. iversity ot Oreg
the I niversity ol the South and
puses, with frequent ap-
pearance at arts festivals, symp
: civic ballet product i
ghoul the nation.
Van Muyden has advice for
parents w ho chet i thai
theii little ones in tight-
ui be baby Mai got 1 ni
Erik Bruns.
" I he best students, the
go on to performing career-
began very early, Nol
lessons- but creative mo
classes oi tap dance, which
bones are too sot; foi formal ballet
study until a child is eight years old.
"Ik careful also which teacher
you choose I ui child. Had
training results in bad technique.
- can often be unlearned later,
but it is verv difficult
Animation Art Show
Display Opens At Mendenhall
When Bugs Bunnv asks, "What's
up. Doc? Hollywood artists must
create 30 to 50 individual pain-
tings�12 for each second o runn-
ing time.
Those paintings, called eel pain-
tings or "eels" are the subject o a
special exhibit and sale to be held at
East Carolina University Greenville
for THREE DAYS!�Mon. Wed
March 2-4, 1981, from 10 a.m. until
7 p.m. in Mendenhall Student
Center.
Animation eels are the paintings
actually filmed m making the
animated cartoon. They are the
culmination of the artistic process.
The characters are painted by hand
on clear sheets of acetate, usually
11" x 14" or larger. Each figure is
outlined on the front and painted by
hand on the back o the eel.
Cels are all one-of-a-kind, not
reproductions or prints. This collec-
Road Runner (left) and Wile E. Coyote
lion was
Lainberg
the nation
authenticated by Gallery
of Cedar Rapids, Iowa,
best-known specialist in
this unique art form. A represen-
tative o' Gallery Lainzberg will be
on hand to answer questions.
On display will be animation eels
from over 25 different Hollywood
cartoon productions, including
several Walt Disney feature films:
"Winnie the Pooh "The Jungle
Book "The Aristocals "The
Rescuers and "Pete's Dragon
Fans ol the Warner Brothers car-
toons will see their favorite
characters: Bugs Bunnv, Daffy
Duck. Pepe Le Pew. Wile E
Coyote, and 1 lie Roadrunner.
Highlighting the Warner Brothers
collection is a suite ol Four Limited
Edition Cels, created and signed b
Chuck Jones. There will also be
signed cels from Mr. Jones' classic
TV Specials: "Rikki-Tikki-Tav i"
and "The White Seal
Chuck Jones, winner of three
Academy wards, is widely regard-
ed as one ol America's foremost
See ANIMATION, page 7. col. 1
Photo bv CHAP GURLEY
( aplured above in a pensive mood, brilliant director-actor Stephen
Finnan ponders .indel's "And Miss Reardon Drinks a Little" which
he is currently directing for an ECU Dinner Theatre Production. The
plav is scheduled to open on March 30 and run for six shows in the
Mendenhall Student (enter Auditorium (room 244). Tickets are now
on sale tor three dessert and three dinner performances. In addition to
directing the dinner theatre. Finnan is also teaching at both Pitt Com-
munity and I enoir College. A former member of ECU'S Drama and
speech Department, where he directed major productions "Rimers of
Eldritch" and "Hedda Gabler he has also produced and directed
off-Broadway such plays a Orwell's "Animal Farm" and O'Neill's
"Hughie" in New York City. In addition to his leaching credits which
include Brooklyn College and Michigan State I niversity. Finnan has
compiled acting credits in films, commercials and theatre.
Tryon Palace Symposium
Focuses On Small Antiques
By FRANCE1NE PERRY
1(1 r�v Bureau
NEW BERN � Beginning and
advanced collectors of small anti-
ques will be particularly interested
in the 13th annual Tryon Palace
Study Says Loneliest People
Are 18-TO-20 Year-Olds
( ps Eighteen-to-20 year-olds
are probably the loneliest people in
America, at least according to
studies done by Dr. Robert Weis ol
the University of Massachusetts-
Boston, along with Dr. Richard
Maisel.
"Vve surveyed all different age
groups, from 18 on up. and our
results suggested that there was
more loneliness among the youngest
people Weiss says.
He explains that older teens begin
to feel very much alone when they
cannot find substitutes for the emo-
tional security previously offered by
home and family.
Weiss says the loneliness is com-
pounded by the fear that "I'm the
only one w ho feels this way An in-
coming student will look around
and see others happy and surround-
ed by friends, and will feel like a
failure in comparison.
Weiss told Seventeen magazine
that young people idealistically ex-
pect to have many deep, lasting rela-
tionships. Failure to realize these
hopes can lead to depres-
sion�another part of loneliness.
Older people, with a lifetime of
experience, tend to be more
realistic, however, and are not af-
fected as deeply as teen-agers.
Symposium March 15-17. Four ex-
perts on folk art, silver, needlework
and tablewares will be among the
speakers.
The annual symposium is co-
sponsored by the Tryon Palace
Commission and Restoration and
the East Carolina University Divi-
sion of Continuing Education, in
cooperation with the N.C. Division
of Archives and History.
Carolyn Weekly, curator of the
Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art
Center, will present an illustrated
lecture on examples in the Center's
collection.
Before she became AARFAC
curator, Ms. Week ley held various
administrative and curator positions
at the Museum of Early Southern
Decorative Arts, Winsion-Salem,
and the Virginia Museum of Fine
Arts, Richmond, Va.
She has also taught at the Univer-
sity of Delaware's Winterthur Sum-
mer Institute and served as consul-
tant and steering committee member
to restoration projects in Richmond
and Petersburg, Va.
Her articles have appeared in An-
tiques magazine, the Journal oj Far
ly Southern Decorative Arts and
Arts in Virginia. She is a past
managing editor o Colonial
Wilhamsburg News.
"Silversmiths of North Carolina"
is the topic to be discussed by Mary
Reynolds Peacock, historical
publications editor for the N.C.
Division of Archives and History
for the past ten years.
Her work has included editing
numerous publications and
documents, among them "The Pet
tigrew Papers "The Wilmington
Town Book "The Papers o
William A. Graham "Tar Heel
Legends" and "The Cor-
respondence of William Tryon
During two revisions of Dr.
George Barton Cutten's book,
"Silversmiths of North Carolina
she collected much information
about the state's silver and its
makers.
"Setting the 18th Century Party
Table" will be presented by Louise
Belden, research associate at the
Winterthur
Henry F. duPont
Museum. Delaware.
Ms. Belden is an authoi and lec-
turer and was formerly assistant
curator at Winterthur. Her special
interests are silver and early enter
tainment traditions m America.
She is co-author of "Collecting
for Tomorrow: "Spoons" and
author of "Marks of American
Silversmiths in the Ineson-BisseJI
Collection At present she is com-
pleting for publication a work on
American party tables up to 1890, a
book covering the uses of energnes,
plateaux, pyramids, gum sugar
figures and other paraphernalia.
Betty Ring, a Houston, Texas,
collector and independent resear-
cher, will speak on "The Needle
Arts in Women's Education,
1640-1840
A specialist in American
schoolgirl needlework for 15 years,
she is the author of several articles
in Antiques and edited an anthology
of needlework articles from 54 years
See TRYON, page 6, col. 2


' � m �






1 111 1 S1 t KOl IN1AN
11 BRl AR 24. W�l
Some Recipes For Making Quiche
Lift
TC
B KM UN WK LER
Inexplicably, foods, like fashions,
go through periods oi chicness. A
few years ago, if you wanted to
demonstrate that you were a superb
hosl oi hostess, you seised quiche.
Although quiche has dropped from
the ranks oi "in" foods, main of us
"common folks" still enjoy it and
despaii that good quiche is hard to
come b) .
Foi those oi you unacquainted
with quiche, il is a rich custard pie
which mav be filled with cheese,
meat, seafood oi vegetables. Round
tinted pans are specially made foi
baking quiche, but foi the following
you should use a ready-to-
bake deep dish frozen pie shell. Un-
fortunately, this means you'll also
have to use a regular oven, for
unless your toaster oven is quite ex-
ceptional, a pie pan just won't tit
For some reason, most people
think quiche is difficult and expen-
sive to make. However, less than
two dollars will teed tout to si peo-
ple with the following vegetable
quiche recipe.
VEGETABLE QUICHE -
You'll need: one unbaked deep dish
pie shell (thawed), one cup milk,
three eggs (beaten), one-halt teas-
poon salt, one-fourth teaspoon pep-
per, tour ounces shredded Swiss
cheese (cheddar is just as good and
cheaper,) one cup cooked and dram
ed zucchini slices and tour ounces
sliced, satited mushrooms )K about
three-fourths of a package oi frozen
spinach (cooked and drained) OK
the same amount of frozen, chop-
ped broccoli (cooked and drained)
You might want to add. with am
vegetable filling, one small chopped
onion, sauteed. Bake the pie shell
for five minutes at 4(M) and cool.
Combine vegetables, milk, beaten
eggs, three-fourths oi the cheese,
sail and peppei in a large bowl. Stii
well. Poui into pie shell, lop with
remaining cheese. Hake at 375' foi
thirty minutes.
It you're read tor something a
little more challenging, tiv the
following, the most famous quiche
oi all.
OIK HE I ORRAINE You'll
need: pie shell (baked as in previous
recipe), one pound bacon, si
ounces shredded Swiss cheese, foul
eggs (beaten), one cup whipped
cream, one cup half-and-half, one
tablespoon all-purpose flour, three
fourths teaspoon salt, dash ot pep-
per, dash ot nutmeg. I rv bacon un-
til cusp; drain, (rumble bacon into
the pie shell and top with cheese.
t ombine remaining ingredients; stir
well. Poui into pie shell. Bake at
s to; sixty-five minutes. You
ma add cooled, sauteed onions to
this recipe, turning it into Quiche
Alsacienne!
CHEES HAM Ot Kill
You'll need: pie shell (baked as in
preceding recipes), one cup diced
cooked ham, tour ounces shredded
Cheddar Cheese, one-fourth teas
poon ground nutmeg, tour eggs
(beaten), one cup halt and-hall (I've
used milk and it works as well), one-
halt teaspoon each sail, peppei.
paptika and one teaspoon parsley
flakes. Place ham in bottom ot pie
shell, top with cheese and sprinkle
with nutmeg. Combine remaining
ingredients; stir well. Poui into pic
shell. Bake at 350 tor forty-five
minutes.
snie an ot th preceedmg
quiche recipes (the vegetable quiche
recipe is particularly adaptable)
can m inventing vour own quu
lr different cheeses, meats.
tables, lor instance, sauteed
mushrooms alone make a delicious
quiche filling. rabmeal or shrimp
could serve as an exotic substitute
tor ham 01 b
I hough no longei a truly "chic"
tood. quiche is a I tnd im-
pressive company dish. Served with
11nit slices or raw vegetables
white wine, quiche can be the
celebrated .enter oi a very sp
dinner a deux.
I hree senioi student
instrumentalists in the
1-as: v aiolina I nivet
St ool ot Music will
pei � � m in recital this
week, in the .1 1 let-
chei Music Center
Recital Hall here.
David 1 ee Merriam
oi Richmond, Va a
saxophonist and can-
didate foi the Bacheloi
oi Musii degiee in
music therapy, will p
form rhursday, Feb.
14. at 7:30 p.m.
His program will in-
clude the J.S. Bad
Sonata No. 4. ai I ecles
s o n a t a ,
"Improvisation" by
Bonneau and Ruett's
Music
"Chanson et
Passepied Piano ac-
companist is James
Gilliam.
Merriam is a student
oi Brad Foley o' the
ECU music faculty and
the son oi Harold and
1 dith Merriam oi Rich-
mond. Va.
Performing in a
p.m I riday, Feb. 20.
joint program are per-
cussionist Stefan
S uber of Southern
Pines and tubisl Joe
Mexandei of Wood-
budge, Va.
Both are candidates
foi the Bachelor of
Music Education
degree: Alexander is
pursuing a second
degiee program in
music theory and com-
position.
St ubet will be
featured in perfor-
mances of "Tanka"
(for multiple percus-
sion) by John
Bergamo. " Toccata"
(for marimba) bv Henk
Badmgs. "Two
Movements for Ivm-
pani" by Rich Holly
and "O Come. Sweet
Death" bv J.S. Bach,
arranged by St uber foi
a marimba ensemble.
He will be assisted in
the Bach piece by five
student percussionists.
Stubei is a student ot
Harold Jones of the
I c I School of Music
percussion faculty and
the son of Dr. and Mis.
R.l . Stubei oi 120 N.
Valley Road. Southern
Pines.
Alexander's portion
of the pi ogram w ill in-
clude the Camille Saint-
Saens "Romance Ar-
ea n gel o Croelli's
"Sonata da Chiesa
Thomas Beversdorf's
Sonata foi Bass Tuba
and Piano, and Paul
Holmes's Quartet for
1 ubas.
Piano accompanist is
I lizabel h Braxton.
Assisting .tie Norman
Simmons and I im
Burgess, euphonium,
and Bi uce Mosiei.
tuba. M osier, a
graduate assistant at
ECU, has been Alev
andei 's tuba insti udoi.
Alexander' parents
are George and Nellie
iTk� HaflM(g)Sfauu!
OHH 14 HOUfl
Wholesale & Retail
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with this coupon
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ood
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Saturday abortion hours
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THE
Sp
( onlii
L, B3S233�J
ATTIC
Souths No 6
Rubens' Paintings Show
Arthritic Deformities
Rock Nightclub
MonFri.
MonTues
Sunday
TUES. (IN THE PHOENIX
ROOM) - BRECKENRIDGE
SHlNGTON
il PI) An analysis ol
the swollen rtands and
wrists in the paintings
oi Flemish artisl Peter
Paul Rubens suggests
rheumatoid ai tin itis ex-
isted 200 years before
s om e - d ical
authorities have been
vs illing to believe.
I hat's the conclusion
a team oi doctors
from the I Diversity oi
Brussels in Belgium and
the lberl Einstein
Medical Center in
Philadelphia.
Unlike osteoarthritis,
which van be found in
the r e in a i n s o t
Rubens
1577 to
iritis is
dinosaurs and early
man. the report said
there has been no per-
suasive evidience that
rheumatoid arthritis ex-
isted earlier than the
last century
lived from
1640.
Osteoari
primarily a wear and
tear disease oi the
joints that comes with
age. Rheumatoid ar-
thritis, however, is
mine serious and more
common. It is inflam-
matory and although it
primarily attacks the
joints, it can also cause
disease in the lungs,
skm. blood vessels,
muscles, spleen and
heart.
Prolonged swelling
in one oi mote joints is
one ot the key symp-
toms ol rheumatoid ai -
thritis.
A British researcher
reported in 1977 that
five paintings ot the
Flemish school, dating
from 1400 to 1700,
depicted deformities
that mighl have been
caused b rheumatoid
arthritis.
Drs. Ihierrv Ap-
pelboom, Corinne de
Boelpaepe and Jean-
Pierre Famaey of
Brussels and George 1 .
Ehrlich of Philadelphia
decided it the work ot
Rubens showed convin-
cing evidence of the
disease, it would go tar
to tell scientists that
rheumatoid arthritis
has been plaguing man
tor a long time.
So they examined the
paintings of Rubens at
an international exhibi-
tion m Antwerp, look-
ing in particular at
hands. Selected pain-
tings then were submit-
ted to independent
review of other doctors
and artists before any
firm conclusions were
reached.
r he Brussels and
Philadelphia doctors,
reporting in the Feb. 6
issue ot the Journal of
the American Medical
Association, said pain-
tings attributed to
Rubens during the last
30 ears of his Hie
seemed to show
worsening arthritis.
Some examples:
� A 1609 painting.
Saint Matthew, shows a
swelling of the left in-
dex and middle lingers.
� Two paintings,
1 he Drunken Sleeping
Satyr(1610)and Suan-
na and the I lders
(1614), continue to
show this fingei swell-
ing and also show a
swollen wrist as well.
�The swollen wrist
persists in paintings
from 1620 to the end of
Rubens' life in 1640
and is most evident in
the portrait of Marie de
Medici (1622).
� Late paintings por-
tray two major defor-
mities: a characteristic
rheumatoid wrist and
the dislocation ot
finger joints.
The doctors said
Rubens attempted a
degree of realism in his
art, but to please his
patrons. he
"undoubtedly left out
their less attractive
features.
"When rheumatoid
deformities appeal in
his paintings.
therefore, without the
thematic material
demanding them, one
has to wondei what
they imply. As a good
deal ot the artisl goes
into the painting itself,
such deformities might
well represent a form ot
signature, perhaps pot
traits ot the artisl who
did them
1 he doctors said the
deterioration ot the
condition, as seen in
the chronological ordei
of paintings, is consis-
tent with the natural
progression ot
rheumatoid arthritis.
"As the progression
is documented in the
last 30 years ot the life
ot Rubens, and not pre-
sent in the works of his
youth, it is possible that
Rubens ot a major col-
laboratoi in his studio,
for all of this latter
period, suffered from
the disease portrayed
WED. - NO VACANCY
(ALL ECU FEMALE DORM
STUDENTS � FREE ADMISSION)
THURS.
Buffet Specials All You Can Eat
11:30 - 2:00
6:00 - 8:30
12:00 - 2:00
Soup-Salad-Pizza
Soup-Salad-Pizza
SpagSalad Pizza
h
Wednesday Spaghetti Day 11:00-11:00
Spaghetti-Toast Coffee or Tea
All You Can Eat $2.49
Thursday LasagnaDa 11:00-11:00
Buy One Lasagna At Regular Price Get
Second One For A Dollar
Tryon Palace Symposium
Focuses On Small Antiques
Continued from page 5
of Antiques which was published in
1975.
She has lectured on needlework in
women's education at seminars and
special programs from Maine to
California.
According to Dr. Ralph Wor-
thington of the ECU Division of
Continuing Education, each of the
tour speakers will present color
slides to illustrate their lectures.
Other symposium speakers are
Peter Sandbeck, director of the
Craven County Architectural Inven-
tory project, who will speak on
"18th and 19th Century New Bern
Architecture: Sources, Influences
and Craftsmen" and Wright Home,
master cabinet maker and manager
of the Anthony Hay Cabinet Shop
in Colonial Williamsburg, whose
topic is "A Twentieth Century Fur-
niture Maker Looks at Antiques
CASTEL
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SOUNDING LIKE WHEN IT WAS
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Visit Jim McKinney at
JIM'S SERV-A-SET
3103 S. Memorial Dr. (beside Parker s BBQ
'
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I
I
I
I
I
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L.
� Hi fidelity system repairs.
� Car stereo repairs.
�We're your JVC Service Center,
too.
(10 off parts with this ad)
ECU OFFICIAL CLASS RING
Date: Feb. 25, 26, 27 Place: ECU Siudeni Supply Store Lobby
equired MasterCard or Visa accepted. -
- hu

i, A
a j, .
-T �1





I HI I M KI IMW
t I HKl �0 24. 19hl
f SU�t C057T Jor
7
)H IT 00eSrv)TCObT
A� TDO MUCH
M
fSv D)vio tW$
AiXKIGHT, AAAO
Aothek fuze &ee&
2-M-ti
Music Students Win A wards
Almost Full '
i , miMtAvnuwu
Several students in
the East Carolina
I niversit School oi
Music have been
recognized foi outstan
ding performance in
campus and statewide
auditions.
Kenneth Hubbard, a
graduate saxophone
student from Raleigh,
was named top winnei
m the annual K I
Spacek As Loretta Lynn
H
( ontinued from payr X
line, Nashville countr
sound, w ho w as i he se
d ol eight childien
�thei oi them is
v tal Gayle, a coun
singei almost as rich
and famous as het
sistei) horn to an im
(erished mountain
minei in Butcher
Hollei . Kenluck. and
who was married at
fourteen and had tout
ildren oi hei own
(and eventualh six)
before finding the
careei and fortune that
began foi hei on the
"Grand Ole Opry"
radio show and on the
charts of c ash Box.
1 he picture, which
follows hei life in a
neat. tins-happened
and-then-this-
happened style, is wai -
ming and just because
oi the up-from -
Appalachian success
sior, oi because ol the
sti ong, accomplished
performances ol Sissj
Spacek as 1 oretta and
1 ommy I ee Jones as
her husband, Mooney
(foi "Moonshine")
Lynn, but because it
works on our emotions
in such an open,
unabashedly regional
fashion.
1 he picture is always
passing up drama in
favor ol keepm' on,
and thus disarms the
built-in boredom and
mild cynicism we all br-
ine to mo ie bios.
I his is a light, eiitei
taming mo ie a trifle
� and its modest) and
common sense allow it
to survive even its own
failures and more
tedious stretches.
(I hese turn up in the
latter third of the story,
when I oretta has made
hei fortune � she had
sixteen records that hit
the top oi t he chai is �
and is working loo hard
and popping too main
pills.)
Faculty Recital Scheduled
Sch 'i i l Music Young
Aiti �'ompetition foi
his pei foi mance oi the
Marcellooncerto in C
Minoi and Km� N(da's
" Improv isation 1
Hubbard was also
winnnei in his categoi
at the annual N
111 -1 t r e a c h e r s
Associat ton compel i
tion held on the EC I
campus.
Honors winners in
the campus ounj i
list ompetition were
two sen i oi students
from Richmond, Va
Michael Rean, an
organist. and Mark
Ford, a percussionist.
Othei I I studeni
winners in the NX
Music reach
Association comp
lion were junior iron;
nisi Glenn John
oi Wilmington, juni
sopran v i e Gunn
Durham, gi ad ua
pianist c arol Wolfe
intei Pai I . 1
special studeni Steve 1:
win, a trombonist v
is a resid
Mile
( )rtonxtri
&� (5' ��-
M
He
( a' '
-
b Mo;
24. ai
in a
� das.
8:15
311, was completed
during his stay in Man
nheim and was actually
used by him for an
"audition foi an ap-
pointment, which, in-
have been two Carnegie
Hall performances and
a performance in
Chicago's Symphony
Hall.
In a review m the
n will be
Hendrix
I (. I "s
den i
tree and
g work,
cidentally, Mozart did Chicago Tribune. John
not secure. Von Rhein wrote of
I he second woik Doskey's performance
programmed is oi the 1 iszt Sonata m B
Gaspard de la Nuit by Minor:
Maui ice Ravel.
( hopis's lour
I I udes and S mat a
B-flai Minor,
conclude
No
( )p 35 . wn
the evening.
� m ong Dos key 's
: et i I a I appeal ances
"He possesses a big,
serviceable technique
that gets him around
the keyboard accurate-
ly, and a tone that is
pai ticularly attractive
m the softei dynamic
reaches. I here is
serious musiciansnip
here to respect
A native of New
Orleans. Henry Doskey
began his musical
studies at an eaily age.
He has earned the
bachelor's and master's
degrees in piano al
Southern Methodist
I 'niversity and the doc-
torate in piano perfor-
mance at Indiana
University where he
studied piano and
chambei music with
Menahem Pressler.
Pepe Ie Pew
Animation Art Show
Continued from page 5
animators.
In addition to art work from ma-
jor studios, the Exhibit Sale will
aUo feature meticulously hand-
inked eels oi those ever-popular
I930's characters, Betty Boop and
Krazy Kat. "Stai I rek" tans will
lake a special interest in eels from
Filmation Studios' animated "Stai
I rek and. tans oi Raggedy Ann
and Andy will relish the elaborate
art work from the Richard Williams
tealure-length production.
Main people collect animation
eels. In fact, in a recent l-amilir-
ck15 M) article on budget col-
lectibles, animation art was called
the holiest collecting area within
the field oi comic art I he rime-
Life Encyclopedia ol Collectibles
(Vol. 1, W"H notes that some fine
art collectors look upon the eels
as an art form and buy them as an
investment, just as they would buy
traditional forms oi art
Eye Care Center. R A.
Greenville
Budget tyewear 39.95 complete
frames, lenses and tin! in plastic
bifocals onh 59.95
Contact Lenses 1 49 complete
Includes exam, lifting, heat disinfection and
for 1 month.
Comprehensive exams (students)
25.00
U ECU student & Haft discount
materials excluding
spec tab and contacts.
Tipton Annex
12b (jreemilie Blvd.
Dr. Pete HoUis
ALWAYS FRESH
DAIRY FOODS
"Home of Greenville's Best Meats"
P.O. Box 2 � 211 Jarvis St. � Greenville, N.C. 27834 � Phone: 752-5025
Overtoil's Finest
Sirloin or T-Bone
Steaks $219
Lb
Gwaltney Franks
I20z. Pkg
89$
Overtoil's Super Coupon
Pepsi-Cola � 16 oz. carton of 8
70t plus deposit with this
coupon and $7.50 food order.
Without Coupon �1.28 Limit
one.
Expires 2 28 81
Gwaltney Sausage
Hot or Mild Lb. Pkg. " M
��
Come by and
compare our low prices
to the competitors
Campbell's
Chicken
Noodle Soup
28
TOO. Can
Mello-Yello
or
Coca-Cola
2 Litre Bottle
78
Banquet Frozen
Chicken
Pot Pies
- $100
Maola
Ice Cream
All Flavors
38 c
Pint
Fox Deluxe Frozen
ilUU ii oz
88
8 OZ
for
Grade "A"
Jumbo Eggs
78
Dozen





Mi
s I i K( ! INI N
Entertainment
UK I IO
Playhouse Presents
Drama 'Getting Out'
Bv JOHN WhllK
rounded bv Vrlie's prison, complete Arlene.
o a steel catwalk looming above the Ruby and Mlenc canned
ol the set from which guards togethei in the play s climax, n this
shocking scene Arlene recounts ho
l s V
Noi
s the
iI
up 10
ess
eon
av
ui like gargoyles. Only Arlie
owevei has the tree run of the set,
as she moves in and out ol the two
environments, either as Arlene's
tiei sell 01 as the demon still
L'lling inside tier
Arlie is played by Paige Weaver,
v; by llison rhompsoi
11 musi be an exceptiona"
lieult ob
ire excellenl
1c
a 1
n
y dif-
1 acting (and casting)
So too ate the
ot the majoi wM members, in-
Dwighl Eastwood as Ben-
rison guard who alternately
and bedevils the
Robert John illie
irbed punk and pimp;
i ravis I ockheai t as the
1 specially notable are
Rhonda Spivev Webb as
rlie Xtlene's mother, a woman
ke hei child has been beaten
ird life; and Karen Cunthei as
a wisecracking, older-but-
� con, a neighboi who tries
� the emotionally ailing
(
Ruby
A se
she began on the rocky road to
rehabilitation in a fit of religious
and emotional hysteria, trying to ex-
orcise the demon ihc out ot hei bv
repeatedly stabbing hersell with a
fork.
I he acting, the direction by
Cedric Winchell and the settings b
Gregory Buch, are all flawless and
first-rate. In fact, the only area ot
the production needing improve-
ment is the environment ot the au-
dience. I he hard metal seats, tightly
jammed togethei. and the tropical
temperature, were somewhat
disconcerting. Perhaps not much
can be done about this situation, but
it something could, tunite audiences
would be mo,t appreciative. It ap-
peared that at the end of the perfor-
mance, the audience wanted to
make a standing ovation but was
physically unable. Otherwise, the
ECU Playhouse's presentation is
richh deserving ot an ovation.
(.
m
m,Ml votint actresses P�i� Weaver and Mlison 1 hompson are seen here in a moment from Marsha Nor-
lIS"S3JJo "In whai must be an exceptionally diffiei.ll job of acting (and cast�nR), both are ex-
cellentall are flawless and first ralerichly deserving of an ovation.
Yolanda King Giving
Lecture In Hendrix
Yolanda King, daughtei o( the late M 11
King, Jr will appear in Hendrix rheatre in Mendenhall
Student Center on rhursday, February 26 � Ms.
King is scheduled to give a dram
"Black rheatre: Moving I - Higher
part ot the Annual Black rts Festival
1 ebruan 22 an
J is slated to run thi
It's lime tor aspiring student filmmakers to go Hollywood-bul fast. Entry forms and comprehensive
�eIZ nowTaila'ble for the Eighth Annual student film ards compeUUen, � program oMhe
Xcademv ol Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and the Academy foundation. Kntr t rn "�
list of regional coordinators may be obtained tree bv calling Karen Arandielov.cn at .213) 278-89W, or
bv calling sieve Baehner at 757-6366.
festival is sponsored by the Student ;
rts Committee.
Yolanda King has been in the mid- ol the
human rights all ot he; life
1 he oldest child of Dr. Martin 1 utl
Scott kme. Yolanda has participated in numerou
demonstrations and spoken before countless hun
rights, religious, and civic organizations.
' ; the age ol seven, Ms. King wrote a play wh
immediately directed with reluctant siblings and subse
quently performed for parents and friend
rhis w.b the beginning ot a career -ahis! 1 �
Smith College, where she received a B.A. in I heatre and
frican-American Studies,
While a: Smith, she directed and performed in
numerous productions throughout the area S then
moved on to New York University where sh
an M.F.A. in acting and performed in se awcase
and Off-Off-Broadway prod
However, it was at the X '� xx '
Workshop in Atlanta whert Ms. Kit � " -
id found hei calling when she p '
Manhoff's The Owl and the Pussveai. Grow ng up
home environment deeply involved in service
humanitv, Yolanda naturally assimilated this va
Though not traditionally regarded as a service
oriented profession, working in the performing arts re
quires an abihtv to fullv share the person that you
In addition, the theatre (i.e. film, music, dance, song
drama) has dramatic impact upon people s lives and
.
-
tile I
ies.
Vrmed N!
I
lei , " WI
force
too lo
"C
Ms! presei
e found
pany ot pei forming artist s
preseni
rowth with ity
NUCl LL'S
countrv wi Stepping In-
to romorrow, �
st
Ms. K � serve
Institute of the Mai in Lu . K x
Violent Social � '
that th K
well as images
.
M -
1
Me; p .
monologue? to complimeni
"What Happens lo D
�-Non Violence: I he a
�' lhe 1: x �
Ms. King, currently authors i Black
Family Mauaine. which high!
d as
teaching tools.
Film Competition,
Awards Offered
Through Academy
��
mprehensive rules are now available tor the
Awards competition, a program ol the
i. and S and the Academy
udeni Film Awards ceremony, scheduled for June
the Academy's Samuel Goldwyn rheatre in Beverly
xv ill honoi films in foui categories: animation,
Iramatic and experiment
ievement Award winners receive SLUM), an
and ate flown to Los Angeles tor the awards
n, up to tso Mem wards ot S5(X) mav be
uegory, as well as one Honorary Award ot $750
1 lemy' - discretion.
ol these awards also receive a trophy and trip to
tor the competition, a film must have been com-
piil 1. 19S0, in a student-teacher relationship within
structure ot any accredited institution of higher lear-
njne ii ' nited States.
mi entries is piil 1. 1981 foi each ot the seven regions
,nducl preliminary and final regional judging in order
which will be submitted to the Academy for the
Mav
s ol any length in 16, 35 01 70mm mav be submitted (8mm
films mav bettered f( 1 consideration in the regional competi-
bui must be converted to a largei formal
Fntry forms titles, and a list ot regional coordinators and then
districts mav be obtained tree bv writing Karen I). Arandjelovich,
administrate, for educational and cultural programs a the
Academy ol Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, 8949 Wi shire
Boulevard, Beverly Hills, Calif 90211, or bv calling (2130
2-K-8990.
ine
whit
national jud
Talented box-office star Sissv Spacek brings a possessive, homebred pleasure to the film
WytI Lynn, "Coal Miners Daughter lhe film w,l. he
shmn this Friday and Saturday night in the Hendrix Theatre.
C&W Corner
Sissy Plays
Loretta
Bv I Romas ( Brickman
I his riday and v ' :
and 28, in Mendenhall Student Center's H
the Student Union Fill
presenting Sissv Spacek and rommy 1 ec I
ihe blockbustei bi( 1 ol -
I oretta I vnn, "Coal Miner's Daughter
fhe movie will be shown al 5, 7:15, and 9
p m n both evenings dri by 1I
dent ID and acm ty said 01 bv MS M
c ard foi faculty and staff.
ou don have to know anything abo
1 ynn in ordet to have a good lime at "
Miner's Daughter You don even have to ,
about country music in ord to like the movie,
but you might iusi end up about
hearing the likes ol Red Foley' "Satisfied Mind"
01 Ernest rubb's "Walkin'the Floor Ovei V
01 Loretta I ynn's own "You're I ookin' at Coun-
try" (all three are heard in the picture aloi
a meat main othei classics)
"Coal Miner's Daughter" is an unassuming ex
iremely pleasant filn ' 1 oretta 1 vnn,
one of the great contemporary tars ol the mam-
See SPACEK, page 7, col. 1
c

Tea
Thre
St
Here

'
I
Inside
1





Sports
Contract Squabble Creates Big Stir
Us t It VHI S(H VMM I U

i
L'lan
ke a wriit
. on and lhai hosi
a action. w;
1 ill feel we ha e a ma
said San lose M - P
i , Dave dani
, still have hopes ol
SJSU-VVVt ligned 1
vet! plan sel
, basis. W esi 12 ' -
avel toalifoi nia w
and sM � :
i � 1982
oped,
000 ht added " 1 he wa thi
sel up out pi
11 � Stati
; he del u ii spendi
!

violated the niattei oui, w
receive S.I SI
(Ik
dan lo - i

"I
i iiae Di. k Mai lin (W'l D
and told '
i for WVI H
Us
I
I
� � v
I
W e
all ec
' I
" v.
v teasib
men; �. ed

aw I Ik olf. We're i
!
Gymnastics
Team Gains
Three Wins
oumament
Here I his If eekend
I H ! W
Regain Ranking
Lady Bucs
Down Wake
H Jlh llul'KI I
l
i
! (
MAW
i
nv i) .1 22 5 i ei all mai k
11
1 C 1
; M.
t 1
m0
The 'Wright' Way
Pirate freshman guard Barry Wright scored 25 on an opponent as felloe guard Charles
points Saturda night to lead ECU to a big win Watkins (11 in background), moves upcourt.
over Richmond. In above photo Wright moves (Photo In Jon Jordon)
Wright Sparks Pirates
Past Richmond, 67-65
��


the Ciirv
ss 44
Junioi speedstei I II
clock to put 1 ad Bi
UM KI s(H Will I R
lard Barrv Wi
� I . �' 25 points
Easi Can lina
I 67 65 n the
irt, Robins
I ai r 80-63
! '� I in Greei
ied i he highest
� � b an
ania-
the ke reborn �
cond I. "We were as
mi pimp balls and loose
enounc
the 1 inal sev onds
I mi. Symanski
th Pirates' 12th
I ; def
attemp! lo finish
1 he �� 1 l !
e also, as tl ti
S 2 6 in a
followed '
Richmond battled ba k, tl ugl .
u i owed the Biu ad ' n ; ; 1
I .tit
rhe Pirates in the win
than the hae in sevei imes,
ning 57 1 peri
rhe Spiders were almosi equalh av
curate, hitting oi rcent.
right, ol coui se, paced i he
Pirate attack I Ik Poi ismouth, a
five ol seven field goal ai
CU'dlk'O
ol missed as c have been in six weeks
j. tempts and added 1N Iree throws
, harles Watkins and Mtcha
.is beina a son added !2 points apiece to the
fI cause. N atkins also con-
J se en assisi
c iuai d John Sch a eil paced the
ie u n i
� P kepi il
said. "Kichi
( kh
quu k
t
si hi when 11 tuts
id for a eason finale this passine team that thev a ird to wa foi the Spiders, scoring 23
Illinois State, a team defend. When we showed a 2 3 we points. Ml menca candi
led despite a narrow drew some matchups
( 54-501 nationally third-ranked Before swii early ii
DP � weeks ago. the first period ihe Pirates trailer
Spiders trailed b as manv as 12 4
eii. one oi the nation's top ten
rs, added 20
rhe loss dropped ihe Spiders to
3 1 !
Inside
TKE Boxing Tourney Begins Tonight
See Stor Page 11
Kathy Riley
Ihe I ad Pirate senior All-America candidate scored 27
points to lead EC! to a 102-63 "in over Wake Forest
Monda night. Rile and tour other I ad Bucs played
their last game ever in Minges Coliseum.
f
-





10
I HI EAS1 (. AROl INI W
I EBRl AH1 24, 1981
Roller Hockey
Season Ending
Grapplers Win
Season Finale
Roller Hockey
This week marks the last week of ECU
Roller Hockey competition and teams are
hustling to make the play-offs. 1 here remain
on! 3 undefeated teams. 1 hese are "Gola
"the Puckers and "The Skater-Daters
11 They won then respective divisions and
automatical!) qualify tor the upcoming tour-
nament .
Other teams who are assured berths in the
upcoming play-offs are " The Ham
merheads "I instead Villians II
"Checkmates "High Rollers and "Un
kappa Fifth
The competition has been tierce and the
1M Department would like to congratulate
all the above teams tor their respective suc-
cesses. 1 he tournament should be an exciting
one.
We would also like to thank Mike
Melshiorre foi all the work he has put into
making tins activity a successful one. Mike is
the IM Grad Assistant primarily resonsible
tor the coordination of the activity. Other
scores from the past week include:
High Rollers 10. Sixty-Niners 2
Gola 9. Jammers 0
Puckers 20. Wild Bunch 0
C hubmks 10. Body Bruisers 0
ROTC Goalies 8, Wild Bunch 0
Umstead Villians 111 6. 1 uff-n-Tender 4
Un Kappa Fifth 10, Heartbreakers 6
Puckers S, Higher Rollers 4
Hammei Heads s. Umstead Villians III 4
Training Wheels 4, Bombers 2
Information about upcoming game tunes
can be obtained b calling your intra-action
line 757-6562.
Faculty Staff Basketball
Through the third round of the Faculty
Staff Basketball League only one team re-
mam- undefeated. They are "The (Clunkers"
from Intramurals and PE. Presently they are
sporting a perfect 3-0 record.
Psychology handed Computing Center it
First loss b a score of 40 1. John I ut toss-
1M Sports 'N' Shorts
By Ditoyne Cnxims
�and�
(iregg Melton
:d m
16 points to lead Psychology. Ken
W heeler scored N points m a losing effort for
the Computing Center.
Other games included The Steelers 59-28
win over Soft Touch. Sam Perkins led the
way vith 14 points. Any similarity between
Sam and the center tor Carolina is purely
coincidental. Rich Robbins paced Soft
Touch with 12 points. The Blue Knights
finally scored then first victory with a 38-25
win over Pitt. Clinton Anderson and Kevin
McKenzie both had 13 pis. for the winners.
Finally, the Klunkers broke open a close
game late by defeating the Weary Warriors
42-35. Dr. Wayne "Truck" Edwards again
led the way by tossing in 18 points. He
received support from Bob "Night-Train"
Fox who threw in 10. Word has it that Fox
scheduled himself tor a physical immediately
after the game. Here are Terrie Houck's top
picks:
I-Klunkers
2-Computing Center
3-The Steelers
4-Weary Warriors
5 Psychology
Again, information about game times can
be obtained by calling your intra-action line
Ext. 6562.
Note: March 2 opens the entry dates for
the following IM activities. They are; ECU
Track Meet. Pro-Season Softball Tourna-
ment, Slow-Pitch Sottball, Volleyball, Golf
Classic (learn and Individual), and Co-Rec.
Innertube Watei Polo. Please get your en-
tries in and check youi student handbook or
drop by the IM Office for further informa-
tion.
Seniors Highlight Weekend
Eleventh-ranked
Notre Dame, known
for its upsets in college
basketball, proved to
be second-ranked
Virginia's Achilles'
neel, snapping the
Cavaliers' 28-game
wmnmg streak.
Notre Dame halted
Virginia's domination
of its opponents with a
57-56 vietorv Sundav in
the game's final
seconds.
In other weekend
games involving Atlan-
tic Coast Conference
teams, it was Senior
Day at some of the
schools and the seniors
made their perfor-
mances count.
Maryland's 94-80
victors over No. 5
Wake forest was the
final home game tor
Albert King, who
scored 28 points, and
three other seniors.
Fn route to the win.
King became
Maryland's all-time
scoring leader with
2,024 � nine more
than John Lucas. scored 23 points to lead
It also was Senior the 13th-ranked Tar
Day m Chapel Hill and Heels to a 75-61 win
Durham, where again over Clcmson. And in
the seniors were the Cameron Indoor
kes. At North Stadium, Gene Banks
Carolina, Al Wood scored
)
points
Bv WILLIAM
YELVERTON
KsH Sports I (til.it
Last Friday night in
Buies Creek, the
Pirates of East
Carolina saved the best
for last.
In what was pro-
bably the last regular-
season wrestling meet
for the Pirates, ECU
torpedoed Campbell
and Davidson en route
to two badly-needed
wins as the team heads
into this week's Eastern
Regionals at Norfolk,
Va.
The ECU wrestling
program is being ter-
minated at the end of
the present season
because of economical
strains on the athletic
budget.
En route to the wins,
the Pirates won every
weight class except for
the heavyweight divi-
sion, w h i c h v. a s
forfeited because of an
injury to Mi n d e11
Tyson.
"I am just very im-
pressed said Coach
Hachiro Oishi, whose
team raised its seasonal
record to 5-9. "It was a
great comeback after
the State meet and just
has to be a big
confidence-booster for
our youngsters. Right
now everybody is look-
ing fine and in good
condition.
"I just have a good
feeling inside right
now
Once again the
Pirates were led bv
senior Butch Revils and
sophomore James
Ellison. Revils pinned
two opponents and ran
his record to a sparkl-
ing 23-0-1. Ellison, who
Oishi said has nearly
recovered from a
shoulder problem, also
scored two pins as he
improved his record to
23-5.
The Pirate coach said
that Revils is recovering
from an injury that has
plagued his star
17-pounder tor the
last two weeks.
Other impressive
Pirate winners included
freshmen Jeff 1 eat,
Gary Webb, and Andy
Hefner, who all scored
one pin and one deci-
sion apiece.
Junior David Jerose
was also impressive as
he came away with two
super ioi decisions,
11-2, and 24-1. "Jerose
is getting so much bet-
ter Oishi noted.
Oishi and his team
now look forward to
traveling to Norfolk
Thursday, to compete
with 36 other teams for
the tourney crown. I he
Pirate coach says the
competition will be
very tough with such
schools as Auburn and
Slippery Rock entered.
I
OPTICIANS 'L j f
ut r�a i L
10 Discount to Students & Focualty
OVER 1,000 FRAMES TO CHOOSE FROM
$19 50
Single Vision White Glass Lenses
$30 50
Bifocal Lenses � White Glass
Single Vision PhotoGray Lenses
$32 50
Single Vision Photo Gray Extra
$38 50
Bifocal Lenses Photo Gray
Soft Contact Lenses $79.95
CLEAR-VUE OPTICIANS
�-�� M - Gn.Ml.S.OOn �.
(�r$iC'�NS0u�0c� �;���(. - � s � "
vrSA �im.D.NO� ImLiiT.
STM ST �� -
Sorry!
We Missed Our Target!
The BUCCANEER Staff would like to apologise for any in-
convenience caused b the sudden location change. Please
remember thai this is your lasl chance to have your yearbook
portrait made!
Traditional poses will be taken tree off sitting fee charge. A
contemporary pose package( Va length, profiles close-ups, etc.)
will be taken foi a sitting fee charge of $3.00. All seniors having
their portraits made will have their 1981 yearbook delivered
tree of charge.
Buccaneer Office
Publications Center
Feb. 16-20
10am-5pm
TODD'Sci;
ALPINE CAR STEREO SALE
Model 7121
Sale:
5190
Complete with Dolby
Model 721
00
Sale:
M59
95
STUDENT UNION
IAST C��OUN� UNIVtftttTY
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
BLACK ARTS FESTIVAL 1981
Presented by the Student Union Minority Arts Committee
1st
Annual
SIG-EP
Shag
Contest
Over
$300.00
in CASH & PRIZES
Begins Thursday 26th
PAPA
KATZ
Information at
the door
Thursday,
Feb. 26,1981
8:00 P.M.
HENDRIX THEATRE
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
YOLANDA KING presents
"Black Theatre:
Moving Us Higher"
ADMISSION:
ECU Students. ID & Activity Cards
ECU Faculty & Staff . Mendenhall Student Center
Membership
Public. $150
Tickets on sale in the ECU Central Ticket Office
Mendenhall Student Center
M
Foi i
year, I
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Seahavs ,
SVMll!
pon
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FOR SAL!
road 250 l
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Leave message
Da via tu
FOR SALE ItTJ
runs and iooxs �
III H . �
7S 551
FOR SALE O
ticke' th row
78 Best Bfl
Call CI �
FOR i-
ton area'
noons for '
FOR SALE C�
75 IT2t after �pr
FOR SALE N
convertible Goo
top Call 7s: MJ
BENI
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WRE
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I HI I AS IAROl IMN
II BRl AR 24. 1981
11
V
i
ocuolty
$79.95
16-20
-5 pm
81
nittee
iENTER
,JJ
iffice
Men Swimmers Win Seahawk
Foi the thud straight
year, the Pirate men
have captured the
Seahawk Invitational
swim meet, scoring
points compared to
I NC-Wilmington's
M6 and 1 ampa Univer-
sity's 302.
1 he I ad Pirates
were not as fortunate,
howevei, as they finish-
ed fifth in the women's
competition. The
finish didn't put a
dampei on Coach Ra
Scharf's enthusiasm
though, since he said
the team "worked fair-
ly hard during the
week.
"Most ol the girls
had already made na-
tional cut-off limes
before this meet he
added. "We are poin-
ting them more toward
the upcoming A1AW
Nationals in Marqueite
(Michigan)
Pacing the Lady
Pirates was Tammy
Putnam, who gained
fourth-place honors in
the 50-yard individual
medley. She also cap-
tured sixth place in the
200 individual medley.
Jennifer Jayes also
performed well,
finishing fourth in the
50-yard backstroke and
fifth in the 200-yard
backstroke. Dordi
Henricsen was another
bright spot by finishing
fourth in the butterfly
as was Sally Collins
who captured fifth in
the 500-yard freestyle.
Doug Nieman led the
ECU men by capturing
first place in the 200
and 400 individual
medleys. Bjorn
Johansen won the 100
TKE Tourney Set
backstroke, while Jan
Wiklund managed a
victory in the 500
freestyle in helping the
Pirate cause.
According to Scharf,
Wiklund's time in theo
500 freestyle was four
seconds better than his
previous best.
All the Pirate vic-
tories occurred in the
first two days of com-
petition. The Bucs
were in second place
after Thursday's first
round, but took the
lead from UNC-
Wilmington on Fridav
and steadily increased
their margin.
Other bright spots
lor the Pirates were
Jack Clower, who con-
tributed second-place
finishes in the 50 and
100-yard freestyles, and
Kevin Richards, who
finished fifth in the 200
butterfly.
Mike A m a n was
another impressive per-
former as he finished
fifth in the three-meter
diving with a score of
305.45.
Scharf said no one
has qualified for the
NCAA Championships
as of yet, but added he
hoped someone would
during the Eastern In-
tercollegiate Cham-
pionships to be held at
Cleveland State Univer-
sity March 4-7.
MARCH OF DIMES
March of Dimes
Birth Defects Foundation
I he sixth annual
rKE-Millei boxing
tournament gets under-
way tonight (1 uesda) I
7:30 p.m. and will
v- n 11 n uc t h i on eli
1 hui sda in ECU's
right Auditorium.
1 he toui ne , co-
sponsored b the Miller
Brewing Company and
C.O. 1 ankard in con-
junction with Tau Kap-
1 psilon fraternity is
;o anyone who
not won prize
money for am kind of
ung even
1
bach match will con-
sist ol three two-minute
rounds and is sanction
ed b the AAU. Iwo
l officials will
referee the tights.
General admission
foi Tuesday and
Wednesday is SI.50
with the price going up
to S2 for rhursday's
championship mat-
chups.
Proceeds from the
tourney go to the St.
.hide's Children's
Hospital, the National
Philanthropy project o
1K1
participants is as
follows:
A total ol 33 entrants
were sot to participate
in the tourney's nine
weight classes as ol
Monday night.
Included among
those entrants is Dale
f rye. the tourney's
Most Outstanding Box-
er lasi yeai and the
defending champ in the
133-142 pound class.
Former unlimited
(heavyweight) champ
and ex-Pirate football
greal Harold Randolph i� in p� m.s
� H i McGa lcf� H
is set to compete in me . H�, H.�,i
193-202 pound class.
The complete list of
123 i: p�i ms
H Pa ki 1 � I)
. I David I
133 143 POl Mis
R �
I I i
143-15 l(ll Nl�s
l t,2 I'Ol M�s
�� . Ra S KluiI
v ! -
IM 73 HOI Sits
B . H H
H
113 WI POl Nl�s
H . H � M it Cil
H.i I
I M IVIM I I)
� ai d I
Classifieds
FOR SALE
fOft SALE Parade drum
Premier, chrome in enceilent con
dilion Call 757 3210
FOR SALE 78 Yamaha on off
road 250 Few m.les Great condi
lion Call 758 5282 after 3 p m
Leave messaqe
FOR sale iWaterbeds direct
com pie t with
� . ot sheets
13 ,tar artanty S'7� Call
David 758 1675
FOR SALE 1�75 Bwx Skylark
runs and loons new AC straight
shift power steennq ii'9S Can
75 557? ro '57 6824 after 5 pm
FOR SALE One Springsteen
ticket '6th row Greensboro Feb
28 Best offer by Thursday 26th
Call Charlie 752 C'48
FOR SALE Hitachi D 230
cassette deck Dolby noise reduc
i.on great shape S85 Call after
noons for David 752 4379
FOR SALE Cannon AE I with
flash and extra lens SIS0 Call
756 8726 after 6pm
FOR SALE 1969 Buick Skylark
convertible Good condition new
top Call 752 9453 ask for Roy
PERSONAL
NOTARY PUBLIC Convenient,
cheap rates Call Amy, 754 6994
WANTED TO PURCHASE 67 69
Camaro Phone 756 7712
LAST CHANCE for Springsteen in
Greensboro 2 tickets left best of
fer Call 752 1670 after 3 00 pm.
BUMPER STICKERS We II print
anvthmq that you ll tell your
mother S2 for one, S5 for 3 Quan
tity discounts available for orders
up to 100 Call 752 1757 between 6 9
pm or send check and i 50 handl
ing to Bumper Sticker, Rt 7 Box
27 Greenville, N C 27834
LOST KEYS Set of six Call
7 58 5499
SMITTY Thanks for the help! But
the situation is beyond repair DB
LOOK GOOD ON PAPER
Resumes term
sionally typed
7 56 �946
TYPING DONE
papers protes
WRITE RIGHT
At home during
evening hours and on weekends
for students, businesses, or items
ol personal nature 527 745 I
Kinston area 1 Call after 6pm
NEED RIDERS For carpool
from Jacksonville to ECU M F
Call 455 7657 or 353 3606
SUNSHINE STUDIOS Offering
ballet, iazi, yoga, and exercise
classes to students at a discount.
Also offering a very special belly
dance in preparation tor the
Greenville Arts Festival All in
terested in learning the art or
helping in anyway please contact
Sunshine at 758 0736 Classes
begin soon. I Sping break taken in
to account )
REWARD 425 to anyone with in
formation leading to the recovery
of my refrigerator call 752 8107
JIMMY BUFFETT SOLD
OUT
Jennifer Jimmy Buffett brings
the walls down at Mmges but you
bring the walls down at the
Ramada inn Clayton must know
how to party C L
Elizabeth Thanks for dinner; It
brought me to my senses Signed
Not Too Busy
PRICE $1 00 for 15 words, 05 for
each additional word
Make checks payable to The East
Carolinian
Abbreviations count as one word
as do phone numbers and
hyphenations
MAIL TO
The East Carolinian
Classified Ads
Old Sc jth Buoing
Greenville, NC 27834
The ECU Media Board is accepting ap-
plication for the following positions for
the 1981 82 school year:
Editor of the Buccaneer
Editor of the Rebel
Head Photographer of the Photo Lab
General Manager of WZMB
General Manager of the
East Carolinian
Editor of the Ebony Herald
Applications may be obtained from the
Media Board secretary in the Publica-
tions Center, M-F from 8-1 or 2-5.
Deadline is Feb. 27.
Art and Camera
526 S. Cotanche St.
Dow Town
g$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$tt$$$ttf
KODACOLOR
Developed and Printed
4
12
EXPOSURE
OIL ONLY
$3.23
NoFr.re.gn EXPOSURE
Fim ROLL ONLY
FOR RENT
FOR RENT Large house. 12
rooms. 2 baths. Ideal for student
group 4500 plus utilities 752 5294
Classified Ad Form
BENNIES
CITCO
WRECKER
SERVICE
Front End
Alignment
All Types of
Auto Repair
Foreign 4 Domestic
Reasonable Rates
2�00 E. 10th Street
Phone 758-4224
ABORTIONS �� TO
m wiik o
PRBONANCY
t T6 0C"aiilfKh�tirr
pregnancy ����. Wrtf con
trot, and problem pregnan
cy counseling For hxttssH
intortnatlon call tlv 0S5
(toll ' free numtar
IOC HI lit oatwoan t
A MS PM weekday
Ratatfk Watte'
MM Or�a�laa�toii
9U We�t Mar fan St.
Available
AH Day
Everv Day
Ope"
Horn 9 p rn
Son thru Thurs
11 a m 10pm
Fri &Sat
Western Steer0
Family
STIAKH0VSE
3005 E
10th Street
Greenville, NC
(Befi,nj Has'ingi Ford)
Take Out Service
Available
758-8550
$4.81
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
� KoDACOLoH
Eft Developed and Printed
Vfe EXPOSURE (C CO
flr ROLL ONlYV J � J J
3$ itimm s mm
No Foreign EXPOSURE C 7 Q
Fi.m ROLL ONLYV � � �
FAST & EASY DELICIOUS LUNCHES
Soup & Salad
Chicken Filet
Sandwich
Baked Potato or French Fries
II
99
Diet Plate
4 oi Chop Sirloin
CotTige Cheese 4 Fruit
SI ��
1
Steerburger &
Bowl of Chili
$199
America's roast beef
Two more reasons
why you & I
Yes sir!
Child's Plate
4oi Chopped Sirloin
Baked Potato or French Fries
Toast
Banquet & Party
Facilities
Available
No Potato
1
Potato & Salad
$19
Steak Sandwich
Pi PitM'i 4 CHiioni Sl
�c Mvthroom Gravy jd
����4 Poijio �)� FrmcH Fries
Steerburger
With Baked Potato
or French Friat
Without Potato
$$$$$$$$$$���$$$
FILM DEVELOPING
$1.92
Soup
89
20 EXPOSURE
KOOACHROME
ANDEKTACHROME
PROCESSING ONLY
38 EXPOSURE �Q C
KOOACHROME VW.IU
AND EKTACHROME
PROCESSING ONLY
SS$SSSS$S5$S$SS
LOW, LOW PRICES ON
Movie
PROCESSING
SPECIALS DAILY
?T-T Beef Tips
s22V
Deny tpecuu i�r�te wit Mto p�'
8 ox. Chop Sirloin
m m g y Tueiaoy A
i or trench tries a '���
DELICIOUS 30 ITEM SaLAD BAR
KOOACHROME
AND EKTACHROME
PROCESSING ONLY
SUPER � AND 4TANOAA0 , MOVIES
-LIMITED OFFER
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
$2.11
beef at
Arbifs
love Art s
Lean Trim & Delicious No gristle No surprises
No Sir' It's America's Roast Beef, Yes Sir'
. � � m � WITH THIS COUPON J �
i Ham Jri �
I and
M Cheese
M
I otter alid thru
I a. all participating Arts Limit one coupon per
J customer per ms Notvalk orithany othef offer MmmmmmT-M
����,iBll,� WITH THIS COUPON J
� Arbys� Roast Beef
I Sandwich With
M Salad Bar
$1-
$019!
� Otter valid thru
� at all parf.c.pat.ng Arhss I ,m.t one C��pc�P� ��
ls,omerpermmi SMmmmmmmStmmmmmmJl
mm GTeenviMe Square Shopping Center
ACROSS FROM KMART
JUST A REMINDER
Student Supply Store offers photo finishing ser-
vices at everyday low prices. In addition, we offer
various specials throughout the year that mean
more savings to you. Compare other prices and
then save with us.
We also carry a good selection of Kodak film and
photographic supplies for your shopping conve-
nience. For knowledgeable and helpful service,
and for that all important "Thank You' shop
STUDENT SUPPLY
STORE
Wright Building
Owned and operated by East Carolina University
Regular Prices
12 exp. 1102.99
12 exp. 1262.99
12 exp.135.
20 exp.1104.55
20 exp. 1264.55
20 exp. 1354.55
24 exp. 1105.46
24 exp. 1355.46
36 exp. 135.7.84

,
���"
1

I










Title
The East Carolinian, February 24, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 24, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.114
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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