The East Carolinian, February 17, 1981






She Sa0t Carolinian
4-
Serving the East Carolina campus community since IV25
Vol.55No.4fi
10 Panes
Tuesday, February 17, lKl
Greenville. North Carolina
( in-ulation lU.(HM)
City Rezoning Foils
Kappa Delta Efforts
N JORDAN
Rezoning by the Greenville City C ouneil ill present Kappa Delia sorority from moving into this house at 1801 E
Fifth SI.
Americans Show Concern As
Foreign Capital Invades U.S.
B MHO WESTEL1
, '�. M f! I'm '
foreign capital is pouring into the takeovers compared to 1978, and a
United State- both to take over ex- 141 percent increase in the known
B PAULCOLLINS
Ne� I dil�r
The Greenville City council voted
Thursday to reone approximately
11 acres between East Fourth and
Fifth Streets and in the process end-
ed Kappa Delta sorority's attempt
to buy a house in the neighborhood.
1 he council voted unanimously to
reone the area from R-6 to R-9,
winch excludes all but single-family
dwellings from the neighborhood.
C ouncilman Joe 1 afl abstained
from the vote since his patents live
in the area being reoned.
Residents petitoned the change in
ordet "to upgrade and stabilize the
neighborhood
Kappa Delia was scheduled to ap-
pear before the Board ol d
justments last month to seek a
special use permit for the house at
1801 E. Fifth St.
1 he hearing, the board's second
on the matter, was cancelled when a
quotum was not present.
1 he board had earliei denied a
pei nut when n found that the
sorority could not meet one ol six
conditions necessary. A Superior
Court judge decided, however, that
the board would have to rehear the
matter.
Supporters ol both sides ol the
issue tinned out in force fot the
council meeting. More than 1(H)
people attended the public hearing
on the matter, and speakers for both
sides voiced then opinions.
Attorneys for the opposing sides
finally ended the public hearing with
appeals for then clients.
1 red Mattox, attorney tor Kappa
Delta, fell the council would be set
img a dangerous precedent it it
voted to rezone the area. He said he
could not remcmbei the council ever
rezoning land under such cir-
cumstances.
"The sole reason tor rezoning
he said, "is to keep the sorority
from going in there
On the other hand, Charles Vin-
cent, representing the rezoning peti-
tioners, said the issue was not the
sorority but whether or not the
neighborhood should be reoned.
Referring to the sorority, he said.
�� I hey have never won, never had a
vested right
Several residents spoke before the
council and said they would tear for
the quality and safety of their
neighborhood it the sorority were
allowed to move in.
Members ol Kappa Delta passed
out lists ol their house rules to the
council and distributed petitions
from their present neighbors at-
testing to the well-behaved nature ol
the sorority.
Representatives ol the
Panhellenic and Inter Fraternity
( ouncils also spoke on behalf ot the
sotonty.
Rev. Richard Gammon, whose
wife is president ol the Kappa Delta
house corporation, gave the most
emotional speech before the coun-
cil.
Gammon said that although the
council had every legal right to
reone he questioned it- moral right
to do so. He asked the council if it
thought it would be fairly represen-
ting Greenville it it voted to reone.
City planning director Bobby
Roberson said that 25 structures, or
70 percent of the neighborhood, did
not meet R-9 specifications.
He added that 22 structures did
not meet R-6 requirements.
Councilman William Hadden said
he would not mind living next to the
sorority but that he would mind liv-
ing next door to a fraternity.
He felt that a refusal to rezone
would "open" the neighborhood to
other fraternities and sororities.
He added that the situation show-
ed the need tor the city and universi-
ty to work more closely in the future
on comprehensive planning.
Other members ol the council ex-
pressed similar v iews.
�KK
ird Jol
� 1 andmarks t
has driven
ire the orange and
restaurants
ous flav ors ol
is A is apple
Bi rpora-
tion bought the chain in 1980 tor
St30 n
Then there are the 1 SIX) A&P
other greal
ell, not
e: West Germany's rengelmann
k over the chain a tew
irs ago. Renault of France owns
American Motors.
can ol Canada owns a chunk ol

the breakfast food
�merican
British Petroleum is the largest oil
iucet on th� fabulous North
Alaska 11 nch company;
c amet a. c anada's
Olympia and York C orporation,
based in Foronto, is the second
tl landlord in New
York City, and another Canadian
developer, Trizec Company, is bid-
ding to buy the World Trade
( enter, the headquai ters ol
American capitalism that dominates
a mown Manhattan. And even
C hesterfield cigarettes is now British
ow ned.
It would be easy to go on listing
famous American companies that
are now foreign owned or controlled
but these examples make the point:
stmg corporations and to launch
new ones.
Not so long ago it was
fashionable to complain that I S
capital was buying up the world.
American investment abroad is still
strong, but now Americans are
beginning to worry about the
foreign economic invasion of iheir
country
Nobody really knows just how
much capital foreigners have in-
vested in the United States. I he
Bureau of Economic Analysis in the
I s Commerce Department publish-
ed estimates that are widely quoted
� the latest is about S52 billion. But
as a US congressional committee
discovered recently when it explored
the issue, the bureau mainly
measures the flow ol foreign capital
into the United States and misses the
huge sums that foreigners borrow in
the US to buy corporations and to
launch new ones. The committee
estimated that the real total of
foreign ownership may be about
$350 billion.
Another branch of the US Com-
merce Department, the Office of
Foreign Investment, clips
newspapers and monitors official
documents to try to keep tabs on
foreign investors. In 1979, it noted
1035 investments by foreign cor-
porations and was able to put a
value on 541 of them, which totaled
S14.7 billion. That was a 53 percent
increase in the number o foreign
value.
1 he country from which most in-
vestment flows into the I nited
States appears to be the Netherlands
� more than S4.5 billion in 1979.
But that is probably misleading
because there ate tax advantages for
corporations k" ohei countries to
channel their investments through
the Netherlands into the United
States; much of that S4.5 billion
does not represent corporations ac-
tually based in the Netherlands
The second largest source o in-
vestment in 1979 was Britain, with
close to S3 billion. Canada was No.
3, with S2.1 billion, a surprising
development from a country that
has long worried about US invest-
ment and control in its economy.
West Germany was credited with
84 investments totaling $1.37
billion; Japan with 43 investments
totaling SI.21 billion; France with
2 totaling S759 million; and
Switzerland with 2" totaling S620
million.
Interestingly, the OPEC coun-
tries, with their huge incomes from
oil, were reported as making only 30
investments. The Office o' Foreign
Investment was able to value 1" ol
them at a total of only SI56 million,
the known value amounting to less
than one percvm o foreign invest-
ment in the US.
ECU Alumni Increase Support
By 1(1 NEWSBl REAU
Private gifts to last c arolina
University totaled more than
1,600 in 1980, according to an
announcement by Donald L.
1 emish, ViceChancelloi for Institu-
tional Advancement and Planning.
Cash annual giving to ECU, the
Alumni Association and the E( I
foundation totaled $282,583 from a
record 6.157 donors "The annual
giving dollai increase was 59 per
cent higher than the previous year's
support and donors were up almost
65 per cent Lemish said. "In addi-
tion to the annual giving figures,
over S399.950 was contributed in
special gifts, securities and gifts-in-
kind These figures d not include
1980 gifts to the Piratelub.
"We aie especial! pleased with
the substantial increase in annual
alumm donor support lemish
said. "In September 19 we set a
five-year goal of building our alum-
ni annual giving to 30 per cent par-
ticipation to rank ECU among the
toj- 10 state colleges and universities
and we are well on our way to
meeting that goal.
In 1978 we had just 1,M" alumni
donors and now we are over 5,600.
Our alumni donor participation
represents 19 per cent while two
vears ago it was about five per cent.
This is why we won a U.S. Steel
Foundation-Council for the Ad-
vancement and Support of Educa
tion 'Alumni Giving Incentive
Award' last summer and expect to
be considered for 'improvement'
again this year
Private gift support provided 40
full tuition and fees honor scholar-
ships. More than SI3,(XX) was used
for faculty travel and research.
Other major support was provided
tor departmental needs and faculty
grants, teaching excellence, equip-
ment purchases and advancement
programs. Over S250.0OO worth o
artifacts were contributed and
special gifts and endowments in-
creased the ECU Foundation assets
b more than SI00,000.
Lemish said ECU seeks privaie
gift support because "We have to be
more than iust good. Our mission at
ECl is to achieve the highest level
o excellence which only can be
achieved through private support. It
is the vital ingredient which provides
the necessary flexibility so impor-
tant in building a sound educational
program. Much o the up-to-date
teaching and research achievements,
scholarships and cultural activities
o LCI' are enhanced or made
possible by private support
A full report o fund raising w1!
be made to the annual meeting of
the Foundation directors Feb. 27.
More than 300 volunteers assisted
the Alumni Association and Foun-
dation in fund raising efforts last
year. Persona! solicitation and tele-
fund campaigns were conducted
throughout the state. More than
half o' all ECU alumni were con-
tacted by telephone for the purpose
o seeking continued and new
private gifts.
College Students Leave
Preppie Trend Behind
Underground Newspaper
Distributed On Campus
By PAULCOLLINS
Several thousand copies of an
underground newspaper called The
Student's Press were distributed on
campus Monday
The paper billed itself as printing
"all the news The Past Carolinian
can! print and detailed salaries
paid to several staff members of the
campus newspaper last semester.
The Student's Press was printed
by Inn Men, an ECU student who
said he wanted to stop the East
( arolinian from "ripping-off" the
student body.
My purpose is eliminating the
fraud on the East Carolinian he
said. There is an injustice being
done to the students. 1 decided to
pay out o my own pocket to inform
the students
Mert said that he and "a group
ol students" were responsible for
the paper.
The Student's Press basically
claimed that students at the East
Carolinian were being paid too
much. It cited payroll figures from
fall semester for 11 staff members.
When contacted by the East
Carolinian, Mertz said that he felt
students should not be making as
much money as some staff members
were.
"Students at the East Carolinian
should not be making so much
money Mert said. "They should
be there for the learning experience.
The paper also said that
employees of the student newspaper
should not receive advertising com-
missions or pay for articles if they
also received base salaries.
The paper called for the resigna-
tion o six East Carolinian staff
members and for reimbursement of
advertisers for advertisements run in
issues when only 8,000 copies were
printed.
In addition it claimed that the
Media Board was being
manipulated by the East Carolinian,
that staff members were taking trips
at student expense and that SGA
President Charlie Sherrod did not
investigate the paper because he was
"making his payoff" for support
received in last spring's elections.
Sherrod responded by saying, "If
the authors (of The Student's Press)
had been coming to Media Board
meetings they would find that I have
been the most vocal opponent of the
fee increase
Sherrod added that he had "full
See STUDENT, Pace 3 Tim Mertz, pictured here, was responsible for printing The Student's Press.
The preppie fad, long in fashion
on college campuses, this year
caught the imagination o the whole
country. With the publication of
preppie posters and even The Prep-
pie Handbook, the fashion look
marked by alligator golf shirts, pink
and green clothes and lopsider shoes
was no longer simply a college
crae.
But as often happens, having set
the trend, college students are now
leaving it behind. And a group o
Princeton U. students are capitaliz-
ing on this movement, even as other
manufacturers are still pushing
preppie wear.
This month, several national
magazines will be featuring the sym-
bol of the anti-preppie trend: a but-
ton, modeled after no-smoking
signs, that features a red slash
drawn through the familiar Lacoste
alligator. Already, stores across the
East Coast are ordering these but-
tons, which were created by
Princeton students Michael Kat
and Margaret Steinbugler.
Kat was selling specialized club
buttons and football booster but-
tons when he and Steinbugler, an ar-
tist, came up with the anti-preppie
design, initially "as just a private
joke he says. The buttons were an
immediate campus hit, however,
and Katz decided to take them to
retail outlets. He found response
overwhelming as he sent sample but-
tons, with cover letters, to national
magazines like Playboy, Seventeen
and People. "We've had almost
lOOo response from the
magazines he says.
Katz, who also heads the campus
typewriter agency, says selling but-
tons is "an incredible way to make
money, and really easy He ad-
mits, however, that the rapid
growth o the anti-preppie button's
popularity has required con-
siderable outlay of capital. "The
money hasn't come in yet he says.
"What with, lawyers for incorpora
tion (to prevent a direct lawsuit by
I acoste), stationery and ordering
the actual buttons), we haven't
shown a profit vet. But we will I
think
Two other Princeton students are
marketing a more violent anti-
preppie statement, freshmen Reed
M. Bend and Howard J. Stark have
sold 200 T-shirts in the Princeton
area that say "Nuke the Preppies"
and depict a dead alligator under a
mushroom cloud, like the buttons,
the T-shirts, which cost $5 each, are
equally popular among campus
preppies and non-preppies, says
Stark.
Both the button and the T-shirt
take a humorous poke at prep-
piedom. "Most of the preppies find
them humorous he says. "I'm not
a preppie, but I have friends who
are. I want them to know it's all a
great joke � with a little nudge
behind it
On The Inside
Announcements2
Editorials4
Classifieds6
Features5
Letters4
Sports8
?





I HI I M C k()i ISIXN
I I HKt rO 7. ISKI
t
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
The deadline for submitting an
nouncements is Friday at S p m
tor the Tuesday issue and Tuesday
at noon tor the Thursday issue An
nouncements submitted after
these deadlines will not be printed
All announcements should be dou
ble spaced and typewi Men or
neatly printed on 8 by 11 inch
paper Messages should be Kept as
short as possible and contain only
essential information The person
submitting th .noouncement
should include his name and
telephone number si � Horn of
the paut
PREREGISTRATION
Tne General College has chang
ed some prereg stration advising
� �� nts should see
Otfn a �'� ' 5 no 6 a no
no 7 tor ' ifion on adv !
9PfM : roci
tor (. � ; � � I prereg �� ��
TUTORS
The Ac counting s.
tutor accounting 240 I i
ting 2521
Wednesday in Rawl 139fn
5 00
CAREER CHOICE
illy oro . . . -
options, is being orfert - .
University Counschnu Centei
staff STudents may partv ,pate m
one of two groups The first group
will meet on February v ant-
February 25 the second group on
February 10 ai Fetw .� , .
groups will meet from 3 OOo in
S 00 pm m 701 Wright Ann
ROTC Auditoriuml The Mronu
Campbell Vocational Interi '
ventory v tered to a
I . . . . the first of the tv

ADVISOR
� ' : �

explored
all lei
world

� �
The Sympoi
�'a . torn
-�
� � ss of
.
on a
SLAP
Appr a

i.M.l A
�ia Mode �.
1
contact tne ECc d Hear
mg CI11
PARALEGAL
�'�
SCHOLARSHIPS
for approxin � . ��
ferpreted
B
� �
WORKSHOP
11


A1
� let
�� � 1
ast of Highway
� r a- � � n a '�
�� ecu
Fellows) 1
Comr-
BKA
Beta Kapt- � Alpha, the Bant
Final � � 1 rti ' � h�ld
t. �.� n � � I "q on Wedi
If 1 18 at 4 00 m Room
221 of Menoenhaii Studen' Centei
The guest speaker will be Mr Tom
jones from Branch Banking ana
Trust Company AM
nvited 1 "end
ADTT
Be the organization with the
most people at Chapter X on F
20 4 00 7 30 and you w
keg'
HUMANITY
Attention an fraternities,
sororities clubs and other cam
pus organizations
Are you looking for a social pro
iect for your groupC The ECU
Campus Ministers in cooperation
a Hi the ECU Hunger Coalition is
willing to make a presentation to
your group about the 1981 Green
Walk tor Humanity
1981 mar�,s the 10th anniversary
of th.s famous local event The
community and the university
IV( worned together closely to
� he Wal a big event in
prevous years
The funds we raise have always
been distributed equally to a local
and international hunger r
proiect Many o Greenville's
� ens rave been helped from
this proiect
I this idea appeals to yo-
us a c all at 752 4214 or contact any
of the ECU Campus Ministers
Thank you'
COMICS
All persons interested in comics.
fantasy and science fiction are in
vited to attend an informal
meeting of the ECU Comic Book
Club, Thursday Feb 19. 8 00 p m
at the Nostalgia Newsstand 919
Dickinson Ave Topics will include
plans tor the upcoming 7th Annual
Greenville Mmi Con m March, and
anything else anybody feels like
yakkm' about We are also prepar
mg a booklet to list an interested
area comics, fantasy and science
fiction fans, artists, writers, etc
For further into call 758 6909
ELECTION
� � � �
752 898 ' �
� . . positiot
pn . � , .
� � . .
'
SPEED READING
� � � �: ' .
mprehi
�� � � . � ay evi
it East l
to 1

PHOTOGRAPHY
� . �
A

. . eacl
. , et for 7 p n
P,
VOLLEYBALL
N' �
.
�� 1 00 tc
P m . � �1 ECUiM Rl Studi '
anostaft to take acvantaat-�this
newnfcrmal recreationaloppor
tuni.
INTERNATIONAL
nternational Dinner spot
by the internat'Onal Studi I
Association m Mendenh
purpose room. Thur1- : 1. Fet) 19
from S to 7 o'clock Call 758 6881 or
58 2977 1 � ' k(1 �'
SWIMMING
An organizational m. � til . �"�
ECU Synchronized
Club will be held Tuesday Feb 17
at 6 00 p m .n Memorial Gym 104
am interested persons are en
� . h i to attend
OFFICIATING
. lasses in off)) at no.
�: 1 sottbail ano soccer will
be offered at East Carolina
. 1 � ty ben Rhino, th S month
1 bal Softball Offii rating
1 meeting Mon
days Feb 16 march 30. 7 9
p m . will provide a work-ng
inding of positions voice
� . � nferprel ition, ban
Sti k) ans ano equipment
is John (Dokey
Grimsle� owner of the Greenville
Trophy I- �� " ator
POETRY
Poetry forum to meet Thursday
Feb 19 at 8 00 p m m Mendenhall
room 248 Bring copioes of poems
to be discussed
nan
ipproved
Officials
pia " � rate 4
I .hips. Th)
ov the N C High School
Association
Soccer Oftn iating � .�
session course, will meet on
: Feb 17 Mar h 24
flea 'th the rules
� .�;��� '
I how 1 ' lami
ysten be explained �
� 1 � 1 �. � , � �
Bra ����(; s head �
1 � . �
ire d) :� �
��.� �� ,1 �� .
but a to playei
leachei n �. appl. � 1
redil
FRISBEE CLUB
The trisbee club will meet in
� nhall rm 22' at 7 00 on Feb
19
SURF CLUB
There will be a surf club
meeting on Thursday Feb 19 at
7 00 in rm 247 Mendenhail This
meeting s n andatory for an
n 1 �� bers important topics such
� thi Fl ���� 1 a tn discuss
, � Bi " � � �
BSU
St Student Union will
itesda . � ven.ng
supper tonight at 5 30
� 1 s Si 75 Come on
the fui � �� � xated
imdy's' on 10th sti � � I
IVCF
��� �� �, Christ.an
�����.� a meel ursoay
�� � II . Ml 'nod'St Stu
t Centei ��� wee 5 speaker
: � . . I Walters

JOBS
Gamma Theta Upsilon invites
you to participate in a series of
talks given by the cooperative
education dept here at ECU On
four succedmg Weds beginning on
Feb 18, open discussion talks will
be held in Brewster C 206 at 3 00
pm This Wed s talk will concern
10b opportunities with CO OP
Feb 25. wiil deal with writing a
resume March 4, with interview
mg for iObs andMarchll.wllcon
cern maior employment oppor
tunit.es Everyone is welcome1
PLACEMENT
rsdav
iat a � � � a � be given
preri . 'ration a
On for Summer School
1981
�� . � : . ��, Placement
Test juisite 'c studei '
enrolling for the first lime in a
foreig inguage tudied in
� 11 ' ' �
'�������� ' -i Fehrunrv 1? must
. � ' Foreign
��-� � . �� . .
Bvs � 431 on or bi ' �
ebi 11
No I
on Offx ial Bulletin Bi
Ciassroom Bu I r further
if
MANAGER WANTED
inager for the
tact thi
Field H
� �
I not ri
qoii rt � . yrnent will
(ACT)
r he - � � � � a" 1 ieg� rest
� b) �� it ECU on
Marcl H "81 Application
. - ire t � 1 ' �
, , c to AC1 Reg trat 1 �
: - Aii. a � 1.240
� Fel
PSTT
��;�-��� gma P- Na
� . hoi � '� � ��'� " '� will hold
t ��� ntl y bu� � " 2 at 6
� �� � �
thers � � �� �"��� �
the sn ker at 7 p n I ,����
' ; rposi roon
I � � � 1 neef � ' 11 �
sn ker beg it p.n .�.���
� �. 132 A
HELP WANTED
rerviewer? in need) d for a
� . . . � . . 1 hing in thi
1 Nortl i Th) pro
� will 1 progress I
�.���� � .
nvolve interv reat
� � � auncl
eastet North Care
Training w iren Applicants
� . 1 �
� ,nng and
own ,��. � � . �- For
� � �� . � rife ' �� �' app
t.on formt ntacf t,tr Fi �
r Mai ���:� � titute fO)
� ,
na University
���.��� '57 ft??0
CHEMISTRY
11 m � � ���
. � iht Bldg

inagan 202 at
iks to all who sup
� last Thurs
PES
All members of Ph. Eta Sigma
are reminded of the meeting Tues
day Feb 17 at 5 00 The meeting
will be held in room 248
Mendenhall
CORSO
Attention all social work and
corrections maiors and intended
maiors There will be a Corso
meeting on Tuesday Feb 24 at 5
p m m Mendenhall room 248 All
members are urged to attend'
New members are welcome!
LAW DAY
AH law society members who
are on tht-law day committee The
law day committee will mee' on
Wednesday Feb 18 at Diane Jones
house 1.7001 Pinecrest Drive) The
meeting will be at 5 30 p m Please
attend!
SOFTBALL
The Greenville Officials
Association will hold its organ.za
tional meeting Feb 19 (Thursay!
at60Cpm m the Elm Street Gym
���1 t.ng room Anyone mtersted m
atmg high school Softball,
recreation softbaH. and or tunior
' l baseball (anc sottbail 1 is m
. led to attend For more info can
BUSINESS MAJORS
The rva R Joyner Alumni
Scholarship will be awarded dur
, " � spring semester to a full
student who is pursuing a
degree in the School of Business
The scholarship will be for the
amount of tuition and tees for a
� �
Students nterested in making
application may secure forms
I �- �� e or

. .
. irtment R325
Economics Department. R238
F.nanr e Department R343
v � � ng and Management
Department R137
applications must be submit
to Ruth Jones (Raw1 3341
the School of
Business Scholarship Committei
by Mai ' I
�� wMl be selected on
oasis of scholarship ano
' p Final selection will be
made by April 1 by the ECU Stu
dent Scholarships, Fellowships,
and Financial Aid Committee
�� m candidates submitted to the
Committee by the Dean of the
School of Business
CIRCLE K
iv : � �
ti �

GENERAL COLLEGE
,enera ege I ai ' a
trai
. � �. . tudenf
ement 6 and
� � 1 omph
- �
PKP
nvitations foi n en I � � si p in
'�� Honor Soc-efy of Phi KaDpa
"ailed this week to
� lents qualifying for membei
hi '�� � . ta'ions are mailed
�� � siudent's home
; � � address To qua I.
tor membership in the society,
iuniors must nave earned a 3 80
overaM grade pont average and
ors must have earned a 3 60
overall average
� lent meeting the above
membership requirements should
ke p a close check on their home
the invitation The
:� idlirte tor accepting the invita
tion is March J 1981 If you have
any questions regarding the honor
society of Ph. Kappa Phi. please
contact Dr William Byrd in the
Physics Department
The Kast Carolinian
N, ' . � , � " ��i
Putu hed�ri Tuesday and
Thursday dur,no the academic
year and every Wednesday dur
" � summer
The East Carolinian s the of
t. a I newspaper of East
Carol.na University owned
operated and pubMsheo for and
� " ' of East Caronna
University
Subscription Rates
Business S35 yearly
All others J25 yearly
Second class postage paid at
Greenville N C
The East Caronn.an offices
are located in me Old South
Building on the campus of ECU
Greenville, N C
Telephone 7S7 6366. 6367 4309
VIETNAM
Dr Memtt s'ark a Goldsboro
pediatrician will present a si d)
lecture on Vietnam A P" ,
cian s Personal E�p' rii Feb
18 at East Carolina university
The presentation is being spon
red bi '�-�' ECU chapters of
honor societies in history and
political science, according to Dr
Anthony Papaias advisor to
Lambda Eta chapter of Ph. Alpha
Theta The event will be at
Brewster B102 at ECU at 8 p m
and the public is invited
FELLOWSHIP
The Rock Student Fellowship
meets every Wednesday night,
from 7 00 8 30 p m in room
number 238 Mendenhall All
students are weicome
FELLOWSHIP
A graduate fellowship s
available from the institute of
Coastal and Marine Resources
which is available from March 1
1981 through Dec 31 1981 Asocial
science or mathematics computer �
science graduate student or senior
is sought The stipend isSlSOOeach
tor the tall and spring semesters
and S2400 for the summer session
The person will assist in the
preparation of field data using
standard computer and statistical
procedures Familiarity with
research methods and the use of
SPSS, SAS and FORTRAN is
essential Anyone interested
should contact User Services,
Room 108 C, m the Ausjtjn
Building
Beta Kappa Alplja
BKA

Hanking Fraternity
CONGRATULATIONS
Beta Kappa Alpha, the Banking and Finance
Fraternity is proud to announce the names of its
new members; who have joined the fraternity
during the 1980-81 school year.
TIM BALANCE
RAY BARNES
SUSAN BEEBE - Secretary
CHARLES BR1TTON - Treasurer
FRANK BULLARD
PAGE CAMERON
DAVID HICKS
REGGIE HOLT
WH1TTEN LITTLE - President-elect
CARROLL PERRY. Jr.
EMORY RAMSEY, Jr.
JOHN WILLIAMS
PATRICK YOUNG
LEGRANDE BENNETT - Planters National Bank
JERRY POWELL - First State Bank
WILLIAM REAGAN - North State SJL
PAUL RENDINE - Wheat First Securities
t
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m i si i k �i ii
11 Hki k i r
Pope John Paul II Appeals For Mutual Understanding

I

I
I
I

o
0
p IS-
as
fehanistan.
K A RACHI, tyandlsiam refugees displaced b lapan and Anchorage, years John Paul lold ween the (. aiholic
Pakistan (UPI) Pope 11k- pope's appeal the Soviet invasion ol Alaska, before flying the Pakistani President church and Islam
John Paul II, starting a came during a three
20,500 mile toui vt the houi stopovet ii
Fat East, celebrated a Karachi during w
Roman Catholic mass he met priv
in predominant In Pakistani Pi
Moslem Pakistan todav Mohammed Zia I !
and appealed for closei Haq and thanked
back to hah ovei the aftei celebrating mass "B, means ol
lohn Paul was on his North Pole. before 60,000 Chris- dialogue, we have come
'hilippines "It is especially grati- nans in the city's na lo see more clearl the
fying to witness how tional stadium "I am mam values, practices
he i ii si leg ol a F
2 da voyage thai will the bonds that unite all thinking in a particuai and teachings thai both
k him as well to these who believe in wa "t the bonds ol oui religious traditions
Ciuam in the South God have been dialogue and trust that embrace: foi example.
aimightv and merciful
God, the creatot ol
heaven and I ai th, and
the imp n tance thai we
give to prayer, alms
giving and I i
'I pray the r
lip
lies between Christiani nation foi sheltering Pacific, three cities in strengthened in recent have been forged bet- oui beliel in the one
Gay Students Subject Of Confusion
How fai inns
lege oi univei sitv
mimodate
students? Despite re
cent court rulings, the
answei to i Ii i ouesl oi
com u
sc
Ne
� d
disci iminai
" Si
N
'Student's Press' Distributed
( ontinued from Page 1 fwo
apei
le siai
Media Board c I a
David (. reccl
i
wen!
ie. I
e n i s w
ave
oui .u.
mem
voted 29-28 not to
the make the change even it
uion it could obtain a federal
d exclude court ruling prohibiting
lary, a funding eul-off, sas
riminates Schaffer. I he issue
osexuals, could come up again at
e possibh the senate's Februan
2 million meet i ng , how evet .
k'partment "Given the close vote,
'i I . it's too earlv to tell
senate what will happen he
' ; vote. s,is.
nat 1 he U.S. Supreme
c oui i m Decembei
upheld the right ol a
rexas &M I gav stu-
dent group to sue thai
university foi civil
houi s a rights iolations. I he
mebodv group sued alter &M
d m work officials refused to
. , '11 send g i ani it university
. n recognit ion because
isexual acts are
� still pi oh i hi led b
Pan 1 nuke I exas law. A&M
. jon iwyers ai gued that the
chool Aas immune
. civ il i ights suits
line because ii is a unit ol
ved ai ment, and
ii and pio 'I'1 1' mendmeni to
the onstiiution bars
Veeord l.incke. Mllls �� ' units ol
. io tate . .en menl I he
Supreme C oui I ruled,
however, thai the
I univei sits "no longei
enjov s absolute . . im-
munity
A gav student group
a) Austin Peav State I .
m lennessee last yeai
won a sun similai to
that broi ght h the
I ex.is AM group. In
comply i n v with a
tedeiai court ruling,
state schools m I en
nessee now registei stu-
dent groups through
the administration,
i ai hei than recognizing
them through recom-
mendations h the stu-
dent govei nmeni.
While accomplishing
the same pui pose. I en-
nessee officials sav
registration does not
implv approval and can
be decided n the basis
ol objective critei ia noi
requiring i al ue
judgements.
Students ai
ashington State I .
voted in 1979 to denv a
campus gav group
status as a committee
ol the student govern-
meni . I he si udeni
� einmeni followed
the dictates of tl
ieleiendum, provoking
a law suil I lie iav
People's Alliance ol
WS1
aiinoimeed i!
will file suil against the
university, seel
i estoi ation ol its status.
I
I he GPA can opeiate
on campus without
committee status, s�ays
lohn inklei. studeni
govei nment president.
but ii cannoi obtain the
funding ii received in
the past.
Harvard I . ad
ministrators decided
earliei this yeai noi
include anv in forma
lion from studeni
groups in registration
packets foi the second
semesi ei . I he C iav
Students Association
called this decision
discriminatot y, sav ing
it was aimed al ex-
cluding a pamphlet on
homosexuality. I he
(. IS took its complaint
to a studeni facul
. ommittee on
undergraduate life,
hoping the pamphlei
could still be included.
V e: a controvei
session attended b
more than 50 GSA
members and sup-
rters, the committee
oied to establish a se-
cond registration
packei lot informatii
from ll student
groups. I he (iSA has
protested on
a � a el
said, "thai mutual
undei si a ndi ng and
respet. i betweenhi is
Hans and Muslim. and
indeed between i
religions, will continue
and grow deeper, and
that we will find still
bettei wav s ol c i opei a
lion and collaboration
foi the good ol
I he population ol
Pakistan is aboul l�-
pei ceni M lem, and
John Pan! assui red Zia
his bnet visit had no
political motives, -
�� as "essential I
religious" in charactei.
s the chief pastoi
' theaihoh, church I
wish to vis 11 the
niei ol the loal
ristian communities
throughout the world
a '��' understand
� hem and theil needs
bettei the pope said.
I he pope's special
Mitalia l)( -10 arrived
n Karai hi ai 6:20 p m.
(8 20 a m. I siaftei i
� seven houi flight
from Rome thai began
his longesl and most
ambitious journev.
In his arrival state
mem. lohn Paul, who
: eted ai the aii
pori by Zia,said he
"admired" the effr
Pakistan lias made foi
the refugees Ii
Afghanistan
e the Soviet I. nion
vaded Afghanistan I
veai, an estimated I f
million fg ha n
aboul in perceni ol
country's po
� e ci ossed the boi I
into Pakistan
"One of the spe
concerns of the cl ui
at the present time
the plight ol refug
blem faced b s
on and I
o t h e i c o u n t r i c
well John Paul sa
shortly afti
Karachi.
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UlltE �aat (Earnltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
PAI I I INC kl . o
Davi Si verin,
Ami I nc siik, p
Chris Lit hok, �� , �����
JlMMV DuPRI I .
I'M 1 Col I INs.
chari i s chandi i k
David Norris,
I SIS I
Opinion
Page 4
'Student's Press'
Publication Clouds The Issues
I here comes a time when unplea-
sant events tend to dominate the
news and when distorted views of
important issues must be publicly
denounced. The emergence of The
Student's Press Monday on this
campus has prompted this rebuttal.
The 'group' o students who pro-
duced and distributed this literature
obviously saw no need to seek to ex-
press their ideas through the various
means provided to all members of
the campus and community. The
'Campus Forum' section of The
Hast Carolinian is provided for the
expression of all views, both for and
against the editorial policy of this
paper, livery letter which has been
sent to the 'Forum' since December
1, 1980, has been published. That
can certainly not be used as an ex-
cuse for The Student's Press.
With regard to the set rules of
grammar and journalistic style, the
publication is a farce. Even its name
implies that it is expressive of one
person's views through use of the
singular possesive 'Student's Press
Now on to the important issues it
distorts.
The partial list of The East
Carolinian's payroll is exactly that;
a partial list. There are many
members o( the staff of over 50
employees who do not come close to
making the figures quoted. Many
employees' pay totals represent a
variety of methods of payment and
that system must be understood in
order to clarify the misconceptions
offered in The Student's Press.
There is no employee of The East
Carolinian receiving a base salary of
SI30. That figure is totally fic-
ticious.
Desk editors and their assistants
receive base salaries, as do the direc-
tor o' advertising and his assistant.
The advertising technical super-
visor, two salesmen and various
production personnel also receive
nominal monthly salaries.
Several outlets are provided to
staff members to obtain suplemen-
tal income. Desk editors, their
assistants and staff writers receive a
per-inch rate for stories printed in
the newspaper.
The supplement provided for
advertising personnel is a 10 percent
commission on only those ads that
they sell. Not the entire revenue, but
their individual totals. This provides
the incentive for them to search for
new accounts. These new accounts
allow The East Carolinian to
become less dependent on student
fees.
A vivid example is the 1979-80
budget which contained $77,000 in
student fees, while the current
1980-81 budget requires only
$34,000 in student fees. It is indeed
significant that The East Carolinian
cut the need for student tees by over
one-half from one operating year to
the next.
The figures from 1977
represented the December payroll,
which is annually the smallest of the
year. The average of the October,
November and December payrolls
are a good deal higher, but these are
the monthes which have traditional-
ly been the highest.
To further complicate the payroll
situation, the staff o' The East
Carolinian has taken a 15 percent
pay reduction effective January 1,
1981. It is doubtful that many o'
our critics would be willing to take a
pay cut from their jobs, but to date
only one staff member has resigned
as a result of this move.
A former professor of journalism
at ECU describes the functions o' a
newspaper as follows: to inform, to
entertain, to mold public opinion
and to service the economy. The
East Carolinian has met each of
these responsibilities.
Just in case it needs to be stated,
THERE WILL BE NO RESIGNA-
TIONS AND NO FURTHER
DISCUSSION OF THE MATTER
IN THIS NEWSPAPER!
Weinberger Unqualified For Post
WASHINGTON � One of the mosl dif-
ficull votes I've cast as a Senator was the
very first vote in the new 1981 session �
on the nomination o' Casper Weinberger
to be Secretary of Defense. In a speech in
the Senate. I explained thai there was
nothing personal in my doubts about Mr.
Weinberger. My problem with him is thai
he knows very little about our national
defense situation.
A number o other Senators told me
afterwards that they have the same doubts.
But, as I knew would be the case, Mr.
Weinberger was overwhelming)) approv-
ed. Still, my grave concerns about out
deteriorating national defense compelled
me to vote as 1 did.
TALK � I talked with Secretary
Weinberger later, and he said he
understood my position. I was encouraged
by his promise to prove me wrong in nn
vote. He noted that in my speech to the
Senate I had stated that if 1 were proved
wrong. I would say so in another Senate
speech. Nothing would please me more.
Our defense capability is today at a
disastrously low level, and it will take us
years, at best, to catch up. But we must do
it, regardless ot the sacrifice. The only way
to prevent war is to be able to fight one �
and to have the national will to stand up
for freedom.
LEAGUE � A few days ago, I read an
excellent article sent to me by the
Americanism Educational league. It was
entitled. "Russia � A Military Machine
It is so timely that 1 want to share it with
you:
"Man) Americans persist in thinking
the Soviet Union is very much like the
United States, except that it has a different
political system.
Jesse
Helms
"Of course, thai is nol the case. The
Soviet Union is an absolutely ruthless dic-
tatorship in which the desires o the people
come last. What dominates Soviet policy is
the determination of the leaders of the
Kremlin to conquer the world.
"Robert Herr, a pseudonym for an
American living in Moscow, in writing for
The New Republic, tells of his meeting
with Roy Medvedev. who is well known in
the U.S. as a Soviet historian and intellec-
tual.
"As Herr says, 'I met with Medvedev
last February. Medvedev said the Soviet
Union 'Is moving in one direction �
toward the strengthening o our military
might. By the end of the century, Russia
will be the strongest country on earth,
there is no denying that. Of course, our
country has many problems � we're poor,
we dress badly and eat badly. But, in the
key sectors oi the economy, we are grow-
ing and growing and the United States can-
not stop us. We are going to overtake the
United States and that is inevitable
"Medvedev went on to say something
that most Americans can't understand. He
said, 'Our country is a military machine.
We are continuing now as we did in World
War 11. We were poor then, we starved i
froze m miserable apartments, bul we Deal
the Germans. The C.ermaiis lost 9,000,00
people and we losl 20,000,000. bin we
won the war. We won because our system
allowed the spending ot colossal resources
tor one purpose alone � military strength.
We ma) be primitive, but we will take
over
"Medvedev points oul a fundament
en or in American thinking on the Sovie;
Union. Americans come to Russia, stay in
the hotels, eat in the restaurants and find
that everything here is badly run. Then
they return to the United States with the
conclusion that since the Russians can't
run a hotel, they can't build a rockel
either. They don't realize that Russia put-
everything into rocketry, that the govern-
ment does not care whether anything is left
over for the population.
"It is the old storv ot the hard-fighting
barbarians against the more developed na-
tion. Rome laughed at the savages in skins
who came across the Alps, but in the end.
those savages sacked Rome because thev
were a more warlike people with a fighting
spirit.
"The Romans were interested only in
their comforts and luxuries, as we are m
the United States today
Editor's Note: Sen. Jesse Helms is the
senior senator from Northarolina and
heads the powerful Agriculture commit-
tee. Opinions expressed in Ins weekly col-
umn are provided as a service to consti-
tuents through his legislative office.
r�Campus Forum
Student Responds To Charges Made In 'The Student's Press'
Thank you, whoever you are, for the
biggest laugh 1 had all day. If your facts,
demands, and grammar had been a bit
less ridiculous, I might not have been
thrown out of the library for guffawing
uncontrollably. And if I didn't think
some students would take your 'paper'
seriously, I wouldn't waste my time ad-
dressing you.
To begin, I'm a little tired of Alter-
nate Presses, and Student Presses writ-
ten and published by people who don't
have the guts or class to put their name
to their work. Granted, I too would be
ashamed to associate my name with this
publication but then, I didn't write it.
Those of you who did should at least
have the courage to admit it.
Secondly, 1 can't help but doubt that
any of you know a thing about The East
Carolinian. If you did, you'd be well
aware that the money the staff receives
doesn't begin to compensate them for
the time and effort they put into their
jobs. Staff members should be paid
more, not less, for what they do. And if
you disagree, try putting the paper "to
bed" some night before you put yourself
there. You won't hit the sack until the
early morning hours. And that'll be
after a full day of work.
Your demands are blatantly
ridiculous. You call for the resignation
of six staff members who have served
the paper long and well. Who, may I
ask, is going to take their place? Who
has their experience and willingness to
work? I assure you, there are very few
people waiting to take over � very few
students desire that much responsibili-
tyYou want a payroll and staff cut?
Say good-bye to the paper. There aren't
enough staff members now and those
few who do continue to put in overtime
to get the paper out are underpaidYou
want to eliminate commissions on ads?
Find me a student who's willing and able
to scrape up advertising without being
paid commission. I'd love to see you
tryYou want to stop paying column
inch to staffers already receiving a mon-
thly salary? Go ahead. You won't find
much to read in the paper. I'd like to ex-
plain something here: The monthly
salaries are paid for such jobs as editing,
managing, layout, etc. Waiters receive
column inch payments. If more students
were willing to write for the paper, staf-
fers with set jobs would be free to devote
all their time to those jobs � as, in jour-
nalism, it should be. Instead, staffers
must do what they're paid for and also
write the stories. Staffers earn those
minimal column inch payments eight
times overNo trips on student fees?
The few staff members who get to take
those trips do so to learn more about
journalism. And what staff members
have learned has helped the paper �
compare back issues with today's East
Carolinian. Student fees should certain-
ly pay for such trips because, ultimately,
students reap the benefitsYou want to
reimburse the Greenville merchants?
This is reality we're dealing with,
remember?And you want the East
Carolinian andor the Media Board to
apologize to the students? What for?
For working long hours? For writing ex-
cellent stories? For being underpaid and
unappreciated? Get serious.
Finally, I noted that you want the
paper "back where it belongs: IN THE
HANDS OF THE STUDENTS It is in
the hands of the students � students far
more qualified to write and publish than
you. Before you begin another edition ot
your "paper I suggest that you learn
to construct and punctuate sentences.
Your letterhead alone, with its misplace-
ment of the comma in "Student's"
(SIC) (pic?) was indicative of the trash
that followed.
You know, now that I've written this
and thought about it, I realize that the
whole thing isn't quite as amusing as it
seemed at first glance. Your 'Press' is
slanderous and I'm tired of the slander
and complaints that are constantly aim-
ed at Robert Swaim, the East Caroli-
nian, and the Media Board. These peo-
ple deserve respect and gratitude for do-
ing jobs that most students are too lazy
to do. I, for one, am grateful. And I, for
one, do believe that the Media Board
deserves more from me than the paltry
$6.37 and one-half that it receives from
my student fees per semester. 1 hardly
think I'm overcharged.
In closing, I'd like to add that I would
just as soon not see another Alternate
Press publication until the writers and
publishers grow up, come to college and
learn to write.
KC NEEDHAM
Senior, English
KDs Opposed
As a former tenant in three different
off-campus neighborhoods during my
student days at ECU, 1 sympathize with
the plight of the Kappa Deltas in their
struggle to relocate to a larger house
near campus.
However, as a property owner in the
Tar River neighborhood, I can explain
the KD's lack of success in convincing
Fifth St. residents and the Greenville
Board o Adjustments that they should
be permitted to move from their present
location. For many years, the citizens of
Greenville have been plagued with noise,
litter and parking congestion because of
East Carolina sororities and fraternities.
One of the worst examples of this was
the Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity, which
after several years of habitation in one
of Greenville's most beautiful houses,
utterly destroyed it inside and out, until
the house and its grounds were an em-
barrassing eyesore for campus and com-
munity alike. The house, once located
on Fifth St was finally condemed and
demolished. Similar situations appear
throughout Greenville.
For the most part, Greenville residents
appreciate the fact that ECU and its stu
dent body are the focus of the city.
Many of us owe our livelihoods directly
to serving ECU students and a few of us,
believe it or not, actually support your
right to register and vote here, since you
pay taxes here and are counted in our
census
Stifi, is a rare citizen who won't seek
any available zoning code protection
after being awakened by noisy parties
next door at 3 a.m or picking up strewn
garbage that drifts into our yards, or
having our property values ruined by
weed-infested, unmown lawns nearby.
The crowding o streets, sidewalks and
even front yards with parked cats i- a
great source of irritation to persons un-
fortunate enough to live near Greek
houses or student-occupied rental pro-
perty.
It is indeed unfair that students who
just want a clean, quiet, convenient
place to live must suffer for past wrongs
they did not commit. Maybe the Kappa
Deltas have not and will not be guilty ot
these offenses against their neighbors.
Bui wary from bitter experience with
students who have offended. Green
ville's citizenry is prepared to fight � in
City Hall and in court, if necessary
FRANCEINE REES
Alumni, 19
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points oj view. Mad or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner library
For purposes of venjication, all tetters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced, or neatly printed. All let-
ters are subject to editing jor brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted. Letters by the
same author are limited to one each 30
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I III I V
Features
I I �
Buffett Concert
Tickets Selling Fast
M�

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popul ii id, A1A. Na
when the tamed av v
I loi ida w ould peo i
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"I ton . sell ii .
When relaxed B
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My . Dim M P �
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ii xuitude Noticeably al
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Popular recording tar Jimmy Buffetl will be in concert 'hi Saturday at R:00 p.m. in Mtngesoliseum.
Comic Book Club
Is Organizing Again
B. JOHN WKM.KK
I y. !
Seiei
ioni n �
H .
ai
es i� spi
Mini-Con i

y, sell � Miius
.�ms. I he 7th V
ille Mil i - n
M - 22, from 10 �� l "
V 103 I as' 4tl Sti
will h
The t
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I aslarolina Playhouse scenic designer Gregory Buch pauses on the prison cellblock catwalk he designed tor
i ol 'Getting Out a Playhouse production running I eh. 18-21. 23-25.
Set Designer Describes Plans
For Production 'Getting Out'
(. u
at ECl is the F
Club I' consi
gi oup ol people av
01 U
aginative expi
vited to atten
formal
Newstand, 919 Did �
1 heii next
1 hursdav. I el
problem plaguing tl pre
� imagination is the n
hat ' age old ai I lorn
. � � only loi children.
I aw renee, president ol
1l C on u Book Club ai d
agei ol the Nostalgia News
deals in new and used
Aani I vpel this myth.
'N. n
i understand when
Bv I KN( I INI I'l KKV
I I S, v Hn
A 1
p
� '
'��. I '
eparatioi
' Ill HI II" I
welded logethei
f ECU1
1 � ncludes several hundred
fpip i mbled
prison cell, a cell-block catwa �
ratlings, and a on apartn
foi the mam eharactei a Solent
woman just out ol prison I out
staii a onnect the two levels ol
Working from Buch's design,
technical directot Michael Gall and
1(1 drama students constructed
the - applied paint and plaster
where needed and arranged props to
furnish the sparse cell and apart-
ment.
i H11 v. C s
Buch's
ludes
I � . com
foi lighting b
lighting designei David
j appropriate cloth
iracters, the task ol
costume designei Pal i
� he pla uht, the
: ! the
have to come
ai k in the pi ocess says
ms in oui pro
� time and lack ol
ivily on i he local an
� o lend fuinishings
e; to enhance the
mosi stock productions,
iw having a brief run
ai at ion time, we hav e
and with limited
Buch said.
professional background
work with several New
ted in, i ;ps !l! v! started, the
.inrcd necessarily loi
rhey wt id ' he
"( artoon in e mo ies w ere
aimed foi adult audiences, not
We've forced the comic
k and cartoons ai ic strips
I lielub is presi a towards the child, I think
listing ol area lists "S notion it's kid stutl is
and interested people. "adds D V
One of the t omk Be. � comics enthusiast and lorn ei 1I
( mics ar� al
d aboiii beinj
k a

pei sona and i
deve And i e foi kids
but ad ' �
i seduct
problem k w 1 think mosi
then Aritien over k
P
Likt Cap
. i p WWII
ic) was wi tten for servicemen,
si e ovet 'here eei day
I hey 'd p them, jusl J;p a
guys sitting in the
t hes or v . ver, the foxholes,
em and say. we
ise suckei -
. lied, � .pica N
: Japanese, ert lam ai
those characters rhey've stayed in
culture, like s
�ed nd as to which ol the
r ea d Id
know w ll s in
the mind and tht It's
aKo in a plact than
real - Plato"
is in pi mi. in loui coloi
� and New 1 ngland theatres and
southeastern summer stock com-
panies.
When designing foi a play he
reads the script carefully and con
fers with the directot before doing
the actual design. From experience
with doei ol dramas, Buch is able
to estimate closer) how much ex-
pense is involved before construc-
tion begins.
Godard's Breathless
Coming To Hendrix
I UC GODARD
I his Wednesday night at 8 p.m. in Mendenhalls Hendrix I heatre, the Stu-
dent I nion Films (ommitiee will present Jean-I m Goddard's milestone
film 'Breathless Admission is by I.I), and activity card for students and
Ms( Membership Card for faculty and staff.
By J.G.WEIGlllM
Sprt ial i" 'h� I i i nr-dinian
I his ednesday nigl I al y p m.
in Mendenhall's Hendrix 1
the Student I nion 1 ilms Commi
will present Jean-Luc Godard's
milestone film "Breathless " d
mission is by 11) and act ivity
foi students and MSC Membership
(. ard foi faculty and stal I
I ollowing the film in room 221 ol
the studeni center, coffee
doughnuts will be served fre
charge. ny students, faculty oi
stafi interested in discussing the film
with others are welcome to attend.
When first seeing "Breathless it
might occur to one that the hero ol
the film is a specimen ol pre
existentialist man: a consciousness
groping Us way toward a philosophy
ol life. But such an interpretation ol
the film is hardly possible, as will be
cleat from a short summary ot its
tents.
rhe cei is Michel, a
. heavy dipped young
man. whom we first see in
Marseilles stealing a car with the
helt" ol a gii fi iend. He drives ofl
northward to Pan- al an ex-
peed, talkmg to himself.
. ng snatches oi songs, making
comments on the people he passes,
(nine his revolvei through the cai
window into the trees, and so on. Ii
is obvious from the stan that he
recognizes no law other than the in-
stantaneous satisfaction ol impulse-
When a policeman on a motorcycle
finally corners him, he shoots his
way out and finishes his journey as a
hunted murderer. Once in Paris, he
steals money from another girl
tnend. while waiting to collect his
share from some unexplained 10b-
See GODARD, page 6, col. 1
t
I





U t AM CAROl INI AN
FEBRUARY 17, 1981
UamwOt )6our CourGt thC Wmv jj
By Pwip Atau�
AHH A)0TNIOG LIKT
SPAGHETTI )0PSflUcr
OH; I PM)K IT ML
NOTMIOfc LJKf
SPAGHETTI kHtHOUrfAUCf
Hearing Symposium
Set For Next Week
Godardys Breathless Coming To Hendrix
Continued from page 5
bery. We then see that he has only
one ambition: to go off to Italy with
the loot and with a third girl friend,
an American who sells the New
York Herald Tribune on the
Champs Elysees. This American girl
is the only chink in his armor. He
loves her and he cannot do without
her physically. She has been his
mistress and is, indeed, pregnant,
but she has an unsettled, unreliable
charactei. What does she want out
of life? Perhaps to be a journalist;
she is, at any rate, prepared to sleep
around to achieve this end. Finally,
for no obvious reason except
general bewilderment and weakness,
she betras her lover to the police.
He is shot down in the street and
dies, quite self-possessed and with a
contemptuous sneer on his lips.
That he is meant to be a hero
there can be no doubt. The film is
biased in his favor. He is not a
criminal who is eventually brought
to justice; he accepts death volun-
tarily and elegantly, after being
betrayed by the only person he was
attached to. He is always racv and
elliptical, insolent and virile. When
a passer-by asks him for a light, he
presses a coin into the man's hand
and savs: "Go and treat yourself to
a box of matches He persuades
the American girl to get into bed
with him, and they disappear under
the sheet, which jigs significantly up
and down as the radio plavs "Music
While You Work
He never rides in a bus or subway;
he simply appropriates the most lux-
urious car that happens to be at
hand by lifting up the hood and
establishing contact with a piece of
wire. Every detail of his behavior
emphasizes his superb indifference
to society: when he asks for a
telephone number he gives the
figures confusingty in Belgian
French; when a pedestrian is knock-
ed down in front of him, he crosses
himself ironically and moves on;
President Eisenhower is in Paris on
his state visit, but Michel and his girl
friend move through the crowds
without as much as a glance at the
official procession.
This deliberate flouting of
generally accepted convention pro-
duces some remarkably realistic ef-
fects. Many of those small inconse-
quential quirks of human nature,
such as r-ellmi and Bergman are so
good at suggesting, find their way
into a French film, perhaps for the
first lime. The emotional relation-
ship between the young man and the
girl, precisely because it is in some
ways so unemotional, so ill-defined,
so improvised at each step, although
they are technically lovers, has an
unusually exciting tang.
One's first reaction, then, is,
"What a fine new talent There
has been a lot of talk recently in
France about writing being finally
superseded bv the cinema, although
novels still come rolling from the
press. The "camera-fountain-pen"
(camera-stylo) has become a com-
mon expression, and we are told
that Godard carried still furthei a
practice initiated by some other
"new wave" directors: inventing his
picture as he went along, without
reiving on any script at all. Bv mak-
ing no concession to "beautiful"
photography and disregarding all
the rules, he produces an
astonishing impression of imme-
diancy. But the first glow of
satisfaction soon wears off, and it is
not long before the shoddmess of
the hero reduces the film to mere
entertainment. He is not unrealistic;
indeed, at the very moment when
Breathless was first being shown,
the papers were full of the trial of a
certain "Monsieur Bill a young
man of good family who had behav-
ed more or less in the same way as
Michel.
I he i rouble is that Michel is just
not as impressive a human being as
(he overtones of the film seem to im-
ply. He cannot really be a hero
because his suicidal behavior during
(he course of the film argues a total-
ly incoherent mind and a complete
divorce from reahtv.
Professionals and lav
persons arc invited to
attend the 11th annual
Speech and Hearing
Symposium at Fast
Carolina University, set
for Feb. 26-27 in the
Carol Belk
Auditorium.
The annual event is
sponsored by the EC I
chapter of the National
Student Speech,
Language and Flearmg
Association.
Featured speaker is
Lyna Miller, director of
the University ot Mon-
tana's Early Childhood
Language Intervention
Program.
Othei experts will
direct mini-sessions on
wavs to help children
with language pro-
blems.
I at i I iv engood,
duecioi ot (he C om-
munity Developmental
Day School Program,
Goidsboro, and
I aRose Daniels, prac
ticing speech therapist
and stall therapisl al
the Goidsboro school,
will direst "The
language Station Ap-
proach to I anguage
rherapy
I om Hawley ol the
ECU School ol Music
faculty will direct
"Music as a
I acilitating Modality in
Speech and I anguage
Development
Svmposium sessions
are scheduled 1-6:30
p.m. Feb. 2 and 8:30
a.m3:30 p.m. Feb. 2"
Purpose ol the sym-
posium i- to increase
die professional growth
and knowledge of per
sons who provide set
vices to the language-
disordered child.
More informa
available from the E I
Dcpatin.cn! ot Speech,
I a nguage and
Auditory Pathology,
telephone 757-6961.
New Course Announced
Some Days, It Isn't Worth Getting Up
By DAVID NORRIN
When you're a little kid. it's easv
to get up in the mornings. I used to
love getting up at 6 a.m. on Satur-
day mornings to watch test patterns
until "The Cisco Kid" or "Flash
Gordon" came on, starting a whole
morning o' watching cartoons.
Now. I'm lucky if 1 get up in time
to see a Saturday afternoon movie.
And. the only way I can watch
something at 7 a.m. is to stay up all
night and take a nap during the
afternoon. Cartoons are tun to
watch but sleep is more important.
bed is so warm, cozy and com-
fortable that it is hard to imagine
that anything can happen during the
class has been cancelled.
As the years go bv, it gets even
harder to get up early. In high
school, I could get up at 6:55 and
catch the bus m front of my house at
7:05. Now. after only a few years ot
college. 1 am in constant danger of
sleeping through 11:00 classes. (At
this rate, by the time I'm 30, I'll be
sleeping through the evening news.)
Alarm clocks are strangely inef-
fectual on me. I can hear one go off
and pound it into pieces without
waking up. Luckily 1 can also reach
out and turn off the alarm without
waking up.
When you think about it, alarm
clocks are really stuck with a tough
job. If thev ring early when they are
it worthwhile to supposed to, they run the risk ot be-
The best way to deal with early
morning phone calls is to ignore
them. It's probably either a wrong
number or some kind of trouble
lurking around waiting to ruin your
day. If it's something good, it can
wait until a better time.
Also, the effort of answering the
phone is usually enough to keep one
from getting back to sleep after-
wards.
Neighbors can also make it easier
to wake up on time. One or more
people yelling, dropping pots and
Senior Show
Announced
pans, kicking around furtiiture,
watching loud TV shows and crank-
ing up their stereos before class is
hard to sleep through.
Neighbors are harder to set than
alarm clocks, though. And, like
alarms, they sometimes don't go oft
when they should. On other occa-
sions, they'll start making racket
hours before you need to get up.
Coffee is a help for some people
who need to get up early. For me, all
it does is keep me awake when 1 try
to take a nap after the early morning
class or exam.
The Department ot
Science Education is
announcing a new
course, Scientific
Photography, SCIE
3110-3111. three
semester hours, which
will be offered next
fall. Qualified students
may preregister for the
course. The catalog
description, to appeal
in the new catalog, will
be: "A course designed
to present the use ot
photographs as a tool
of research, and lot
publication of scientific
and technical reports.
Special techniques
close-up photographv.
ph o t om ac r ogr ap h y,
photomicrograph)
will be utilized.
Students should have a
35-mm camera. Some
commercial processing
of color materials will
be expected
To be taught bv Dr.
Floyd Read, who also
teaches the v e rv
popular SC 11
2110-2111, Elementary
Photography, the new
course seeks to provide
a practical course in
scientific photographv
for students in the
natural and the social
sciences.
I he objectives ol the
course are: (1) lo in
troduce students to the
v aiiou - aspecI -
scientific photography
as practiced today; 2
t o provide
background in tl
special photogi aphk
techniques needed bv
students in theii pat
ticular disciplines; (;i
to show the value ol a
v isual image in presen
tations ot technical
subjects; (4) to
demonstrate the um
the visual image a
tool in the investigat
process.
The permission ot
(he instructor a prere-
quisite foi Scientific
Photography. Students
will be expected
show a future need foi
the material ot the
course, and enrollment
will be inted.
How evet. for t he
general 35-mm en
thusiast, a course in
Nature Photography,
S( II 3010-3011, three
semestei hours, will be
offered in the spi
semestei
Dr. Read office is
the fourth
1 lanaean
ated on
o I
Building.
ARMY HAW STOUC
w
J1�ll Pe�CM�V Prk�v
? S�kv Combl Booh. Plut �
1 Ml SE��nt Street �
LXXi
BENNIES
CITCO
WRECKER
SERVICE
Front End
Alignment
All Types of
Auto Repair
Foreign A Domestic
Reasonable Rates
200 E. 10th Street
Phone 7 58 4224
ATTIC
TONIGHT
I IN THE
PHEONIX
ROOM
BUFORD
T.
dav that makes
leave the comfort and security of the
bed. For instance, today I traded the
comfort and security of my bed for
some boring mail that 1 threw away,
a long walk in freezing weather and
some dull errands. It was a bad
trade.
As if getting up weren't hard
enough, nature sometimes throws in
extra embellishments like rain,
freezing cold, blasting winds and,
on really bad days, all of the above.
It's amazing how the prospect of an
8 a.m. walk through a mile or so of
freezing, wind-driven rain can make
one have second thoughts about at-
tending class.
Worst of all is gathering up the
will power (and umbrellas and
coats) to make it to class on such an
inhospitable day. and finding out
ing pounded into pieces by an irate
former sleeper. If they are nice and
keep quiet, they get broken to pieces
by an irate former sleeper who is
four hours late for work.
Some alarm clocks are chicken,
and quietly stop running during the
night, so they don't have to ring.
There are things that are more ef-
fective than alarm clocks for waking
up sleepers. Big dogs that jump on
your stomach and slurp your face at
7 a.m. are pretty efficient wake-up
devices.
Telephones ring louder than
many alarm clocks, and often do so
at earlier hours. A phone can't be
smashed as easily as an alarm clock,
since phones are larger and are
sometimes in a different room from
the sleeper.
Paintings and mixed-
media works in several
styles by John E.
Daniels Jr. of Kinston,
senior student in the
East Carolina Universi-
ty School of Art, will
be on display in the
main lobbv of the Leo
Jenkins Fine Arts
Center here Feb. 15-22.
Daniels is showing
realistic oil and acrylic-
paintings, paintings
with superimposed im-
ages in several media,
acrylic graphic patterns
and acrylic n o n -
figurative works.
A candidate for the
Bachelor of Fine Arts
degree in painting, with
a minor concentration
in drawing, Daniels will
graduate at the end of
spring semester.
He is the son of John
and Ruth Daniels of
Kmston.
CASTEL
CARINI
RESTAURANT & PIZZA
NEW YORK STYLE PIZZA
FREE DELIVERY
756-8704
TRY OUR SICILIAN
STYLE PIZZA
Open
Mon -Tours
8 30 A M -11 OOP M
Fri & Sat
8 30 A M -12 OOP M
Call for take-out
758-0080
tree)
-GET TO KNOW US IN FEBRUARY SPECIALS-
MONDAYS NEW DEUS VEGETABLE HJP
(a hearty homemade soup ot beet
broccoli carrots & barley
AND A SESAME BAGEL WITH SVH
TUESDAYS: KNOCKvVURST SAN
. - ockwurst kraut, mi
and spicv mustard
MA
WEDNESDAYS: DELI DOG �'��� ' MEI
THURSDAYS SPROUTSPE
(a fa ta sprouts ��� ' � � �
tomato, on.ons and mayo on :
AND POTATO SALAD
FRIDAYS NEW ENGLAND CLAM CH( �DA
iMPERNICKEL BAGEL WITH PROVOLONE CHEESE
1 95
1 95
1 95
1 95
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Taco Bell
Daily
Special
2.00
Monday Plus
Enchirito, Bean Burrito - Small Drink
Tuesday
Burrito Surpreme, Tostada - Small
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Wednesday
Beefy Tostada, Taco -Small Drink
Thursday
Beef Burrito, Pintos 'n Cheese - Small
Drink
Friday
Combo Burrito, Taco - Small Drink
Two Taco Surpremes - Small Drink
Sunday
Two Tacos, Pintos 'n Cheese - Small
Drink
I NEW YORK RAVED IN 1979
NOW IT'S COME TO GREENVILLE
CE
The East Carolina Playhouse Presents
GETTING OUT
by Marsha Norman
"The Best Play of 197"
Studio Theatre
8:15 p.m. - February 18-21,23-25
General Admission � $2 50
ECU Students - $1.50
For ticket reservations call 757-6390
J
t





1
'VSTOUC
n 9�mt.
lifM. Snorkel �
! toots Pluv �
tatSlrMt
IC
HT
IHE
n!X
RD
out
080
LE
Sports
Rematch Set For
Wednesday Night
ECU Coach
( alh Andrui
B CHARLES CHANDLER
Spurls1ihir
1 he dale was Wednesday,
January. 28, 1981. I he long streak
ended aftei a grueling battle. Now
the lime has come foi the big
awaited rematch.
On the above date the ECU 1 ady
Pirates, smarting from a recently ac-
quired national ranking, took on
powerhouse N.C. State and its
64-game in-state winning streak in
the friendly confines of Minges Col-
iseum.
1 he game was a see saw battle all
the way, the Lady Pirates coming
awa the winners in a 78-77 over-
time decision as over 4.(XX) wild
1 v I tails looked on.
Following the contest State coach
Ka Yow was obviously frustrated
and hinted that she was looking for-
ward to a rematch in Raleigh's own
Re) nolds Coliseum.
I he rematch is fast approaching,
and will take place tomorrow
(Wednesday) at 7:30 p.m.
Come gametime the 1 ad Pirates
will have had an eight-day. layofl
following a 96-65 thrashing of
I N( Wilmington last "uesday.
I he Wolfpack, on the othei
hand, has been quite busy. I he team
recently competed in the Atlantic
Coast Conference championship
tournament, tailing in the finals to
Maryland b a single point, 64-63.
I his and the revenge factor has
1 Cl coach Cathy Andruzzi con-
cerned.
" rhey'll be more fired up against
us than against any team they've
played this year claimed Andruz
i. "When a team stops their tradi-
tion, the 64-game winning streak,
they're going to be wanting revenge.
"I'm going up there expecting
them to play out of their minds
As for her own team, Andruzzi
says the 1 adv Pirates' emotional
level is below what would be ex-
pected with such a game upcoming.
"We've had to get high for so
main games she said. "The girls
are not acting verv fired up for this
game. I hat has me very concerned.
But, alter all, we weren't fired up
when we beat Carolina earlier this
season either
Despite the fact thai the rematch
with the Lady Wolfpack will count
in the NCAIAW standings, Andruz-
zi ret uses to call the game a
"must-win" situation for her club.
"We're not putting as much
weight on this game as people
think she said. "It's not a do-or-
die situation. What we're concerned
with ultimate!) is the state tourna-
ment. I his game would be nice to
win, though, because it would seed
us higher in the tournament
The key foi E( U, says Andruzzi,
is slopping Slate stai forward Trudi
I acey, who scored 24 points in the
first game and is averaging 20.4 and
11.6 rebounds per contest.
"We've got to keep Lace) off the
boards Andruzzi said. "We're
not sure vet who we'll put on her
1 he big gun foi ECl' in the first
game was Mar) Denkler, who
poured in 2 points and now has her
average up to 14.7 after a slow start.
Kaihv Rile) leads the Lad) Pirate
attack with an IK average while
Sam Jones tallies 14.4 per game.
1 he nationally-ranked Wolfpack
go into the game 16-7 while ECU
puts its 20-5 record on the line.
Xote: The( Si ale matchup will
be earned live via Greenville's
M ()()l radio station, found at
1340 on the M radio dial. Pre-
game coverage begins at 7:10 p.m.
with tipofj time set at 7:30.
Lady Pirate center Marcia Girven (23) fires shot during first
ECU-State matchup this season.
ECU Record Falls To 11-13
Timmons'Junwer Gives Sea hawks 57-5 Win
Dave Underwood Slams One
ByHARLES CHANDLER
Sport t!il'�r
I NC Wilmington guard Edward
1 minions canned a 13-fool turn-
aiound'jumper at the buzzer to push
the Seahawks past last Carolina.
57-55, in Minges Coliseum Monda)
night.
I he shot ended an ECU rail) thai
was culminated bv Pirate Mark
Mel aurin's 18-foot jumper that tied
the game at 55 with 13 seconds re-
maining in the contest.
I he Seahawks hurried the ball
down the floor and had trouble fin-
ding an open man. Just as the game
appeared headed for overtime, Tim-
mons spun away from two
defenders and calm) put the game-
winnei through the nets.
"This was a very disappointing
loss for East Carolina Pirate
coach Dave Odom said, "but a
great win for I NC -Wilmington. It
was a hard-fought game. They
deserved to win but 1 can't say we
deserved to lose
The Seahawks, now 11-10 alter a
2 7 stait, jumped to a quick 10-2
lead before the Pirates tied the game
and eventuall) took the lead, at
24-22, via a Charles Watkins layup.
They carried thai lead into the
lockeroom at the half.
1 he first foui and a hall minutes
o! the second hall were all UNC-W,
though, as the Seahawks regained
the lead with a lft-ft surge thai put
them up 38 JO
Again the Pirates slowl) moved
then wav back into the contest. I he
Hues pulled even for the first time
since earl) in the hall when Michael
Gibson muse led in a lav up with 1:52
remaining to knot the score at 53.
Wilmington then took possession
and patient!) waited foi exact I) one
minute before finding senior for-
waui Danny Davis underneath tor a
lav up to put the 'Hawks ahead.
55 53.
Heroics b) McLaurin and then
Timmons closed out the scoring and
severe!) dashed ECl 's hopes o a
winning season.
I he loss dropped the Bucs to
11-13 with onl) two tough awa)
contests remaining, at Richmond
this Saturday and at Illinois Slate
the following weekend.
Shawn Williams, a native ol near-
bv Washington, responded to the
presence ol man) old friends,
leading the wav foi Wilmington
with 24 points.
The performance o! Williams
came as no surprise to the Pirates,
Odom said.
"The irony o the thine is that we
talked about Williams before the
game the second-year ECU men-
tor said. "1 knew (he) would be
tired up with the Washington people
here
Coach Mel Gibson's Seahawks
did not experience their first down-
to-the-wire contest in this one. Six
overtime contests and numerous
other close games dot their previous
results. This, said the Wilmington
coach, had something to do with the
win.
"It was a difficult game for either
team to lose Gibson said. "We've
played a lot o close ones this year
and have confidence in these situa-
tions
Mike Gibson led the wav for the
Pirates, scoring 13 points and pull-
ing down seven rebounds.
McLaurin added 12 and Watkins 10
to the ECU cause. Dave Underwood
led the team with eight rebounds.
Shooting played a big part in the
second straight ECU home loss (the
other an upset at the hands o
Delaware State on Thursday). The
Pirates shot only 38.5 percent in the
opening half and finished the game
at 41.8.
Contrastly, the Seahawks came
back from a 37.5 percent first-halt
showing to shoot a blistering 68 pel
cent in the second half.
f j;i
Mark McLaurin Rebounds
State Defeats
ECU Wrestlers
B WILLIAM YELVERTON
1 verybody's heard the old cliche
about the score not telling the whole
story about a game, but never was
this statement bettei suited than
describing the N.C. State-LCU
wrestling match in Raleigh last
Saturday afternoon.
The match was an exciting one
filled with draws and close deci-
sions, but when the dust cleared, the
13th-ranked Wolfpack prevailed
33-6 en route to their seventh
straight win.
The Pirates fell to a disappointing
3-9, while State upped its record to
13-1.
East Carolina's Butch Revils,
ranked fifth in the nation at 177
pounds, saw his attempt for a 22nd
straight win thwarted by Matt Reiss,
the defending national champ at
167. Reiss and Revils fought to a 4-4
draw in the 177-pound match.
Pirate Head Coach Hachiro Oishi
said that Revils wasn't in the best of
health, though. "He didn't practice
at all last week because of an in-
jury Oishi pointed out, "but he
still didn't wrestle too well
Revils wasn't the only Pirate to be
stopped, as 167-pound James
Ellison was defeated by old nemisis
Greg Cox. Cox won the match 7-1
and Ellison's record dropped to a
still respectable 21-5. Cox had
defeated Ellison earlier in the season
at the Monarch Open.
I he Pirates' 118-pound Jeff Leaf
was pinned by national!) second-
ranked Chris Wen, at 5 Oishi
said the match was a good ex-
perience for his young wrestler,
whose opponent was undefeated.
Oishi was also pleased with
freshman Gary Webb's perfor-
mance, even though he was defeated
2-1 bv State's Gary Roch at 142
pounds.
"Webb is getting better Oishi
said. "The first time the) met this
veai, Koch beat him pretty badly,
but Gary has improved and that's
why the match was so close
Chris Giles ran into State's Frank
Castrignano, the nation's eighth-
ranked ISO-pounder, and was
defeated 8-5. Castrignano won his
15ih straight match without a defeat
in what proved to be an exciting
match.
The Pirates' Andy Hefner return-
ed to action at 158 pounds after a
lengthy layoff because of an injury
and battled to a 7-7 draw. "He
wrestled very well considering he
was coming off an injury Oishi
noted.
In the 190-pound class ECU's
Sam Mayo was pinned by Jerry
Rodnque at 1:59 of the match.
Rodriquez, who is ranked fourth in
the nation at 190 pounds, is
undefeated and owns a victory this
season over the 1980 national cham-
Gymnasts Fail To
Gain Weekend Win
Now Hit Road Again
ECU All-America wrestler Butch Revils (in action above)
saw his perfect record blemised a bit this weekend as it fell to
21-0-1 after a draw with defending national champ Matt
Reece of N.C. State.
pion, Oishi said.
Heavyweight Mindell Tyson
knocked heads with State's 6-foot
5-inch, 400 pound freshman, Tab
Thacker as the two fought to a 2-2
draw.
"Thacker doesn't have much
technique Oishi said of State's
prize freshman. "Mindell didn't
make any mistakes, and he wrestled
very well against a guy so big.
"State is just a very strong
team Oishi said. "They don't
have any weaknesses. With our
tough schedule this year, we don't
have anything to be ashamed of
considering our record
The Pirates travel to Bowie's
Creek Friday for a match with
Campbell, Barber Scotia and David-
son.
By CAND1CE MATTHEWS
staff Wrttrr
ECU's women's gymnastics team
went on the road twice last week,
collecting losses both times.
On Tuesday night, the Pirate
gymnasts traveled to Chapel Hill to
meet with UNC. Then on Fndav
night, the Lady Pirates went to
Raleigh to compete in a tri-meet
with N.C. State and Western
Carolina.
Tuesday the Pirates were soundly
defeated by a strong Tarheel team.
The Carolina gymnasts scored
131.65 points, with ECU scoring
117.65. Although the Pirates were
beaten as a team, several ECU gym-
nasts placed well individually.
On the vault ECU had several
clean performances. Kathy
McNerney took fifth place with an
8.1 and Claudia Hauck tied for sixth
place with an 8.05.
Lisa Tamarru had an outstanding
performance on the balance beam,
receiving second place with an 8.2.
"This was a very significant second
place said coach Jon Rose.
"Carolina has an awesome beam
team
In the floor exercise, Joanie Ford
claimed third place with an 8.0.
Claudia Hauck also performed well,
receiving a 7.85 and fourth place.
State completel) dominated Fri-
day night's meet, scoring 130.5.
ECU was narrowly defeated b
Western Carolina, 117.65 - 117.15.
In this meet, the Pirates were
competing with a reduced team. In
warm-ups 1 ndav night, Claudia
Hauck badly sprained her ankle,
putting her out of competition for
the remainder of the season.
Elizabeth Jackson was also not
competing due to an injury.
ECU did not fare as well at State
as they had at Carolina. Susan
Lawrence scored the highest for the
Pirates on the vault, receiving an
8.05.
"With the exception of Susan,
Friday night was definitely not one
of our best team vaulting efforts
said Rose.
Lisa Tamarru again performed
well on the beam, receiving fourth
place with a 7.55. Jennifer Bell also
had a good routine, claiming fifth
place with a 7.5.
"We had a super team effort on
floor said Rose. "Everybody hit
their routines cleanly Joanie Ford
received the highest score for ECU,
an 8.0.
This weekend, the Pirates again
are on the road, traveling to George
Washington Friday night and to
Tow son on Saturday night.
t
run �t�� ��wwwMpB





8
I HI I AM t ROI IM AS
I I HKl K1 I 7, I4M
Booters Down Local Foe classifieds
B TIM WILLIAMS
Mall V nu-r
In North Carolina
Soccei I eague action
Sunday, the ECl
Pirates kicked theii
wa) pasl Greenville
based Stroll's Miens.
2-0.
I he Miens (formerly
the 1 as! Carolina Soc-
cei Club) is a group ol
i I students who
picked up the sponsor
ship of the Hallow
Distributing Co. of
Greenville.
I he game was the
tn si ol the spring
season foi each team,
and this was evident in
the pla. Consequent!) .
this is w here the Pirates
held the uppei hand
because it seemed thai
the were a bit more
oi ga nized, having
played and practiced
together almost ever
dd for most of lasi
fall.
1 he Aliens had main
new players who were
not will) the team lasi
season and were often
"out of synch
I he Pirates tallied
once in each half with
David Hayes firing a
left-footed shol past
the outstretched hands
of Aliens' goalie Man
Hamilton from 18
aids out with 35
minutes gone in the
tii st half. rwo
defenders collided and
thai lelt Hayes open
with the ball on the
edge ol the penalty area
where he put the shot in
the goal in the right
corner.
In the second hall.
Walter Shroeder scored
foi the Pirates alter a
Cavs Win Another
c H
rtvn
left
n I s
npsi
M
i :
R 1 O I
11. Va. (UPI) Wednesday against streak.lop scoret for
Lamp scored 19 Clemson, oi it Virginia the Yellow Jackets,
and Ralph wins one of its next two 4-10 and 0-12, was Fred
n added 15 i games, the title Hall with 10 points,
hi to carry goes to the Cavaliers. Virginia led 48-17 at
i to an For the undefeated the halt and its biggest
ut ol Georgia Cavaliers, 23-0 and lead was 43 points.
in tlantic 12-0 in the ACC, Jeff three times in the se-
( �a s
izame
Ihe
irgin
a k e
victory assures
a ol at leasi a tie
: cX title. It
1 oresl loses
lackets 4X-2S.
t.i oK.i iii h '��:
knwatvlu 12-31. Mum I � (j
i i : Had 4 : : i�, i ton : : i.
WiKim 4 I 4 '�.ik D � I 0, Ni � n u n
" I n 1 II II II lotah 7 M IK 42
V IHC.IM ISJI
WiK.m I .) RobhtkOfl 4 111.
SaOMtwa h M 15. I mp � l im,
J.mrv 5 1-2 12. Moan (I 2-3 I M
iim.in I 4 4 III. i.iiifv 1 (i (i J Klt-in I
ii o iiihnv : it ii 4 iiu u is :n
Jones also scored 12 cond halt.
points, ihe Cavaliers Sampson had 12 re
have won 28 straight bounds and Craig h
games over two Robinson 10 for "i int�t�4�.�.wt�Tecii
seasons, the nation's Virginia, winch outre- 1 tfv
. , ImiK (troTR I -i h 20. ircnu 211
longest winning hounded the Yellow ihi (Mt K ��,
Raquetball Tourney
Competition Fierce
Men Women's Raquetball ,
Doubles I ournaments
rhe 1 11 .CU 1epi Racquet-
pasl wcek- .andtesults are in-
dicativeol itie fieices. impetition ex-
itedhrouglOUl tieweekend's play .
First,in themen 'Vdivision, top-
needed John E�itmanand Hob Brew ington
teamedo defeat w aUH1urpln and es
V an enby scoes ol21-15,and 21-20. All
thesepai� i"i n!5 tank among
11jest anwas superb.
Nexiin linewas theW(men s div ision
� iheresultsare a-follows; Rose Hester
nid' Ii
.i -�121 1 1 � . i here ai
EC I His e 11�� - to be
�. stu was lasi
les champion.
:u at oIS tii0all foui par-
ucipants
Finally, in the men "B" division,
M ie! Melchiorre and Lee Meacham,
both PI Grad Assistants, teamed to
Bruce Hallmuller
anci
Hank
Aland. I his match was significani in
the fact thai the teams met early in the
tournament with Hallmuller and
Strickland winning by scores ol 10-21,
21 12. 15-4.
Since this tournament was a double
elimination eveni Melchiorre and
Meacham were able to tight then way
back into the finals. Here they were able
to defeat Hallmullei and Strickland b
scores ol 5-21, 21-12, 15-6, forcing a tie-
breaker match gain, it was Melchiorre
and Meacham by scores ot 10-21, 21-12.
15-6 eat ning their team the championship.
Ihe Intramural Dept. would like to
ink all those participating in the tour-
nament tor making ii such a successful
event.
IM Sports 'N' Shorts
Dy Lhoayne (Jrooms
� and �
Gregg Melton
Arm Wrestling Results
Ihe finals ol the arm wrestling tourna-
ment were held during last Thursday's
ECU-Delaware State basketball game.
Ovei 75 contestants started the tourna-
menl and the 12 finalists concluded the
action on rhursday. In the firsi match ol
the evening "Black Bart' Collins
deteated Henry "Pee Pee" Runnion.
Next. I aura "Killer" Quisenberry was
deteated by Wanda "Powerhouse"
Moore. "These matches formed the
lightweight divisions in the competition.
Moving on into the middleweight divi-
sions the results included Carlton
"Killer" Thompson who pinned Allen
"Batman" Bes; m less than 2 seconds,
rhe next men's match was a rematch of
last year with Warren "The Destroyer'
Vistal defeating John "The Samurai"
Hill. Again, th.s match was ovei in less
than two seconds.
In the women's 136-pound and over
competition, Flame "Devil Dog" Davis
pinned Cindy Sailor. Elaine also won this
event last year.
Finally, in the men's heavyweight divi-
sion, Nate "Big Wig" Wigfall defended
his title for the third straight year by pinn-
ing Michael "The Assasin" l.ange, who is
the 1979 Mr. NC "Teenage America
The Intramural Dept. would like to
thank all the participants and remind
them to pick up their Budweiser T-shirts
at the IM Office.
( )pti iiiKtl K.
Eye Care Center, R A.
(jreei vip
Budget Lyewear 39.95 complete
hrames, lenses and tint in plastic
bitocals only 3V.V3
Contact Lenses 159.00 complete
udej exam, litting, heal disinfection and all follow
� , i . �
Comprehensive exams (students)
25.00
10 ' LCL student & staff discount
on all materials excluding
specials and contacts.
Tipton Annex
22ci Greenville Blvd.
756-9404
Dr. Pete Hollis
scramble in front oi the
Aliens' goal on another
near-perfect shot to the
top left corner ol the
goal from 20 yards out.
Each team had
numerous other oppor-
tunities thai weie not
capitalized upon.
In this weekend's ac-
tion, the Pirates play a
make-up game with
North Carolina
Wesley an Saturday,
and then take on The
Kick (Greenfield
Academy of Wilson) on
Sunday. Both games
are at the Last Carolina
Varsity Soccer field at 2
p.m.
The Siroh's Aliens
travel to Rocky Mount
to play N.c . Wesleyan,
Sunday, at 2 p m.
Johnstone
Is Player
Of Week
C.Rl I NSBORO,
N.C. (I PI) Wake
forest center Jim
Johnstone, who keyed
the seventh-ranked
Demon Deacons to
wins last week over
North Carolina and
Duke, was named to-
day as the Atlantic
Coast Conference
player of the week.
I he 6-11 junior was
picked foi the honor by
a panel ol ACC sport-
swriters and broad-
cast ei s .
Johnstone scored 28
points, grabbed eight
rebounds and made
seven assists as Wake
forest routed the ninih-
i anked I ar Heels,
84-68, and squeezed by
Duke. 58-52.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE Parade drum
Prcmici chrome in e�cellenl con
dilion Call 7S7 3210
FOR SALE Lark banio Almost
new hardshell case Earl Scruqs
booh included �U5 Call Keith at
758 7876
FOR SALE Surfboard 6 6 lonq.
ChaMtnqer roundtaii i65 Call
756 4598
FOR SALE Quilts 8� year old
Granny makes them to sell ijs 00
each also pillows Si 00 and s; 00
plus crochet pieces Call 752 1785
or 752 8850
FOR SALE Pawleys Island ham
mock and frame Best offer
757 364'
FOR SALE ?8 Yamaha on oft
road 250 Few miles Great condi
tion Call 758 5282 after 3pm
Leave messaq�
FOR SALE Utah 2way
speakers. J70 00 Larqe cabinet
rms 4C wats call '58 8493
FOR SALE Reel to reel tape
deck Good condition very etti
cient 4120 Tuner in fan condition
120 Call 758 3753
PERSONAL
NOTARY PuBi.il Lonvenient
cheap rates Call Amy 758 69�4
COUNSELORS foi western North
Carolina CO ed summer camp
Room meals laundry salary and
travel allowance Enpenence not
necessary, but must enioy livmq
and working with children Only
clean cut non smoking college
students need apply For applica
tion brochure write Camp
Pmewood 1801 Cleveland Rd
Miami Beach. Fi 33141
WANTED IN K INSTON Someone
to commute with Monday through
Thursday Call 522 1146
kim You can use my phone
anytime you, want and good luck
m court Paul
TINA Thanks tor the card Don t
be chicken PL
WANTED TO PURCHASE 67 69
Camaro Phone 756 7712
LOOK GOOD ON PAPER
Resumes term papers pio'i-
sionally 'yped WRITE RIGHT
756 99 it
FOR RENT
APARTMENT Foi if" Ii
rooms modern bath and kitchen
study Call 752 3020 after 6 00 p m
FEMALE ROOMMATE Wanted
to share two bedroom Tar Riti
Apartment Can Lisa 7 5? 06 53 or
758 5629
ROOMS FOR RENT 575 per
month utilities included lor into
call 752 )480
ROOMMATE WANTED 2
bedroom Eastbrook 5107 plus half
utilities Call 58 6693 or 787 �6'6
FEMALF ROOMMATES NEED
ED House 1 block from campus
$100 00 mo everything included
Call 758 3318 ask for Anita
FOR RENT Larq. h . 12
rooms 7 baths Ideal for student
group 5500 plus utilities 752 S296
FOR RENT I and 2 bedroom
apt Call 758 40! 5 Mon Fn
10 00 6 00 Sal Sun M i M
FEMALE ROOMMATES
WANTED C .press Gardens hall
mie from campus Call 752 5947
FEMALE ROOMMATt
WANTED To share j bedroom
house 580 mo plus third utilities
Call 7 58 0838
MALE HOUSEMATE WANTED
i Mock! irom Attic 565 rent one
fouitn utilities pr.vate room
7 52 3199
NEEDED Female roomma'
share 7 bedroom apt close to cam
pus Hall rent hall utilities
teri sled pUase call Donna rf
758 7728
ROOMMATE WANTED 5' 00 a
month, deposit required
Available March ist Call 7S� '
after 5 00 MWF or '58 5982
5 00 Tu Th
ROOMMATE NEEDED Tar
River Estates �' 70 per month plus
one hall utilities 757 354" Can
between I 4 p m or alter 10 30
classified ads can be i
CHASED FROM 7 f AT
I m f EAST C A R O INIA N Of
Sorry!
T
We Missed Our Target!
The BUCCANEER Staff would like to apologise for any in-
convenience eaused by the sudden location change. Please
remember thai this is your last chance to have your yearbook
portrait made!
Traditional poses will be taken tree o sitting fee charge. A
contemporary pose package( v4 length, profiles close-ups, etc.)
will be taken for a sitting fee charge o' $3.00. All seniors having
their portraits made will have their 1981 yearbook delivered
tree of charge.
Buccaneer Office
Publications Center
Feb.16-20
10am-5pm
ABORTION
The Fleming Center has been here for you since X974.
providing private, understanding health care
to women of all ages at a reasonable cost
Saturday abortion hours
Tree pregnancy tests
Very early pregnancy tests
Evening birth control hours
The Fleming Center we're here when you need us.
Call 781-8850 In Raleigh anytime.
THE FLEMING CENTER

Camp
SUMMER JOBOPENINGS FOR CAMP COUNSELORS
at Camp Sea Gull (boys) and Camp Seafarer (girls). Serving as a
camp counselor is a challenging and rewarding opportunity to
work with young people, ages 7-16. Sea Gull and Seafarer are
health and character development camps located on the coast
of North Carolina and feature sailing, motor boating, and
seamanship, plus many usual camping activities including a
wide variety of major sports. Qualifications include a genuine
interest in young people, ability to instruct in one phase of the
camps' programs, and excellent references. For further infor-
mation and application, please write a brief resume of training
and experience in area(s) skilled to Don Cheek, Director,
Camps Sea GullSeafarer, PO Box 10976, Raleigh, North
Carolina 27605
rS$$ss$$$$$SSS$SSS$S�Sf
KODACOLOR
Developed and
4
No Foreign
Film
12
EXPOSURE
ROLL ONLY
20
EXPOSURE
ROLL ONLY
$M3i
$4.81
The ECU Media Board is accepting ap-
plication for the following positions for
the 1981-82 school year:
Editor of the Buccaneer
Editor of the Rebel
Head Photographer of the Photo Lab
General Manager of WZMB
General Manager of the
East Carolinian
Editor of the Ebony Herald
Applications may be obtained from the
Media Board secretary in the Publica-
tions Center, M-F from 8-1 or 2-5.
Deadline is Feb. 27.
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$!
KODACOLOR
Developed and Printed
$5.53
24
EXPOSURE
ROLL ONLY
No Foreign
Film
EXPOSURE
ROLL ONLY
$7.97
$$$$$$$$$�(��$$$$$$$
FILM DEVELOPING
20 EXPOSURE 41 QO
KODACHROME K�Si�
ANOEKTACHROME
PROCESSING ONLY
$3.15
36 EXPOSURE
KODACHROME
AND EKTACMROME
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LOW, LOW PRICES ON
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PROCESSING
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SUPER I ANO STANUftftO oviES
orn� � LIMITED OFFtK
$$$$$$$$$$
$2.11
t
I
f





Title
The East Carolinian, February 17, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 17, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.111
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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