The East Carolinian, January 20, 1981






ttfte
roltntan
Vol. 55
�7

Serving the Lust Carolina campus community since 1925
10 Pages
Tuesday, January 20. 1981
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 10,000
Hostage Release Hits Snag
Again
WASHINGTON (UPI) Presi-
dent Carter announced early today
sn agreement with Iran to free the
2 U.S. hostages, but it appeared at
midday some snags were holding up
his departure for Germany to meet
the Americans at the end of their
443 da ordeal.
Vter a nearly all-night vigil
waiting for documents covering the
rtent to be signed in Tehran
patched to Algiers, Carter,
looking somber and weary,
delivered a nationally televised
statement in the White House press
.enter shortly before 5 a.m. EST.
"We have now reached an agree-
ment with Iran which will result, 1
believe, in the freedom of our
American hostages he said.
The president said a few
documents still had to be signed
"before the money (Iran's frozen
assets) is actually transferred and
the hostages released But he add-
ed: "We are prepared to move as
rapidly as possible
The president planned to fly to
Wiesbaden, West Germany the site
of a U.S. Air Force hospital where
the hostages will be cared for once
the Americans have been flown out
of Iran. Several sources confirmed
that the hostages had been taken
early today at the Tehran airport.
But it appeared that there were
some snags holding up Carter's
departure. And as the hours passed,
with no word that the hostages had
yet left Tehran, some of the
euphoria that had filled the predawn
hours appeared to fade.
Former chief of staff Hamilton
Jordan and White House counsel
Lloyd Cutler were grim faced when
they conferred shortly after 10 a.m.
EST with press secretary Jody
Powell.
Asked whether the hostages
would be freed soon, Cutier said,
"We don't know. We're still
waiting. We'll find out
Jordan also told reporters: "1
don't know anything yet
Earlier, an administration official
said that one of the documents con-
cerning instructions by the Bank of
Iran to the Bank of England to
create an escrow account had not
yet been signed off.
There also was concern at the
State Department over the safety of
the two Algerian jetliners if they
were to take off after dark from the
airport, which is in a mountainous
area.
At the State Department, Mrs.
Louisa Kennedy, wife of hostage
Moorehead Kennedy, said, "My
prediction is that they may have to
spend another night (in Tehran)
She told reporters, "Evidently it
is a bit dangerous to fly out of Iran
after dark. It might be wise if it goes
too long to hold off for another
day
There is 8 hours time difference
between Washington and Iran.
Carter had hoped to return to
Washington in time for the Tuesday
noon inauguration after flying to
Germany to greet the hostages.
Thirty minutes after Carter's ear-
ly morning statement announcing
the agreement with Iran, White
House press secretary Powell an-
nounced additional documents had
been signed to set in motion the
transfer of some $9 billion in gold
and cash to an escrow account in
London.
ECU Students Hit With Flu
B I'M LCOLLINS
News Y ditor
The East Carolina Student Health
( enter (infirmary) has reported a
cant increase in patients with
flu-type symptoms in the past week.
According to Ka van Nortwick,
trative manager of the infir-
10 percent of the center's out-
id ast week were people
pe of flu symptom.
� the patients were critically
last week was the first one
i vacation we thought it
rse, and it did van
: She reported that the
load of flu cases had gotten heavier
over the weekend and was even
heavier Monday.
Van Nortwick added that no ex-
act figures were available yet.
The type of flu most frequently
seen has been a viral infection
lasting from two to three days, infir-
mary sources indicated. The symp-
toms include chills, fever, sore
throat and congestion.
Van Nortwick indicated that the
outbreak of flu had not put a strain
on infirmary services. "I don't want
anyone to think we have an
epidemic on our hands she said.
"There are plenty of beds
available
Some students, however, reported
long waiting periods to see a doctor.
"I'm sick, and I've been waiting
here for over an hour to see the doc-
tor said one student who asked
not to be identified. "It's hard
waiting out here when you're sick
The infirmary does not issue writ-
ten excuses to students who have
been ill, van Nortwick wished to re-
mind faculty members. "It is
against our policy to issue written
excuses to students, but we welcome
phone calls from instructors who
wish to verify that a student has
been ill
A number ot professors indicated
that increased absences were
noticeable in their classes but in
most cases were not overwhelming.
Davidson College was forced to
close for two das last week because
of a flu epidemic that hit campus.
As many as 500 of Davidson's 1,400
students were hit with the flu, and
the school was not able to resume
classes until Wednesday.
United Press International
reported Monday that several cam-
puses in the L'NC system, including
Appalachian State. UNC-Charlotte
and N.C. State, have been struck
with outbreaks of flu.
Steakscam' Results In Indictment Of Ten
Bv STEVE LEVIN
rt.rn 1 hi Vews and Observer
u Bl RN - THe hottest issue
Mew Bern since November has
b eye steaks,
e meat has resulted in a
hi the indictment of 10 per-
son- grand jury charges
;e, a request for a federal grand
investigation, a state Justice
Department audit and accusations
mismanagement at the county
hospital ti the tune ol $50,000 to
groups providing the
ai e the (raven County
Hospital administration and the
New Bern newspaper. The Sun-
Journal. They've been trading can-
nonades in public and in print since
it was revealed Oct. 31 that three
hospital employees � who are
among the 10 later indicted � had
been dismissed in connection with
thousands of pounds of missing
meal and fish.
The Craven County Board of
Commissioners has called for the
hospital's boare. of trustees to fire
the hospital's top administrator,
Lonnie E. Moore. But the trustees
last week voted unanimously to re-
tain Moore. The commissioners will
meet Monday amid promises that
the issue is not dead.
SGA Votes Support Of
Kappa Delta Sorority
B PAUL COLLINS
News Ir dil�tr
The SGA voted by acclamation
Monday to support Kappa Delta
Sorority in its fight to purchase a
house on East Fifth Street.
Kappa Delta, which is presently
housed at 2101 E. Fifth St has
tried to purchase a house in the 1800
block of the street but has been
blocked by the Greenville Board of
Adjustments.
Fhe matter came before the board
last October, after Kappa Delta had
reached an agreement with the
owners of the house.
"We thought it was cut and
dried said Flo Cammon, president
of the Kappa Delta Corporation for
the local chapter. "But at the
meeting on Oct. 23 they had scads
of people there for the other side
I he board denied Kappa Delta's
efforts to buy the house, saying that
the sorority would cause a hazard by
increasing'traffic and noise in the
area, Gammon said.
The sorority gave notice of ap-
peal, but a series of injunctions and
petitions has further complicated
the situation.
As the situation now stands the
Board of Adjustments has been
ordered to rehear the matter. The
residents of the neighborhood have
filed an injunction against Kappa
Delta to stop the hearing and pro-
duced a petition calling for the area
to be rezoned so as to exclude all but
single family dwellings.
The hearing on the injunction will
be Thursday morning and will deter-
mine what further action must be
If a new hearing is called, it will
take place Thursday night.
Gammon said that the sorority
decided to move because its present
house is too small and too far from
campus. "Some people don't realize
that we want to be part of the
neighborhood and make a contribu-
tion. I just don't see how we can
win
Vice President Lynn Calder noted
at the SGA meeting that the Inter-
Fraternity Council, Chancellor
Brewer and other members of the
administration had all expressed
support for Kappa Delta.
In other business President
Charlie Sherrod said that the Board
of Trustee's workshop held in
Raleigh last weekend "was a good
one for students
According to Sherrod, the
trustees discussed a number of
issues affecting students including
problems with drop-add and the
School of Business. These discus-
sions, Sherrod said, were informal.
He did say, however, that the
trustees voted unanimously that
they would make the final decision
regarding a change in student
seating at football games.
"1 don't think they (the trustees)
were convinced that Ken Karr's plan
was the right remedy Sherrod
said.
SGA member Russell Oberman
announced that he met Friday with
the Faculty Calendar Committee,
which indicated that it would poll
the faculty on a fall break using ap-
proximately the same questions ask-
ed of students.
He added that if approved the
first fall break would be during the
1983-84 school year unless a special
change sought.
The bone of contention is rib eve
steak, or the lack of it. Since 1978,
the hospital has bought more than
40,000 pounds of rib eyes from
three meat vendors.
During fiscal year 1980, the
hospital bought 22,220 pounds of
steaks � enough for 120 half-pound
servings of steak every day that
year, in a hospital with a capacity
for 248 patients.
Hospital officials said the meat is
served to patients five times during
every 21-day period and to hospital
staff twice during every 21-day
period. But reporters from The Sun-
Journal, in interviews at the
hospital, could find only one patient
who could remember being served
rib eye steak.
An investigation by the SBI,
Craven County Sheriffs Office and
the hospital's security force has
resulted in the indictments of 10
men on charges of embezzlement,
conspiracy to embezzle, larceny
conspiracy to commit larceny,
possession of stolen or embezzled
property and conspiracy to possess
stolen or embezzled orooertv.
Those indicted include the three
hospital employees, two local
grocers, four meat truck delivery
drivers and a New Bern resident.
The investigation has revealed
that $600 worth of steaks destined
for the hospital on one day never
were served by the county-owned
facility. An audit by the hospital's
public accounting firm concluded
that "the actual loss may be indeter-
minable due to the fact that food
usage documentation is not retained
in the ordinary course of the
hospital's business
The Sun-Journal has reported
that as much as S100.000 worth of
meat a year never was served by the
hospital, up to $400,000 worth over
a five-year period.
"We see the taxpayers' money be-
ing wasted, and we want to do
something about it said Publisher
Eugene X. Bryan in an interview.
But there are those who think the
newspaper has been less than fair.
"It upsets me because of the
adverse and untrue publicity we've
See STEAK, Page 3
Phao bv MH SLOAN
Students waiting at the infirmary. A flu wave has hit both North Carolina
and ECU.
Student Spending
Reaches $28 Million
Hhoto t� JON JOKDA.S
Students gathered in front of the Student Store last Thursday for a moment
of silence to observe Martin Luther King's birthday.
By GEORGE THREEWITTS
K t Nr�o Bureau
More than S28 million in retail
purchases in the city of Greenville
were made by East Carolina Univer-
sity students in 1980, nearly doubl-
ing what students spent three years
ago, an ECU study reveals.
The reasons for the increase, says
Dr. Charles T. Ziehr, an assistant
professor of Geography and Plann-
ing, were inflation and a larger ECU
enrollment.
Ziehr, who directed the economic
impact study as a class project in
Urban Geography, said the higher
expenditures also may result from a
somewhat higher living standard
among students. He noted,
however, that no empirical data on
living standards was obtained.
The project closely parallels
similar studies conducted by ECU in
1974 and 1977. In these studies, stu-
dent expenditures totaled S15
million in 1977 and $7.5 million in
1974.
Student enrollment at the time of
the studies rose from 8,327 in 1974
to 10,891 in 1977. There were 13,165
students on campus when the 1980
survey was compiled.
In conducting the study, a ques-
tionnaire was distributed which
sought students' weekly expen-
ditures in Greenville for the 43.5
weeks that ECU is in session. Pur-
chases during the period were divid-
ed into six retail categories; food,
clothing, entertainment, auto ex-
penses, personal hygiene items and
other expenses. Lodging and phone
costs were excluded.
In addition, each student was ask-
ed to indicate the retail source area
in which the largest proportion of
each item was purchased.
The ECU computer was used to
analyze the results.
Of the 716 students that respond-
ed, 334 were female and 382 were
males. Nearly half of those respon-
ding lived in dormitories while the
remainder resided in either frater-
nities or sorority houses or lived
away from campus.
Average weekly expenditures for
the students raneed from $54.58 to
$74.13. As might be expected,
students who are employed full-time
spent the most money followed
closely by students who live in
fraternities and sorority houses.
Dormitory students had the lowest
weekly average expenditures.
An interesting feature of the
study shows how students distribute
their expenditures across six retail
categories. Food was first with
weekly averages of $21.88. The
others wre entertainment, $11.37;
auto expenses, $8.57; other ex-
penses, $7.98; clothing, $6.44; and
personal hygiene items, $4.91.
"Women spent more than men
for clothing and personal hygiene
items, while men had greater expen-
ditures in all other categories. Food
and entertainment categories show-
ed the greatest contrast between
men and women with men spending
an average of $4.62 more per week
for food and $4.29 more for enter-
tainment the report said.
The largest percentage of students
surveyed picked the Pitt
Plaza Greenville Square area to
shop for food and hygiene items.
Carolina East Mall was the major
choice for clothing purchases while
downtown absorbed the largest
amount of dollars spent for enter-
tainment.
The $28 million that ECU
students spent in Greenville area is
about 8.23 percent of overall retail
sales. The Greenville Chamber of
Commerce listed retail sales of
$340,962,543 for the fiscal year
1979-80.
Surveys taken in 1974 and 1977 by
Urban Geography classes were
directed by Dr. Ralph Birchard.
On The Inside
Announcements2
Editorials4
Classifieds9
Features5
Letters4
Sports8
?
m t" r �






1HI I AS I CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 20, 1981
Announcements
STUDENT UNION
POSITIONS
Applications are being a.
tor CoHeelKMJSe Chairperson and
embers immediate
'v �� jv applications in the stu
e,v ��� Rn . M in
Vi idenhail STodenf i "��� Can
S611 Exf
FOOD LAB
tomics
5 jp, 1 Quanti
t,r Dm
season
. V -
I
' �
� rntai I

SCI Fl
n tan
�. - Avenue
I � �� eeting is foi
SRAMEETING
The Student Residence Associa
lion will meet Tuesday Jan 20 in
Rawl Room 130 at 5 00 p m All
members are urged to attend
CHESSBACKGAMMON
Every Tues night at 7 00 pm
chess and backgammon players
get together m the Coffeehouse at
Mendenhall tor some friendly
competition People with different
levels of ability participate so
come on over and play a few
games
.

FIELD HOCKEY
� .
HARASSMENT
HOTLINE
aDOuT
� � " I
. . mteeo vour
�o fiU
I '
v
BOXING
SOCIAL WORK
The spring semester deadline to
apply to maior m social work or
corrections is Jan ?6 W8i Twom
ews with members of the
faculty must be held prior to Feb
9
�us who have completed a
'i-n.mum of 34 semes'er hours of
genei i allege courses, have a
� n um grade point average of
2 5 and who have had at least one
social work course are eligible to
. , , i'ions are available
Health Bido i"
lerested students are encouraged
to apply a soon as possible For
mor, formal call 751 69A1
� �'
GUITAR
instruction in playing the guitar
� .� .�. be offered on Wed
Qmn,ng Feb
n
riss meeting
� � s will give basic m
n playing styles care Ol
's and music fun
damei
. meet from
. m and the guitar
s from 7 30 to 8 30 p m
g to instructor Roy
Ki ttle or no previous ex
pei enc wtt me instruments is
required although participants
"� ii own banjos or
lass
f-ijr" - ation about these
and other non credit evening
courses is available from the Of
� , � Non Credit Programs. Divi
sion of Continuing Education.
FCU Greenville N C telephone
i!43
FRENCH
Evening classes in conversa
�ionai German and French will be
offered at ECU for adults who
wish to review previous language
� . . r tor beg oners pianmna
n Europe
Conversational German" will
� on Tuesdays Feb 10 April
Conversational French
' � �soas, Feb 12 April 23
iss s scheduled for 7 8 30
� � er will teach
language course
� . taught by Patricia
GYMNASTICS
We are pleased to announce the
continuation of the Children's
Gymnastics Instructional Pro
gram this spring Registration for
children's gymnastics will be held
on Tues Jan 20. and Thurs Jan
22 m the gymnastics room m
Memorial Gym at 6 00 p m
Classes will start on Monday
evening, Jan 26. si 6 15 p m
There will be a 12 week session
� rtg S35 There will be two
classes per night, starting at 6 15
and another class at 7 15 Each
child will be permitted to attend
one class per week
Classes are under the supervi
Sion of Jon Rose, gymnastics
coach at ECU He will be assisted
by Donna Pendley and members
of the women's qymnastics team
The rest of the teaching staff will
consist of physical education ma
lors gaining practical experience
in gymnastics
If you child has already pre
registered, just send a check for
S3S with them on their first night of
c lass
PHYSICAL
EDUCATION
The Dept of Health, Physical
Education, Recreation and Safety
will admm.ster a motor and
physical fitness competency test
on Feb U, W81. at 10 00 or 11 00
am m Mmges Coliseum All
students planning to deciare
Physical Education as a maior
this semester and all mators plan
rung to student teach in the spring
or fall semester ot 1981 must take
the test during one of the two test
periods Come prepared for
physic al a Hvitv such as running,
lumping, e'v For more mtorma
tion call 757 644!
ACSSA
The American Chemical s
Student Attmates will hold an m
portant businei g Jan 20
1981. at 7 00 p m in Flanagan
Rm 202 AM members and Othei
interested persons are urged to at
tend
DO m'
Further
ana Otl
redit curses
Office of
.ition about these
spr nq semester non
s available from
Non Credit Pro
RUGBY
All men interested m playing
Rugby should meet behind the
Allied Health Bidg at 4 p m
Tues , Jan 20 Subseguent prac
tices will be held Tues through
Thurs at 4 p m The basics of the
game and conditioning will be em
phasized during the first two
weeks of practice so don't worry
about not having any exper �
or being out of shape For addi
tional information call Keith Dix
on at 7S8 1662 or Pete Dockery at
752 2447
SYCHRONIZED
SWIMMING
Synchronized swimming a
sport rising steadily m inters! It is
an AlAW varsity sport and will be
included in the 1984 Olympics tor
the first time it is a sport jirr
to gymnastics and figure skating
using the water as the medium
Synchronized swimming will help
keep you slim and trim as well as
qive you the opportunity to �
form m shows and compx I I
Anyone who is interested It s
club, please meet on Wed . Jan
21st, at 7 p m m Rm 104
Memorial
GAY COMMUNITY
The East Carolina Gay Com
munity will hold 'Is weekly
meeting Tues Jan 20. at 5 00
p m The meetings are held at 953
E 10th St at the bottom of College
Hill This week we are plannma'o
meet at the above address and go
out tor salad and pua At 7 00 we
will attend a hearing concerning
the disposal ot harmful waste
materials by companies in the
N C area The hearing will be at
the North pitt High School H w
give the local community a Cham e
to air its opinions concerning toxi
waste disposal ano what regula
tions should be applied to it
FITNESS
Classes for faculty and staff
fitness will begin Jan 21 12 00
p m in Memorial Gym, Rm 108
Classes will meet on Mon W
and Fn Aerobics Da' erizi
Slenderize A special emphasis
will be placed on the program for
men including new varied a
t.vities weights, aerobics.
games and running Contact Mrs
Jo Saunders. Memorial Gym. Rm
205, 7S7 6000. for more mforma
tion
A.M.A.
The ECU chap'er of the
American Marketing Association
is holding a membership drive
during the first 30 days of the
semester Named the Albert R
Conli y Chapter the organization
proposes to bring together the pro
fessional and the student n the
field of marketing
Applications may be obtained by
contacting the officers, Mike
McMahan or Elton Bone in A 226
Rawl
ART SHOW
The Sixth Annual Art Show will
be held Jan 24 31 at the Green
Museum of Art Artists must
deliver work between 12 00 8 00
Jan 23 to room 1105 Jenkins $1 00
non refundable entry fee ECU
registered students only More in
formation at M � '��� tx ffici
BKA
Beta Kappap Alpha the Bank
ing and Finance Fraternity will
hold its Jan meetmg Thurs I I
22, 1981. at 4 00 in Rm 221
Mendenhall The field trip, ban
quet and other activities planned
for this semester will be discuss
ed The guest speaket � lit from
F.rst Federal Savings and Loan
All inlted in 'sons are invited
PHI SIGMA PI
Tau Chapter of Phi Sigma Pi Na
tional Honor Fraternity will n
at 6 00 p rr 132 Austin
WOMEN'S RIGHTS
How well do women fa'
N C laws' Attorney Jud H
Kornegay will discuss curn
legislation coming before the N C
ieneral Assembly this session on
Jan 20th at 8 p rr
Presbyterian Chun h
uth sts Addressing
Women Voters si e�
followmu pieces � � � a'
wh
woo imen's Prop
Rights. Day Care Fair Employ
meol, and Tax Funded Abort
aii interest persons are invited
to attend
SAAD'SSHOE
REPAIR
I I 3 GianoV Ave.
759-1228
QualityRepair
CBP
qrams Division of Continuing
Education ECU Greenville, N C
telephone ?S7 6143
TRUSTEES
SKI CLUB
ot ECU
19 a the

AgHtricajoa stb��L
Americas
AUDITIONS
PBL
NURSERY
The Nursery School Program
�� � it tin ECU Dept of Child
� and Family Rela
tions is nov ng applications
for the 1981 82 school year Ap
� on deadline 'S Feb 13
Open to children who have third
� " days by Oct 15 "
:� )ram has I m.ted spaces
� An, parent of a three
� � � t'gr old may appiy Fur
�� . � � irmation about the pro
available m Rm 128 of the
ECU Home Economics Bldg or by
� one 75? 6926 or 757 6908
SKI CLUB
FRISBEE CLUB
There a tM Bi
s� tub meet oc 'ta� jao 20 at
5 00 P m . Rm 104 Memorial
� -� iers and non skiers are all
,lted 1 �'� 'A Feo 13th
� it Amtergreen is plann
� ed The season is great so
every rte come and iom the c'ub
,a t0 if you have guest.ons contac' Dt
Edwards in the "iramurai office
for $2.00 roast
fArby's Roast Beefbeef (S
andwiches
I'Limit one coupon per customer Valid through Februarv 7 1981
HNot valid with any other coupon Valid only at participating Arby -
j2T5i$2.22
lArby's Beef 'N
�Cheddar
Sandwiches
Limit one coupon per customer Valid through February 7. 1981 ft� i V
Sot valid with any other coupon Valid only at participating Arby s �. �
THE EARLY
PREPARE FOR
MCAT-LSATGMAT
SAT-DAT-GRE CPA
Join our "Early Bird" and
Summer Classes In Preparation
for Your Fall 1980 Exams
� Permanent Centers open days, evenings and
weekends.
� Low hourly cost Dedicated lull-time staff
� Complete TEST-n-TAPE,m facilities for review of
class lessons and supplementary materials
� Small classes taught by skilled instructors
� Opportunity to make up missed lessons
� Voluminous home-study materials constantly
updated by researchers expert in their field
� Opportunity to transfer to and continue study at
any of our over 85 centers
OTHER COURSES AVAILABLE
GRE PSYCH GRE BIO MAT PCAT
OCATVAT TOEFL MSKPNMB
VQE � ECFMG FLEX - NDB - NLE
Call Days Eveninf s t Weekends
Lambda CHI Alpha
FRATERNITY
500 Eli Habrt h �t.
rush!
your
it's
BEST
hot
ixa party
Executive Park. BM�
I'M Chat Mill �lve
DvrMm. N C UW
I fit! �t-�7M
Educational Center
TEST MEPMATION
SPECIALISTS SINCE IMI
i.t 0VW Ceiteu i" Wok Tr-ar 85 M�iO' US
iNiaa & Abroad
far Nrtereutiea a�aal ather ceaterj OUTSW M SUTt Call TOU. Fitt HO ffl-WM
Tiths. 20& 9Ol
ReKjhing Rooms!
ws6.2sl 9!02
p. I. party
i
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each of th��� adv�iiMd itomt I roqulrad to b r��dtly available) for tale at or
balow tha advartlaad prlca In aach A4P Stora. axcapt a tpaclflcalty notad
in thai ad
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT JAN. 24, AT A&P IN GREENVILLE, N.C.
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO
OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
Highway 264 By-Pass
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Coca-Cola,
Meilo Yello,
Tab, Sprite,
Sugar Free Fresca,
Mr. Pibb, Orange Crush,
Grape Crush
2
Litre
Plastic
Bottle
99
FROZEN
Jeno's
Pizza
�109
�Hamburger (12 oz.)
�Pepperoni (11.75 oz.)
�Sausage (12 ox.)
�Combination (12.5 oz
A&P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
WHOLE BONELESS 18 To 21 lb avg
Shoulder Roast
lb.
U.S.D.A. INSPECTED
FRESH
(5 lbs. or more)
Fryer Legs
A&P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
FRESH
(5 lbs. or more)
Ground Chuck
A&P QUALITY (BUTT PORTION lb. 1.08)
Shank Portion
Smoked Ham
lb.
98
NORTHERN
Bathroom Tissue
99c
Assorted
Colors
Save 4 roll
20e pkg.
ANN PAGE FROZEN
Look-Fit Ice Milk
Save v2gal.
16� ctn.
1
19
( 60 COUPON )
ALL GRINDS
Maxwell House Coffee
LIMIT ONE WITH THIS COUPON
GOOD THRU SAT . JAN 24. AT A4P IN GREENVILLE, N C
16 oz
bag
199
629
I
I
I
50 COUPON
p
PLAIN � UNBLEACHED � SELF-RISING
Red Band Flour 5
LIMIT ONE WITH THIS COUPON
GOOD THRU SAT JAN 24 AT A&P I N GR E ENVILLE, N C
lb.
bag
79
626 j
40' COUPON
CONTAINS RICH BRAZILIAN COFFEES
Eight O'Clock Instant Coffee
AT
LIMIT ONE WITH THIS COUPON
GOOD THRU SAT JAN 24. AT AP IN GREENVILLE, NC
6?7
fj- fO fK��H�ss IMC MviNGS -p �?� AFh wm
4 GOLDEN YELLOW T
1' Dole Bananas 4 I
FLORIDA CRISP SOLID
Green Cabbage
h lbs.
only
100
BUTTERY RICH
California Avocados
Large
14 Size
39C
5
30 size
only
1
oo
,�w
!





! HI I S,K) IM
.1 VSt H 20, I S� 1
i
1
I
I
I
29 '
te26
9
627
OS
Anheuser-Busch Plan May Soon Double Profits
Rfpi inicd From Ihr
NallSueci lournal
If Anheuser-Busch
isn't careful, its success
in the beer business will
turn into an embarras-
ment of riches b 1985.
By then the brewer
plans to have com-
pleted a $2 billion, five-
year expansion pro-
gram that will increase
its capacity 40 percent
and add significantly to
its 29 percent share o'
the beer market. Fro-
nts may well be double
1980s expected Si 69
million.
But what will
Anheusei Busch, which
derives more than 90
percent of its net in-
come from brewing, do
tor an encore'1 The St.
I ouis concern is trving
to find an answer by ex-
perimenting in several
new consumer markets.
Its choices, however,
have competitors and
analysts puzzled.
Consider Anheuser-
Busch's first "learning
probe as the com-
pany calls its diver-
sification experiments,
into the soft-drink
business. From the
start, the test was the
subject of considerable
second-guessing.
"Would Coke and Pep-
si enter the beer in-
dustry from scratch
and go up against
Anheuser-Busch and
Miller?" asks a skep-
tical rival brewer. "I
think the answer would
be no
Anheuser-Busch's
answer, after two years
of testing, also may be
no. "We've learned it's
a competitive jungle
out there says August
Busch 111, chairman,
"just like us and Miller
in the brewing in-
dustry
His experience stems
primarily from Root 66
root beer and another
version, which have
been sold in five cities
since the summer of
1979. Mr. Busch says
the drinks have "a
respectable market
Ten Indicted
( oatinued from Page 1
had hospital Trustee
Mane F. W hit ford said
in a telephone inter-
view. "So many things
they've reported have
been innuendo and par-
tial truths that would
lead people to believe
son : that isn't
true
fireworks began
when the newspaper re-
quested a list of the
hospital' food ven-
dors. The hospital
ret used, saving the list
could harm its own in-
ternal lnv . a on of
the missing meat.
The paper sued to get
the docun
v. it
dv and the
public in-
A District
. ed and
pital to
I cuments
i Journal.
The documents
showed that massive
: meat had
tinel)
through the office ol
the food services direc-
h a puhnc be
records a;L
formation.
(our;
tor, but that employees
and not the director
had signed for the
meat. The joint law en-
forcement investigation
has revealed that the
meat would be left on
trucks and never
delivered to the
hospital.
The meat remaining
on the truck would be
transferred to two local
grocery stores for
future sale.
An audit by accoun-
tants hired by the
newspaper revealed the
hospital had overspent
its 1980 food budget bv
$124,000 and its 1979
food budget by
$9000. The hospital
also was paying more
per pound for meat
than it cost customers
in local grocery stores.
This month, it was
revealed that the
hospital bought more
than $65,000 worth of
fish last year, enough
to serve fish to every
patient in the hospital
twice a day, year-
round.
share but com-
petitors contend it was
achieved mostly
through cents-off dis-
counts offered to con-
sumers.
Anheuser-Busch's
first foray into soft
drinks was the ill-fated
Chelsea, a citrus
beverage that could
have had the snob ap-
peal and profit margin
of Perrier. Introduced
in September 1978,
Chelsea was hooted off
the market by nurses
and others who ob-
jected to the alcoholic
content (0.4 percent)
and beer-like ap-
pearance of the
"not-so-soft soft
drink
Company officials
are reluctant to disclose
much about the pro-
spects for their
"learning probes but
last year Jerry E. Rit-
ter, vice president-
finance and treasurer,
acknowledged that
"beer earnings and
share growth may slow-
as we approach our
long-term 40 percent
market share goal
The brewer is planning
for that day, he said, by
"getting our feet wet in
new business areas, not
massive diversification
efforts
Anheuser-Busch
hopes to trade on its
established strengths. It
knows a lot about
manufacturing and
packaging beverages
and then marketing
them (ad spending last
year was about SI90
million). Its most
powerful asset is its
distribution system:
950 beer wholesalers
with fleets of trucks
and sales links to bars,
restaurants, super-
markets and liquor
stores.
Beer distributors
were used for the soft-
drink test and also for a
look at the snack
business, where
Anheuser-Busch is sell-
ing its new Eagle line in
bars. One sign of suc-
cess: distribution is be-
ing widened to 24 cities
from a handful.
The third "learning
probe less prominent
than snacks or soda but
more encouraging to
several followers of
Anheuser-Busch, is the
company's develop-
ment of Sesame Place
educational parks in
c o n jii n c t i o n with
Children's Television
Workshop, producers
of "Sesame Street
With no rides and
only three to four acres
I he Fast Carolinian
Published pvery Tuesday and
Thursday du' ng " . i i
nfr ano every Wednesday dur
�' � E ast Carolinian is the of
' . ai newspaper ot Eas'
�a University owni

by the student I Eas1 Molina
' Sity
Subscription Rates
Busi S3 .� � .
au others $2S �� .
d class postao paid at
ireenv � N C
Tnp East Ca'Oi.n �� .
are located in the Old S
. � " � impus ot ecu
� N C
Telephone 757 6366 6367 630
ATTIC
N.C, No. 3(jNIGHTCLUB
TUES � Grammy Award Winning
CAPITAL RECORDING ARTIST
DON SCHLITZ
in the Phoenix Room
HARVEY DALTON
ARNOLD
i Former members ot the Outlaws.
Super Grit & GnnderswitchI
THURS. � Warner Bros. Rec. Artist
ARROGANCE
Record Bar Hugger Festival
Eric Binford
lives for the
movies
Sometimes
he kills
for them,
too!
DENNIS CHRISTOPHER
� compared to at least
100 acres for such
theme parks as
Disneyland or the
brewer's two Busch
Gardens � Sesame
Place doesn't require
too much capital. The
first park, complete
with Big Bird bridge en-
tranceway, opened last
summer near
Philadelphia. The com-
pany says its major
concern so far has been
that people stayed five
hours, instead of a pro-
jected two and one-
half, to play the games.
A fourth diversifica-
tion experiment, which
requires even less
capital and could pay
off sooner than the
others, is overseas ex-
pansion of the brewing
business. International
sales account for less
than 1 percent of
Anheuser-Busch's beer
volume. Earlier last
year Canadian brewer
John Labatt Ltd. began
manufacturing
Budweiser and impor-
ting Michelob for sale
there.
Industry experts see
obvious problems in all
these attempts. Foreign
protective tariffs and
laws would make ex-
ported beers or brews
that might be produced
in an Anheuser-Busch
plant overseas high-
priced. Licensing
foreign brewers to
make Anheuser-Busch
products might be the
only feasible alter-
native. And, asks one
beer marketing expert,
"What makes them
think foreigners crave
American beer
The big sales and
profits in snacks are in
supermarkets, which
the King of Beers
hasn't tackled yet; it
would find a vigorous
defense there from
snack king Irito-l.ay.
Entertainment parks
may work, but would
they add significantly
to the company's
revenue, estimated at
$3.3 billion last year
A likely possibility is
that Anheuser-Busch
will use its knowledge
from the experiments
to guide it in future ac-
quisitions. "We'll have
acquired a hase of per-
sonnel and experience
to use Mr. Ritter
said. "We aren't under
the gun to diversify for
the next five years
But analysts say that
large acquisitions will
be tough to finance.
1 he company's heavy
load of debt would
make it hard to add
more, and much ot
Anheuser-Busch's cash
before 1985 will have to
pay off current brewery
expansion. The com
pany's conservative
management probably
would be reluctant to
dilute earnings by using
its stock lor an acquisi-
tion.
What about
Anheuser-Busch's
rival, Miller Brewing,
which faces similar pi
blems down the road as
beer industry growth
slows?
Welcome Back
Student Special
All You Can Lat Trout
With Your Favorite Beverage
$3.59
1 uesday Only
OYSTER BAR
NOW OPEN
"A Great
Seafood
Restaurant"
�l
FOSDKKS
1890 Stated
NEW HOURS
Monday �CLOSED
TuesThurs. 5:00 9:00
FriSat. 5:00-10:00
Sunday 5:00-9:00
2311 S EVANS ST EXT GREENVILLE
Flamingo Discoteque
" Thursday Night Live"
11 you want something to do on 1 hurs-
day Nights, If you want someone to do
it with, 11 you want someplace to go
where you can do what you want to
do. We've got the time. We've got
the place. We've got the people and
We ve got the entertainment.
1 he Hamingo Disco proudly
presents 1 hursdav Night Live
Lntertainment guaranteed to please.
Students get in tree until 1 1:00. "The
Thursday Night Gang" We do it on
1 hursdav too. hor into call 752-7331
H.L. Hodges-Bond's
Sporting Goods
50
Ski-Wear
Aspen �White Stag
20 to 50 Oh
Warmups by Adidas
Court Casual,Loom lops
I
Don't Cheat Yourself Out Oi 1 he Lxpert Knowledge
Onlv Years Ol Service Can Oiler. Shop At H.L.
Hodges and Bonds. Not New. But Still The Best
This Weeks Special
Zipper Hooded Jacket
Reg. $12.95 Now $6.95
IRWIN YABLANS � SYLVIO 1ABET . s
A LEISURE INVESTMENT COMPANY & MOVIE VENTURERS LTD. PRODUCTION
DENNIS CHRISTOPHER 'FADE TO BLACK"
TIM THOMERSON NORMANN BURTON, MORGAN PAUIL GWYNNE GILFORD, EVE BRENT ASHE JAMES LUISI
. . LINDA KERRIDGE . � . ALEX PHILLIPS. JR. - CRAIG SAFAN
, . . IRWIN YABLANS . SYLVIO TABET . GEORGE G BRAUNSTEIN - RON HAMADY
. JOSEPH WOLF ��VERNON ZIMMERMAN
�tsTmctfo
CLASSIFIEDS
They're Like
In Your Pocket.
If you want to
BUY, SELL,
TRADE, or GIVE
anything away.
Classifieds will
get the job done!
AN AMERICAN jsx CINEMA RELEASE i�m����cw.rwic.n1 � i.( mt�n
Opening Soon At A Theatre Near You
The East Carolinian
Classified Advertizing Rates:
1 to 3 Lines $1.00
Each Addition Line
$.25
iMlHIIMMjIllll m �





Stye lEast (Earolmtan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Chris LiCHOK, G�awtkumm
Jimmy DuPrl-e, ��
Paul Lincke, ;���.� un Paul Collins, f�u�
Dave Severin. �� m. Charles Chandler ����
Anita Lancaster, pro tar David Norris, ����
January 20, W81
Opinion
Page 4
Cheerleaders
h Aeed Of Sufficient Help
Much talk has arisen lately con-
cerning the need for growth in the
ECU Athletic Department. Many
areas have been criticized for their
weaknesses.
One area that has not been men-
tioned but certainly deserves it is
cheerleading.
Any person who has attended the
men's basketball team's home
games on a regular basis this season
would probably not speak highly of
the cheerleading squad.
The American Heritage Dic-
tionary defines a cheerleader as
"one who leads group cheering
Judging by performances at most
home basketball games, there is no
way under the sun that the ECU
squad fits this description.
The squad has often seemed to
lack the zeal and enthusiasm re-
quired to lead a large group of peo-
ple in cheering.
There are reasons why this group
is not performing up to standards.
It should be mentioned at this point,
by the way, that help has come from
within the administration and the
cheerleaders have done their job
much better than before in recent
games. Much is still left to be
desired, though.
Money is one big problem for the
group. The cheerleaders are allotted
less than $1,000 annually, for all
sports.
Also, there is no awards banquets
for the cheerleaders as there is for
many groups on campus. The squad
also does not earn monograms for
their service during the athletic year.
All these things detract from the
enthusiasm that a cheerleader might
have. Still, the group should have
enough zeal to carry them, and the
ECU fans, through.
There is a real problem here,
though. The cheerleading squad
seems to lack sufficient supervision.
Leadership is not afforded the
squad as it should be.
The supervisor of this group
should make sure that the squad
does its job, that being to cheer.
Rather than having the squad
simply go through a number of
gymnastic routines, the supervisor
should have this group around the
bleachers, in the bleachers �
anywhere they are needed � to lead
the fans in cheering.
You might say that one of the
cheerleaders, perhaps the lead,
should take over and correct all that
is wrong. Well, there is little that
can be done by this person if there
are roadblocks on the higher rungs
of the totem pole.
The morale on such a group as
this should always be high. Since the
squad is partly responsible for the
enthusiasm of the fans, this squad
itself should be enthusiastic.
Well, folks, morale is often not
high on the ECU cheerleading
squad. One member quit the squad
recently. Another missed a game
assigment due to a date. Now really.
Morale? Afraid not.
Something must be done, and
soon, concerning the supervision of
the Pirate cheerleaders. This group
needs professional help and
deserves it.
The cheerleaders are earnestly
trying to improve their performance
at home games. Since ad-
ministrative help came on the scene,
the squad has been much more in
evidence.
Recent men's home games with
Richmond and Atlantic Cristian
saw the squad begin to branch out
of their "cubby hole" behind the
basket. The squad made more con-
tact with the fans and, at times,
moved into the stands stomping,
clapping and leading cheers.
Whoever has tried to change the
direction of the cheerleading squad
has begun something positive. The
reasoning behind this editorial is to
encourage further changes � big
changes.
After all, if the football team suf-
fered through several miserable
years, something would be done to
remedy the situation. Why not do
something about the cheerleaders?
Meanwhile, though, there are
things we must all remember. The
cheerleaders are improving,
students. There are being restruc-
tured to a certain degree. One thing
they don't need is student apathy.
They need student support. Let's all
give it to them. Let's join with them
and be enthusiastic at our home
games. Student and fan enthusiasm
at games can spread to cheerleaders,
too. They have enough problems
without the student body supplying
another.
r Campus Forum
Student Input Urged
In December I wrote a letter to the
East Carolinian expressing my opposi-
tion to Ken Karr's "marketing plan" for
Ficklin Stadium. The point that I tried
to make in the letter was that only a year
ago we saw a substantial increase in our
"fees" which was supposed to overcome
the problems in the Athletic Department
and now we're told that not only did the
increased fees not do the job but they
need more income that could only be
provided by students buying tickets to
the games.
I received two letters in response to
my own. Neither letter, however, ad-
dressed itself to wha. 1 felt to be the key
issue: that is the fact that those least able
to pay and with the least voice were be-
ing asked to pay more and more for their
athletic program.
The bottom line of all this brings up a
question: can ECU afford Division I
athletics in the 1980's? You've already
seen the demise of the wrestling team.
What's next?
Now, I have always been of the opi-
nion that it's much easier to criticize
than it is to 'solutionize' and that all
things in life come full cycle. Now it
turns out that one of my classes in the
MBA program has been charged with
the project "Save the Pirates
The idea is to develop a marketing
plan that will increase the sales of season
tickets. This involvees identifying and
reaching various groups that are not
presently Pirate fans and convincing
them to buy season tickets. All this must
be done on a budget so small that if a
thief could steal it he wouldn't bother.
So, since we've been asked to help
we're turning to you the student body
and asking for your help. To start with
we need your thoughtful comments and
suggestions on ways to increase atten-
dance at the games. We've all been given
a chance here to help save ECU
athletics. At the risk of having my pun
license revoked � we've been given the
ball; let's run with it.
Send your letters to:
Donald Pack
Dept. of Economics
Rawl Building
ECU
Greenville, NC 27834
Uhfce up schouak � th cHeeftUAoeRs � a&outto vo met oesr 9$uruj&
McLuhan Left Mark In The 1960's
By DAVID ARMSTRONG
Marshall McLuhan's death on
December 31 marked the passing of a man
who was, in his way, as much a part of the
optimism and epic sweep associated with
the sixties as were John Lennon and the
Beatles. An author who proclaimed the
eclipse of print, McLuhan celebrated a
"global village" joined by electronic
media, in which people around the world
shared experiences � John Kennedy's
televised funeral, for example � as in-
timate and profound as the tribal rituals of
earlier ages. In McLuhan's reckoning, the
changes induced by the media were ex-
plosive, evolutionary.
Like other sixties culture heroes �
Buckminster Fuller, Andy Marhol, the
Yippies, rock and roll shamans �
McLuhan championed process over struc-
ture, the present over the past, intuition
over the rational, linear thinking he
associated with print. And, like his pop
peers, McLuhan was an exemplary
showman, issuing sermons on contem-
porary culture as though from the Mount.
"Electronic media circuitry is Orien-
talizing the West McLuhan wrote, refer-
ring to Eastern mystical traditions. "The
contained, the distinct, the separate � our
Western legacy � are being replaced by
the flowing, the unified, the fused To
young people who used the flowing, unify-
ing, fusing properties of yoga and
psychedelic drugs as rites of passage, such
a conception of media came easily. They
adopted the lanky, loquacious Toronto
professor as a wise elder of Hip.
In recent years, the countercultural trap-
pings fell away from McLuhan, whose
pronouncements on the miracles of media,
particularly television, became conven-
tional wisdom � sometimes with dismay-
ing consequences. Last year, at a party, I
met a former member of Kennedy's
cabinet. When he learned 1 was a jour-
nalist, the politician held forth on how TV
had ended the Vietnam war by beaming the
brutality of war into evryone's living room
and making it impossible to ignore. While
the politician didn't cite McLuhan as an
authority, his remark was in keeping with
McLuhan's cheery view that the dissemina-
tion of media technology, by itself,
enhances communication, sharpens our
understanding of social reality and pro-
duces greater understanding.
Unfortunately, that's not true, far from
bringing the Vietnam war � or any other
war into people's homes, TV delivered a
stylized representation of war, complete
with commercials, that may, through
repetition, have hardened viewers to the
fighting. Vietnam, to many tube addicts,
was a spaghetti Eastern, not a revelation. 1
wager that the American peace movement
and, especially, the Vietnamese revolu-
tionaries had more to do with ending the
war than did Walter Cronkite. At that, it
took 14 years, making the Vietnam conflict
the longest war in American history.
McLuhan notwithstanding, if merely ex-
tending the means of mass communication
could create a mystical media democracy,
it would have happened long ago � when
the telephone was introduced, for exam
pie. But the phone, while it is unques-
tionably a useful device, has not made
America more democratic merely by being
there. Phone users who call one another to
commiserate about the bland sameness of
presidential candidates move no closer to
controlling the political process that pro-
duces those candidates by talking on
marvelous equipment rented from a
monopolistic utility.
McLuhan's technological determinism
� his belief that the introduction of
sophisticated tools, rather than the clash of
political interests, shapes history � proved
as attractive to establishmentarians in the
seventies as it had to youthful radicals in-
fatuated with the potential of video in the
sixties. In his later years. McLuhan was a
celebrity for hire, leading expensive
seminars on media manipulation for cor-
porate executives and saying nothing about
the increasing concentration of media
outlets among fewer and fewer owners.
His increasing fame led to a short, funny
appearance playing himself in Annie Hall
and guest spot on TV talk shows. I last
saw him airily lecturing on the right and
left hemispheres of the brain to Tom
Snyder, who pretended to understand.
If Marshall McLuhan was often a
myopic visionary, he was also an influen-
tial one. His thesis thai the medium is the
message, while overstated and ultimately
misleading, drew attention to the ways thai
media shapes messages. With his pla
punning � he titled one ol his books The
Medium Is the Massage he underscored
how media combine to form an informa-
tion environment that envelopes
kneads us. Mel uhan's influence sun
his passing, much as Beatles' mu -
vives the assassination of John I ei
it resonates from the radios M
described as the world "
David Armstrong, aulh
Journal is a syndici .
lege newspapers.
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes lei
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
For purposes oj verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author)s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced, or neatly printed. All let-
ters are subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted. Letters by the
same author are limited to one each 30
da vs.
Carter Liberals Add To Legacy
Jimmy Carter and the liberals in his ad-
ministration are on their last legs. In the
waning days of the Democratic administra-
tion, the Carterites have been busy little
mischief-makers. They are swinging wildly
in an attempt to leave a final inprint on the
country before January 20.
Over at the Department of Justice they
have just signed, despite objections from
Reagan transition officials, a consent
decree bowing the demands of civil rights
groups for affirmative action (reverse
discrimination) policies in hiring federal
professional and administrative personnel.
For many years government hiring has
been based on the civil service exams which
test people on their merits and not their
color. Under the civil service merit exams
all applicants were treated equally and fair-
ly. Government workers were hired on the
basis of their ability to perform a job. That
consent decree has just been invalidated
and tossed in the gutter hiring based on
merit and ability.
Then just a few blocks away at the
Department of Labor, liberal Secretary of
Labor Ray Marshall signed a new regula-
tion that witholds federal contracts from
firms that pay membership fees for
employees who belong to clubs that engage
in "discrimination How utterly
ridiculous can the government get It is no
business of the government what private
club anybody belongs to. Is there no sanc-
tuary of privacy0
Hopefuly the administration of Presi-
dent Reagan will be able to undo these acts
Robert M.
Swaim
ir- 4 �l )i�
of tyranny that are the result of the last
vestiges of liberalism.
OSHA, an overzealous body of
regulatory bureaucrats, has been busy put-
ting the last minute screws to American
business. Once again, over the objections
of Reagan transition officials, they have
issued new "work safety rules No one
objects to a safe environment for workers.
Workers are usually shielded from danger
by management that doesn't like the costs
of accidents that result in increased costs
of workmen's compensation and lost work
time. These new regulations are just
another load of federal red tape and ex-
cessive paperwork.
The Department of Energy, destined for
dismantlement by President Reagan and
Governor Edwards, energy secretary
designate, has imposed several hundred
million dollars in fines on oil companies.
These fines were imposed because the oil
companies could not understand the in-
tricate and contradictory price rules that
the energy department wrote several years
ago.
The EPA, another legendary legacy of
red tape, has issued new water pollution
standards that will cost the pulp and paper
industry 1.8 billion dollars in control costs
by 1984. Guess who the pulp companies
are going to pass that increased cost on to?
The hard working American taxpayers
are footing the bills not only for the in-
creased costs of consumer goods due to
costly regulations being imposed on
business, but we are also suffering from
decreased productivity and industrial
development that would create jobs were it
not for the outrageous costs that American
industry and businesses incur in complying
with ridiculous regulations.
When will this idiocy end? Hopefully on
January 20 when President Reagan takes
office.
we're beginning to ignore the
sacredness of the individual. If we keep go-
ing in that direction there can be one out
come: our surrender to a totally govern-
ment planned and controlled society. And
when it happens it will be called the
'fulfillment of the liberal dream But in
fact it will be fascism, because that's what
fascism is: private ownership with total
government control so said President
Reagan in 1976.
Government must once again be made
the slave of the people rather than the
master it has become over the past 50 years
of liberal Democratic control and socialist
drift.
t
4t





TU& V
HI I si . Kol I MAS
Features
JANUARY 20, 1981
Page 5
Washington: Preoccupied With Social Games
l rom I Iw N vcrri
One Kissinger is worth two
Brzczinskis. A George S ill oi an Al
Haig outweighs a doen liberal col-
umnists or a cloakroom ol
Democratic senators.
Suddenly Sen Strom I"hurmond.
the upcoming chairman of the
Judiciary Committee, is one of the
mosl sought-after men in town. Sen.
Howard Baker, the new majority
leader, could show up at the open-
ing ol a car wash and the
Washington, papers would dispatch
a photographer and two social
reporters to cover him.
Even now. the courtiers are press
ing at the White House gates. Forget
Jod) Powell and Gerry Rafshoon.
Does anyone here know Beis
Bloomingdale? In the Washington
social power game, it is never too
earl) to begin one's moves.
Washington is always preoc-
cupied with the social power game,
but never more so than at the onset
ol a new administration. The game
is crucial to how the city operates,
from court appointments to foreign
aid. Henry Kissinger nourished dur-
ing the Nixon years, in part, b
playing the game well. Zbigniew
Brzezinski tried but was clumsy.
Jimmy i arter never even
understood the rules. But Ronald
Reagan. Ah, Mr. Reagan! On his
tirst full evening in town after the
election, he wooed the souls oi 50 of
Washington's most influential
leaders over veal piecata at the ex
elusive F Street Club.
I ooks, charm, wealth, intellect �
alone they count for little in
Washington. Power is all. What
really matters is: Whom do you
know What have you done? And
what can you do for me? Ciuests
don't get invited out in Washington
because they've got twinkly blue
eves
One can disapprove of the game.
One can laugh at it. One can, as Mr.
Reagan's speechwriter Anthony R.
Dolan did recently, call it pagan.
But if one wants to succeed in
Washington, one cannot dismiss it.
Nobody among the 2,500 men
and women who make up the inner
village oi pol i t i c a 1 - soc i a 1
Washington goes anywhere just for
fun. "It's really a continuation of a
day's wrok says 1 orraine Cooper,
a veteran hostess and wife of former
Sen. John Sherman Cooper. The
advantages oi parties and the ac-
quaintances made there are substan-
tial and particular.
Sen. Claiborne Pell: "You can
better perceive where areas of com-
promise might be on a difficult issue
than you can in a general meeting
Joan Braden, lobbyist and
hostess: "When you go to testify, it
is much easier to get your point of
view across if you know someone
(on the congressional committee)
Alejandro Orfila, secretary
general ot the Organization of
American States: "You can advance
the goals of your country
Some Washington figures have
exercised power for years without
ever going out at all. Senate majori-
ty leader Robert C. Byrd and the
conservative columnist James J.
Kilpatrick, to name two, are rarely
seen on the social circuit. But they
are exceptions. I ew can afford to do
without the sometimes dramatic op-
portunities parties offer.
ITEM: At a dinner at the
Austrian Embassy last July,
presidential counsel I lovd V Cutler
took Attorney General Benjamin R.
Civiletti aside and told him the
president had misremembered a
conversation with Civiletti concern-
ing Billy Carter's relationship with
I ibya. The following day, Civiletti
disclosed the new information at a
press conference.
ITEM: At a dinner party given in
1977 by Barbara Walters, who
though based in New York is a
regular on the Washington social
scene, the Israeli and Egyptian am-
bassadors chatted cordially about
their countries' mutual efforts
toward peace. They had never
before officially acknowledged each
others' existence.
Such historic moments are,
however, less typical of the social
power game than the night-in,
night-out collective judgments that
are rendered regarding
Washington's leaders. Who's OK?
Who's not OK? Who's moving up?
Who's on his way out?
The end result of that process can
drastically alter the way a diplomat
or administrator or senator is
perceived. It can make him win, or
lose, the favor of his pecs. And
who can estimate the usefulness of a
friendship, formed or cemented
under such auspices? Do columnists
write critical pieces about their
friends? Do bureaucrats stand in the
way of their friends' projects? Do
senators grill their friends in com-
mittee hearings?
When Richard Helms was under
fire several years ago tor his ac-
tivities while director of the CIA,
several important friends petitioned
the then attorney general, Griffin B
Bell, to go easy on him. Would
some officials of the U.S. govern-
ment and members of the
Washington press corps have viewed
the Shah of Iran somewhat dit
ferently had they not been such
regular guests at the Iranian Em-
bassy? Ambassador Ardeshir
Zahedi's lavish entertainments and
generous supplies of caviar made
him one of the town's most popular
hosts.
To gain the approval of
Washington's inner village, to win
the friends who can help, one must
work at it, and nobody played the
game better than Henry Kissinger.
He was powerful, brillant, witty and
accessible, and from the earliest
days of the Nixon administration he
was everywhere � catching a movie
with Kay Graham, lunching at his
While House office with former
Ambassador W. Averell Harnman,
See WASHINGTON. page 7, col. 1
or
pages.
due to
re the
we keep go-
be one out
illy govern
ociety. And
called the
im But m
at's what
nth total
President
in be made
rr than the
50years
id socialist
Directions For Cooking
Some Tastier Meals
Bv klll WEYl IK
mong the : ew and
whelming experiences novice
college students may have is the task
of providing themselves with decent
J. W he:tie; on-campus
the op- ire pretty much
same: the various ( I dining
establishments, the v
v ille dm iments, or
prep I ;n oui doi m i
i part men t. At some time or
' ,T whatever reasons, the
ns will probably be
unsuitable foi everv student. When
this happens, he can (1) live on
peanut butter and or lunchmeat
sandwiches oi (2) learn to cook.
Do noi lei. reader,
at the pos cooking, It is
surp- simple - and wonder-
fully cheap compared to eating out.
It you can read this article you
�so
ic skills necessarv to bake
broil or fry any number ot delicious
nly cooking limitation
plac, I students is pr
ly a lack ot space and ap-
pliances, and even this problem is
fairly easily to oercome.
1 o ook, at least one appliance is
needed. Having only one appliance
will limit m oils; two or more
sources is terrific. I he most useful
are as follows:
A hot plate or burner - il foi
boiling, frying, and heating canned
foods.
A hot pot aimosi as is a
hot plate, but not suitable for fry-
ing.
toaster oven - perfect tor hak-
toasting, and. I e mode! �
mits, broiling I consider this i
indispensible. It you do not possess
one, put it on your "gimme" list tor
birthdays and I I
With these three items, it js possi
ble to prepare a fantastic meal
without a kitchen. It you live off
campus and have a kitchen, that is
even better. I tie square thing with a
door on the front and four circular
objects on top is an oven. Do not be
afraid to use it. But don
small appliances from your dorm
room davs. toaster oven will Jo
almost anything a regular men will
Jo and uses less electricity, ton.
Once small appliances have been
acquired, a tew accessories are need
ed to help you use them, rhese are
known collectively as pots and pans.
Assuming you have at least two
plates and cups or glasses, the
following is a bate minimum oi
what vou will probably need to turn
out a nice me,
')ne or, better vet, two cooking
pots ot at least a one quart capac
One might be a frying pan.
of
MS Et
w i?, 1.945
SS

� tamo
aH,f 1
C, t(
! IKS IN
Monuments Of The Past
These tombstones rest in a pile in a weed-covered corner of the courtyard of
the old East Cafeteria Building.
, ' " S
� . b. -
A casserole dish of at least a one
and I a ' quart capacity. I prefer
glass otorningware. Corningware
can be used on top of a burner.
can opener � manual is just as
good as electric.
measuring cup and measuring
spOl �
V leasl two spoons and forks and
e knife preferably sharp.
rhings that come in handy but
vou can manage without: a grater, a
colander, bowl serapers, a loaf pan,
pie pan. baking dish (square or rec-
baking sheet, rolling pin,
and sifter.
Alter vou have acquired all the
items necessary lor your makeshift
kitchen (watch the dollar specials at
discount stores foi bargains on these
items), you are ready to cook. Ac-
tually lumping m and preparing
tood from scratch is a little scarv at
. so let's ease into it with some
See UPS, page 7, col. 1 Luckily, the worst part off the semester book-buying rush has suosiaed. making shopping for textbooks
Applying To Princeton

Browsing For Textbooks
t ��� GAKV: PAT! �
quiet
PRIN( 1 ION. N.J. (CPS) �
Ciod has applied to Princeton.
Hoping to be accepted to the
(lass oi 1985. God wrote a
"personal statement" sent in
December to the Princeton Admis-
sions Office that He would like to
"experience first-hand what college
life is presently like He added that
it did not seem right that He listen in
on courses that He has not been ad-
mitted.
The application was brought to
the attention oi James Wickenden,
director oi admissions, who
reported to the Princeton Weekly
Bulletin that the candidate entered
his name only as "God In describ-
ing Himself, God checked both
male and female for gender and
checked all possible ethnic origins,
in addition to writing "You name
it next to the ethnic origin
response marked "other
W ickcnden said he was not sur-
prised at the applicant's test scores,
which included perfect 800s on both
the math and verbal portions of the
SAT. However. He hadn't fared
quite as well on the College En-
trance Examination Board's
achievement tests. An error on the
relativity question on the physics
achievement test dropped the score
to only 760. On the application,
though, Ciod resolutely maintained
"Einstein is wrong perhaps prov-
ing that to err is divine.
In biology, He scored 770 because
His answers on the evolution ques-
tion were also marked as incorrect.
In the essay portion of the ap-
plication, Ciod wrote His academic
and intellectual interests included
It's Almighty Hard To Get In
"discreetly helping people and
listening to prayers.
"1 take advantage ot dreams and
apparent accidents or mistakes (the
realization oi the structure of
benene and the discovery oi
penicillin are good examples oi
each) and get to be oi service to
mankind he elaborated.
Also included in his
"non-academic activities" were
"arranging the weather which
takes up 168 houts each week, as
does "listening to prayers Addi-
tionally, God reported spending 14
hours per week "turning day into
night" and another 14 "turning
night into day
Although a federal privacy statute
dictates that Wickenden cannot
release any information contained
in admissions applications, he told
the Weekly Bulletin he thought it
appropriate in this case to "be
responsive to a higher law He
acknowledged that this application
was "the first of its kind" that he
had seen.
"A couple of fictitious applica-
tions have been submitted over the
years he said, "but those were of
a different nature because thev in-
volved human applicants
The admissions office has no idea
where the application came from.
but said that the question received
much speculation from students.
"Everyone regarded it for what it
was: a clever ruse he said. "I hope
it made people laugh
In releasing the information
about the candidate. Wickenden
noted that a separate application
had been included in the envelope
Even God, it seems, cannot escape
certain human conditions. He ap-
plied for financial aid.
Crafts Workshops Offered Now
Two different programs of non-
credit short courses are now being
offered for Spring Semester by
Mendenhall Student Center. Crafts
workshops, available through the
Crafts Center, and mini-courses on
several subjects, available for
registration at the Central Ticket
Office, make up the short course
programs.
Crafts workshops are available to
all ECU students, student
dependents, faculty, staff and their
dependents, who are Mendenhall
Student Center members, may par-
ticipate.
Payment of a $10.00 semester
Crafts Center membership fee
allows an individual to register for
one workshop. All persons must
register in person at the Crafts
Center during regular operating
hours, 3:00 PM until 10:00 PM,
Monday through Friday, and 12:00
N until 5:00 PM, Saturday.
The final day to register is Satur-
day, January 24 and class space is
limited. No fees will be refunded
after the registration deadline.
Workshops available include
silkscreen, stained glass, macrame,
beginning jewelry and metalwork
batik, quilting, photography, floor
loom weaving, pottery and
darkroom techniques.
Individuals who would like to
participate in a mini-course must
register in person at the Mendenhall
Central Ticket Office between the
hours of 10:00 AM and 4:00 PM,
Monday through Friday. Registra-
tion fees will be accepted through
the day prior to the first class
meeting.
Each mini-course has a maximum
and a minimum enrollment. No
refunds of course fee's will be made
after the registration deadline unless
the course is cancelled due to lack of
enrollment.
Each registrant must show
hisher ECU ID or driver's license
and ECU Activity Card or
Mendenhall Student Center
Membership, with the exception of
a spouse or a guest who must be
registered by the participating card
holder.
The mini-courses now being of-
fered are CPR training, wine
tasting, clogging and calligraphy.
t
T
t
-
1





1 HI I. AS I CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
Ua��
JAM ARV. 20, 1MH1
I'age h

Weekend Film Brings
'Shining' To Campus
Shis Friday and Saturday night,
anu i 24, at 5, 7:45, and
10:30 p.m. in the Hendrix Theatre,
lent Union Films Committee
Si tnley Kubrick's "The
as the third weekend
film of the semester. Ad-
II) and activity card or
all Student Center
Card.
ey Kubrick docs everything
act. He finds a
M, writes or co-
nplay, chooses all the
s vises the lighting and
ites the cameras,
it, edits the film, and
the publicity.
nopula
Me
nbei
shining, he continues in
while directing .lack
to one of his best, if not
le, performances.
on the pulpy
ohen King, uses
� t
v
' ui
sential elements of plot
vel and turns them into
uignol.
� the first times, at least
angelove, the leading
Kubrick film is at least as
able as the photography, and
' Kubrick's Hair has pro-
to be in his skill as a
tographer. Each scene in The
or that matter each shot,
either for max-
� to help build
Jack Torrence
(Nicholson) finally loses his mind,
and he must be completely crazy to
explain some of the more illogical
aspects of his sadistic actions, and
takes to his wife (Shelly Duvall) and
little boy (Danny Lloyd) with an
axe, there are instances where, for a
split second, the action is frozen, as
it would be for a still photograph.
Then the props begin to move. Add
to this Kubrick's use of color and
dazzling special effects � the color
is stark, without bright tones � and
you get the perfect transition o vi-
sion from mind to screen.
There are only two worlds in
which life is this stark: Mr.
Kubrick's and the subconscious. As
it happens, what interests Kubrick
are life's paradoxes, incongruities,
and absurdities � not the stuff that
films are commonly made of, but
that hasn't stopped the director thus
far and doesn't even slow him down
in The Shining.
Moreover, he is certain that these
things will interest other people as
well. When he decided to make what
he calls a "nightmare comedy"
about the results of isolation on the
average fellow, he felt it would have
enormous appeal. The Shining,
though its overall impact should be
credited to the performance of Jack
Nicholson, is obviouslv a Kubrick
picture, and it illustrates anothei
important aspect of the Kubrick
method: he wants his pictures to
have the widest possible audience.
His reasoning is logical. One must
get the largest possible audience to
get the success that allows one to
make only the pictures one wants to
make. It is a simple philosophy that
has worked very well for many a
rebel boring from within, but it can
be annoying, as it was to Mr.
Kubrick when he bowed to real or
imagined threats of censorship and
made the film Lolita (1962) less sen-
sual than he envisioned it.
In many ways, the film as a whole
is warped and is at times confusing,
at least until the very last shot, but
one thing is certain: Nicholson is
tremendous.
The danger in The Shining is that
Nicholson will use his boyish
shark's grin, the familiar preening,
brutal one-up-manship. He's won
the audience with his cocky freaks
and this is the big one � the bull
goose loony. Nicholson can be too
knowing about the audience, and
the part he plays is pure temptation.
But Kubrick keeps him in check.
Sure, he steals the show, he always
does, but for all the right reasons.
Nicholson giving screen wife, Duvall, the axe in a
scene from 'The Shininghis eyes are farther away,
muggy, veiled even from himself. The danger in 'The
Shining' is that Nicholson will use his boyish shark's
grin, the familiar preening, and his brutal one-up-
manship.
Capra Double Feature Topical
Richter's New Film
Explores Germany
Kenneth k one o the documentarv film's most stimulating plat-
� ties, will appear in Hendrix Theatre, Mendenhall Student
� n 20 1981, to present the new film, Germany. The program
Admission for ECU students will be by ID and activi-
new film is an exploration of a country that, despite the stur-
man
k against a weak dollar, is still an affordable travel
pro ne plans carefully. Such planning is well wor-
Germany is beautiful to visit, with the gloss ot a pro
led b any nation on earth.
voted several segments of the film to examine some of
r uties. He focuses on the special problems and status ot
in' divided by a wall. In Munich the film shows Nymphenburg
Park and the English Gardens, two favorite relaxation spots tor
Mumchers
Ric
Ucrmanv
This Wednesday night, January
21. in Mendenhall Student Center's
Hendrix Theatre, the Student Union
films Committee will supplement
today's inauguration proceedings
with a special Inauguration Double
feature highlighted by frank
Capra's classic film of 1939. "Mr.
Smith Goes to Washington The
film will be shown at 9 p.m. only.
Rounding out the double bill is
another great Capra film. "Mr.
Deeds Goes to I own" (1936), starr-
ing Gary Cooper in the title role as
the legendarv i ongfellow Deeds
"Mr. Deeds" will run at 7 p.m. onlv
and there will be a short break bet-
ween the two films.
Admission for the movies is free
with student ID and activity card or
MSC Membership Card.
Frankapra has gone after the
greatest game o all, the Senate, in
"Mr. Smith Goes to Washington
In doing so, he is operating, ot
course, under the protection of that
unwritten clause in the Bill o Rights
entitling every voting citizen to at
least one free swing at the Senate.
Mr. Capra's swing is from the floor
and m the best of humor; if it fails
to rock that august body to its heels
� from laughter as much as injured
dignitv � it won't be his fault but
the Senate's and we should really
begin to worry about the upper
house.
For Mr. Capra is a believer in
democracy as well as a stout-hearted
humorist. Although he is subjecting
the Capitol's bill-collectors to a deal
of quizzing and to a scrutiny which
is not alwavs tender, he still regards
them with affection and hope as the
implements, however imperfect they
may be, o our kind o government.
Most directors would not have at-
tempted to express that faith other-
wise than in terms o drama or
melodrama. Capra, like the juggler
who performed at the Virgin's
shrine, has had to employ the only
medium he knows. And his comedy
has become, in consequence, not
merely a brilliant jest, but a stirring
and even inspiring testament to
liberty and treedom, to simplicity
and honest).
The magic of frank Capra is evi-
dent in the 1936 classic "Mr. Deeds
Goes to Town" � perhap- the
director's best film ot a long and
prosperous career.
The directing-writing combina-
tions which functioned sN suc-
cessfully in "It Happened One
Night and "Broadway BUI" has
spiced Clarence Budington
Kelland's storv with wit. novelty
and ingenuity.
Longfellow Deeds is the hero
the occasion and Longfellow Deeds
becomes one ot our favorite
characters under the attentive
handling of Mr. Cooper, who prov-
ed himself one ot the best light com
edians in Hollywood. Mr. Deeds is
the poet laureate ot Mandrake falls,
Vt. He writes greeting-da) verses,
limericks and Edgai Guestian
jingles with equal facility, and he
plays the tuba in the town band
Then an uncle dies, leaving his
$20,000,000 estate to the Vermont
innocent, and Mr. Deeds, slightly
dazed but unimpressed bv his sud-
den riches, is tossed willynilly and
tuba into scheming New York.
Crooked lawvers beset him. the
hoard ot the opera elects him chair-
man, a girl reporter gains his con-
fidence and then headlines him as
the "Cinderella Man Crushed,
derided, deceived and disillusioned,
the lean I ongfellow prepares to
share the wealth bv establishing a
collective farm colony and then,
crudest jest o all, he is hailed
bet ore a lunacy commission and on-
lv bv the narrowest ot margins and
the love ot Miss Arthur, the repen-
tant sob sister, e being
Iged a manic depressive
1; this is the storv in outline, it
Joes not attempt to capture the gay,
harebrained but eniireiy ingratiating
quality of the picture. To appre
that, you will have to watch Mi
�per struggling with the tuba.
Mr. Stander fighting ofl apoplexy,
Ravmond W alburn (that most
perfect gentleman's gentleman) rais-
ing his voice against an echo. and.
ultimately, the scene ot the lunacy
commission's hearing which Is a
perfect spoof of alienists.
Nicholson In
His Element
In 'Shining'
By COLIN DANCAARI)
HOI I YVYOOD � Jack Nicholson arches his
evebrows and flashes that devilish grin. "I LOVE be-
ing sarv he says. "There's nothing like having
people take a little step to the side when they see you
coming
Nicholson, then, has good reason to be happy. His
it movie. The Shining, is scaring people in suffi-
cient numbers to make it a box-office hit, second on-
lv to The Empire Strikes Back.
For Nicholson, 43, it's his biggest success since
lew Over the Cuckoo's Nest. In the Hollywood
s holding a full hand, but some of
:ould be stronger.
His longtime girlfriend Enjelica Huston will not
marrv him although he keeps asking � and
despite his popularity he still can't get a job in town
lor any oi his friends.
nd even with this movie there is controversy, with
some people simply failing to regard chopped
as entertainment.
In The Shining, directed by Stanley Kubrick,
Nicholson plays a writer who lives with his wife
(Shelley Duvall) and young son (Danny Lloyd) at a
large mountain resort closed down for the winter.
It is built on an old Indian burial ground and there
are unanswered questions about the last caretaker,
who chopped his family to death with an axe, then
shot himself.
In the same job, and in identical isolation,
Nicholson apparently becomes obsessed by the same
demons and, drooling at the mouth, axe in hand,
stalks his family through a setting where the ghosts
materialize as real people.
Billed as "the ultimate horror movie it's a fitting
follow-up to Cuckoo, in which Nicholson played a
cra?y of another kind. Obviously he is cornering the
market on roles for the demonstratively tormented.
Certainly, he is building an unusual following.
As he admits: "I have strange fans yeah. I get
unusual confrontations in parking lots. A man comes
up, invites me to his cave in Laurel Canyon, says he's
Tpm Mix's alter ego and wants me to see his ghost
horse. I get that a T�t, yeah


The Juilliard String Quartet features Robert
Mann, violin; Earl Carlyss, violin; Samuel
Rhodes, viola; and Joel Crosnick, cello. This
unique American ensemble of four ideally
matched virtuosi has set a standard of ex-
cellence for an entire generation.
Artists Series
Big Four
At Hendrix
On Thursdav, January 22, 1981, Mendenhall Student
Center's Hendrix Theatre will be graced by the sounds of the
world's highest ranking string quartet. The Juilliard String
Quartet, commonlv referred to as "the first family ot
chamber music will take the stage at 8:00 P.M. for what
promises to be a truly exciting performance.
This unique American ensemble of four ideally matched
virtuosi has set a standard of excellence for an entire genera-
tion. In addition to serving as Quartet-in-Residence at the
Juilliard School of Music (where its members have trained a
number of the most successful up-and-coming chamber muM,
groups) and Quartet-in-Residence at the Library of Congress
in Washington, D.C. (where it gives an annual series of 20
concerts on the priceless Stradivarius instruments willed to
the people of the United States by Mrs. Gertrude Clark Whit-
tall), the Juilliard String Quartet has to date played more than
3,000 sold-out concerts, not only in all of the major cities of
the United States and Canada, but throughout South and
Central America, Europe, and the Near East and the Far
East.
"Better quartet playing cannot be found today said
Harold C. Schonberg of The New York Times.
The Quartet's repertoire thus far has included more than
375 works, over 150 of them by 20th Century composers, and
it is expecially noted for its championship of American com-
posers, having premiered more than 35 works by Copeland,
Foss, Piston, Carter, Babbitt, Sessions, Mennin and
Schuman among others. In the summer of 1948 it made na-
tionwide headlines for the performance of the complete Bar-
tok Quartets at the Berkshire Music Festival in Tanglewood.
It is also identified with the gigantic undertaking of presen-
ting the complete cycle of Beethoven quartets, and it has
repeated each of these two cycles more than 25 times and
presented one or both of them not only in the leading cities of
the United States, but also in Edinburgh, Berlin, London,
Stockholm, Vienna and Tokyo.
Under three major record labels (Columbia, Epic and RCA
Victor Red Seal), the Quartet has made more than 80 major
recordings, including two complete Bartok cycles, the com-
plete cycle of Beethoven String Quartets, all the string
quartets of Schoenberg, most of the string quartet staples,
and such "specials" as the Copeland Trio, Piano Quartet and
Sextet with the composer.
WE
AJ0 Pi
(
Wa
( ontinud ti
charming
Joan B
pla
little
favorite
restaur
while.
worku j
tiu,
dropp.
cemen
somew
Tip
Sotrii
Continued
ds alre
to a
c v I
You
of ma
xrw-
a
salt.
Pi
macar
mix a c i
package
(You'll ne
and a pc

oven i
so
While
he
tuna
please,
wastebasl
it in:
and cl
flake
i
clumps
teaspoon
mixture
well.
!
O f I
alum
bake
minu:
will prol
the
Rus
Sch
R;
frat
MonWi
hou'
The b
the top tj
Fl
q
� Expl
-�� � ��
i
t
'�





IMF I MAKOI INI AN
JANUARY 20, 1981
Lc7)�ajQG Afiojnr CotuGf T Haw (YMy
51 Daw A)ofitt
WELL, THCflE'SJUbT
ILL sty Got t Hmcut
jvjmtk VHP Hty
7;
TO TUflrJ 6)C v)TD
HifVf
Washington: Preoccupied With Social Games
C ontinued from page 5
charming guests at
Joan Braden's house,
playing host at intimate
little dinners at his
favorite Chinese
restaurant. And all the
while, Killinger was
working: picking up a
tidbit of news here,
dropping an item there,
cementing a contact
somewhere else.
All of this effort paid
off generously. Presi-
dent Nixon had plann-
ed to fire Kissinger
from his post as na-
tional security adviser,
but when Watergate
hit, Kissinger was nam-
ed secretary of state in-
stead. Presidential
aides said later that
Nixon apparently
hoped to ease his other
problems by choosing
Tips for Cooking
Some Tastier Meals
Continued from page 5
foods already familiar
to a lot of students.
EASY TUNA
CASSEROLE
You'll need: One box
of macaroni and cheese
mix. one can of tuna, a
casserole dish, a little
salt.
Prepare the
macaroni and cheese
mix according to
package directions.
(You'll need a hot plate
and a pot for this.)
Now turn your toaster
oven on to about 350�
so it can pre-heat.
While the oven's
heating up, drain the
tuna (into a sink,
please, not the
wastebasket) and mix
it into the macaroni
and cheese. Be sure to
flake the tuna; that is,
don't leave it in big
clumps. Add about one
teaspoon of salt to the
mixture and mix in
well.
Loosely cover the top
of the dish with
aluminum foil and
bake for about 30-40
minutes. The timing
will probably vary on
the age, quality and
Rush Bus
Scheduled
Rush Bus Service for
fraternity rush:
M onWed. operating
hours: 8:30 12 pm.
The bus leaves from
the top of College Hill.
condition of your oven.
For a different taste,
mix in one of the
following before bak-
ing: one small can
(drained) of mushroom
stems and pieces OR
one small can (drained)
of peas.
This dish will serve
two to four people
depending on amount
of hunger, so invite a
friend to dinner. Shar-
ing your cooking ef-
forts with friends is
always advisable as it
assures you of ap-
preciative tastebuds,
dinner conversation �
and help with the dishes
afterwards.
Auditions
To Begin
The Coffeehouse
Committee will beein
the 1981 Spring
Semester with auditions
on January 23 and 24.
Performances for the
semester will be chosen
from these auditions,
which will be held in
Room 15 of
Mendenhall Student
Center from 9 to 11
P.M. Friday and Satur-
day. Admission is free.
The Coffeehouse
Committee offers a
variety of contem-
porary music entertain-
ment and attractions
suitable for a relaxed
atmosphere. Free
snacks are served in ad-
dition.
such a respectable can-
didate, a man who was
so much a part of the
Washington establish-
ment. Those connec-
tions became apparent
when Kissinger's
nomination reached
Capitol Hill and little
of the expected opposi-
tion from liberal
quarters in the press
and Congress
materialized.
Few in the Carter ad-
ministration could
count on friends in
Washington. In
February 1976, Jimmy
Carter was introduced
to the Washington
establishment at the
home of the columnist
Clayton Fritchey and
his wife, Polly.
Everyone was impress-
ed with the attractive
newcomer who had
recently captured the
Iowa caucus. Yet
Carter never managed
to build on those initial
social contacts.
Carter's aides took
their cue from their
boss. Their initial at-
tempts at socializing
outside their own circle
were infrequent and
often misfired. Later in
the administration,
when some Carter staff
people did try to reach
out, it was too late. In
the words of one
famous Georgetown
host, the Carterites
were perceived as
"little lOth-rate
drugstore cowboys
The people who
wieldsoialjpowerare, tion
for the most part, noi
household names out-
side Washington and
they do not, like so
many of their guests,
ebb and flow with the
changes in administra-
D,
Cteax-
0PTICIANS
3 CONTACT
. 5?
V
J
LENSES
I
Soft Contacts
79
95
10
ECU
Student
Discount
on
glasses
HEAT UNIT INCLUDED
Guaranteed Fitting Or Your Money Refunded
SEMI SOFT & HARD LENSES AVAILABLE
-EYEGLASSES-
single vision
PLASTIC OR GLASS
LENSES
(SELECT AAQC
GROUP OF V9'
FRAMES �i 4
UP TO PLUS OR MINUS 5D
Any Tint 36.95
EYEGLASSES
BIFOCALS
PLASTIC OR GLASS
LENSES
5495
UP TO PLUS OR MINUS 50
(SElFCr GROUP
OF FRAMES
ANY TiNt,
CLEAR VUE OPTICIANS
GREENVILLE. N C
PHYSICIANS QUADRANGLE
BLOG A 1705 W TH ST
Adi to E Carolina Eye Clinic
G'en�ili� Stce Only
VISA'
m no
OFFICE HOURS
9am 5 30 p m
Mon . Tues . Thors , Fri
? a m i p m Wednesday
ATTIC
POINTER
SISTERS
CONCERT
TICKETS will go on
sale Thurs Jan. 22,
at Apple Records,
and at both Record
Bars in Greenville.
Photographer
Needed
for Photo Lab
For More Information
Call Chap Gurley at
757-6994
ig
:0
FREE FRIES
with the purchase of
a large Chili
n
c
c
c
2
:more meat than mama's chili
OXJD FASHIONED
HAMBURGERS
Good at all participating Wendy's
ExDres 131-H cheese fxtra
Carolina East Mall
Saturday, January 20
Lunch- Chicken n' Dumplings, 2 vegetables ����������.$1.79
Supper- Ham Steak v pineapple ring,candied vams $2.29
Wednesday, January 21
Lunch- Liver c Unions. 2 vegetables�pl.o9
Supper- hried Shrimp with hushpuppies $3.10
Thursday, January 22 .
Lunch- Meat L�ar with Spaghetti. 2 vegetablesJpl.yy
Supper- Roast Beet with oven brown potatoes$2.29
Friday, January 23
Lunch- Salmon Pattv. 2 vegetables$1.99
Supper- Trout Almondine, slaw, hushpuppies$2.49
Saturday, January 24
All Day- ' - Baked Chicken with yellow rice$2.59
Sunday, January 25
All Day- Country Stvle Steak with rice 1.99
RlfiGAN
SHOE
REPAIR
111 W. 4th St
QraanvNFa, N.C
towntown QraanvWa
Across From
Bount-Harvoy
Parking In
Front & Sac
Of Shop
PHONE
758-02Q4
MOFFITTS MAGN A VOX
Special
Magnavox 19" Color TV
SQQQ00
Sale Price OOZJ
X. One Year Parts 6c Labor Warranty
Lxpert TV Service Repair Available
756-8444
Located on Lvans Street Lxt.
WEDNESDAY IS NOW
nip
TACOS
25 Draft All Day Thursday
1ST-
Serving Daily 11:00 A M8:00 P.M.
Fri. & Sat Till 8:30
COUPON
Corpet Steam Cleaning
& Deodorizing
I V O discount wcoupon
Phone 752-3960 after 3:00
Free Estimates
E
Located at 512 W. Greenville Blvd.
(next to Tarheel Toyota)
756-2072
Dinner On Sundays!
Free Delivery All Over Town
Your Best Pizza and Sandwich
Famous Pizza
A NNUAL
nr IMPCW
COmE THROW A � AT
THE SlGfnA OF YOUR CHOICE
FRIDAY, JANUARY 23
:tiMPfERX
330 p.�. REI2UCIB BEVERAGES
EXCEPTIONAL
MANAGEMENT
OPPORTUNITIES
We Offer Current Opportunities
Pizza
Small
Nuclear
Engineering
Business
Management
Aviation.Law
Nursing
1 Medical School
Scholarships
i Civil
1 Engineering
' Shipboard
Operations
� Intelligence
Most Liberal Arts Major Eligible
The Navy Officer Information Team will visit campus
on 27,28,29 January An information desk will be set up
outside the Book Store An interview or test can be ar-
ranged by calling 1 800 662-7568 toll free
starting salary up to
$18,000 increases over
$30,00 m 4 years
30 days paid vacation an
nually
fully financed graduate
programs
superior family health plan
more responsibility and
leadership opportunities
world wide travel and
adventure
Prestige and personol
growth potential
Tomato&Cheese3.00
Onion3.20
Peppers3.20
Pepperoni3.40
Mushroom�3.00
Hamburgerm 3.40
Sausage3.40
2 Wav3.70
3 Way4.00
House Special4.75
Subs Small
Meatball2.35
Sausage2.35
Pastrami2.50
Ham2.35
Italian2.35
Turkey2.35
Roast Beef2.50 t
Super Sub2.50
Steak2.50
Salads
Tossed .25
Greek2.60
Chef's � 2.60
Call for free
Delivery 758-5982
or 758-5616
We're The Best
Large
3.00
3.00
3.50
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.50
3.50
3.50
Famous Pizza
now serving
Greek Food
Lunch Special
Gyros 2.25
Free Tea
What's A Gyro?
Gyros is a lean Blend of
specially selected meats that
are lightly seasoned and cooked
to seal the flavor inside






1 HI EAS1 CAROl INI N
Sports
JANIAKY 20. 19X1
Page H
Tough Road Ahead
ECU Defeats Devils
By t HARIJES CHANDLER
Sports I ditor
The East Carolina women's
basketball team jumped to a quick
20-point lead and held on as Duke
battled back to down the Blue
Devils 79-69 in Minges Coliseum
Monday night.
The Lady Pirates outscored Duke
22-4 during one six-minute span in
the opening half to gain their biggest
lead, at 30-10, following a Marcia
Girven field goal at the 10:36 mark.
Following Girven's bucket the
Lady Devils called for a timeout and
made some adjustments that paid
big dividends.
Duke went on a tear and got the
ECU lead as low as eight, at 42-34,
before going to the locker room at
halftime down by 13, 47-34.
The Lady Pirates opened the se-
cond half much as they did the first,
racing out to a 17-point advantage,
at 53-36.
Duke again settled down and
began to chip away at the lead. The
Ladv Devils got the ECU lead down
to six, at 69-63, with 4:02 remain-
ing.
The Ladv Pirates then recaptured
their poise" and ran off six straight
points to push the lead to 12 and
asure themselves of victory.
"1 thought we really showed a lot
of poise there at the end said ECU
coach Cathy Andruzzi. "In the final
two minutes, when we really needed
to play well, we did. I'm very, very
proud of that
The win pushed the Lady Pirate
record to 12-3 on the season and,
more importantly perhaps, 1-0 in
the NCA1AW standings. Duke fell
to 7-8 and 0-1.
"This was truly a great win for
us added Andruzzi. "It's especial-
ly big because its our first con-
ference win. We definitely need to
win these conference games
The Lady Pirates turned to their
inside game in gaining the win over
Duke. Forward Mary Denkler was
the game's leading scorer, tallying
23 points, most coming on short
turh-around jumpers.
"Marv is doing a super job for
us Andruzzi said. "(Duke) was
closing up on Kathy (Riley) and Sam
(Jones) alot. So we went inside. We
can't just be an outside ballclub.
You'll get nowhere being a
perimeter team
Aiding Denkler inside was senior
center Marcia Girven, who finished
with 17 points, 13 of which came in
the first half.
Denkler was nearly the complete
ECU offense for a six-minute period
in the second half. During that
span, she scored 11 of 13 Lady-
Pirate points.
Jones and Riley also scored in
double figures for ECU, tallying 14
and 10 points, respectively.
Husky forward Barb Krause led
the Duke attack with 13 points.
Center Stacy Hurd and guard Claire
Rose added 12 apiece.
The Lady Pirates now face a
grueling scheduling that could bring
the club into the national spotlight,
should some big wins occur.
The team hosts West Virginia this
Wednesday in a 7:30 tilt and then
travels across state's borders to play
at James Madison on Saturday.
The club then will take on a
challenge that could lead it into the
national rankings.
Beginning on Sunday, Jan. 25 the
team will take on three nationally-
ranked teams in a five-day period.
The team travels to 15th-ranked
Virginia on Sunday and then returns
home to take on number 12 N.C.
State next Wednesday, Jan. 28.
Tenth-ranked Southern Califor-
nia follows on Friday, Jan. 30. Both
the State and Southern Cal games
will be played in Minges Coliseum
with a 7:30 p.m. starting time set for
both.
Are
IfMM t" C.�r�
Pillcrvwi
ECU'S Mar Denkler
BILLIAMKLKRl)N
SUfl Wrilrr
Overall, the last leu days haven't
been too good for the ECl wrestl-
ing squad.
This past weekend the Pirates
ventured to Lynchburg, Va to par
ticipaie in the I ibert) Baptist 1 out
nament. They came awaj with a
fourth-place finish and suffered
three injuries to ke wrestlers, said
head coach Hachiro Oishi.
Injured are 118-pound Jeff 1 i
who will probably be out six weeks
and 167-pounder Andy Hefner, who
probably will be out for at least a
month.
In the 150-lb, class Chris Files was
also hurt, but it wasn't believed to
be serious.
I ast I hursda night the Pirates
were upended h Northern Iowa,
24-1 in Minges Coliseum. The
much-anticipated rematch between
Joe Gormall and Butch Revils in
the 190 pound class ne er
materialized.
�?Gormall) was defeated by Jerry
Rodriquez oi N.C . State in a match
before the one with us Oishi ex-
plained. "He was probably mentalK
upset and knew he would have a
tough match with Revils, so he
didn't wrestle
Gormally, who is ranked second
nationally in the lsX)-pound class,
defeated Revils. the fifth-ranked
wrestler in the nation at
177-pounds. in the nationals two
vears ago
In the 190-pound class, Revils
defeated Northern Iowa's Mark
Johnson 14-7 to extend his unbeaten
record to 14-0.
(Photo by Orrw ������
Girven Boards
Lewis
Named
l ast Carolina University
tootball coach Ed Emory an-
nounced today that Terry
Lewis, former offensive line
coach at Southern University,
will become offensive line
coach tor the Pirates
1 ewis, 32, also coached
linemen at Western Michigan
and Illinois.
��With his background in
coaching offensive line we
think Terry is the best coach
on the market tor what we're
looking tor Emor said.
"We went after him and we
fee! verv lortunate to ha'e a
man of his caliber with us.
A Dream Comes True For Watkins
B CHARLES (HANDLER
The young man say; it's like a
dream. His coach feels the same
way. May they both live happil)
ever after.
es, the tale of how one Charles
Watkins arrived on the scene (jusl
the knick of time) to lead the 1 ast
Carolina basketball team in scoring
reads like a fairy tale.
Watkins, a 6-3 guard, was recent-
ly released from the U.S. Marine
Corps. Upon his release. Watkins
came to ECU and began to work
wonders for coach Dave Odom's
Pirates.
The 24-year old sophomore join-
ed a team in December that included
six freshmen and only one senior. In
onlv his second game, Watkins was
a starter and now, atter playing
eight games, is the team's leading
scorer with a 16.1 points per game
average.
All this is amazing enough. But
the most amazing thing about
Watkins' story is the way in which
he arrived on the Pirate scene.
The story begins in the spring of
The Watkins Jumper
1980, following the 79-80 Pirate-
cage season.
"It was sometime near the end oi
March recalls Odom. "One
Saturday afternoon my sons and I
were riding around.
One o them asked if we could
stop by Memorial Gym and watch
our guys, who usually play there on
the weekends during the off-
season1
Little did Odom know what was
in store for him when his son asked
to visit the gym.
"We got there and two cross-
court games were in progress the
second-year coach said. "1 noticed
one of the guys across the way. He
was all over the court, dunking and
everything.
"1 asked Mike Gibson who he
was and he said he was a Marine
from Cherry Point
The following Saturday Odom
was back in Memorial, as was the
talented Marine. This time Watkins
was playing with the other Pirates,
and performing especially well.
"He looked even better than
before Odom remembers "1
talked to him and asked him if he'd
ever thought about school. He said
'Yeah coach, that's all I ever
wanted He told me he'd heard 1
might be there that day and he
thought he'd try to impress me if 1
was.
Watkins was not offered a
scholarship until the summer, when
he was visiting with a number of the
incoming freshmen.
Even after the matter of the
scholarship was completed, Odom
still had to go through the process of
clearing such an unusual deal
through the NCAA because
Watkins was not to be released from
the Marines until January.
January became December,
though, because the New Orleans
native had 40 days of leave saved
up, making him eligible for play at
the beginning of the spring
semester.
Watkins' first game came in mid-
December in the Elm City Classic.
He saw limited duty, but still
managed to score nine points in a
72-63 loss to Iowa State.
Watkins drew his first starting
assignment of his collegiate career in
the consolation game of the
tourney. The former Marine tallied
14 points in 25 minutes of playing
time.
Watkins' third game was a home
matchup with Campbell. The
Minges debut was a smash. Watkins
scoring 22 as the Pirates won, "5-65.
Since that time Watkins has not
been out o double figures, scoring
21, 18, 19, 12 and 14 points in the
last five games.
"Charles' adjustment has really
been amazing says Odom. "He
has played in more games than he
has been in practices. He doesn't
know our system well at all. It's
been really amazing
Odom notes that Watkins has
given the Pirates several dimensions
that were badly needed: speed, scor-
ing, and especially maturity.
"He's very exciting; a very
acrobatic player Odom noted.
"But he'll be a much better player
once he gets more practice time
Watkins. too, feels there are some
big improvements that must be
made in his play.
"I've got to work on my ball-
handling and defense says
Watkins.
Suprisingly enough, ECU is not
the first college that Watkins has at-
tended. After graduating from high
school in New Orleans, he took off
for Louisiana Tech, where he stayed
a year and a half.
"1 just wasn't ready for school
yet Watkins says o his decision to
quit Tech and join the Marines. "I
wasn't mature enough and 1 felt the
military was a good place to get that
maturity
After a while in the Marines,
Watkins learned what he wanted to
do after his four-year duty was com-
pleted.
"I realized that you are nothing
out there unless you've got an
education. 1 knew that 1 did not
want to stay in the military � not
because it's that bad, but because 1
felt 1 was ready for school
For the last several years of his
military stint, Watkins was station-
ed at Cherry Point, N.C. It was here
that he was to meet the person that
he would eventually plan to marry
and the person who would lead him
to ECU.
Watkins began to see a young
ECU student, Pamela Lane. He
began to make visits to Greenville to
see her and, meanwhile, began to
get attached to the town's universi-
ty' A
Miss Lane, now a senior, and
Watkins are now engaged and plan
to marry after both are finished in
school. Watkins is academically a
freshman, as only eight hours
transfered from La. Tech. He says
Miss I ane plans to go on to
graduate school, hopefully at UNC-
Chapel Hill.
Watkins leaves little doub: about
why he chose ECU. "Pamela was
the main reason he said. "I've
really been looking forward to get-
ting back to North Carolina to see
her, plus 1 really like it at East
Carolina
It was during the stint in the
Marines, Watkins says, that his
basketball skills were honed.
"1 played for one year in high
school he said, "but 1 wasn't very
good
Once in the Marines Watkins
played basketball almost habitually,
starting out in the intramural ranks
and eventually moving up to the
Marine Corps varsity team.
"On the varsity team you get
college-level coaching Watkins
explained. "1 learned a great deal
from that experience
The Marine varsity team is based
in Camp Pendleton, Calif, and com-
petes against area junior college and
NAIA schools.
The Marine team got little atten-
tion, though Watkins says an assis-
tant coach from San Diego State
and other schools approached him
about playing collegiately.
Attention has been all in Watkins'
direction, though, since he arrived
at ECU.
"1 can't believe this is happening
to me Watkins said. "It's like a
dream come true. I had the idea in
my head that I'd like to go back to
school and play basketball but I
never saw it like this.
"Everything has just fallen in
place. Heck, I have never been in
the newspaper in my life. I come
here and I read about myself in the
papers and I'm on television. It's
really like a dream
Watkins says he is not about to let
the bubble burst either, expressing
confidence both in himself and his
teammates.
"There's a lot of talent on this
team. It's just very young. Even-
tually we're going to jell and this is
going to be a great team
One might doubt how long a man
in his mid-20's could stick around a
university and play basketball with
vounger players.
"That's not a problem assures
Watkins. "I love it here. I messed
up at Tech but I'm not going to let it
happen again. You know, four
years of military make you realize a
lot of things
ECU sophomore guard Charles Watkins slams one
home during a recent home game with Pan American.
Since arriving on the Pirate squad following a four-year
stint in the Marines, Watkins has become ECU's leading
scorer with a 16.1 average. (Photo by Drew Rumbley)
G
L
BV
MALM
stiff
1 ne 1
gymnasticsi
two n I
end
iseum.
slim n
1 r i d a
Pir I
with Raj
Wil

ev c
wii I
and
fii
and
re j
I
ev �
and
Cl
FO
FOR SALE
Bass Guit�f
shell case
NAVY Blu!
sale Needs
to do repa�'
i�7S ;
S7S0 Gooo I
: B i 000 m
Edenton
FOR SAl E
Mas aiarm
Laps
me da y
plated band I
ly MS one
FOR Si.tl
!rjC� - I
condition
'M .
FOR SAlE
nqsteen Col
Highest B-
' DC p m
FOR SALF.
peed pr�
old i�a
SUN
and i
0 en'
M1YATA
perfect col
IMS C�ll
LOST anfl
rev-
wronq s I
cal'
cii
C�'
i
i
I '� c
I MCtl I
I
m ABtxl
I . I
� m�-
I
I
r





Hit I ASK AkOI INI AN
JANl KV 20, 1 SH 1
1
lams one
merican.
tour-ear
s leading
umble)
Gymnasts
Lose Two
u (AN DICE
MAHHKWS
suit Writer
The ECU women's
gymnastics team hosted
two meets this week-
end in Minges Col
iscum, losing both by
slim margins.
Friday night the
Pirate gymnasts met
with Had lord and
William & Mary Had
ford surprised
everyone, however,
winning the meet with a
score of US.6. ECU
and Wiiliam & Mary
finished with 116.05
and 1065 points.
respectivel).
The 1 ad Pirates did
extremely well in the in-
d i v i d u a 1 s c o r1 n g .
finishing with second,
third, and fourth places
in several events.
In the vault, ECU
gymnasts Joanie Ford
and I muse Matthews
contributed fine perfor-
mances, tying for thud
place with scores of
8.2.
In the balance beam,
Jennifer Bell took se-
cond place with a score
o 7.55. The Pirates
also took third and
fourth place in the
event with 1 i s a
lamarru scoring a 7.2
and Elizabeth Jackson
receiving a 7.05.
In the floor exercise,
routines by Joanie Ford
and Lisa lamarru
claimed second and
third place, with scores
ot 8.2 and 7.95.
"We were really sur-
prised to beat William
& Mary said coach
Jon Rose. "With fewer
mistakes we eould've
beaten Radford
Saturday afternoon
the Pirate gymnasts
met with Madison, los-
ing bv a score o 114.9
to 113.83.
i he 1 dd Pirates
were not entirely disap-
pointed bv their loss.
Rainey Takes 2nd
By WILLIAM
YELVERTON
Stiff Wrilrr
1 he last Carolina
track team found the
going tough in Chapel
Hill Saturdav as they
finished behind UNC-
CH and South Carolina
in a tri-meet.
The Tar Heels led the
way with 64 points,
followed by South
Carolina with 56, while
the Pirates tallied 15.
EC IPs point total
was deceiving,
however, as the team
onlv participated in the
quarter mile, the
6(H)-vatd run and the
mile relav.
Craig Rainey was a
bright spot for the
Pirates, finishing se-
cond in the 600 with a
time of 1:13.21. Team-
mate Ray Dickerson
was third with a time of
1:14.0.
Tar Heel Walter
Miller was the winner
with a time of 1:11.7.
Head coach Bill Car-
son was pleased with
the efforts of Dicker-
son and Rainey. "They
both ran good times for
that track. They are on-
lv freshmen, but thev
ran well UNC's
Miller qualified for the
Nationals last year.
"We really lost to
some good people in
that event
As for the mile-relay,
Carson said that the
time wasn't too bad for
the type of track, which
is boarded. The Pirates
finished second behind
UNC with a time of
3:22.0, one second off
the Tar Heels' pace.
"Carlton Bell didn't
start well, and he also
collided with a IS(
runner on the second
curve Carson pointed
out. "We were hoping
for a 15-20 yard lead,
bui could onlv manage
a five yard one
Overall, we ran fairly
consistently
The ECU head men-
tor says he is looking
tor more improvement
when the team travels
to Philadelphia to par-
ticipate in the
Philadelphia Track
Club Invitational this
weekend.
"At this meet teams
will be divided into two
groups. We'll probably
be in the second group,
but last year Maryland
wa in the same one
and they won it (ar-
son said. "It's going to
he a good meet
( arson indicted that
his team is "lookin
little better now ,
Dickerson is getting
better andharlie
Wat kins has shown a
whole lot ot improve-
ment
iPhotn b (,�r PaMrrscni
ECU Gymnastics Action
however. "To come
within one point of
beating a Division 1
team like Madison is
pretty good said
Rose. "We definitely
have a good shot at the
Regional Champion
ship
E C U again had
several outstanding in-
dividual performances.
On the uneven bars, the
Pirate gymnasts per-
formed five out of six
perfect routines.
Claudia Hauck claimed
Classifieds
FOR SALE
FOR SALE Fender precision
Bass Guitar Sunburst with hard
shell case Excellent cond'tion
Call 752 �626
NAVY BLUE 1968 Volvo 144 tor
sale Needs owner that is wilimq
to do repair Call 758 �742
l�7S FIAT SPORT 52 000 mi
S'JSC Good condition Honda 360
CB IS 000 mi S800 Call 482 7173
Edenton
FOR SALE LCD Digital watch
Has aiarm Chronograph with
Lapse time tearure dual time
mo day date Stive' with silver
plated band with light S45 original
ly 465 one year old Call 752 72?0
FOR SALE Stereo AM FM 8
track Realistic model Excellent
condition S�S Call Kent at
'58 2140
FOR SALE 4 tickets to Bruce Spr
ingsteen Concert in Greensboro
Highest bidder 758 1223 betore
II 00 p.lft
FOR SALE Miyata Americana 10
speed perfect condition, one year
old 5145 Call 758 5689
PERSONAL
SUNSHINF UDIOS Will be ot
lenng cia-���, m ballet ian exer
cise and yoga tor a very special
New Yea's rate 2 tor the price ot
" g enroll call 758 0736
Ml t ATA AMERICANA lOspeed
perfect condition One year old
l'i Call 758 S68�
LOST and FOUND Blue and kaki
reversible vest Picked up 'he
wrong sue m Eibow.lt you did also
call 752 B661 ask tor Dianne
WANTED E xpenenced amateur
carpenter for small Ob Must have
own tools Call 752 5775
BECKY Happy Anniversary'
Love, Verner
HAPPY BELATED BIRTHDAY
TOM! Welcome aboard Frog
From the rest ot the 502 club You
are:
VERNER Have a happy birth
day I have onioyed partying with
vou at 502 Amanda
ANNOUCING Notary public lor
ail legal notoruation Small
tee Call Amy at 758 6994
NEW OPTOMETRIST Needs
part time receptionist .Call
756 4680 or come by 1805 Charles
Blvd
WANTED Tickets lor Springsteen
m Greensboro Will pay good
money Call 752 0247
LADIES We don t have much fur
niture yet but we promise you no
rugbums'GPJ CWM
FOR RENT
WANTED Female roommate to
share three bedroom house Big
front and back yard. Garage.
Electric heat and only hall mile
form the mall and one mile lorm
Pitt Community College Only MO
Mo plus utilities Call Anita or
Ann at 756 9011 or leave message
at 757 6366
NICE Two bedroom apartment
Hea' and water furnished Phone
756 1050
APARTMENT For rent Two
rooms modern bath and kitchen,
study Call 752 3020 alter 6 00 pm
FEMALE ROOMMATE Wanted
to share two bedroom Tar River
Apartment Call Lisa 752 0653 or
758 5629
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEED
ED To share large house Walk
mg distance to campus $70 rent
plus traction or utilities Call
752 3444
ROOMMATE NEEDED Three
bedroom house on Jarvis St $85
per month plus utilities Call
Terry at 758 4745
ROOMS FOR RENT $75 per
month utilities included, lor info
call 752 3480
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed
to share two bedroom King s Row
Apartment Hall rent and
utilities Call 752 085 or leave
message at 758 9707
MALE ROOMMATE Needed lor
two bedroom duplex at 1312 B E
14th St
FEMALE ROOMMATES
WANTED Cypress Gardens, $80
per month plus utilities partially
lurmshed. semi private Call
752 5947
FEMALE ROOMMATE Wanted
to share two bedroom Village
Green Apartment. $112 plus
utilities. Call 752 9846.
FOR RENT One and two
bedroom apartments water and
cable included Ail kitchen ap
plianced pool ECU bus every h
hour Call 758 4015
CLASSIFIED ADS CAN BE PUR
CHASED FROM 2 00 4 00 M F AT
THE EAST CAROLINIAN OF
FICE
Classified Ad Form
PRICE $!K tor tj words. 05 lor
�ach additional word
Make checki payable lo The ����
Carolinian
� �.btrev.ations count as one word
I lt ao phone numbers and,
� hyphenat.oni
I MAIL TO
The Eas' Carol.nun
Ciassilied Ads
Old Sou'h Buildmg
Greenville. N C 278)4
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
Carolina Opry House
Wed21st
Bill Lyerly Band
Ladies � Free
Men - $2.00
Thurs. � 22nd
George Jones
Ticket Locations:
Apple Records, Western Pleasure
and Carolina Opry House

Fri. & Sat.
Bill Lyerly Band
beasm, a fine routine
by Lisa I a marm
received first place with
a score of 7.36.
Elizabeth Jackson's
performance on the
floor exercise won se-
cond place with a score
ot 7.50.
second place with a The Lady Pirates'
score of 7.33. next meet is Wednesday
On the balance night at Duke.
LSUDefeats
No A Kentucky
BATON ROUGE,
La. (UP1) � Using a
combination of a four-
corner offense and a
f u 11 - c O u r t press
defense, reserve guard
Willie Sims scored 22
points to lead sixth-
ranked Louisiana State
to an 81-67 victory
Monday night over
fourth-ranked Ken-
tucky.
Sims, who has been
averaging 11.5 points
per game, came off the
bench to lead the Tigers
to their 14th c
secutive victory. 1 he
crowd of 15,192 was
the largest ever at the
LSU Assembly Center.
Kentucky was led by
center Sam Bowie with
22 points and forward
Charles Hurt with 14
Art and Camera
526 S. Cotanche St.
Dow Town
i$$$$$$S$$$$$$$$$$$$$$g
KODACOLOR s
Developed and Printed
T
No Foreign
Film
12
EXPOSURE
ROLL ONLY
S3.23S
EXPOSURE St4 ft!
ROLL ONLYV �V
$$S$$$SS$$$$$$S$$$$$S$S$$
KODACOLOR
B? Developed and Printed
St fc EXPOSURT fcC CO
�� tff R0LL ONLYVi�uJ
: �rr,8� �t�su0RNt$7.97�
$$$$$$$$$$Yide$$$$$$I
FILM DEVELOPING
20 EXPOSURE Q!?H'
KODACHROWF
AND EKTACHROME
PROCESSING ONLY
36 EXPOSURE
KODACHROME
AND EKTACHROME
PROCESSING ONLY
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$�
$3,151
LOW. LOW PRICES ON
Movie
PROCESSING
$2.11
SUPER � AND STANUaAO MOVIES
LIMITED OFFER
NOTHING ELSE FEELS LIKE NAVY FLYING.
The sharp whine of jet engines
covers the flight deck
Throttles are at full powi i
and you're waiting for the
signal to launch.
Now The c atapult fires.
11 forces slam you back into
your seat. Suddenly, you're
flying low and fast over the
. ' -i a
Nothing else feels like Na
flying. Nothing. And as a
pilol or flight officer you can
part of it.
The Navy puts you in full
control of a multi-million-
dollar super-sophisticated
combination of jet til craft
and electronic wizardry
In return, the Na y
demands something ol you:
Leadership. As officers, right
from the start, members of
the Na a iation team " i
decision-making authority,
leadership responsibilit y
management experii n e
t )ther career- car give you
responsibility But Navy giv
it to you miiner
Make your first lership
deci-ion now vnd in the
coupon. Nothing else feels like
Navv fh ing
NAVY OFFICERS GET RESPONSIBILITY FAST.
B STATION
'A Complete Meal On A Bun"
215 E. 4th STREET
GREENVILLE, N. C. 27834
752-2183
ORDER BY NUMBER
Ham & Cheese
Bologna & Cheese
Ham. Salami & Cheese
Salami, Cheese & Pepperoni
Cheese. Turkey & Ham
Roast Beef & Cheese
Cheese, Pepperoni & Ham
Cheese, Salami & Cappicola
Ham. Cheese & Cappicola
Turkey & Cheese
Tuna Fish & Cheese
All Cheese
Salami, Cheese, Pi pperoni & Ham
Proscettino & Cheese
Ham. Cheese & Proscettino
Corned Beef & Cheese
Cappicola & Cheese
Bologna. Ham, Cheese & Cappicola
SUPER SPECIALj
Salami, Bologna, Cheese, Turkey,
Cappicola, Ham & Pepperoni
Pastrami On Rye
Ruben On Rye with Corned Beef,
Swiss Cheese, Mustard & Sauerkraut
Italian Meatball (in sauce)
Italian Sausage with peppers (in sauce)
Hot Pastrami on onion roll
Cheese Steak
Hot Dog (with Chili)
Chef Salad
Filet of Chicken on Onion Roll
2 25
1.80
3.35
2.40
1.70
Sandwiches include lettuce, tomato, onion, oil, vinegar,
oregano, salt and pepper.
PHONE AHEAD FOR FASTER SERVICE

I





10
1HI 1 M KOI l
I M KY 20, WSl
TKE Tourney
A Month Away
ByDAVESEVERIN
Amateur boxing returns to Green-
ville as the 1 ambda I'm c haptei ol
Tau Kappa Epsilon fraternit
presents the sixth annual 1 KJ Box
ing loin namenl i n W right
Auditorium, February 24 26
1 his ccnt has attracted man) not
only from EC U, but from all
around eastern North Carolina to
sec exciting amateui bovine. I he
Millei Brewing Company is spon
ii this yeai and is pro
viding all the trophies for the win-
ners
! he 1 Kl Bo namenl
� 1976 as a ;ollaborative
e Anpala
chapter ot 1 kl 1
mi State
o! ihe funds
�em to
v hildren's Hospital.
St. Jud � the national philanthropy
foi I an Kappa 1 psilon as
Damn rhomas i- the 1 KI luni-
977, 1 Kl a: I CU took
ind has been i unn-
1 a � something interesting
see u ' � event. 1 asl
. bin Plaj mate Jams
Schmiti v! Greenville and wa
the ring i the tournament.
I his year, I Kh in holding a
"�Ring Girl" competition at the
"Elbo Room They are asking all
fraternities, sororities, and dorms to
sponsor a girl tor the competition.
Any girl can also enter by herselt.
1 he winner will be the "ring girl"
tor the tournament and receive
$100.00 in prie money.
The tournament will also have a
"Most Valuable Boxer" award to
be voted on by the referee and
another judge. The referee, b the
way, will be an AAU sanctioned ol
ficial.
1 here will be nine weight classes
stalling at 123 lbs on up to the
heavyweight division of 2(2 lbs and
above with tout boxers in each
weight class. All equipment in-
cluding 14 oz. gloves, headgear, and
mouthpiece will be provided.
Iheic will be reduced prices tor
tickets thi year; $1.00 toi the semi-
final nights and SI .50 on champion-
ship night.
Registration tor boxers will run
January 19 through February 20
between 6-9 p.m. at the 1 Kl house,
951 E. lenth St at the bottom of
the Hill.
1 ot more information about the
tournament or the "Ring Girl Com-
petition call 758-7699'
SPEC1ALGET ACQU Al N TE D OF F E R
With This Coupon Good to Jan 3'
Shampoo, Cut & Blowdry Styling
I
EG
RICE
12
so
Tmo00'
EXPERT STYLISTS
FREE CONSULTATION
I
YOU
SAVE
SO50
I
LATEST EASY CARE
STYLES AND PERMS
NO APPOINTMI N
NECI
ill
1111111
irolma Edit Mrfll 7S6 8694 Mrs 10 9 Mon Sal
AftORTIONtUFTO
IftftWIIKO
1 -�� 71M��NANCY
1 "� 00 ��II H�ctv)��
1p�t�ft�ft� H�t trt c�n
1 f1 'SP' ,��f o. and problem prtynan
TuZ 1cy counting For fwrlrwr
ti intortrtttor call 112 �SIS (tall ' fraa nwmhar ino 77) mi) fettwttn t
��
iv"?lAMI p M waa�dar� NaMflh �����'� MaaMi Oraamiaian firwMlNtaraaalt

Buying Gold � Silver Coins
Also Sterling Silver
Paying I op $
Come in for KREL estimate
Carolina Compact
Kivergate Shopping Center
Price may vary depending on market
Available
All Day
Every Day
Open
1 1 a.m9 p.m.
Sun. thru Thurs
a.m. 10p.m.
Fri.&Sat.
Steer
'pomi'y
3005 E
10th Street
Greenville, N.C.
(Behind Hastings Ford)
Take Out Service
Available
758-8550
FAST & EASY DELICIOUS LUNCHES
Swimmers Finish 2nd
Soup & Salad
$199
B IIMWU.I.lVMs
Mafl VV nlrr
lite ECl Women's swim team
soundly defeated William c'v Mary in
Saturday, by an
82 48
"I thought William & Mar was
one ot the better Division II MAW
teams, but � mr girls reall) mopped
ip ECU coach Raj Scharf
e case even though
mes were not bet-
lennifei I ayes did
the qua � . ne tor the
-1 VA . � . ps in
kstroke with a
��on the 2(X!
r baci
cd in first in the KM) and 2(H) meter
butterfly.
Other winners for the 1 ad
Chicken Filet
Sandwich
Baked Potato or French Fries
$199
Diet Plate
4 oz. Chop Sirloin
Cottage Cheese & Fruit
$199
Pirates were Maria McHugl
HX)
(
11
�'� cp;
.
� who rac
treestyle, 56), Tammy Putnam
(400 Individual Medley. 5:00.6),
McQueston (50 freestyle, 26.1). and
the 4(K) medley rela team (Jayco,
Malcolm. Hennckson. McHugh).
Coach Scharl stated that in the
upcoming meet on Saturday, .Ian
24. a: UNC-W, it was important
that the girls did not have a let down
because William and 1ur has
beaten I MW alread) this year.
I he meet also includes Virginia
Common wealth University,
las; Saturday's meet lett the
1 ad) Pirates with a -1 avoid I n
the season with the onl loss coming
� � North, Carolina, sixth place
� s in the A1AW Nationals last
Child's Plate
4oz. Chopped Sirloin
Baked Potato or French Fries
Toast
-69
Banquet & Party
Facilities
Available
Steerburger &
Bowl of Chili
$199
Potato & Salad
$199
No Potato
Steak Sandwich
Plain, Peppors & Onions,
or Mushroom Gravy
Baked Potato or French Fries
$029
Steerburger
With Baked Potato
or French Fries
Without Potato
SPECIALS DAILY
Mondoy & Wednesday
Beef Tips
$229
Daily specials served with baked potato or french fries & toast
NO TAKE OUT ORDERS
ON DAILY SPECIALS
Tuesday & Thursday
8 oz. Chop Sirloin
$"89
DELICIOUS 30 ITEM SALAD BAR
Home of Greenville's Best Meats'
Overtoil's Super Coupon
�� i
COCA COLA & PEPSI A
2 LITRE BOTILK ISi
NO LIMIT PEPSI
98
TROPICANA PURE
ORANGE
JUICE
Vi gallon jug 99
TIlrlMM
iii'imh
ouih y
JUICI
mitt: m
SOU1 & PRETTY
TOILET TISSUE
4rollPkg.gg$ &�
Fab Detergent Qt. Box 98$ with
this coupon and $7.50 food order
excluding advertised specials. Without
coupon � $1.79. Limit one per customer.
Expires 1-17-81
Pepsi-Cola
16 oz. ctn. ol 8
$1 38
plus deposit
No Limit
1
Overton's Finest
Full Cut
Round Steak
$1 89
1 Lb.
California
Large Head
Lettuce
38e
4
Morrell Pride Sirloin or
T-Bone Steaks
$029
Del Monte Catsup
Qt. Bottle
78
"W
EATSUP





Title
The East Carolinian, January 20, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 20, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.103
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy