The East Carolinian, December 2, 1980






Witches Still Exist!
Even in these modern
scientific times, there are
practicing witches.
But, some witches in
New Bern don't quite fit
the old stereotype of the
evil witches of stories and
fairytales.
For more, see page 5.
Rogers Gets Heisman
South Carolina runn-
ing back George Rogers,
the nation's leading
rusher, was named the
winner of the coveted
Heisman Trophy Mon-
day afternoon.
Rogers outdistanced
Pittsburgh defensive end
Hugh Green and
Georgia's sensational
freshman running back,
Herschel Walker, for the
top award given to a col-
lege football player.
Rogers received 216
first place votes, Green
179 and Walker 107.
For further details see
page 8.
ECU Hosts Champions
The East Carolina
women's basketball team
plays host to defending
AIAW national cham-
pion Old Dominion this
Wednesday at 7:30 p.m.
in Minges Coliseum.
For ECU coach Cathy
Andruzzi's pre-game
comments see page 8.
She
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
o&
ol.55N
o. 2
ov
10 Pages
Tuesday, December 2, 1980
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 10.000
Thefts Plague Mendenhall
Bv CHRIS LICHOK
and JIMM DuPREE
In spite oi, oi possibly because oi
the volumn of traffic in Mendenhall
Student Center, theft has recently
become a popular activity. Rudolph
Alexander, associate dean for stu-
dent activities, reports that in the
past there have been scattered in-
cidents where student center proper-
ty was stolen, but that in recent
months the frequency oi these
events has increased at an alarming
rate.
While no official announcement
has been made. Alexander said he
doubted there would be any further
exhibits of art until further security
measures are taken. He added the
state museum of art would be con-
sulted as to possible security alter-
natives.
One of the most recent thefts in-
volved a professional art exhibit
w h i c h was removed from
Mendenhall prior to Thanksgiving.
Alexander was unable to estimate
the value of the artwork, but ex-
pressed alarm that it was removed
without detection.
"We've had other items stolen
from the building Alexander
states. "We had at the beginning of
fall semester two of our bean-bag
chairs stolen from the TV lounge on
the tzround floor.
"About two weeks ago, someone
stole a work of art that was hanging
on the gallery wall. This was stolen
Friday night between 10:30 and
midnight. This was a professional
exhibition, not a student exhibi-
tion
In an effort to avoid any further
incidents, Alexander requested that
a member of the usher corps be
positioned in the gallery area, "in
hopes of spotting anyone who might
be in the process of taking
something But as he points out,
the plan did not work as well as it
was designed.
"Along about that time Alex
Option Still Open To Courts
Busing Issue Debated
CHARl ESTON, S.C. (L PI) �
A Justice Department spokesman
officially confirmed Monday the
agency is considering filing a
desegregation sttfl against the
Charleston County school system
that would leave busing an option to
the courts.
"Charles! ot the areas
we have under consideration, but
there has been no decision yet said
John Wilson, a public affairs officer
for the department in Washington.
'I don't expect a decision for a cou-
�! weeks
Wilson refused to confirm or
deny a United Press International
report quoting sources saving that
Drew S. Days Hi, has recommended
to Attorney General Benjamin
Civiletti that the suit be filed.
Differing House and Senate ver-
sion- oi an anti-busing provision are
currently being hashed out in a con-
gressional conference committee.
and President Carter has been urged
by Justice officials to veto the
legislation.
A veto would give the department
until Jan. 20 to file such suits, but
sources told I'PI the president
would be asked to wait the full 10
davs permitted under law if he
decides to sign it to allow civil rights
lawyers to file suits where investiga-
tions are completed.
Charleston County is made up of
eight constituent school districts
under one consolidated school
board. There are 45,000 students in
the system, including some 7,700 in
the penisular city where the schools
are 99.5 percent black. The coun-
tywide black-white ratio is 53 per-
cent black to 47 percent white.
Keith Thompson, chairman of the
consolidated board until January,
defended the current district lines
and said he is opposed to busing to
achiev e a racial balance.
"1 don't think it serves any pur-
pose except frustrating students and
deterring education he said.
Thompson, who has served on the
board seven years, said the black-
white ratio is equivalent to the com-
munity at large � 35 percent to 65
percent � in seven of the eight
districts. Only District 20, the penin-
sula area, is predominantly black,
he said.
"The board is concerned about
it he said. "We are now in the
process of establishing magnet
schools to attract whites back into
the system.
"Given time, 1 think the schools
will re-integrate themselves. A lot of
white people are moving back to the
downtown area and renovating the
old houses
Thompson said school officials
are just "sort of hanging in limbo"
waiting to to see what Justice of-
ficials will do.
Several members of the con-
solidated board said they would op-
pose busing as a means to in-
tegregate the schools, but the Rev.
Cornelius Campbell Jr another
member, supported the idea.
"1 believe there is room for bus-
ing in the city of Charleston he
said. "1 welcome the suit in
Charleston County. It's long over-
due
"1 would definitely not vote for
the district to fight the suit
The Justice Department investiga-
tion was prompted by a complaint
filed by the Rev. Thomas Duffy, a
Catholic priest, and Maurice
Cohen, who has children in the
schools.
ander maligns, "someone stole two
of our lamps from the lobby area
Alexander said the lamps were
valued at $125 each, but was unable
to explain the method with which
they disappeared.
He added that several pieces of
artwork were stolen a week ago
from the North Carolina museum of
Art exhibit.
"This is more than we have ever
had stolen in the six years-plus we
have been in operation Alexander
said. "There's no way we can watch
all these doors
Alexander stated that earlier in
the semester a student was caught
removing a plant from the student
center, and the plant was returned
to its proper place in the lobby.
One solution Alexander favors is
to make some of the doors emergen-
cy exists. Also involved in this pro-
posal is the installation of an alarm
system which would signal viola-
tions.
By G15r PiTTERSONi
Unseasonabh Warm Weather
. . . ECU Students lake Advantage
East To Visit
EdJ CampilS As Interim General Manager
Brewer Withdraws
From Consideration
Chancellor Thomas Brewer an-
nounced Thursday that he asked
the University of Louisville to
withdraw his name from con-
sideration for president of the
university.
Brewer, chancellor at East
Carolina for the past three years,
was reportedly one of two
finalists for the Louisville job.
Donald C. Swain, a vice presi-
dent of the University of Califor-
nia system, was reported to be the
other finalist.
Swain declined to comment on
Brewer's withdraw!
The announcement ended
speculation that began two weeks
ago about Brewer leaving ECU
when he went to Louisville to be
interviewed for the job.
Brewer had said earlier that his
talks with the Louisville search
committee were in line with his
beliefs on professional develop-
ment.
"By comparing institutions,
they (administrators) either reaf-
firm their dedication to their pre-
sent institution or move to new
challenges he said.
"Even if the new position is
declined, looking in some depth
at another institution provides
new ideas which should be ot
benefit to the school. This at-
titude, I believe, is commonplace
in the field oi higher education
Woodford R. Porter, chair-
man of Louisville's board oi
trustees and a member oi the
search committee, said in an in-
terview Thursday with The News
and Observer that he learned oi
Brewer's decision Wednesday
night.
"It conies as a bit ot a shock to
me Portei said.
Another member oi the board
ot trustees. A. Wallis Grafton
Jr said the committee had not
yet recommended any candidate
to the board.
William C. Friday, president
of the University of North
Carolina system, said he knew of
no offers oi a pay raise to entice
Brewer to remain at ECU.
Brewer's current salary is $63,250
a vear.
In his statement Brewer said,
"We have much work ahead oi
us at Last Carolina University. 1
have said before, and 1 sav again,
it is a privilege to serve as
chancellor oi this fine institu-
tion
Bv CHRIS IK HOk
and JIMMY DuPREE
Newly elected Republican Sen.
John East will return to the campus
of East Carolina University
Wednesday. December 10 to meet
with students, faculty and area
citizens at Mendenhall Student
Center from 7-8:30 p.m.
East, who narrowly defeated
Democratic incumbent Robert
Morgan in the November 4 general
election, will attend the reception
sponsored by the staff of the student
center, the Student Government
Association, the Student Union and
the officers of the faculty.
Rudolph Alexander, Associate
Dean for Student Activities, states
that the event is designed to give
supporters of the East campaign to
meet with the successful candidate
before he begins his term in the
Republican-controlled Senate.
"Dr. East has served for many
years as a member of the faculty in
the department of Political
Science said Alexander. "He has
been an outstanding faculty member
and an outstanding teacher. His
election to the Senate has brought
credit to the university and to all of
us.
"1 should think that students,
faculty and staff should want to
Lichok Replaces Green
Sen. John East
come by and say hello, congratula-
tions, best wishes; just enjoy a
reception which we think will be a
lot of fun for everyone
While there will be no set pro-
gram, East is expected to make com-
ments of thanks to his supporters.
"I think regardless of anyone's
political affiliation or beliefs
Senator-elect East will be senator
for all the people of North Carolina.
"That's the way we look at it; it's
strictly a non-political function. The
election is over. This is simply an oc-
casion when all of us will have a
chance to wish one of our own the
very best in the years of service he
has ahead in the United States
Senate
By JIMMY DuPREE
Mantginu tdilur
Out with the old and in with the
new, as they say.
After a successful, though ab-
breviated, tenure as the general
manager of The East Carolinian,
Richard Green turns over the reigns
of leadership on an interim basis to
former "business manager Chris
Lichok. Green had announced his
resignation at the November 12
meeting of the ECU Media Board,
but stipulated he would serve until
the first of December.
At their final meeting before the
Thanksgiving Holiday, the Media
Board voted to accept Green's sug-
gestion to appoint Lichok as acting
general manager until a permanant
appointment is made December 10.
Green set aside rumors he was
leaving because of dissatisfaction or
hostility towards the Media Board,
stating it is simply "that 1 graduate
at the end of the semester
"1 did tell David Creech (Media
Board chairmam) that I was tired of
fighting with them said Green.
"But they're probably tired of
Green
fighting with me too. But, you
know, it isn't easy having an adver-
sary relationship with your
employer.
"One thing that could help is
changing the relationship of the
newspaper and the media board
he continued. "The media board is
a student organization which we are
bound to report on, lik the SGA.
But if we have to go in there and ask
for something, we're not going to go
in there with guns blazing; that has a
chilling effect
Lichok
During his employment at The
East Carolinian, Green witnessed
and participated in many changes.
The most significant, he states, was
the installation of vidio display ter-
minals in the place of the "ancient"
equipment previously used.
"The biggest change has to be the
computers he says, "because it
has changed everybody's work load.
At first when you're learning how to
use them, it seems like the hardest
thing in the world. But once you get
the hang of it, it makes the work so
much easier
lichok, characterized as a
dedicated and popular worker, sees
the future of The East Carolinian as
full of potential thanks to the
leadership of Green.
"Richard Green brought an era
of improvement to the paper says
Lichok. "One that must continue to
become a standard to improve
upon. The general manager is just
what the title implies; he is responsi-
ble for generally managing the
operation and the affairs oi he
paper.
"However, he must be aware of
all of the functions of the paper and
coordinate them into a smooth
operating procedure.
"The staff here is made up of
many multi-talented individuals
who have a broad range of interests,
from graphics and design, to in-
vestigative reporting, to marketing
and advertising.
"With this broad based staff
Lichok continues, "I'm looking for
a successful future for the paper
I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN DECEMBER 2. 1980
?
Announcements
GENERAL MANAGER
Applications are now being ac
cepted for General Manager of
The East Carolinian Position will
be available as of Dec 1 Applica
tions may be picked up in the
Media Board Office m the Publica
tions Center
SOCIANTH
On Tuesday December 7. the
Sociology Anthropology Club will
meet in the lounge at 12 00 noon
for a doodad party BE
PREPARED! We suggest you br
mg a bag lunch scissors, tape
paste etc along with your ideas
For more mto. call Anna at
752 0826
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA
The Lambda Chi Alpha Little
Sisters would like to congratulate
Jobeth Rambo for winning their tl
quor raffle of November 23rd
FINANCIAL AID
There will be a meeting on
Wednesday December 10 to
distribute financial aid applica
tions and to disseminate intorma
tion concerning financial aid for
the "81 82 school year The
meeting will be conducted in
Wright Auditorium at 4 00 p m
All financial aid recipients who
will be applying for financial aid
next year are expected to attend
INTERNSHIP
Sophomores, lun.ors and seniors
currently enrolled m a North
Carolina college or North Carolina
residents attending an out of sta'e
college have until February 2 to
apply for the institute of Govern
ment Summer internship Pro
gram m state government
Twenty four students will be
selected by an advisory commit
tee to participate in a living
learning internship in North
Carolina state government
directed by the Institute of
Government The Institute of
Government interns will work
from May 26 through August 7
Students will work 40 hours each
week n a responsible position in a
state department, participate in
evening educational seminars and
be paid approximately J130 per
week
Students interested m the pro
gram should secure a brochure an
nouncmg the program and a Sta'e
of North Carolina application form
from their college or university
placement office or local Job Ser
vice OH �
Students interested m the In
stitute of Government program
should mail an application to the
Institute of Government, Knapp
, �
1981
Applicants will be accepted
�r. thout respect to race s� oior
national origin, religion, or nan
dicap
onnson, a student of Eas'
�, served as an
� ' �� ' .overnment intern in
s'a'e cjcvernment during the sum
mer of 1980
SOCIANTH PARTY
All sociology and anthropology
faculty, staff, grad students, ma
jors, minors, and members are in
vited to the SociAnth Club party
on Wednesday December 3 The
tun will begin at 12 noon in the
lounge (BD302) with coffee and
punch provided A donation of food
or money will be appreciated
Please RSVP in the office, or call
Anna at 752 0826
JOBS NEEDED
inmates at the Maury Correc
tional Facility are looking for jobs
Many inmates have been recom
mended tor work release, but iobs
aren't available If you have one to
offer or know of one please call
756 932'
PRISON VISITS
Many ECU students have joined
Maury Correctional Facilities
Thursday night visiting program
We go from 7 30 pm 900pm
Car pooling and pick up is
available it's a friendly at
mosphere and enjoyable for all
Let's not forget these lonely people
during the Holiday Season Call
756 9324
GMAT
The Graduate Management Ad
mission Test (GMAT) will be of
fered at East Carolina University
on Saturda. January 24. 1981 Ap
plication Blanks are to be com
pieted and mailed to SMAT.
Educational Testing Service, Box
966 R, Princeton NJ 08540 Ap
plications must be postmarked no
later than December 22 1980 Ap
plications may be obtained from
the ECU Testing Center Room
105 Speight Buildmg
ALLIED HEALTH
The Allied Health Professions
Admission Test will be offered at
East Carolina University on Satur
day. January 17, 1981 Application
blanks are to be completed and
mailed to the Psychological Corp ,
304 East 45th Street, New York,
NY 10017 to arrive by December
20, 1980 Application blanks are
also available at the Testing
Center, Speight Building Room
105. East Carolina University
INSTRUCTORS
NEEDED
instructors arc needed to teach
� � rt tern oeg.nri .nq
works) s for the
Centi at V � 'tiaii Stu
dent Center The areas for which
instructors are needed are
darkroom techniques ,ewelry and
Silkscreen Graduate or fourth
art students or anyone who
has v M .�- unowleoge to teach
a CO � of the areas men
tioned may contact Tana Nobles
Cra"s and Recreation Director at
Mendenhail. 757 6611
MUSICIANS
Auditions for all music school
spring semester performance
groups will be Friday. December
5, 1 00 3 00 at Fletcher Music
Center
Non music school students who
wish to audition, contact music of
fice for information
Music school students, see
private teachers Audition
material is available now
LaCROSSE
There will be a meeting of the
East Carolina Lacrosse Club
Thursday, Dec. 4th in room 104 of
Memorial Gym Guest speaker
will be Robert Mack of the Wilm
ington Club If you want to play In
the Spring, please attend
CIC FELLOWSHIPS
Until February I, 1981, prospec
five applicants from outside In
diana may call toll free between
9:00am and 5 00 p m ESTform
formation or application forms
The number is (800) 457 4420
Now in its fourth year, the CIC
Fellowships Program in the social
sciences makes awards in an
thropoiogy, economics,
geography, history, political
science, psychology, and
sociology
The humanities fellowships are
available to students seeking doc
torates in American studies, art
history, classics, comparative
literature. English, German,
linguistics, music, philosophy,
religion. Romance languages and
Slavic-languages
Fields covered by the natural
sciences, mathematics and
engineering program include
chemistry, biological sciences
agricultural sciences, physics,
and geological sciences We
welcome inquiries concerning
specific subfields
JEWISH STUDENTS
Come to the Creative Friday
Night Service, led by fellow Hillel
students, at the new syngogue
1420 E Uth St , held on Dec 5,
1980. at 8.00. For more info, or f a
ride is needed, call Mike at
758 1153, or Jerry at 752 5942
JEWISH STUDENTS
Hannukkah party at the new
synagogue. 1420 E Uth St , Dec 3,
1980 from 6 30 to 9 30 Potato
Latkas and a speak from
Jacksonville, N C For more .nfor
or if a rido needed, call Jerry at
752 5942
SIGMA TAU DELTA
Sigma Tau Delta, National
English Honor Society, will hold
its December meeting on Thurs
day. Dec 4, at 7 30 pm in Speight
129 induction of new members
and election of new 1981 officers
will precede a slidesound show by
Karen Blansfield on "Greece To
day and Yesterday "
SNA
The final meeting of the fall
semester of the ECU Student
Nurse's Association will be held on
Wednesday, Dec 3. 1980 at 7 00
p m in the nursing auditorium
Carol Cox will present a film on In
cest which will be followed by a
discussion Drawing for gift cer
tificate will also be held Members
and non members may attend
CAROLING
Mendenhail Student Center in
vites everyone to come and hear
the songs of Christmas presented
by the ECU Chorus, under the
direction of Dr Charles Moore
The Chorus will bring us the
sounds of the season on Monday,
December 8 at 1 00 pm on the
Mendenhail central stairway Stop
by for some refreshments enjoy
the chorus, and help us celebrate
this special holiday season
SOULS
There will be a SOULS
meeting on Thursday, December
4, 1980 Please plan to attend The
meeting will be at 7 30 p m in the
Cultural Center
ECU SURFCLUB
There wli be a Surf Club
meeting on Thursday Dec 4 at
7 00 p m in Room 243 Mendenhail
Members are urged to attend All
are welcome
DANCE
A workshop of varied dances
choreographed by faculty
members of the East Carolina
University Department of Drama
and Speech will be presented by
the ECU Dance Theatre Dec 5 7
The program will feature con
temporary ballet. azz and
modern dance pieces performed
by ECU dance students Perfor
mances are scheduled nightly at
8 15pm
FRISBEE CLUB
There will be a meeting for all
interested persons Tuesday night
at 7 00 in 104 Memorial Gym Con
struction of a friSOCC aoH course
will be d'Scussed
PHI BETA LAMBDA
Phi Beta Lambda will meet on
Tuesday, December 2nd at 4 p m
in Rawl 103 The Guest speaker
will be Mr Fred Swayez from Pro
ctor & Gamble All unsold tickets
fro the December Social must be
returned along with all the ticket
money on Tuesday, December
2nd
Gi
i
ADVERTISED
ITEM POUCV
Each of theee edvertleed Item
below the advertised price
in this ad
?m� is required to be raadlly available for �al at oA
In aach A4P Store except as specifically noted J
PRICES GOOD THRU DEC. 6 IN GKhbNVILLE
BKA
Bela Kappa Alpha, the Banking
and Finance Fraternity, will hold
its December meeting on
December 4th 1980 in Room 221
Mendenhail at 7 00 Guest speaker
wiH De Mr Paul Rendme Branch
Manager of Whea' First
Securities All interested
members and nonmembers are in
vited to attend
RESIDENCE STAFF
App! i si �� ��� 9
rece .� I : . " � I . ' ' '
Residence Life for Resident Ad
visors for Spring Fall Semester
Any full time student who has
reserved a residence hall room
and has an overall average of 2 0 is
eligible to apply information and
application forms can be obtained
from a Residence Hall Director or
the Residence L'fe Office. 214
Whichard Building
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Reagan Faces Frozen
Pizza Deregulation
W ASHINGTON
(UP!) � One of the im-
ponderables all of us
can hardly wait to
ponder is the policy the
Reagan administration
will adopt with respect
tc deregulation of
frozen pia.
I he trend in recent
years has been toward
less federal regulation.
We have seen the
regulatory process
modified or dropped
for trucking, the
airlines and certain
other key industries.
1 he froen pia in-
dustry, however, ap-
pears caught up in a
counter-movement.
Just the other day it
was revealed that an
a g e n c y o the
Agriculture Depart-
ment is preparing to
issue the federal
government's first piz-
za standards.
These criteria would
establish such things as
the minimum amount
of pepperoni needed to
qualify a frozen dough
disc as pepperoni pizza.
Ten percent, the
government says, and
that certainly seems a
reasonable pepperoni
ratio to me. But the
question is: How does
President-elect Reagan
feel about it&
Somewhere in that
vast transition
machinery the Reagan
people have established
� somewhere in that
multitude of advisory
committees � there
presumably is a pizza
expert.
It could be that after
weighting all of the
facts and figures �
balancing the
mushrooms against the
mozzarella or whatever
� Reagan's pizza ad-
visers will come forth
with alternative recom-
mendations.
The Regan ad-
ministration, for exam-
ple, might favor 6 per-
cent pepperoni, or even
15 percent pepperoni.
Or it might be against
any type of pizza
regulation at all.
I have placed several
queries but have not yet
learned what, if
anything, Reagan did
about pizzas when he
was governor of
California. During the
campaign, however, he
came across as anti-
regulation, if not anti-
pepperoni.
He often spoke o'
"getting the govern-
ment off the people's
backs Surely that
could be taken to mean
he would have grave
reservations about get-
ting the government in-
to people's pizza pies.
Make no mistake
about it. The proposed
requirement that frozen
pizza sold in interstate
commerce must meet
certain labeling stan-
dards may sound in-
nocuous enough. In-
deed, to some pizza-
lovers it might even
sound salubrious.
But anyone at all
familiar with the
regulatory pattern can
tell you that issuance of
standands is only the
first step.
If regulation reaches
the ultimate, we will see
the creation of a
Federal Pizza Commis-
sion to enforce the rules
on sausage topping,
tomato paste content,
etc.

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Geologists Conduct Summer Fieldwork
ECU Profs Study Minerals
On windy days a bell
rings, says the legend of
the Sierra Campana
("Mountains of the
Bell") of Mexico, but
two geologists from
East Carolina Universi-
ty who have studied the
rocky terrain for
several years have set
to hear it. Instead, their
thoughts are turned to
geological instruments
and to analysis of the
rich mineral resources
of the region.
Dr. Richard L.
Mauger and Dr.
Richard K. Spruill,
ECU professors and
geochemisis, have con-
ducted summer
fieldwork in the moun-
tains near Chihuahua
City since 1973.
In those years they
have surveyed an entire
mountain range and
although they have not
discovered the bell that
legend says was taken
by Indians from a
Spanish mission and
erected in the moun-
tains centuries ago.
they have analyzed
numerous rock samples
and have constructed
geological maps of a
mountain range. Their
expertise is well known
to the Mexicans.
"There is nobody
else that knows as
much about the
g e oIo g y of the
Chihuahua City region
as we do simply
because we've been
there longer than
anybody else and we've
maintained a very
coherent project over a
long period of time
says Dr. Spruill.
On the basis of their
background and
research, the two
geologists were recently
selected by URAMFX,
a government agency
involved in uranium ex-
ploration to conduct a
seminar for Mexican
geologists on inter-
preting how volcanic
rocks may be related to
deposits of uranium
ore.
The program was
held Nov. 3-8 in
Chihuahua City and in-
cluded fieldwork and
lectures by Mauger and
Spruill on the geology
of that part of Mexico,
particularly the Sierra
Pena Blanca (White
Mountains). The
deposit of uranium in
this area, according to
the geologists, may
turn out to be one of
the larger deposits in
the Western
Hemisphere.
"We are very
familiar with the ages
of the rocks, the
chemistry of the rocks
and the geological pro-
cesses that produced
the rocks. To operate
an exploration pro-
gram, these are the sort
of things one needs to
know. The Mexican
geologists were very in-
terested in talking to us
about our work said
Spruill.
He said Mexico's in-
terest in uranium min-
ing is a recent develop-
ment brought on bv an
increase in worldwide
demand. Uranium is
used primarily by
nuclear generating
plants.
The area where the
ECU geologists are
focusing their research
is in the north central
region of Mexico in the
state of Chihuahua. Its
capital. Chihuahua Ci-
ty, is a highly in-
dustrialized metropolis
with more than 500,000
residents and is the
fourth largest city in
Mexico. It is about 225
miles south of El Paso,
Tex.
Chihuahua has abun-
dant mineral depostis
besides uranium. Its
lead, zinc and silver
mines are among the
richest in Mexico.
Some of these mines
may have been worked
by Indians at the time
of the Spanish Con-
quest.
ECU's interest in the
region began in 1973
when Mauger visited
Chihuahua to explore
Finishing Touches Begin
In Robert Garwood Trial
CAMP 1 I .11 I l
(UPI) � Prosecutors
Tuesday will begin put-
ting the finishing
touches on their case
against Marine Pfc.
Robert R. Garwood
with additional
testimony from
Vietnam-era POWs �
including a former
Vietnamese soldier.
After a s i x - d a y
recess, Garwood's
court-martial resumes
with prosecutors
predicting they will
wrap up their case next
week against the only
Vietnam-era s e i
vtceman charged with
joining the enemy.
"We really have very
little left to do said
Maj. Werner Hellmer,
the chief prosecutoi.
I e Dinh Quy, a
prisoner of the Viet
Cong during the late
1960s, is scheduled to
testify Tuesday, and is
expected to basically
corroborate the
testimony of the seven
ex-POWs who have
preceded him on the
stand.
Garwood is charged
with desertion, col-
laboration with the
enemy, making pro-
paganda statements
and misconduct as a
POW by striking and
verbally assaulting
POWs. He could be
sentenced to life in
prison if convicted.
So far, eight former
servicemen, seven of
them ex-pows, have
testified during sj days
of trial, accusing Gar-
wood of joining forces
with the Viet Cong in a
series of jungle POW
samps located outside
Da Nang in the mid to
late 1960s.
Essentially their
stories have been the
same that Garwood
lived among the Viet
Cong as a comrade,
carrying a weapon, and
boasting of holding a
political rank
equivalent to second
lieutenant in the com-
munist Army. Ihev
have also accused him
oi presiding over
political indoctrination
courses, interrogating
POWs for the Viet
Cong and standing
guard over his fellow
Americans.
the
In addition to Quy,
government has
scheduled Marine
Corps Lt. Col. John A.
Studds, Garwood's
company commander
when he disappeared
outside Danang, as a
witness.
$74.95
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the volcanic rock for-
mations of the Sierra
del Nido-Calera. He
learned then, that little
in the way of scientific
geological research had
been conducted.
In ensuing summers,
Mauger and Spruill,
along with graudate
students from ECU,
mapped large parts of a
mountain range 140
miles long and 40 miles
wide. Rock types and
geologic ages have been
studied and chemical
studies of the major
and trace elements have
been completed. The
research has been fund-
ed by nearly $100,000
in grants from the Na-
tional Science Founda-
tion (NSF) and by
smaller amounts from
the Mexican govern-
ment.
The ECU geologists
say they will continue
to assist Mexico by pro-
viding information
about their research.
Several cooperative
projects between the
two groups are in the
planning stages. In ad-
dition, U RAM EX has
indicated that at least
one of its geologists
would like to attend
ECU for further study.
A member of the
ECU Faculty since
1969, Mauger holds
degrees from the
California Institute of
Technology and the
University of Arizona.
His major fields of in-
terest are petrology and
geochemistry.
Spruill, a native of
William st on, N.C
joined the faculty in
1979. He holds' an
undergraduate and
master's degree from
East Carolina Universi-
ty and the PhD in
geochemistry from the
University of North
Carolina at Chapel
Hill.
Dr. Richard Mauger and Dr. Richard Spruill Study Map
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Qftft SEaat (Earnltmatt
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Chris Lichok. &����
Terry Herndon, &� mwimh Lisa Drew, � ,��,
Jimmy Dupree, �& Paul Collins ���
David Severin, qkiMm va� Charles Chandler, m eaw�
Anita Lancaster, wui .��. mm David Norris, �.�� bk�
December
1980
Opinion
Page 4
Jones Cafeteria
Meyer Sets For Improvements
For years it has been routinely
passed on from one incoming group
oi' students to another that one of
the most unpleasant dining ex-
periences in Greenville is East
Carolina's own Jones Cafeteria.
While no reports of death or
poisoning from consumption of
matter from this establishment ex-
ists, it is still regarded as a last resort
at meal time.
Elmer Meyer, vice chancellor for
student life is out to destroy that
myth and restore faith in Jones
Cafeteria. With the assistance of a
designer from the Atlanta office of
Serv-O-Mation, Meyer has recently
unveiled plans to revamp the
cafeteria.
Present plans call for complete
refurbishing of the furniture, with
partitions to be utilized to enhance
the atmosphere and to eliminate the
high school cafeteria motif current-
ly in use. According to Meyer, only
minor details of the proposed
changes were suggested after an
open meeting with students and
faculty prior to Thanksgiving.
With everyone in agreement that
Jones Cafeteria needs a facelift,
there can only be one further step to
be taken: execution of an excellent
plan of action.
Meyer would prefer to work
directly through the Serv-O-Mation
Corporation in making the pur-
chases and labor, but such may not
be the case. As with any state-
funded organization or institution,
rules and guidelines of procedure
call for bids to be submitted when
outside contract work is to be per-
formed.
At a cost of $50-75,000
"depending on the cost of labor
Jones Cafeteria will be one of the
most modern campus dining
facilities in the state. Funding, ac-
cording to Meyer, is not the pro-
blem. Reserves from previous din-
ing facility allocations will cover the
cost of renovation if that is the
desired method of payment.
The big problem at this time, is
time. Meyer estimates that it will be
at least 1982 before any changes will
take place, but adds it could be as
late as 1983.
A food service consultant ex-
plained that when deciding on
where to eat, most people consider
atmosphere the most important fac-
tor, followed by service and the
quality of the food. With this in
mind, it can be assumed that the im-
provements to the cafeteria would
increase revenue as well as populari-
ty.
"We're making progress and we
want to continue says Meyer en-
thusiastically.
That sort of enthusiasm often
goes unrecognized for one reason or
the other. If it should happen that
the plans to facelift Jones Cafeteria
falter and are never executed, it will
not be the fault of Vice-Chancellor
Elmer Meyer, for history will record
that he is the individual who got the
ball rolling and showed concern for
the students of East Carolina
University.
ECU Journalism
Meets Opposition
The ECU administration has for-
warded a proposal to the UNC
Board of Governors for the creation
of a department of communica-
tions. If adopted the new depart-
ment would offer degrees in print
journalism and broadcasting,
something students have been ask-
ing for.
Unfortunately, as it has always
been, the infamous News and
Observer of Raleigh has found fault
with creating any new departments
or degrees at ECU.
In a recent editorial the N&O at-
tacked the program as unnecessary
"duplication translated that
means that they don't want any
school in the state to offer jour-
nalism degrees except for their
beloved "Carolina
It should be duly noted that the
publisher of the N&O, his father
who is the chairman of the board,
and his grandfather, Josephus
Daniels, who founded the N&O, are
all graduates of Chapel Hill.
We can probably expect more op-
position from the big papers in the
Piedmont and possibly from the
educational hierarchy in Chapel
Hill.
The fact is that the program
would not duplicate the efforts of
the journalism school at Chapel
Hill. Their program is concentrated
in teaching theory. In contrast, the
ECU program would teach
"shirtsleeve" journalism; how to
write, edit, design pages, and other
day to day working tasks.
The need for such a program is
acute. If UNC continues to have the
only journalism degree in the state,
then many potential newspaper and
broadcasting students may never
realize their career dreams.
What about the student who live
in Pitt, Lenoir, Martin or Beaufort
Counties that cannot afford to go
away from home to school. If they
want to study journalism or broad-
casting they are just out of luck.
What about the student who may
have no interest or desire in going to
school in Chapel Hill. Do not these
students deserve the same oppor-
tunity that is made available to
those who choose to attend the big
school in Orange County.
The N&O alleges that there
already exists an overcrowded
market and that there is no need for
anymore journalism graduates than
are already being turned out at
Chapel Hill. There may be an
overabundance of journalists in the
Triangle, but just ask eastern
editors and publishers what a hard
time they have getting reporters.
Frequently the eastern editors call
ECU journalism professors asking,
sometimes begging for journalism
students. There is not an over-
crowded market here, quite to the
contrary, there exists almost a shor-
tage. That shortage, combined with
the desire of many ECU students to
pursue a journalism degree, is the
primary reason for creating a com-
munications department here.
At present a student can get a
minor in either journalism or broad-
casting. What we need is an expand-
ed program that offers a major.
The administration and faculty
have put together a good program
proposal, which we wholeheartedly
support.
Now the administration must per-
sist in getting approval for the pro-
gram from the Board of Governors.
It may be an uphill fight, but in the
end the rewards will be well worth
the fight.
A2U1&KX&
�IT SURE IS NICE TO SEE THEM C0U.E6E STUDENTS BEHAVING THEMSE1VES AGMH �
Campus Forum
Karr's Decision Opposed
Athletic Director Ken Karr's decision
to drop wrestling and field hockey has
stirred up one of the greatest controver-
sies in the history of East Carolina, and
rightly so. This controversy centers on
one thing that Ken Karr or Chancellor
Thomas Brewer cannot know or ap-
preciate about this school�and that is
its tradition.
East Carolina has had national
notoriety in the past for such things as
partying and hell-raising. ECU has
worked very hard to live down those
things by turning the school into one of
the highesl respected academic univer-
sities in the state, thanks to Dr. Leo
Jenkins. Recently our athletic programs
reached national notoriety when our
football team turned in the greatest
rushing year ever and was ranked second
in the nation for its efforts. But East
Carolina has another athletic team that
has been in the national limelight since
1970.
Coach John Welbourn turned a young
wrestling program into a dominating
power in the Southeast. His teams won
numerous tournaments en route to five
Southern Conference championships,
thus earning him the Most Outstanding
Coach award several times from his
peers in the Southern Conference. It was
a great loss to the sport of wrestling, and
the program here as well, when he
resigned from coaching to become Assis-
tant Athletic Director.
After two years of struggling, the
wrestling program was on its wav up
again under Ed Steers when it was
rumored that wrestling was destined to
end at ECU. Losing a fine coach like
Steers was not too tough when a new
wrestling coach was hired that had as
much, if not more, potential to build a
great wrestling program at ECU again.
Hachiro Oishi is perhaps the fines!
wrestler in the sport next to Dan Gable
and his coming here gave us the boos; we
needed. And now, after team spirit and
confidence were flying high, the carpel
was pulled out beneath us after training
and conditioning for months.
The opportunity is here to regain
some of that lost tradition but two
members o this administration who
never knew what East Carolina was real-
ly like, either do not want it to happen or
just do not care. Thanks alot.
DAVID JEROSE
Mendenhall Solution
I believe that it should be brought to
your attention the thievery that has been
happening in Mendenhall Student
Center. More articles have been stolen
from Mendenhall in this semester than
in its prior six years ol existei
ticlcs stolen have included: 2 b
lamps, patio furniture, art work. 2
chairs, and 2 student director!)
idents. ,K1 UP I his is
money thai has been taken from a
that all students should be able t
f you see something susj .port
it to the information
Mendenhall. If not, we, th
will not be able to enjoy our
Center. It the stealing continues, student
fees may rise again come Fa
It you ha v sugg
me this problem, contact
Dean Alexander oi I esl
in Mendenhall.
M R1A P. ZIGOVSK
V
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes
expressing all
t drop
Building, acn
f " purposes
must includt (ht ame, ma �
clc � . addrt ss, pi
and signatun he auth
Green Draws Praise
For Paper Guidance
By ROBERT M. SVVAIM
snmr Miff Vlrmbrr
To many students the name Richard
Green may not ring any bells. He is the
"retiring" general manager of this
newspaper; the ninth person to head the
paper since 1 joined the staff in 1976.
Richard, a native of Charleston, South
Carolina, came to us in August, 1979.
We were having our annual ritualistic
staff organization meeting about two mon-
ths before school started to plan the first
edition that would come out on registra-
tion day. As usual, we were woefully shor-
thanded. Richard was an unknown to us.
He popped in with the features editor. Bill
Jones, who had come across Richard one
day while eating lunch at McDonalds.
So we all gathered in the ad office to lay
out the plans for the first paper. I have
always been wary of strangers, so 1 was
quick to inquire as to who this unfamiliar
face was. 1 was told that he would be join-
ing our staff as the assistant features
editor.
Well within four weeks he became the
managing editor, quite a feat for someone
who had never worked here before and
didn't have any connections with the staff
hierarchy.
We were all stunned at Richard's
knowledge of newspaper work, his writing
ability, and his mastery of photography.
He quickly became the shining star on our
staff. Never before had someone shown
such energy; he was a workaholic.
All of us old timers on the staff were us-
ed to pulling 24-hour shifts for two and
three days at a time, and we doubted that a
newcomer could hang in there when it was
time to put the proverbial shoulder to the
wheel and the nose to the grindstone.
There must be a bit of a masochist in
Richard, because not only did he hang with
the best of us, he actually seemed to enjoy
it.
He took on the work of five people and
constantly looked for something else to do
when he had finished his required tasks.
Richard became more than a co-worker
to us. He was our friend. He possesses a
flair for life, love and laughter that warm-
ed all of us when the drudgery of work and
school would get to us. Men of strong will
and character are difficult to come by these
days; a real rarity. In Richard we found a
leader and a comrade.
He became my most trusted confidant
and counselor. He lifted many oi my
burdens and made life bearable when it
seemed that the whole world was crumbl-
ing around us.
This somewhat haughty Charlestonian
was the new blood with fresh ideas that the
paper was lacking. He had a commanding
presence, yet he could motivate any and all
of us with just a request or suggestion.
His success could be attributed in large
part to the loyalty and devotion of the
staff.
As mentioned earlier, I have seen
general managers come and go, eight oi
them before Richard. Some were good,
some were bad, some were mediocre;
Richard will be remembered as the one
who brought us credibility and a sense oi
purpose.
He was, perhaps, the most conservative
boss we have ever had. He has a high sense
of principle and a keen set of values.
He was unafraid to challenge and ques-
tion our institutions and the powers that
be. At the same time he was not a radical
crusader.
Many a night we would burn the mid
night oil over a beer at the Tree House in
informal bull sessions where we would
brainstorm. Those quaint gatherings oi the
staff were often the scene of major strategy
and long range planning for the paper.
That was Richard's style. It was alwavs a
"let's relax and figure this out" at-
mosphere. From the Regency dining room
of the Raddison Plaza in Charlotte, to the
bars of the old slave market in Charleston,
to Pantana Bobs, Richard led the staff in
the most progressive direction the paper
has ever seen.
Richard Green is first and foremost a
newspaper man who has a clear grasp oi
the total newspaper concept. He was a
humorist, an editorial write a computer
technician, a graphics expert, and an ex
sional advisor to the Jid department. He
possessed a knowledge ol and an interest in
all phases and operations the
newspaper, and was genuinely concerned
with the welfare of each individual staff
member.
To the public, he was low key and
modest. He refused to be a politician or a
lobbyist, a role he felt was beneath
dignity oi his position, and rightly so.
I recall an evening at the Grove Park Inn
in Asheville last July when we had the oc-
casion to sip a tew scotch and waters and
rub elbows with the high and mighty ol the
North Carolina Press Association.
It was in the wee hours of the morning
and we were all in our cups. I here was
Walter Phillips, outgoing president of the
VC. Press Association, Frank Daniels,
publisher oi The News and Observer, and
several other powerful publishers. Being
the only people there under 40 years oi
age, we were the center ol attention.
1 remember Mr. Phillips telling Richard.
"Son, you're very bright He then turned
to his colleagues and said "Mark my
words, gentlemen, one dav we will hear
about this bov. He's going to be a great
success in the newspaper business. He'll go
all the wav to the lop
Those newspaper moguls don't usually
hand out compliments 50 readily. 1 believe
that their prophesv about Richard will be a
reality somewhere down the toad.
Richard will leave behind a legacy ol ac-
complishment at The Eastarolinian that
is unparalleled. His mark can be seen in the
quality of the paper. The first and only
stylebook the paper has even had was writ-
ten entirely by Richaid. It will serve as a
guide foi those who till out shoes long
after we are gone
It is impossible in print to relate to our
readers the magnitude oi his contributions
to the paper. Let it suffice to say that he
did one hell of a job, the likes of which we
will probably never see again.
Indeed my friends, we will hear of
Richard Green again.
f
0
t his studt nt
tor .t t)�.
Cin
inte
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llli I AST CAROLINIAN
Features
1)1 C l MM K2, lsh()
Pate S
Modern-Day Witches
Don't Fit Stereotype
Sharing A Drink
This student is generous!) sharing her coke with a canine friend. A cup is an inconvenient drinking container
for a dog, hut this one doesn't seem to mind.
Cinema Society Returns
When you hear the word
"witch what image comes to
mind? Your girlfriend's roommate?
Or maybe a certain professor? In all
probability, you picture an old hag
with green skin, a pointy nose with a
wart on the end, and an evil cackle,
a kind of Wizard of Oz-type
character.
If this is your perception of what
a witch is, then keep reading,
because this article may change your
mind.
Recently, I went to the National
Wicca Headquarters in New Bern in
pursuit of the Real Witch, and I un-
covered some pretty amazing facts.
I spoke to Skip Tarrant and Kathy
DeLaney, two very interesting,
modern-day witches. In all honesty,
I have to admit that I went to New
Bern expecting all kinds of strange
goings-on, but when I left there, my
whole attitude had changed. Skip
and Kathy are very normal, in-
telligent people with whom I en-
Includes Films By Truffaut, Others
The Cinema Society of Greenville
is being revived. Some of you may
remember or were members o the
Society a couple of years ago; for
others, this may be an introduction.
Eithei was, we hope that you will be
interested in the new and exciting
offerings of the Cinema Society in
conjunction with Mcndenhal! Stu
dent Center for the spring of 1981.
This year, instead of using
Jenkins Art Theatre, we will be
showing the films in Hendrix
Theatre in Mendenhall Student
Center on the last Carolina Univer-
sity campus. Seating in this theatre
is welt-designed and comfortable,
and parking facilities near the
theatre are plentiful. Each film
showing will be followed by a short
discussion over coffee and
refreshments for anyone interested.
The spring offerings include wide-
ly acclaimed current features as well
.b some film classics, and encom-
pass a broad range of international
stvles. The lineup for the season is:
January IS. The Marriage oj
Muna Braun (German)Directed by
Ranier Werner I assbmder. 1978.
This is the most spectacular product
of Fassbinder's career and probably
of the New German Cinema as well.
Mixing soap opera, sexual politics,
offbeat comedy, epic romance, cur-
rent history, social satire and period
piece, this story of a prodigious
heroine who mobilizes herself up-
ward while waiting for her long-lost
soldier-husband is a metaphor tor
the defeat, rise, growing pains, and
ultimate fate o postwar Germany.
The star, Hanna SchyguUa, "raises
screen acting to a new level of sexual
knowineness
February 8, Jules and Jim
(France) Directed by Francois Truf-
faut, 1961. This lyrical vision of a
three-sided love affair is one of the
all-time cinema classics and an ex-
cellent introduction both to the
work of Truffaut and to the
cinematic innovations of the French
New Wave. Jeanne Moreau's il-
luminating performance as the
capricious, exuberant woman
shared by two friends is one of her
most memorable. Oskar Werner
and Henri Serre are perfect as the
friends who become her husband
and her lover in this buoyant
celebration of life.
March l, The lady KUlers
(Britain) Directed by Alexander
Mackendrick, I955. A product of
the legendary Ealing Studios, this is
a sophisticated lampoon of the
traditional gangster films of the
1930s. The film is a delightful con-
coction of humor, suspense, and
satire, and ranks as one of the all-
time greats of British film comedy.
With Peter Sellers, and starring Alec
Guinness as the leader of the most
improbable gang of crooks im-
aginable in one of the performances
that earned Guinness a special
Academy Award for his contribu-
tion to film.
March 22, Orpheus (France)
Directed by Jean Cocteau, 1949.
Cocteau's modern retelling of the
Orpheus-Eurydice myth treats the
conflict between the real world and
the world of imagination and the
unknown. A spellbinding fantasy,
the film is a remarkable blend of
magic and realism, executed with
brilliant special effects, and offers
an exploration of cinematic techni-
que as well as the role of the artist.
Starring Jean Marais and Maria
Casares.
April 26, Get Out 'our Handker-
chiefs (France Belgium) Directed by
Bertrand Blier, 1978. A love story
and a buddy movie, this is a comedy
of the new morality with a classical
charm. Raoul will do anything to
make his wife happy including fin-
ding a potential loser to lift her out
of depression. The resulting confu-
sion provides an unusual twist on
the Oedipal theme, and leads to a
Campus Capsules:
Goings-On At
Other Universities
FIVE-MINUTE BACKRUBS
were offered by student nurses at
San Diego State U. as a way of rais-
ing money. The backrubs were sold
in the student center for $.50. The
only problem was explaining to
students the difference between a
backrub and a massage, say the stu-
dent nurses.
PARENTS are one source that
four out of five Stanford U.
students turn to for advice on career
planning, a new survey shows. Nine
out of 10 Stanford juniors also seek
parental guidance on personal pro-
blems, says the survey. Students
consider parental advice on their
careers more important as juniors
than they did as sophomores, but
tend to seek less advice on course
selection the longer they are in
school.
MORE WOMEN STUDENTS
are headed toward business and pro-
fessional careers, according to a
College Board study of high school
seniors. The report describes
characteristics of the one million
seniors who took the Scholastic Ap-
titude Test. For the first time in that
test's history, more women than
men (18.8 percent vs. 18.5 percent)
expressed interest in business and
commerce as a major field of study.
Women are also studying
mathematics in high school more
and have a rapidly growing interest
in graduate degrees, says the report.
Average SAT scores continue to
decline, the report adds.
OFFICIALS CANCELLED a
blues and jazz festival at Grand
Valley State College because of
serious problems with alcohol con-
trol. Despite a campus ban on liquor
consumption, many of those atten-
ding the festival brought alcohol,
and college officials say they are
concerned about the school's legal
liability should an intoxicated
festival-goer be injured.
A REFRIGERATOR USER'S
FEE was imposed this year in Nor-
thern Illinois U. dormitories to
cover the cost of additional utility
use. Residence HaM officials found,
however, that collection of the
$17.50 annual fee was an ad-
ministrative nightmare and may
See GOING, page 6, col. 1
startling and touching climax. The
overwhelming hit of the New York
Film Festival. Starring Gerard
Depardieu, Carole I aure and
Patrick Dewaere.
May 3, The Last Wave (Australia)
Directed by Peter Weir, 1978. A
mesmerizing thriller about the
supernatural, this eerie film com-
bines dazzling photography with a
story of primeval powers clashing
with the modern yvorld. Richard
See CINEMA, page 6, col. 7
joyed talking.
First of all, let's clarify what Wic-
ca is. The word itself is Keltic (not
Celtic) in origin. Its literal transla-
tion means "the wise or the wise
ones Wiccacraft, or witchcraft, is,
obviously, the craft of the wise.
Skip told me that Wicca is "the sur-
vival of the religion of the pie-
Roman British Isles and all wit-
chcraft is today, basically, is a
religion no different than Chris
tianity or Judism. In America, there
are over 2,000 active members of the
school of Wicca�people studying
to become witches�which is not
alot, but the number is growing.
One of the misconceptions about
witchcraft is that most people think
it to be synonymous with Satanism,
the worship of Satan. Nothing is
further from the truth, however, as
Wiccans cannot practice Satanism
because in Wiccan religion there is
no evil diety. Witches do believe in a
creator diety which parallels the
Christian God. They also believe in
all gods of all civilizations, such as
Zeus, the Greek god, Isis, the Egyp-
tian god, and so on.
Another basic tenet of witchcraft
is something called the Wiccan reed
(a wise saying). "This is the closest
thing to a law we have said Skip.
It is the basis of all Wiccan
philosophy. The saying says, "An
(if) at harm none, do what you
will How's that for a yvise saying?
This basically means that you are
free to do anything as long as it
doesn't harm yourself or others.
The last tenet of witchcraft is the
Principal of the Sacred Pentafaen.
(The Sacred What, you say?) Penta-
faen is Welsh for hearthstone. In
ancient times the hearth was the
center of the home where common
religious observances were held, and
this still holds true tor Wiccans to-
day. They believe that a man's home
is his temple and witches hold their
rites in their home, not at a church
or another building of the like. Wit-
ches prefer to hold their rites outside
in the woods or in a clearing, but the
house is the next best thing.
These tenets are adhered to
generally by most witches, but Skip
told me that the one distinguishing
characteristic of Witchcraft is that it
is "intensely individualistic The
Wiccans are a loosely organized
group of people who share, more or
less, the same ideas. There is no cen-
tral authority in witchcraft ;s there
is with the Pope and Catholicism.
1 here are older, more experienced
members called Elders, but the title
is simply honorary with no authori-
ty-
Witches are interested in only life
forces, not death and negative ac-
tions as some people would believe.
"We are interested in making our
arena a better place, not in destroy-
ing others Kathy said.
I know you're ready to hear about
some of the mystical magic practices
witches do, so I'll get on to that.
1 irst of all, witches have certain
tools they use to practice magic,
some of which are the famous
crystal ball ("I'm not very good at
it Skip commented.), the pen-
dulum, Tarot cards, pyramid
power, herbalism, divining, magic
circles, and meditation. While my
friends and I were visiting Skip and
Kathy, Skip showed us a tiny
pyramid that had a piece of fresh
hamburger inside it. The strange
thing was that the meat had been in-
side the pyramid for seven years,
and it wasn't nasty or rotten, thus il-
lustrating the weird power of the
pyramid.
Witches also approach marriage
in a unique way. They believe mar-
riage shouldn't be "a life sentence
so they take out contracts which
usually last for nine years or less and
can be renewed at the end of that
time, if the couple wants to. Before
a contract can be entered into.
See MODERN. paBe 6, col. 1
Effective Spraying And A Little Cleaning
Can Help Eliminate Your Pest Problems
Roaches are probably the most
common of household pests. If
you've never seen one, they vary in
color (light broyvn to black) and in
size. They have smooth, shiny-
bodies, long antennae, and a very
unpleasant odor. They like warm,
dark, moist places and cannot be
eliminated by simply stepping on
them. Where there's one. there're
more.
Basically, there are two types of
effective pesticides: space sprays
(you use them on flies and mos-
quitoes) and surface sprays. A sur-
face spray attacks the crawling bugs
by leaving a deadly deposit that
keeps on working after it dries. This
means you've got to put it in the
bug's path, especially where it
comes in.
Of course, all pesticides are tox-
ic�they have to be to kill the bugs.
But, the ones you can buy commer-
cially are no real threat to you or
your pets (pets hate the smell) unless
you mishandle them. Pesticides
should never be used on or around
food.
The cockroach, who has survived
assaults since primitive times, is one
of the most difficult insects to kill.
But, it can be done, with a surface
spray that contains either diazinon,
baygon or dursban.
You've got to spray where they
live, not just at random. That means
getting up under the sink, around
the edges of the tub, around any
pipes that come into your apart-
ment, and any other dark, warm
place. You'll need to spray twice.
about a week apart, to make sure
any eggs that hatch don't cause you
new problems all over again.
Ants are easier to kill, mainly
because they come out in the
daytime where you can fight them
head-on. Space sprays�and taking
their food away�should do the job.
There are a number ot ways to at-
tack spiders. You can use a space ot
surface spray that contains
malathion or ronnel. It's a round-
about way, but you can also attack
their food source�other in-
sects�and they'll be on their way to
better hunting grounds.
If you suspect that something's
been nibbling away at your linens,
clothes, or bookbindings, start
looking for silverfish. You can kill
them with surface sprays that con-
tain baygon or diazinon. Spray
where they're attacking and around
the baseboards and plumbing.
Since October 1, 1977, North
Carolina apartment dwellings have
been governed by a new law which
imposes certain responsibilities on
both the landlord and the tenant.
Apartment tenants have the duty to
pay rent and keep the premises in a
clean and livable condition. The
landlord's duty is "to provide fit
premises North Carolina statutes
define fit premises as compliance
"with the current applicable
building and housing codes
Hard Work, Smokes
Make Long Life For
Brazil Centenarians
1 rf V
A Walk In The Woods
Perhaps on the nay to a class, this student strolls through the woods
on a sunny fall day.
(UPI)�Want to live a long life? 1 he
secret appears to lie in plenty of
hard farm labor, a skimpy diet and
consumption of harsh, coiled tobac-
co.
In Brazil, a government census
has discovered a man of 142, a
woman of 134 and a couple who
have lived together for 97 years.
"I'll still live another 20 years
said Francisco Pereira, 142.
Pereira's youngest daughter,
Djanira, born when he yvas 1(K),
looks atter him on his small home
beside a river in the southern state
of Parana, yvhere he sells eggs and
chickens.
"He eats just about everything
Djanira said.
But Pereira contradicted his
daughter. He does not eat pork,
rice, salt or honey.
Beef is fine, Pereira said, but
right now it's a little too expensive
for him, so he lives mainly on a por-
ridge of corn flour and w heat. Black
beans also are among his favorite
foods.
Oldersters Liberato and Maria
Araujo claim the title of Brazil's
longest-surviving couple. They have
been together for 97 years in the in-
terior of Rio de Janeiro state.
Araujo described his ideal
diet �which he can't afford any
longer�as beans, coffee, flour,
crisp pork rind, lots of vegetables,
dried meat, sugar cane syrup and
sugar cane juice.
Pereira and Araujo both smoke,
and in that they're joined by Ana
Maria de Jesus, who, at 134, is listed
as Brazil's oldest woman. She lives
quietly in an old folks' home in the
interior, where one of her favorite
pleasures is her pipe.
"In the early days we just bought
a box of matches, lit up our pipes
and smoked all we liked she said.
Pereira's favorite is a hand-rolled
cigarette made of the same oily
black twisted tobacco that de Jesus
puts in her pipe. It looks like a coil
of messy rope. Traditionally,
Brazilian peasants have smoked this
tobacco flaked and rolled in a piece
of corn leaf.
Araujo also likes his corn-paper
smokes, together with a glass of
cachaca�raw Brazilian rum�for
which he walks to the bar in the
nearby town each morning.

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Cinema Society Returns
Continued from page 5
Chamberlain start as an Australian
lawyer whose defense ol five
aborigines accused of ritual murder
involves him in a series of bizarre
and inexplicable experiences with
the spirit world. A fine example ol
the new Australian cinema, which is
earning a growing international
reputation.
All films will be show n on Sunday
afternoons at 2:00. Attendance at
all turns is b subscription member-
ship onl . The cost of a subscription
to all six films is ten dollars and
must be purchased b Decembei 20.
For further information, contact
Glen Brewstei 01 Karen Btansfieid
at the English department ol I a I
Carolina University (757-0641).
Goings-On At Other Schools
Continued from page 5
consider including the
refrigeratoi rental fee
in room and board bills
in the future.
1111 P H O E
HI 1 I S I NPA1D b U.
of Soul h Carolina
students cost the
Southern Bell Co.
$12,000 last year, say
officials. Nearlj 8,000
I S c' students use
special card accounts
charging long-
distance telephone calls
and phone company
spokesmen say some of
those students are steal-
ing phone time by giv-
ing the wrong account
number to long-
distance operators.
TOMMY TROJAN
may be the symbol of
skill and courage for I
of Southern California
students, but he ducks
into a plastic and can-
vas shroud each year
before the USC-l Cl.A
tootball game. The life-
size bronze statue o a
1 rojan warrioi. which
recently celebrated its
fiftieth birthday, used
to suffer the almost an-
nual indignity of a blue
and gold paint job by
UCLA students.
AN AD-
MINISTRATIVE
ORD1-R thai all hotel
rooms reserved for this
year's Notre Dame U.
senior formal be single
sex has students there
complaining. Ad-
ministration officials
ruled that when seniors
travel to Chicago for
the annual weekend, all
hotel rooms must be
reserved by members of
the same sex.
400 SURGICAL
MASKS were purchas-
ed by College of
William and Mary
science students and
handed out to students
entering one classroom
building. The masks
were used to call atten-
tion to the alleged
presence of dangerous
asbestos in the
building.
ATYTir GALLOWS GIFTI
l I I II GALLERY
SALE!
3rd.
7th.
Modern-Day Witches
Don 9t Fit Stereotype
The Happy Store
OPEN 24 HOURS
Ask About
"Mark it up club"
Keg and Ice
delivery reservations
REG. SALEI
ATTIC T-SHIRTS $3.50 $2 4(
BASEBALL SHIRTS$4.00 $2 81
ATTIC MUGS $5.00 $3.3
ATTIC KEY CHAINS NORMAL-
LY 75C ARE FREE WITH A
$10.00 PURCHASE. ALL OTHER
ITEMS REDUCED 33V3.
WED. 3rd FABULLOUS KNOBS
,with THE G1LFTTF
GOOD HUMOR
FRI. 5th.
K
SAT. 6th
SUN. 7th.
W HH 3-30-7-nfl
-THE STATES,
PENDULUM1:
( m tinned from page 5
vever, the couple must live
togethei for a year and a day in
order to be totally sure that they
want to be married. The ceremony
itsell is called a Hanfest, and it is
performed by a priest and a
priestess
now you're probably
inated and want to know how to
become a witch, right? Well, first ot
all. you have to have an interview
with a member of Wicca in which
you discuss your religious and
philosophical views. It your beliefs
contradictory to those of
witchcraft's, then too bad; get
yourself another teacher in wit-
chcraft. If not, then you must go
through a year and a day of study of
the beliefs, practices, and
philosophies of witchcraft and have
deep discussions with your Wiccan
teacher. This includes the hows of
witchcraft; the tools needed and the
magical procedures. Then you go
through an initiation, a rebirth into
the Wiccan way of life. At this in-
itiation you choose a new name
which reveals something about you.
Anybody interested? Don't
worry�Wicca is not a cult in the
sense of the Moonies or People's
Temple. You are free to come and
go and do whatever you please as a
witch. As Skip said, "Witches are
not out to shock people. What most
witches want is to be left alone and
the freedom to practice our own
religion Personally, 1 was
fascinated by these people and their
philosophies. Who knows? 1 might
just run off and join them.
Pizza Inn
AMERICAS FAVORITE PIZZA
m
PIZZA BUFFET
ALL THE PIZZA AND
SALAD YOU CAN EAT
$2.59
MonFrl. 11:30 2:00
Mon. & Tues. 6:00-8:00
758-6266 Evening buffet 82.7A
Hwy 264 bypass Greenville . N. C
LA KOSMETIQUE
Unisex Salon
Announces
Bob Slade
Specializing In
Total Hair Care For
The Black Woman
Consultations On TuesWed.
By Appointment Only
Fermadyl Relaxers
Jeri Curl
California Curls
Call
752-3419
Master Charge Visa
Hour 8:30-7:00
Mon. Thru Sat.
and
"Super Grit Cowboy Band"
Terry Forrest Show
with the Coulters
Thursday, December 4,1980
Urban Cowboy Night
$100.00 cash-1st place $50.00 cash-2nd place
for the
Best Looking Cowboy and Cowgirl Couple
Show Starts At 8:00 p.mUntil
$5.50-Advance Ticket for Students (with I.D.)
$7.00 All Other At Door
Wright Auditorium
East Carolina University
Sponsored by East Carolina University
Student Union Special Concert Committee
Greenville, N.C.
WET T-SHIRT
TONIGHT
AT THE
EEKI9
AND IT'S LADIES NIGHT
SPONSORED BY SIGMA TAU GAMMA
1st. Prize $75
2nd. Prize $50
ADMISSION $1.50 MEN
.75 LADIES
JOLLY ROGER
ENTRY PRIZES FOR ALL CONTESTANTS
FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 758-4140
S
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I
girl
IVneuvl
I
I
point o
I
flat
are
tlllK
a mat
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I HI I S v ROl ll
Entertainment
1)1I Mill K 2, 19X0 li
ns
Jane Konda and Robert Redford slar in The Electric Horseman in this weekend's Free Flick. Shows are at
5:00. 7:00 and 9:00 p.m. on Frida and Saturday in the Hendrix Theatre in Mendenhall Student C enter.
Electric Horseman
Stars Redford, Fonda
Will we ever see Jane Fonda and
Robert Redford playing unvirtuous
people, people on the wrong side of
the great issues, scurvy meanies,
wrongos instead of rightos? Don't
bet on it. That's too bad, because
we need lady Macbeths as well as
Cordelias, lagos as well as Othellos,
and you'd think that high-voltage
actors like Fonda and Redford
would want to transmit both the
negative and positive electricity in
human beings.
Since these stars are celebrated
mavericks, supposedly resistant to
movie-biz stereotyping, its in-
teresting that they seem to see
themselves as behavioral models,
icons of righteousness pointing the
way toward proper conduct in a cor-
rupting world. Righteousness blends
with their grace and beauts: you
don't have their grace and bautv but
you certainly can be righteous, so if
you'll only agree with them on
whatever it is the Vietnam War,
nuclear energy, the environment �
you too can have the golden flair
and ethical sexiness of Fonda and
Redlord.
Students can see the pair at their
most golden, ethical and sexy this
Friday and Saturday night in
Mendenhall Student Center's Hen-
drix Theatre when the Student
Union Films Committee presents
The Electric Horseman for six
showmgs at 5, 7, and 9 p.m. Admis-
sion for the film is bv student 11)
and activity card or Mendenhall
Student Center Membership Card
for faculty and staff.
1 liis ability to make right-
mindedness so seductive, stylish and
debonair is what makes The Electric
Horseman such a sweet and beguil-
ing movie. Redford even makes
alcoholism adorable as Sonny
Steele, the former world-champion
rodeo cowboy who's hitting the bot-
tle because he's been reduced � Oi
promoted � to shilling tor a
breakfast cereal (take heed, Bruce
Jenner), cold-kicking his vav
through TV commercials and mak-
ing personal appearances riding a
horse while dressed in an electrified
cowboy suit that shimmers and
blinks like a one-man Coney Island.
During a supershow promotion in
1 as Vegas, Sonny rebels when he
finds thai his mount is a once-gteat
racehorse. Rising Stai, who's been
pumped full of drugs to make him
docile. The hungover cowboy rides
the spaced-out stallion right through
a line oi chorus girls, out past the
crap tables, through the flashing
plastic of Vegas and into what little
remains of the American frontier.
Sonny is pursued by the heartless
corporate types who own his soul
and Rising Star's body. He's also
followed by Hallie Martin (Fonda),
a cyncical TV news chick who thinks
Sonny is just a wacko in neon chaps.
But when she tracks him down and
finds that his mission is to free
himself and Rising Star from cor-
ruption, she becomes his ally and
together they pit their wits against
the cops, ears, copters and even
guns that have been dispatched to
bring back not so much the has-been
horseman as the multimillion-dollar
horse.
Robert Garland's screenplay is an
electrified updating of the old
cowboy-and-the-lady films, with
strong whiffs o Mr. Deeds Goes To
I own and a good dollop from later
films like Lonely Are The Brave.
But the picuture finally works
becuase Redford and Fonda take
your disbelief away. Redford
especially hasn't been this effective
in a long time. In their love scenes
they actually make you believe that
pure virtue is the strongest of
aphrodisiacs.
limes for the film are 5, 7, and 9
p.m. Admission is by ID and activi-
ty card or MSC membership.
Madrigal
Dinners
Presented
Once a year, the splendor that
was Elizabethan England returns.
The Great Hall of a noble manor
house becomes the scene of a
glorious Christmas celebration and
entertainment for the residents of
the Kingdom. The time of the
revival is here again. December 2-6,
1980, at 7:00 p.m Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center will sponsor its annual
Madrigal Dinners in the Multi-
purpose Room at Mendenhall.
Mendenhall Student Center spon-
sors Madrigal Dinners each year to
open the Christmas season in tradi-
tional English fashion. The dinners
are modeled after an Elizabethan
feast in a country manor house. The
Lord and Lady of the Manor
preside over the entire feast; they
are dressed in luxurious period
costumes of velvet and lace and
stand ready to greet their guests.
Jim and Francine Rees are the
gracious host and hostess.
Dinner itself is served by costum-
ed waiters and waitresses. Wassail
and roast beef with all the trimm-
ings provide a delicious meal to
compliment exciting entertainment.
The singers are under the direc-
tion of Dr. Charles Moore of the
ECU School of Music. All are
costumed in period clothing, and
sing period songs and arrangements.
The singers will also perform
Christmas carols in Madrigal ar-
rangements. In a final gesture of
fellowship, the Lord and Lady of
the Manor will ask all guests to join
in the singing of traditional songs of
the season.
The Madrigal Dinners are a
tremendous success each year. Only
a very few single seat tickets are left.
Tickets are $8.00 for ECU students
and $10.00 for the public. They are
presently on sale at the Central
Ticket Office in Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center. For forther informa-
tion, call 757-6611, ext. 213.
Invasion Of The Body Snatchers
Plays In Horror Double Feature
In this era of house-plant chic, it
is amusing to consider that a flower
could be the means by which aliens
from outer space take over humani-
ty. This is exactly waht happens in
the 1978 remake of the 1956 classic
film Invasion of the Body Snat-
chers. Body Snatchers is being serv-
ed up by the Student Union Films
Committee as the tail-end of a Hor-
ror Double Feature this Wednesday
night at 9 p.m. in Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center's Hendrix Theatre.
Roman Polanski's Repulsion
Horror Classic Showing At Hendrix
When the mind is the actual stuff
of horror, when madness and col-
lapse are presented from inside,
rather than viewed from without,
then the solid ground itself shifts
and crumbles and we do indeed find
ourselves in a bottomless pit. This is
the theme of Repulsion, described
bv one critic as the most terrifying
tiim ever made.
Roman Polanski's amazing film
will be shown as one half of a Hor-
ror Double Feature to be presented
this Wednesday night at 7 p.m. in
Mendenhall Student (enter's Hen-
drix Theatre. Admission is by stu-
dent ID and activity card or MSC
membership. The double feature is
sponsored by the Student Union
Films Committee. Following Repul-
sion, at approximately 8:30 p.m
coffee and doughnuts will be served
in room 221 of the student center.
In a most perceptive article, Ken-
neth Tynan states that Carol, the
girl in the film (played by Catherine
Deneuve), "has much in common
with Tony Perkins in Psycho by
presenting a double murder from
the killer's instead of the victim's
point od view
Carol is a Belgian girl living in a
somewhat dreary South Kensington
flat with her sister Helen. Both girls
are working, though Helen's job
seems uncertain, and most of her
time is taken up with an affair with
a married man, Michael. Carol
herself works in a beauty salon as a
manicurist. Although apparently
capable enough at her job, she is
withdrawn and moody. In her
lonliness, her mind starts to
Catherine Deneuve as Carole in Roman Polanski's psychological
shocker repulsion. The film is showing Wednesday night at 8:00 p.m.
in the Hendrix Theatre in Mendenhall.
disintegrate. She begins to have
hallucinations � of crumbling walls
and strangers in the flat.
After an incident in her work, she
is sent home. She shuts herself up
finally in the flat, wandering
aimlesslv in her nightgown. An
abusive phonecall further upsets her
balance. The hallucinations become
more terrifying. When a friend
comes to see what is wrong, and
worried and exasperated beyond all
bearing, breaks open the front door,
she kills him with the utmost
violence and hides the body in the
bath.
Later the landlord, a coarse boor,
also forces his way into the flat,
which she has feebly barricaded,
and, misled by her appearance and
manner, starts to make approaches
to her. In wild panic and revulsion
she slashes him to death with a
razor, and attempts to hide his body
also. Rapidly the last shreds of sani-
ty give way, and when Carol and
Michael return to the flat they find
it a horrifying shambles, and Carol
King motionless and silent under the
bed.
Opinions will differ as to the most
shockin g moment in this film so
crowded with shocks � the man in
he mirror, the opening of the door,
or the last sudden thrust of a pair of
hands through a patch in the wall. It
may well be that the most unnerving
moment of all is a quieter one.
Carol is sitting alone in the little
basement of the beauty salon after
listening to tearful complaints by a
friebd of her boyfriend's
"beastliness
She is staring idly in front of her,
abstracted and withdrawn. Sudden-
ly a shaft of sunlight comes through
the dusty little window and falls on
a chair beside her. For a moment
she gazes at it blankly, then slowly
leans forward and tries to brush the
ray off her seat. On the quiet sound
of her hand against the wood the
scene fades. This brief intimation of
the failing of reason, the
remorseless approach od madness,
is more fearful than any screaming
shock would be. The dark door is
opening for Carol � and for us.
Admission for the films is by ID
and activity card or MSC member
ship. At approximately 8:30 p.m. in
room 221 of the student center, cof-
fee and doughnuts will be served.
Any students, faculty or staff in-
terested in discussing the film with
others are welcome to attend.
Right from the start, the aptness
oi doing a '70's remake of Body
Snatchers becomes clear, and what
better setting could it have than the
original home o' "flower power
San Francisco? Director Don
Seigel's 1956 film has become a hor-
ror classic, but only the most
diehard purists could begrudge the
stylish and entertaining variations
director Philip Kaufman has wen en
into the original.
The story of how an entire
populace is duplicated bv
mysterious pods, creating a new
species devoid of anxiety but in-
capable o love, hate or any other
human emotion, is sufficiently
abstract fo lend itself readily to the
allegorical readings oi any decade.
In the I950's, the film could be
taken as an indictment of conformi-
ty, a scare movie about the evils of
Communism or. just a easily, the
dangers of McCarthyism.
Kaufman, whose last film. The
White Dawn, was about the in
sion of the Eskimos by the white
man. is a flashy, elliptical si
somewhat in the manner o Nic
Roeg (Don look Now). He's a
master at evoking an ominous, im-
personal urban landscape, but I e
seems less engaged by the bu
and-butter demands of the act
movie.
The long chase at the end of the
film�which Seigel engineered
such masterly fashionseems
almost anticlimactic. Still. Body
Snatchers offers plenty of wonder-
fuly paranoid chills foi the holiday
that is vet to come. Whether it is two
years later or fourteen years later,
this plot is always spookily in tune
with the times
Senior Music Recitals
Scheduled This Week
Percussionists Bruce Smith of
Wilmington and Mark Ford of
Richmond, Va and clarinetist
Ronnie Wooten of Goldsboro, all
senior students in the East Carolina
University School of Music, are
scheduled to perform in recital dur-
ing the week of Dec. 1.
All are candidates for the
Bachelor of Music Education
degree. Smith and Ford are students
of Harold Jones of the ECU School
of Music percussion faculty and
Wooten studies with Herbert Carter
of the instrumental faculty.
Student recitals are free and open
to the public.
In a program set for 8:15 p.m.
Dec. 1, Smith will perform several
works highlighting marimba,
vibraphone, timpani and multiple
percussion by composers Minoiu
Miki, Karlheinz Stockhausen,
Robert Kurka and Michael Col-
grass, along with an original com-
position written by Smith during his
studies here.
He will be accompanied by piano
faculty member Patricia Foltz in the
Kurka Concerto for Marimba and
assisted by a nine-member student
ensemble conducted by Harold
Jones in the Colgrass Concertino
for Timpani.
Bruce Smith is the son of Dr. and
Mrs. ST Smith of Wolfe City,
Iexas and Dr. and Mrs. James
Megivern of Wilmington.
Percussionist Ford will perform
Dec. 5 at 7:30. in a joint program
with pianist Marv McNeill.
His program will include John
Floyde's Theme and Variations tor
Four Timpani. Tanaka's Two
Movements for Marimba, Kraft's
"Images" and Paul Creston's Con-
certino for Matimba.
Student pianist Melissa Ussery
will accompany Ford.
Ford's parents are Earl Carlton
Ford and June Ford of Richmond,
Va.
Ronnie Wooten will perform
Romantic and contemporary
clarinet works in his Dec. 1 recital,
set for 9 p.m.
His program features Brahms's
Sonata No. 2, Opus 120, Persichet-
ti's "Parable" for Solo Clarinet and
Gordon Jacob's Three Songs for
Soprano and Clarinet.
Accompanist is student pianist
James Gilliam, and the soprano
soloist is student Vanessa Malloy.
Wooten is the son of Callie B.
Wooten of Goldsboro.





Sports
Lady Pirates

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I HI 1 AS IA KOI I.MAN
DEC I MBIK2. 1V80
s
n
PR OFILE
A Look At The Trials Of
Heisman Winner George Rogers
By JOAN MOWER
l PI Sports Mrtlrr
COLUMBIA, S.C. � For Ceorge
Rogers, football was a way to
escape the dreary life he knew as a
youngster � poverty, washing
dishes and having to sleep three to a
bed.
"Nobody I know comes from a
background like mine the shy,
soft-spoken Rogers said recently
"Some things I just can't tell you,
you wouldn't believe
Rogers, 21, knew in the third
grade that he had talent with a foot-
ball, but he had to overcome in-
credible odds to go on to win the na-
tion's highest individual collegiate
football honor on Monday � the
Heisman trophy.
The rags-to-riches story of the
6-2, 220-pound running back from
the University of South Carolina
has the quality of a soap opera �
except that it is true.
Rogers' mother was a domestic
who relied on welfare to help sup-
port her five children, three boys
and two girls.
His father, George Washington
Rogers Sr is a convicted murderer
who was divorced from his wife a
decade ago. After serving nearly
eight years in Georgia prisons for
shooting a woman friend, the senior
Rogers was paroled in time to see his
son play in the Georgia-South
Carolina game Nov. 1.
The story of George Rogers and
football began when he was 8 years
old. After crying on the sidelines
because he had fouled up a play in a
school game, the coach gave the
youngster a second chance.
"Finally he (the coach) put me in
with not much time left recalled
Rogers, a native of Duluth, Ga.
"They pitched me the ball and I
took off running and scored
Despite his auspicious beginning,
Rogers did not get back on the field
for almost seven years during which
time his mother moved her Family
around small towns in Georgia �
Norcross, Decatur, Oglethorpe and
Scottsdale.
"We started moving all the
time he said, remembering how
his mother often had trouble paying
the rent. "My mom was a nurse, but
after the food and car note, there
wasn't much money
Life was not always pleasant. "It
was crowded sometimes. We'd be in
a house with two rooms We'd
have me and my brothers in one
bed, you'd have somebody's feet all
over
Rogers remembers how his
mother did not always have enough
money for his school lunch. At age
15, he began working at a series of
odd jobs.
"I was washing dishes, stacking
sacks of cement for $1.80 an hour
he said. "I wanted to go to school,
but it was hard to look at everybody
eating and you didn't have lunch
But Rogers had an idol � his
cousin, Napoleon Rogers, who
played football at Duluth. When
Rogers' aunt, Ottella Rogers of
Duluth, agreed to board her
nephew, the young star was on his
way.
In his fourth game, Rogers scored
three touchdowns, and he went on
to gain more than 900 yards that
season. In his junior year, he gained
2,300 yards � a feat that attracted
the attention of collegiate scouts. A
hip injury slowed him during his
senior year, but he still gained 1,300
yards.
Rogers said he chose South
Carolina � a team which had never
had a Heisman winner � because
the team needed running backs and
he thought he would get a chance to
play early.
Once at college, Rogers ran into
difficulty with academics. His
teachers determined that he was on-
ly reading on a ninth grade level and
he had trouble taking notes.
With the help of professor Sandra
Wert, he made great improvement.
"He's not going to graduate Phi
Beta Kappa but we know he's im-
proved 200 percent said Harold
White, the Gamecocks' academic
counselor.
Rogers said celebrity status has
not substantially changed him. In
his free time he enjoys the simple
pleasures of roller skating, swimm-
ing and basketball.
And Rogers' family comes first.
When he begins earning money,
Rogers plans to buy an expensive
car for himself, a house in Atlanta
for his mother and presents for his
brothers and sisters.
"If it wasn't for football, 1
wouldn't be able to say none of
these things I am saying now he
said. "It's amaing, isn't it0"
The Happy Store
OPEN 24 HOURS
Cooler, Case n' Ice $11 00
GSS) Keg and Ice
delivery reservations
Rockwood Stables
Horseback Riding
9MUeteatiaJ 10th St.
Highwdv i$
752-7714
l)iv ount tn LCI Students
ABORTION
The Fleming Center has been here for you since 1974.
providing private, understanding health care
to women of all ages at a reasonable cost.
Saturday abortion hours
Free pregnancy tests
Very early pregnancy tests
Evening birth control hours
The Fleming Center we're here when you need us.
Call 781-B680 in Raleigh anytime.
THE FLEMING CENTER
Heels' Crum Gets Honor
RALEIGH, N.C.
(I PI) North
Carolina's Dick Crum,
whose llth-ranked Tar
Heels roared through
the Atlantic Coast Con-
ference en route to a
10-1 record, was the
overwhelming choice as
ACC coach of the year,
it was announced to-
day.
Crum, rounding out
his third year at North
Carolina, received 96
of 12 2 votes in
balloting by the Atlan-
tic Coast Sports
Writers Association.
First-year coach Monte
Kiffin of North
Carolina State was a
distant second with 13
votes and Maryland's
Jerry Claiborne was
third with nine.
Crum, 46, came to
North Carolina in 1978
after a successful four-
year stint at Miami of
Ohio. His first Tar
Heel team went 5-6, but
improved to 8-3-1 in
1979 and was
undefeated in ACC
play this year and will
play in the Bluebonnet
Bowl against Texas
Dec. 31.
His overall coaching
record is 57-20-2 in
seven years.
This was the fourth
year his teams have
won at least 10 games
and Crum is 3-0 in
post-season play, in-
cluding North
Carolina's upset of
Michigan last season in
the Gator Bowl.
A defensive coor-
dinator at Miami
before he became a
head coach, Crum has
specialized in hard-
nosed defenses. The
Tar Heels led the na-
tion in several defensive
categories for part of
the season this year and
finished tops in the
ACC in total defense
an total offense.
Six teams failed to
score a touchdown
against the defense,
and two teams scored
just one each.
Crum is a native of
Youngstown, Ohio,
and attended Musk-
ingum and Mount
Union colleges. After
six years as an assistant
high school coach, he
was head coach of
Mentor (Ohio) High
school, where his last
four teams went 38-2.
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The good times roll to a new comedy high as Fon and gang grow funnier
the more they grow up1
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Y DAYS AGAIN
WEEKDAYS 4 PM
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WNCT-TV
GREENVILLE





Wake, State
Claim Wins
Last Night
WINSTON-SAL EM. N.C. (UPI) �
Seven Wake Forest players scored in double
figures, including four reserves, and the
Deacons had little trouble routing Johns
Hopkins 111-58 Monday night.
The Deacons trailed once at 6-4, but rattl-
ed off 24 unanswered points and never look-
ed back. Wake forest coach Carl Tacy
began substituting freely midway through
the first half and his starters played onlv
sparingly in the final period.
Wake forest. 2-0, led by 26 points at
half time and b as many as 57 in the second
half.
Alvis Rogeis uas the game's leading
scorer with 18 points for the Deacons, in-
cluding eight in the first 1:12 of the second
period. Starters Frank Johnson and Guy
Morgan added 12 and 10 points apiece.
Wake Forest reserves combined for 54
points. Glen Meyers had 15 points, Scott
Davis 11 and Anthony Teachey 10.
JOHNS HOPKINS 5
Sikh 5 5-7 15. Ituifatr 4 3-4 II fhrHairtl "11 RmiIM,( mil
S-7, Ban : : S Wall I ll I. Cimini 0 0 11(1.ljli.n I II II : I ilt 1 0 I
: Kit man I (' 0 2. X oiifhl 0 0 0 0 ratals 'I 1 f 21 5H.
W KI InNIM i III'
Rogen � l-i IX. Morgan I 4-f. Ill h.hn 3 �. Htlmv 4 nil H.
JofcaMM - 2 4 i: DafcaH I �-S 5, M�ir- 4 H 15. uunc 5 2 12,
Shmleton � i-3 I. D�vh l ' io 11 l.a.ho 4 1-4 to Vaaykm00-0�
lolal. IX JS �' i I '
HalfiiaH �jk, l.in-i 52. Johnv Hopkins M roaM MM PaaaW.
Ian� I � � iji li'ul- l.ihnv Htpkiiu M W j, Kami H fllHail all
J 'hns Hopkku arack, 2 V ionki
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RALEIGH, N.C. (LPI) � Forward Art
Jones had 22 points and 15 rebounds Mon-
day night and North Carolina State
capitalized on superior inside strength to
defeat Davidson 89-72.
The Wolfpack out rebounded the Wildcats
51-27 and got double figure scoring from
two other front-line players. Sophomore for-
ward Thurl Bailey had 18 points and center
Craig Watts added 13 points and 12 re-
bounds Guard Sidne Lowe had 11 points
and a school record-tying 14 assists for the
V olfpack, now 2-0. The Wildcats fell to 1-1.
iiiu n
- 1-4 23. Ha . ;
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siiKIMXR01 INASTATi Ittl
4-4 18. Waits 6 1-3 13. Wl
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21. N 5 1.1
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ECU Sporting Events For The Week
(Dec. 2-8)
WEDNESDAY, DEi .
Wrestling learn vs. N.C. Stale, Minges al 4p.m.
Women's Basketball vs. defending national champion Old
Dominion, Minges at 7:30 p.m.
Men's Basketball at Maine, 7:35 p.m. 1 Radio � WITS FM
93.3, WOOW 1340 AM)
FRIDAY, DEC. 5
Men's and Women's Swimming at Penn Stale Relavs
(mnaslics vs N.C, State, Minges at 7 p.m.
SATURDAY, DEC. 6
Men's and Women's Snimming at Penn Stale Kelavs
Indoor Track at I ehigh Invitational (Bethlehem. PA)
Men's Basketball vs Texas Wesleyan. Minges at 7:30 p.m.
MONDAY, DEC. H
(Minges l)oubleheader:
Women's Basketball s Campbell, Minges al 6:30 p.m.
Men's Basketball vs Bern College, Minges following
women's game.
Art and Camera
520 S. Cot am he St.
iJotm Town
r3ewtci9
Classifieds
( )pti metric
Eye Car e Center, R A.
OF GREENVILLE
SOFT CONTACT LENSES
$89.00
INCLUDES LENSES & HEAT CARE KIT
DOCTORS PROFESSIONAL FEE $70.00
INCLUDES FITTING,EYE EXAM AND ONE
MONTHS FOLLOW UP VISITS
TOTAL FEE $159.00
TIPTON ANNEX
228 GREENVILLE BLVD.
GREENVILLE,N.C.
756-9404
FOR SALE
FOR SALE Technics SA $00 40
watts SL 230 fully automatic
turntable with Empire 2000 E" III.
Phase Linear speakers
Aluminum antennae Paid SHOO,
best offer Call 752 M0. ask for
Graham
SNOW SKIS K2 244 MID 170s
444 Soloman bindings. Caber
leather boots and poles All equip
ment brand new! Asking S330 for
everything Call or come by and
see at Evans Auto Parts Inc
FOR SALE US Divers aluminum
tank. J valve, back pack, Calypso
J Regulator with case Used one
season 752 0526 after 500 p.m
FOR SALE Beige woven rug, S16
hiqh 81 jxlOft. with pad. S30
75 241)
FOR SALE Navy blue 1968 Volvo
144 Needs owner that s willing to
do repair If interested call
753 9742
FOR SALE Stereo Power Amp
100 watts, DC. to 25 KHi S150cali
757 6713 or 752 7817 ask for Al
FOR SALE Sharp black and
white 10 inch TV Great shape
MO, 752 0483
FOR SALE: Used Vivitar elec
tromic flash model 283 with
automatic exposure Call 752 9992
FOR SALE : Used Nikon FZA body
with 50mm F 1 4 lens and cary
case Call 752 9992.
NAVY BLUE: 1968 Volvo 144
Needs owner that is willing to do
repair If interested call 758 9742
FOR SALE '67 Chevy Van, needs
inspection, as is $450 752 4769
FOR SALE 74 Suiuki 250, runs
good $200 Call 752 4769
PERSONAL
CUSTOM CRAFTING: and repair
of gold and silver Buying and
selling of gold and silver by Les
Jewelers 120 E 5th St 758 2127
HURRY Time running out but
perfect Christmas gift offer still
open! Special student prices: $10
cancatures $20 and up portraits
personalued T shirts done too!
Professional portrait service since
1976 Call John Weyler 752 5775
ANYTHING YOU CAN WRITE
We can write better Typing, pro
ofreadmg. editing Write Right
756 994
MULTI MEDIA MAKERS
Greenville's newest creative art
service has a special Christmas of
fer: 8x10 pen and ink portraits or
characatures of your favorite per
son for only $15 Suitable for
framing A unique gift idea! Tak
ing orders until Dec 5, get your
order in now by calling 752 4277
Mon Fri between 3 00 p m and
6:00 p.m
ANNOUNCING Notary Public
Reasonable rate for Convenient
notarnation Call Amy at 752 8022
MONTY Drink lots of beer and
beat up doors. CAUTION May
become and expensive pastime
Don t forget the seven years bad
luck Your best friends. GoMo and
Puff
MAIN GYMNASTICS To Nan.
Louise Eluabeth When good
looks were handed out you girls
must have stood in line twice you
knock us out The boxers who
make so much noise Stuart and
Rick
NEED A DATE: To the Ph. Sigma
Pi's chicken picking Call Peter
Murphy, 752 6823.
THAS RIGHT! THAS RIGHT!
We bad THAS RIGHT' 502 Club.
Edwin, Hollis, Tomahawk, Tom
my, Conrad- You are!
TO THE ONE Who once said.
THERE ARE BATTLES TO BE
FOUGHT AND WENCHES TO BE
WON Now that you are getting
married I want the $5 00 back I
gave you to date her
FOR RENT
ROOMMATE WANTED Non
smoker to share completely fur
mshed two bedroom apartment at
Tar River Rent is $130 plus half
utilities Call 758 649 Keep try
mg it no answer
MATURE FEMALE Graduate
student wants to rent affordable
house or apartment. Call 754 2232
before 9:00 a.m.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEED
ED Three bedroom duplex apart
ment at Wilson Acres ' j rent and
utilities Call 752 2719
THREE FEMALES NEEDED
To share a spacious three
bedroom house beginning spring
semester Walking distance to
campus Present occupants
graduating Rent $75 per person
per month, plus ' i utilities Don't
miss out! Call 758 3424
FOR RENT Private room, three
blocks from campus, quiet Call
752 4006 after 12 noon
SUB LEASE One bedroom, kit
chen, bath, wall to wall shag $150
deposit rent $150 rent Heat and
Air included in rent Half mile
from campus 758 7103
ONE OR TWO Female room
mates needed by January 1 Call
758 0838 after 5 00 p.m
FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE
CLASSIFIED ADS CAN BE PUR
CHASED AT THREE LOCA
TIONS
Student Supply Store Lobby, MWF
1000 11:00, TTH 11 00 12:00.
East Carolinian Office, MTTH
4:00 5:00. WF 2 00 3:00.
Student Organization Booth
(Mendenhall), MWF 12001:00,
TTH 11:00 12:00.
DR. PETER HOLLIS
BAUSCH
LOMB
SOFLENS'
I
Classified Ad Form
I PNICK: tl.M for IS word 05 for
� MCh additional word
I Make checkt payable to Th� East
! Carolinian
� Abbreviations count as one word
as do phone numbers and.
� hyphtnal.ons
� MAIL TO
I
I
The East Carolinian
Classified Adt
Old South Building
Greenville. N C 17814
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
SPORTS
WRITERS
NEEDED
Call 757 6309
And Get In
On The Action
SAAD'SSHOK
REPAIR
I H( irandr -Vr.
758-1228
Qualits Repair
ARMY NAVY STORE
Backpack. B 15 Bomber
� Field. Deck. Flight Snorkel �
Jackets. Pcacoats, Parkav
Shoes Combat Boots Plus ?
I MIS Evans Street

The Happy Store
OPEN 24 HOURS
3jd, Schlitz Strohs
Miller Kegs $37 00
Pony Kegs $19 00
12oz Cases $8 99
Keg and Ice reservations
GOLD BEADS
Good Everyday
Low Prices
ELECTRONICS
Stereos Tape Players
CalculatorsClock Radios
Stereo Stands
PHOTO
Canon Minolta
Pentax � Kodak � Vivitar
DIAMONDS
Pendants Earrings Rings
(Color & Diamond Combinations)
HOUSEWARES
Toastmaster � GE Sunbeam
Kitchen Tools Blenders Cookware
4
PERSONAL CARE
Hair Curlers Blowdryers
Sunlamps Curling Irons
Make Up Mirrors
SILVER CRYSTAL CLOCKS
TYPEWRITES SMOKE ALARMS
FIREPLACE ACCESSORIESBABY GOODS
SPORTING GOODS
J.D. DAWSON
TURN YOUR OLD GOLD INTO CHRISTMAS CASH
SPORTS
WRITERS
NEEDED
Call 757-6309, 6366
CLIFF'S
SPECIALS
E. 10th St. Extension
752-3172
MONDAY-THURSDAY
Oyster Plate3.95
Shrimp Plate3.95
Seafood Plate3.95
Ocean Perch2.50
Blue Fish2.50
Crab Cakes1.85
THURSDAY
Popcorn Shrimp2.95
�$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$�
� KODACOLOR
Developed and Printed
f
12
EXPOSURE
ROLL ONLY'
N r ire gt
n
20
EXPOSURE
ROLL ONLY'
$3.23
$4.81
&$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
KODACOLOR �
� Developed and Printed
4
&
Nc I
24
EXPOSURE
ROLL ONLY
36
EXPOSURE
ROLL ONLY
$5.53
$7.97
ffr
FILM DEVELOPING
;$$$$$$$$$$
EXPOSURE C 1 QO
DACHROME V A �&
20 e:
KOI
AND EKTACHROME
PROCESSING ONLY
36 EXPOSURE
KODACHROME
AND EKTACHROME
PROCESSING ONlLY
$3,151

�$&$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$&
LOW, LOW PRICES ON
Movie
PROCESSING
KODACHROME
co "I i
PROCESSING ONLY
SUPER 8 AND STANUiaO.o MOVIES
offer �� LIMITED OFFER
iSSSSSSSSl
The Official ECU Class
Rings
Cut Class

THIS WEEK
Pick our favorite ArtCarveJ tl.t-N ring. Cut it out.
Keep it with ou tor a while Gel an idea what it's
like to own the rin that says, "1 Jid I
Then, next week, have the genuine article fitted
by. the ArtCarved representative viMting campus
For these days you'll have our newei selection
ot ring styles to chtx�e fnrni � and i specialist
uho will make sure the tit i perfeci Plus, there
will he some incredible Arr( !arved lifters to i.ur the
t,o-r ot ,uir 1.1.inn ring .
LIT your tic- wirh the p.i-t during our "vjieat
Ring Exchange Trading our ;vft ,1.1 high
school ring tor .1 new -m arved college ring could
n.iv c you a- much 1- S9C
CL'T tin cost . t .1 trad 1 n
�� 1 hum nii'j t 1 just vi4 95
ntemporary
CLT .1 smashing figure with ,1 women's class ring
1 our exciting new "lesignet "Hamond Collet
tloM
A?n iwr von ji! u, next week is ru' best week in select ow nCcmtfd class .�
,RT(7IPVED
XCOLLEGE RINGS
SYMBtM.lZlCi YX'R BILm ro.Al.1HEM

Dec. 4-5
10-4pm.
Student Supply Store Lobby
Wright Bldg.
$10 Deposit required MasterCharge or ISA accepted
' ni dtved U�lic�r Hi
e�fr Rings
?





Title
The East Carolinian, December 2, 1980
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
December 02, 1980
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.97
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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