The East Carolinian, November 11, 1980






�he
(Earnlinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
oi.55Norr'�. 33
10 Panes
Tuesday, November 11, 1980
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 10.000
Greenville Group
Sues Jaycee Chapter,
Area Radio Station
Glisson
.filing suit against area Jaycees and a radio station.
By TERRY GRAY
staff V riter
A local rock band has filed a suit
in Pitt County Superior Court
against the Washington. NC Junior
Chamber of Commerce and WSF1
radio in New Bern.
The suit alleges that the radio sta-
tion and the Washington Jaycees
agreed to pay SI .5(H) or a percentage
o the gate profits to the rock band
that placed first in a "battle of the
bands" competition held in
Beaufort County this summer.
Glisson, the group which has tiled
suit, was judged to be The best band
in the contest, but says the Jaycees
�ailed to award them cash prize.
Tom Glisson. Fred Glisson, Kyle
Alcoholism
Survey Shows Low Abuse At ECU
Ul
i
aent!
Univei
de
drin-
problems,
se who
;bly
3 nef � :es as a
a campus survey shows.
A
and
sit)
while
consu
result
'The results of the study indicate
that ECU is very comparable in its
problems to most campuses where
similar studies 'nave been done
says Jerr 1 otterhos, Director of the
Alcoholism Training Progiam, and
Chairperson of the C am
Alcohol Drug Education C
tee.
1 otterhos' committee conducted
the research study last yeat to
�neasure the drinking behavior oi
the campus community, both
students and employees, as a m
oi determining the extent oi the pro-
blems and needs which exist.
"It's not that we have a unique
problem here, but rather that we
wish to assume a positive and
responsible approach Lotterhos
said.
The survey was part of a broad
program encouraged by ECU to
promote responsibility in the use of
alcohol for members of the campus
community who indicated that they
use or have used alcoholic beverages
to some extent.
Following the research study,
recommendations to develop a stu-
dent peer intervention prevention
program to "support responsible
decisions about alcohol and drugs"
are being implemented, Lotterhos
said
Students To Receive
Wages Retroactively
A student centei for
Alcohol- Drug Information is to be
opened and manned by student
volunteers to provide service to
students. Also, a committee of the
faculty and staff is planning an
employee assistance program for all
university employees, he said.
Dr. Elmer E. Meyer, Jr Vice
Chancellor for Student Life, said
"We feel that any university should
do what it can to promote respon-
sibility in our students in all areas
including their chemical consump-
tion Meyer last year appointed a
campus AlcoholDrug Education
Committee to study the problem
and make recommendations.
The Lotterhos survey indicated
that a small percentage of the
students and employees had ex-
perienced some
"negative"consequences as a result
of drinking behavior. These conse-
quences included such things as
missing class because of drinking,
damage to personal relationships,
driving under the influence, being
involved in fights and causing some
property damage.
The survey also showed that a
small number of students and
employees indicated they felt they
might have a personal drinking pro-
blem
The great majority of the students
and employees surveyed indicated
that they use alcohol, but with no
negative consequences as a result.
ECU Chancellor Thomas B.
Brewer said "We feel that, in keep-
ing with our continuing efforts to
provide an atmosphere of quality
education, a campus-wide program
promoting the responsible use of
alcohol is supportive of our overall
developmental goals, and is a
responsibility we should pursue
McBnde and Elliot White are the 800 people
members of the group. All four are concert. As
ECU students.
Several other bands participated
in the contest, which was sponsored
in June by the Jaycees to help raise
funds for the organization. The con-
test was a part of the Jaycees Sum-
mer Festival, which included other
fundraising events.
WSFL-FM radio helped promote
the events for the Jaycees, according
to Station Manager Ed Seeger.
Seeger has also been named as a
defendant in the suit.
The band is seeking SI, 500
damages and SI 5,000 punitive
images, in addition to other costs.
rhe East Carolinian could not
rea Steve Nobles, President of the
vs ashington Jaycees, for a comment
on the case. But in an interview in
Julv, Nobles said Seeger had in-
dicated to the Jaycees thai as many
as three or four thousand people
would attend such an event.
Seeger said that the radio station
had successfully promoted a similar
contest the previous year.
According to Nobles, only about
actually attended the
a whole, the Summer
festival lost SI.(XX), said Nobles in
the July interview.
Nobles said thai "no percentage
was ever mentioned " for the bands,
adding that his chapter did not have
the money to pay.
Bucanneers
Unavailable In
Student Store
The 1980 Buccaneer is
now available in the Buc
office located on the
second Poor o the
publications center.
Students wishing to pick
up their copy of the
yearbook must present a
photo ID to the Media
Board Secretary. The
Buc may no longer be
picked up at the Student
Supply Store.
Justice Department
Asks Judge To Approve
Discrimination Settlement
WASHINGTON, D.C.
(CPS)-After a brief but heated bat-
tle, the U.S. Department of Educa-
tion affirmed last week it- intent to
allow students on College Work-
Study financial aid programs to col-
lect minimum wages retroactively
from October 1.
The new Higher Education
Reauthorization Act, passed in
September after two years oi intense
politicking, made work-study
students eligible for the S3.10
minimum wage for the first time in
history. Then a political battle
erupted over when students could
start getting the minimum wage.
Many administrators�who had
claimed giving work-study students
the minimum wage would eliminate
jobs for students�complained the
new pay scale should not go into ef-
fect until January 1, 1981.
"We understood it wouldn't start
until January 1 says an aide to
Sen. Thomas Eagleton (D-Mo.), a
member of the Senate education
committee.
A House education committee
staffer, who requested anonymity,
claims to be constantly fielding
phone calls from college ad-
ministrators worried about the addi-
tional expense of paying their stu-
dent workers more.
Primarily because of the wage
dispute, the Department of Educa-
tion delayed sending out a letter to
all colleges that explains how to im-
plement other parts of the landmark
reauthorization act, which provides
Consequently, work-study
students will soon be getting an ex-
tra paycheck for the hours worked
since October 1 that they hadn't
received S3.10 per hour.
The Department of Education let-
ter warns schools to deliver the extra
paychecks before the end of 1980.
Opponents of making the wage
hike retroactive were worried about
more than paying the extra money
to eligible students.
They worry that since work-study
funds are awarded as a lump sum,
students will have to work fewer
hours to make the same amount of
money. Schools would therefore
have to hire more people to work
when work-study students have
finished their hours.
Administrators also fret that the
new minimum wage will anger other
workers on campus. Federal exemp-
tions allow schools to pay
"unclassified hourly employees"
sub-minimum wages.
When they suddenly find co-
workers making a higher wage,
"there is bound to be some
disgruntled employees concedes
Dallas Martin of the National
Association of Student Financial
Aid Administrators.
Martin predicts that, as the result,
schools will be forced to extend the
minimum wage to their
"unclassified" employees as well.
Martin, who favors the minimum
wage for students, notes that the
October 1 date will be troublesome.
"Many of these schools already
WASHINGTON (UP1) � The
U.S. Justice Department Monday
asked a judge to approve a proposed
settlement of a discrimination suit
that calls for substantially increas-
ing the number of blacks and
women in the North Carolina
Highway Patrol.
In the settlement, the state of
North Carolina agrees to hire blacks
for 50 percent of the openings in
trooper training classes for the next
five years and women for 25 percent
of the openings.
The long term hiring goal is to
have the percentage of blacks and
women in trooper positions equal
the percentage of qualified blacks
and women in the state's civilian
labor force.
Currently, women comprise 41.3
percent of the state labor force and
General
become
i federal
Washington by Attorney
Benjamin Civiletti, will
final upon approval by ;
judge.
Besides settling most aspects of
the federal suit charging the state of
North CArolina with violating the
1964 Civil Rights Act, the decree
also would resolve a private class ac-
tion suit filed in 1974.
In addition, the state agreed to
promote black officers in at least the
percentage of their representation
among eligible officers. The length
of service requirement for line
sergeant, the first supervisory rank,
was reduced from seven to four
years to increase the number of
eligible blacks.
The settlement also requires the
state to hire minority applicants for
30 percent of the state highway
patrol's civilian positons. The state
JJtlV-V-lll Ji HIV J1HIV ,M. �- � i -
blacks 19 percent. There now are 53 agreed to start an active program to
blacks among the 1,150 state
troopers in North Carolina, and the
only woman trooper was hired last
March.
The consent decree, announced in
recruit blacks and women for
trooper jobs, including the recruit-
ment of women without regard to its
minimum height requirement of five
feet six.
Teen Suicide Rate
Jumps Dramatically
Thirteen teenagers kill themselves 17-month period ending last sum
IS:�wtteh collets mus, have ,he,r budge figured for �he
inc guiuciwiva , cvmnathie with their
follow for the next five years
At the department, Student
Special Services representative Skee
Smith confirmed the explanatory
letter had been delayed, adding that
"the department has acknowledged
that schools will be inconvenienced
(by the new wage), and that it will
cost them money But she said i
was clear from the start that
students would be eligible for the
wage as of October 1, not January
I.
year, and we sympathize with their
predicament
"But this provision has been in
the proposed bill for almost a
year he points out, adding that
many colleges made the switch long
ago in anticipation of the bill's
passage.
Indeed, the student minimum
wage has been anticipated so long
Along For The Ride
in the U.S. every day.
The film "Ordinary People'
dramatizes this epidemic. The pro-
blem the Jarrett family faces � an
adolescent son trying to recover
from a mental breakdown, signaled
by a suicide attempt � is not un-
common across the country.
Nationwide, the suicide rate
among teens is rising rapidly, as the
suicide rate for the general popula-
tion is declining. In 1977, the last
year for which complete figures are
available, 4,747 teenagers aged 15 to
19 killed themselves, a 20 percent in-
crease in one yar, and a 300 percent
increase since 1960.
Suicide is now the third largest
leading cause of death among young
people aged 15 to 19, ranking just
behind accidents and homicides.
For the general population,
however, suicide is the ninth leading
cause of death.
Experts say, however, that since desperate for help but don t know
many suicides are reported as ac- how to find it said Giffin.
mer, 28 teenagers took their own
lives.
Chicago's North Shore, one ot
the richest areas in the country, is
known as the "suicide belt" among
local therapists. Why is suicide so
high in affluent areas?" "I just
don't know said North Shore
psychiatrist Mary Giffin.
"Everyone will give their own
sociological guesses on why suicide
is a problem particularly in affluent
areas, but no one has the answer
Though about 5,000 teenagers kill
themselves each year, the number
who attempt suicide is as much as
100 times as high, or about 500,000
teens.
Psychiatrists say that people who
attempt suicides are really looking
for help � not death. "Those who
attempt to commit suicide are
Edward Murchison, of Umstead Dormitory, brought his pet, Krankie the
Ferret, out into the unseasonably warm sunshine ECU students have en-
ioved for the past several davs. Frankie's ancestors in Europe were com-
wage has been anticipated so long JO " and bs Frwke fprs , f hjs
� iX: ttjzxsz? ��his back -�and eamine (he passers b-
cidents, suicide is the number one
killer of young people.
The news is worse for affluent
teens. One cluster of 10 suburbs on
Chicago's North Shore now leads
Laurie Russell, a sophomore at a
high school on Chicago's North
Shore said she knows of people at
her school who have attempted to
commit suicide. "Growing up in
the state in teenage suicides with a this kind of environment is tough.
250 percent increase since 1970. In a Parents have very high expectations

I






I HI LAST CAROL INI AN
NOV I MBl R II, 19S0
Announcements
ECU SURF CLUB
VVe have a business meeting
scheduled for this Thursday at 7
p m in room 248 Mendenhall to
develop plans for the Nov 22 con
test at Wnghtsville Beach
Members are urged to attend and
all interested persons are
welcome
AMA
There will be a meeting
VVednesdaya, November 12 at 5 00
p m in Rawl 130 All centest
tickets are due November 11 at
4 00 pm The tickets are to be
turned m at Or Keyt s office
EXCEPTIONAL
CHILDREN
interested m learn,ng more
about exceptional ir"ldren and
where education s heading for
them in the 80 s' if so don't mis
out on this great opportunity the
Student Council tor Exceptional
Children State Convention to be
held here on campus at
MendiPi Nov 14 and
Saturday ?�� jnlights in
ciudf� panel of
the state,
shopsspeakers ana
the Ci c hcnrAll programs
revolve around the theme Spt
- of the 80s Registration
Mendenhall trom 5 00 to 7 00
�.�, night and from 8 30 9 00
on Sa'uroa� morn-ng You don't
t an SCEC member to at
� or even a special ed maior
� . � - � ��' spec ial
Reg rratu ����� s: oo
GAY COMMUNITY
Fast Carolina Gay Com
munity a hold "� weekly
met' 'w Tuesday November 11th.
' �, meetings are held
al 3 E 10th St at the bottom of
College Mill This week there wilib
e a guest speaxer Nominations for
new i : CGC will also
be accept �� S meeting
Nove" ' �8 ECGC will
have a Thanksgiving Dinner
q $1 50 to
help pay 1 " � � � � 1 � � ;l!an
rue ecgc
ai i nes a.one who s n
itte B � of Our
Ac are a service
rga rat It rhe ECU campus
u have any questions concern
the purpose of our organization
please feel tree to ask
SAM
� �� The SOv ety tor the Ad
vancement o Management will
3 DuS!ness meefng Thursday
N .mber 13th a 4 00 n Raw 104
a- � 'o attend There are no
� dues this semester so iom 1V"A
GAMMA SIGMA SIGMA
. - � - jma Serice
Soror.t, s sp Wing 1 Cosmetic
. NovemtM W it c 00
� .s be 1 it Mendenha
Room 244 Cosmot
� . - iners
A �'
11.25 a in be ised al
�� � joor Procet a g ft �� �
. . itiot ree � � . � res
HUNGER COALITION
The C 1 ' s open to anyone
tterested n study rtg and acting
"e problem o iocai ana world
hunger A meeting will be held
Nov 13 ai 4 00 p m at the
Ni'frian Center. 953 E tOth St
LDS
The LDS Student Association in
vites you to join them for an in
stifute class each Thursday night
at 6 15 in Brewster B 20! Class
content under the instruction of
Bro Bill Evenhuis, Seminary In
stitute Director for the Kmston ,
NC Stake, centers around the doc
tnnes and philosophies of The
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter
day Siants The class will be held
at this time for the remainder ot
the 1980 81 school year All in
ferested persons are welcome to
attend
BUSINESS
CONFERENCE
The North Carolina Business
Education Association will hold its
'sixteenth annual conference
November 6 8 at the Bordeaux
Motor inn in Fayetfeville Approx
imately three hundred business
and office education teachers
from lunior high school through
the university level are expected
to attend
HEALTH CAREERS
More than 60 health and human
service agencies will visit East
Carolina University Nov 14 to in
terview upper level ECU students
who are preparing for career m
health related fields
The represented agencies in
elude hospitals rehabilitation
centers state and local human
resource agencies centers for the
handicapped and the U S armed
forces
Interviewing institutions are
located throughout the Carolines
as wen as Virginia Maryland,
Tennessee, Georgia and the
District of Columbia
informal interviews will be held
in the ECU Nursing Building bet
ween 9 45 a m and 1 p m
REAL ESTATE
A real estate investment
seminar designed tor real estate
professionals, lending officers and
potential investors. will be offered
b� East Carolina University
Wednesday Nov 19
The program will be directed by
James R Mawkins A former
mayor of Durham, Mawkms has
more than 21 years of professional
experience in commercial and in
come properties
Co sponsors ot the seminar are
the ECU Division of Continuing
Education and the Greenville Pitl
County Board ot Realtors Ses
sions will be held at the Ramada
inn
Topics to be discussed include
a'acteris'cs ot real estate in
vestments forms o real estate
ownership cash flow determma
tion and analysis, measuring m
vestment returns and sndica
tions
Further information about the
seminar is available from Reai
Estate investment Seminar
Div son ot Continuing Educaiton.
E Hi Carolina University Green
� N C 28734
ARCHITECT
Ralegh architect Joseph
Flowers A I A , will speak at East
Carolina University Nov 19 in a
public program on the restoration
of the Andrew Johnson birthplace
in Raleigh
Tic lecture scheduled for 1 p m
in Room 1327 of the Leo Jenkins
F ,ne Arts Center, is open to all m
terested persons Sponsor ot the
program is the ECU chapter ot the
National Society ot interior
Designers
ARTIFACTS
A collection of 100 items from
pre Columbian America and
works by primarily local, contem
porary artists are on display at the
Gray Gallery of East Carolina
University's Museum of Art
The pre Columbian exhibition
includes works from the Mayan
mean and other old American In
dian cultures and ranges from
ceramic figures and pottery to
pieces of woven textiles and stone
carvings Both utilitarian articles
and religious items are on display,
most dating from the period
before Columbus discovered the
New World
Also on view are items m
various media from the traveling
exhibition of works by ECU School
of Art graduate stur its and a
print retrospective Jf graphic
art selected from folios from ECU
art seniors during the years
1969 1976
The ECU students works will be
on display through Nov 11 The
pre Columbian art assembled
from collections of Duke Universi
ty the ECU anthropology pro
gram and various private owners,
will be shown through fall
semester ���
Gray Gallery, located in the Leo
Jenkins Fine Arts Center on the
mam campus, is open each week
day from 10 a m until 5pm and
on Sunday afternoons from 1 to 4
p m
HUNGER COALITION
The Greenville Hunger Coalition
will meet on Thursday. Nov 13 at
4 00 p m at the Newman Center
953 E Tenth St The Coalition is
open to anyone interested m study
mg and acting on the problem of
Iocai and world hunger We are
currently planning the Fast For A
Wona Harvest Nov 20th
FAST
Each yeat the Greenville
Hunger Coalition and the interne
tional agency, Oxfam America,
sponsor a tast on the Thursday
before Thanksgiving The money
you save by not eating is donated
for self help projects to aid hungr,
people become self suffic en'
Plan to fast' Stop by the table out
Side the Book Store on Nov 18th or
19th to sign up
AUTOMATION
David Fraade of G
internationally knowr
will speak at Eas'
University Nov 11 on the npart
ot Automation in Today � '
Society " Fraadr
Automation Engniu
Burroughs WeMcomi- c H
lecture is sponsored by Hillel a
Jewish youth ana stud
organization S .
ticipating m the program tor
ECU'S Jewish and international
Festival w th a sef es o' I ms lee
tures a lewish dance workshop
anc a lo ind bage so � �� .
2 6 I esl � � activities � I � �'
Mendenhall Student Center ana
the Ledonia S Wright Cuitura'
Center on campus Fraade's lee
ture is scheduled at 7 p m . Nov
11, m Room 244. Mendenhall Stu
dent Center
SPORTCLUBCOUNCIL
The November meeting ot the
Sport Club Council will be held on
Wednesday. November 12 at 3 30
p m in 104 Memorial Gym All
club presidents and advisors
should attena Representatives of
student groups wishing to become
recognized sport clubs should also
be in attendance at this meeting
FOOSEBALL
Register now to participate in
Mendenhall Student Center's
ACU i All Campus Table Soccer
Tournament The double elirmna
tion tournament will be held
Wednesday. November 19 at 6 00
p m m the MSC recreation area
Open to ECU students, this tour
nament will detenne the one (1)
open doubles team who will repre
sent ECU at the Assocation ot Coi
ege Unions international Region
V tournament at East Tennessee
State University m Februrary An
entering team may consist of two
(2) men, two (2� women or oil-
man and one (1) woman The
participants who W'll be going to
Tennessee will have all trip e�
penses paid by Mendenhall Stu
dent Center
Registration forms and more in
formation are available at the
MSC Billiards Center Teams
must register by Mono
November !7 in order to par
in 'pate
EPISCOPAL WORSHIP
An episcopal sevice ot Holy
Communion will be celebrated
Tuesday evening Nov llth in the
chapel of the M-tbodist Student
Center (5th Street across trom
Garrett Dorm I The service will
be at 5 30 p m with the Episcopal
Chapiam the Rev B'H Hadden
celebrating
PROTECTIVE
SERVICES
Pa Capps win speak on Protec
� .1- Services offered in Greenviie
Monday night, Nov 17. at 7 p m at
244 VSC Refreshments w n be
served Everyone is 'nvited to
come
S.U. ARTIST
Applications are now being
taken for position of Student union
Arl st for Spr.ng Semester Ap
pneat'on forms may be picked up
n the Student union Office, room
234. Mendenhall Student Center
Deadi.ne November 14 1980
MUSIC
� East Carolina University
chapte' of Sigma Alpha iota a
professional music fraternity, a
be sponsoring a Community Ac
Music Proiect The event a
be held Thursday. November 13
1980. from 6 30 to 9 00 p.m at the
Carolina East MaU The purpose
o the proiect is to make the public
aware of the different organiza
tions within the ECU School of
Music and how they are beneficial
to the community Among the
organizations participating are
The Music Therapy Club, the ECU
chapters of the Music Educators
National Conference iMENC
National Assooat.on of Jazz
Educators NAjEi. Phi Mu
Alpha. S.gma Alpha iota, and the
American Choral Directors
Association (ACDA)
GRE
The Graduate Record Examma
t,on viil be offered at East
Carolina University on Saturday
December 13. 1980 Application
blanks are to be completed and
mailed to Educational Testing
Service. Box 966 R Princeton NJ
08540 Applications must oe
postmarked no later than
November1980 Applications
may be obtained from the ECU
Testing Center Room 105 Speght
Building
FILM
The New England of Robert
Frost a travel adventure film
narrated by Dewitt Jones, will be
shown at East Carolina universi
�� s Mendenhall Student Center
Nov 13 at 8 p m
The film, first of ECU'S 1980 81
Travel Adventure Film Series
will be screened m Mendrix
Theatre Tickets are available at
the Central Ticket Office at J2 50
each
SIGN LANGUAGE
The Sign Language Club will
have its regular b' monthly
meeting on Sunday November 16,
1980 at 6 p m in the multi purpose
room of MSC There will be a
covered dish supper before the
meeting and a Captioned film
afterward This week s film is
"The Poseidon Adventure' All
members are reminded to attena
and anyone interested in ioining
may do so you need not know
sign language
LSAT
The Law School Admission Test
wilt be offered at East Carolina
University on Saturday.
December 6, 1980 Application
olanks are to be completed and
mailed to Educational Testing
Service Box 966 R, Princeton NJ
08540 Registration deadline is
November 10, 1980 Applications
may be obtained from the ECU
Testing Center Speight Building
Room 105
SIGMA TAU DELTA
SIGMA TAU DELTA National
English Honor Society, will meet
Tuesday. November 11 1980, at
7 30 p m in Mendenhall 221
Following a short business
meeting Dr Karen Baldwin will
present a sound'Siide program
about American Folklore An in
formal coffee hour will follow
Members, prospctive members,
and interested persons are invited
BIRTHDAY
Announcing the birthday of
Sharon Marie Albert On this
special day. i give you nothing
because all that is mine belongs to
you l love you
Forrest
PHI BETA LAMBDA
Phi Beta Lambda will meet on
Tuesday, November 18th at 4 pm
in Rawl 103 Tickets for the
December social will be
distributed to members Please
plan to attend this meeting, so the
sale of the tickets can begin on
Tuesday November 18th
COFFEEHOUSE
The Student union Coffeehouse
Committee urgently needs new
members for spring semester and
next year
The committee will lose 34 of its
members to graduation in
December, and the remaining 1 4
will graduate in Ma
It you enioy the Coffeehouse and
have about four hours a week you
can spare, please apply m the Stu
dent union office, rm 234, MSC
We especially encourage
underclassmen to apply, although
we welcome all students
MINORITY
LAW DAY
The University of North
Carolina School of Law is sponsor
ing a Carolina Minority Law Day
on Friday. November 21. 1980 in
Chapel Hill All minorites con
templatmg graduate law studies
are encouraged to attend Applica
tion forms are available in the
Career Planning and Placement
Center m the Bloxton House
ART SHOW
Art work m various med.a by
Kathy Sholar senior student in the
East Carolina University School of
Art, wil be on display Nov 7 13 in
joyner Library A candidate for
the Bachelor of Arts deorpp In
communication arts, Ms Shoiar s
displaying a number of gra
designs I logo, poster and bro I
designs drawings ana iliustra
tions, intaglio prints and
photographs She is a member of
Gamma Beta Phi honor society,
the Visual Arts Forum and Design
Associates During her studies
here, she has done several design
proiects for local businesses and
campus organizations
AUDITIONS
Auditions tor "Die Fleder
maus a light opera by Johann
Strauss Jr . will be held Nov 10
and 11 7 10 p m m the Recita
Hall of the Fletcher Music Center
at East Carolina university The
ECU Opera Theatre production
auditions are open to students
ECU faculty members and Singers
from the local area Roles to be
tilled include two sopranos one
mezzo soprano (or alto) three
tenors, two basses, as weM as
chorus parts and speaking parts
The opera will be presented Feb
26 28, 1981 While rehersals will
begin after Thanksgiving, mten
sive rehearsals will not be under
way until after Jan 1 Further m
formation about the auditions and
the production is available from
Dr Clyde Hiss at the ECU School
of Music, telephone 757 6331
ROAD RACE
Tr.e Coastai Care na Track
Clue an Pitt Plaz � �
Assoc of GreenviMe NC are spon
sonng a 7 Mile Road Race ana a
�' � Ron Run to be held on
. Novembei
�, m. T he races w fart a
� P M Piaza
rchanaise awaras a
g.ven to the overall male ana
lie winners as well as t( ��
� st place mail and te' �
shers in each ag�' group
Vodals will be presentea to the
2na and 3rd place t n stw
and female in ea ' � ' 'up
Pan panl � ' -
� oups
���" nated by the Pitt
Plaza Merchant '� a tx
�. i draw i to I held
. � . �
. ��
wards w � � -
cart pan's
� ry tee for ftnl s S4 00
ECU studet ' � � ' � �
� H in �" raged to par
pate E n'r v blanks are
available fro� Pitl Plan
chants or at the R
Room 204 Memorial G '
" . � A �
VACCINE
The Influenza vaccine is
available for students at the Stu
dent Health Center Students bet
ween ages 13 27 should get the vac
cine m two doses given one month
apart Students over 28 years old
need only one dose The cost ol the
vaccine is $1 50 per dose It is par
ticularly important tor students
wth chronic respiratory disorders
such as asthma and emphysema
or any other chronic illnesses to
receive the vaccine (both doses if
under 28 years old) before
Christmas
ACCOUNTING TUTORS
The Accounting Society will pro
vide tutoring services every
Wednesday afternoon from 4 to 5
p m. in Rawl 339 for Acct 2401 and
2521 students
cso
The Center tor Student Oppor
tunit.es (CSO) in the School of
Medicine has immediate openings
for qualified tutors with expense
m math, physics ana chemistry
You must have an academic
. erformance m the
subiect amj Wage based on
academo classification, eg
undergraduate graduate Contact
Dr Frye. 217 Whichard Annex or
Call 757 6122 or 6075 tor ar inter
view
RAFFLE
Wn 1500 00 in records tapes of
your choice from the Record Bar
in Easter Seals Holiday $500
Record Rattle Tickets each
SI 00 Your group can buy and or
sell t � ilSO 00 m
records) or register by mail to
day Can Easter Seals. 114 E
� � - � Street ?58 3230
ART CONTEST
Worla Research inc . the San
Diego California based non
profit non part.san educational
ana research group has announc
� mat ' s sponsor ny a nation
wide art competition among high
sc hool and college studc '
a new bole ogo
or ding to Barbara
fevi promotion director tor
Resea n All entries must
be re e by midnight,
Decembei N 1980 to t. � .
the 1 � � .
� �, �� � npetil m is open to all
high scl � '
Students interested n submitting
a log - should write ART
CONTEST World Researc
. lornia 92121
tor entrant requirements and con
tes' ' '
ATTENTION
Ihe Easl aroliniun
welcomes all campus
organizations to submit items
to the Vnnouni emenK sec-
tion. Due lo oar span I
tions, however, all
submissions should be no
longer than 5(1 words. Hand-
written submissions will also
no longer be accepted. Items
must be submitted no later
than 1 p.m. on Mondays or
W ednesdas.
PHIALHPATHETA
Phi Alpha Theta, the History
Honorary Society is having a
meeting on Tuesday. November 11
at 7 30 p m in the Richard C Todd
Room in Owing Brewster items
of discussion have not been f main
ed so all members are encouraged 10
attend
SURFANDSAND
The Sociology'Anthropology
Club invites everyone from
biologist to beach bum to a presen
tation by Dr John Maiola and
John Fisch on Marine Coastal
Studies The lecture will be held
Wednesday. November 12 at 7 00
p m at Brewster D 302
Refreshments will be served
following the program For more
info, call Anna (752 0826) or Britta
(7S8 8867)
AKA
There has been a slight change
in the dates previously listed for
the Student of the Year Contest
sponsored by Alpha Kappa Alpha
The deadline has been moved to
Nov 17 and the actual date of the
contest to Nov 23 It will still be
held in the Mendenhall
Auditorium beginning at 7 00
Would any person interest in par
ticipating please call 752 9192 or
contact any Alpha Kappa Alpha
soror for details.
CHANGE
The Department of Geography
at East Carolina University has
been renamed the Department of
Geography and Planning The
change is effective immediately.
according to Chancellor Thomas
B Brewer The department offers
both geography and urban and
regional planning degrees at the
bachelor's and master's levels
MUSIC RECITAL
Clarinetist Barbara Ellen
Arneth ot Raleigh senior student
in the East Carolina University
School ot Music, will perform in
recital Friday. Nov 14, at 7 30
pm in the AJ Fletcher Music
Center Recital Hall Her program
will include Vaughan Williams'
"Six Studies in English Folk
song, ' the Brahms "Sonate Es
Dur Opus 120, No 2 and CM
Maria von Weber's Concertino
Opus 26 She will be accompanied
by pianists Elizabeth Braxton ana
Va! Parks and assisted by flutists
Dena Biomberg and Michael
Elliot and guitarist Mark Stone
CAREER SERVICES
Mark Your Calendars Take A
Giant step Workshop, November
11 and 12, 3 5 p m 221 Mendenhall
Student Center A seminar which
will help you "take a giant step m
to your future Learn about
career services available to you as
a freshman, sophomore, tunior or
senior Don't miss it!
$4.81
!$$S$$$$$$$$$$$$$$S$5$$$!
KODACOLOR
Developed and Printed
EXPOSURE (C CQ
ROLL ONLYP-�-JvJ
No Foiegn
Film
;$$$$$$$$$$
SUMMER CAMP
Summer Camp Employment
Day is November 18. 103pm in
the Mendenhall multi purpose
room Students who wish summer
employment with camps should
come be the Cooperative Educa
tion office in 313 Rawl Building to
arrange interviews with
recruiters
COMMITTEES
The Office of the Vice
Chancellor for Student Life is still
accepting applications for the 63
committee openings The various
committees fall under the
headings, Administrative Comit
tees. Faculty Senate Academic
Committees, Academic Support.
Institutional Support Please come
by room 204 Whichard and fill out
an application
36
EXPOSU
ROLL ONLY
Wld.�M4
FILM DEVELOPING
$1.92
20 EXPOSURE
KODACHROME
AND EKTACHROME
PROCESSING ONLY
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LOW, LOW PRICES ON
Movie
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SUPER � AND STANOAftS MOVIES
LIMITED OFFER
OFFER EXPIRES
In
I
AOVEBTISCD
ITEM POLICY
ach of th��� �dv.rtlMd lt�tn� it .�quired to b� r.adlly available tor ��'��' �'
balow the advertiee'i price m each ASP Store except at apecifically noted
in thlt ad
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT. NOV. 15 AT ASP 'MOREEN VI LLE RS
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLfcbALfcHb
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I Ml i M C AROl INI AN
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It ASE
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U-4
)ME
Individual Histories Preserved In Manuscript Collection
By TKKKV C.RAY
Staff riler
Here's an old wai
story from the memoirs
of William von Ebcrs-
tein into the historj
book:
During the Civil
H ar, when Union
forces occupied the
coastal areas of North
Carolina, the Con-
federate Army detach
ment in Greenville
helped guard against
any i 'nion raids deeper
into the state
c)nc morning, Con-
federate scouts
� t ported back to
Greenville that a I 'nion
army was advancing on
the a i rough the
da) 's ea fog. 1 he
had seen tl
adows and hec
their march as the) ap-
proached across
Brow ns 'arm.
('onfusi ke out
the Confi derate
ranks as offia rs sent
ton on;
mands. I mall).
di isii n was made to
real from (he i
than face
unprepared. 1
con was sent o c
to Brown's farm to
Blued tats at

lerates retreated
� ard Falkla
But whi
. Bi farm as
� i d, the
� e company
wai greeted b) an unex-
i hi Instead oj
umns
. Sort hern
i .
pt field
Von Eberstein was a
sea-roving ship captain
who settled in
Washington, NC and
i oined
federates
the Con
when war
dividuals.
At least halt oi the
manuscripts are family,
personal, military or
administrative papers
that pertain to North
gSS&se
tqtH J te
hfoebent a fcm.tr
ledae f t hm
m
l(tNH: tf't (.rr'i
rait fLarotina Lmii ersitu
Cjreeni'ilCty r forth C urotina

o.
V j�r K
kc His
in the
1870s, are preserved in
Joyi Library's
Manuscript c ollection
as are the public and
. ate papers of hun-
dreds of interesting in-

m
c arohna, aIt houghthe
collectionCXCclsin
other areas, suchas
documents a bo u t
China.
DonaldR. 1 ennon,
d i r e c t o ioft h e
manuscriptcollection.
spends a lot of his time
soliciting contributions
to the collection.
"There is a tremen-
dous amount of com-
petition, especially con-
sidering that we don't
have the prestige of the
UNC-Chapel Hill or
the Duke University
collections I ennon
said. "Most people
wouldn't think of call-
ing ECU. I spend a
great deal of my time
contacting people to see
if they want their
papers preserved here.
As a result, we have to
do a lot more outreach
work
I ennon, who also
teaches history at ECU,
began working with the
collection in 1967 when
it held only 25 collec-
tions. Today, the
records, letters, diaries
and other papers of
about 5(X) individuals
have been acquired and
classified.
Getting manuscripts
sometimes involves a
little detective work.
Once, a man called to
ask about some papers
he had seen, but would
not say where the
papers were located.
"By the way he talk-
ed, it seemed that he
was on to something
rathei important
1 ennon recounted. "1
did a little bit of sear-
ching, and found the
collection scattered on
the top floor ol a
tobacco warehouse
he said.
As it turned out, the
papers belonged to a
Charles Dyer, a naval
attache in Madrid at
the time that the
Spanish-American Wai
broke out. " J hings
turn up in the most
unlikely places I en-
non said.
The collections are
concentrated in tour
categories.
Besides the large
North Carolina
category, the collec-
tions include military
records oi all kinds,
missionary records and
diaries, and documents
dealing with tobacco.
Although the tobac-
co papers are often
related to North
Carolina, many of
them are from tobac-
conists who report oti
then experiences while
doing business in China
and the Middle last.
I he oldest single
document in the
manuscript collection is
a land record dating to
1715 concerning the
sale of colonial Gov.
I homas Carey's pro-
perty after the rebellion
now named alter him.
The collection most
requested is the
7,000-piece collection
from North Carolina's
first p o s t -
Revolutionary War
governor, Filias Carr.
According to Len-
non, students are the
largest users oi the
manuscript facility,
although authors and
researchers from other
states and nations have
done work there.
Jewel Tradsr
Case & Pouc)i
30 day a
ef CMKJ Us
Many Pressures Lead To
Suicides Among Teenagers
Continued from pajt' 1
1 aui ie Russell, a
sophomore at a hi
school on Chicaj
North Shore said
knows of people at her
school who have at
tempted to commit
suicide. "Growing up
in this kind ol envin
ment is tough. Parents
have very high expec
tions and when you fall
short it's hard to deal
with. The all want
their kids to be on the
honor roll and the)
don't realize that
everyone just can't
make those grades.
I hose who don't, feel
like failures
"We have everything
we want materially
Russell said, "but that
doesn't make up foi
emotional needs that go
unfulfilled. A lot oi my
friends don't feel loved
or needed
:hough there is no
such thing as the
"typical suicide vic-
tim" experts generally
agree that certain
characteristics are
signals that someone
could be suicidal. "Any
change in attitude is
serious Giffin said.
"It suddenly an outgo-
ing person withdraws
or a happy person
becomes despondent,
then they should be
considered suicidal.
I hese radical changes
in personality are the
key indicator.
"The most common
characeristic is depres-
sion Vale Child
Studies Center
psychiatrist John
Schowaltei said. "II
the person seems very
sad, wonders it life is
worth living, feels that
thev are a burden to
ety or that the
world would be better
ofl without them, he oi
she should be watched
�ely. These kinds of
things are very com-
mon among suicide vic-
tims
,ide experts have
ny theories on why
the rate ot suicide is ris-
ing among young, up-
per middle class young
people. "People on the
lower end of the social
lie expect less than
these people do
Chicago psychiatrist
Harold Yisotskv said.
"Whatever ar er the
poo: experience � thev
act it out in antisocial
wavs � vandalism.
homicide, riots. With
well-to-do kids, when
the rattle goes in the
mouth the foot goes on
the social ladder. The
competition ethic takes
over, making the stu-
dent feel even more
alone. He's more likely
to take it out on
himself
"My friends have to
deal with much more
today than they did 20
years ago Steve
I atham, a senior at a
high school in Dallas
County said.1 he
suicide rate among
teens in Dallas C ounty
is 50 percent higher
than the national
average.) "There are
other reasons tor teen
suicide then the typical
ones who can't cope
with their first B in col-
lege. Students are
aware of the state oi
the country and the
world. I here are SO
many problems but no
answers. I hey are
disillusioned
Yale psychiatrist
Schow alter contends
there are only two valid
speculations on causes
of suicide. "The break-
up o the family unit, it
is generally agreed, is a
major factor in teenage
suicide. One-half to
two-thuds ol teens who
who kill themselves use
guns. Drugs and hang-
ing are the other most
common methods.
I he highest rate of
suicide is among
18-year olds. Tedford
said that 18 is a par-
ticular vulnerable age
because teenagers have
to leave home to go to
college and have many
difficulties adjusting
when they get there.
Another study releas-
ed m October, shows a
disproportionately high
suicide rate among
juveniles held in adult
jails. The study, spon-
sored by the Office of
Juvenile Justice and
Delinquency Preven-
tion found that the
suicide rate for young
people in adult jails is
tour times greater than
the rate for the general
population.
The suicide rate con-
tinues to swell despite
various community ef-
forts to curtail the
surge. Teachers and
social workers are
trained in suicide
prevention and 24-hour
hotlines are operated in
many areas. One
hotline, manned by
Chicago psv choanalyst
Joseph Pribyl, receive
150 suicide-related calls
a month.
The National In-
stitute oi Mental
Health operates a
S u i c i d e P r e ven t i o n
Center as part of the
Disaster Assistance
Program. The Center
organizes conferences
and publishes literature
but does not fund any
suicide prevention
clinics.
"Suicide can be
prevented said Social
S c i e n c e A n a 1 y s t
Dorothy Lewis. With
programs set up to
counsel young people,
many suicides could be
stopped. The problem
is that here are no
funds to back up our
concerns. There is no
legislation directed at
suicide prevention so
it's up to the individual
community to address
the problem � and it's
not being done
I ewis explained that
there is no money for
suicide prevention.
"Given other problems
in terms of sheer
numbers, suicide is not
considered a priority
item for people who
design the budget
At the local level,
psychiatrist Giffin said
that the problem
should be addressed
through the schools.
Some high schools have
set up pre-eollege rap
groups that deal with
separation from family
and how to deal with
academic pressure.
Sell It Faster
Sell it faster
Classified through
Classified Ads
id t cd'Os
Research in the col
lections is supervised,
and no documents may
be removed from the
room. Many oi the ap
proximately 1.5 million
items in the collection
are fragile, hundred-
year-old papers that
cannot be replaced.
lor this reason, the
manuscript room has
humidity and heat con-
trols that are separate
from the rest ol the
library.
"We keep the room
at the optimum condi-
tions tor the prserva
lion of the papers
said Pennon. " The col-
lections are stored in
acid-free paper boxes,
and deterioration is
kepi at a minimum
I he collection
open to the public
Monday through Fri
dav trom X a.m. until
p.m. Visiting scholai
genealogists, and I
public are welcome
use the facility.
CLIFFS
SPECIALS
E. 10th St. Extension
752-3172
MONDAY-THURSDAY
Oyster Plate3.95
Shrimp Plate3.95
Seafood Plate3.95
Ocean Perch2.50
Blue Fish2.50
Crab Cakes1.85
THURSDAY
Popcorn Shrimp2.95
LA KOSMETIQUE
UNISEX SALON
2800 EAST 10th STREET
IN SHOPPING CENTER WITH
J.D.DAWSON CATALOG SHOWROOM
SPECIAL
THROUGH
NOVEMBER 30th
ALL DESIGNER
HAIR CUTS $6.50
FOR
MEN AND WOMEN
WE ALSO SPECIALIZE
IN TOTAL HAIR
CARE FOR THE
BLACK WOMAN
CALL 752-3419
ask about our
FROSTINGS HAIR RELAXERS
HENNA CALIFORNIA CURL
BODY WAVES JERI CURL
CURLY PERMS HIGH LIGHTING
LUM1N1ZING MANICURES
HOURS
) 8:30am - 7:30pm
i MON. thru SAT.
MS
The Contest:
Domino's Pizza will award
free, 50 large pizzas to the
winning male �female
dorms purchasing the most
pizzas during the 7-day
period starting Nov. 9 and
running through Nov. 15.
(coed dorms included)
The pizza sales will be com-
puted on a per capita basis.
The Rules:
1. Carry-out orders and all
deliveries will be counted if
we are given your dorm ad-
dress.
2. Any pizza over $7.00 will be
counted twice.
3. The winning dorm's Resi-
dent Advisor will be notified.
Announcements will be
published in the East Caroli-
nian Nov. 18, 1980.
4. The location and the time
of the party will be conve
nient to both the winning
dorms and Domino's Pizza.
5. The 50 pizza will be one
item pizzas. The winning
dorms will have the choice of
item. The pizzas do not have
to be the same.
All Pizzas Include Our
Special Blend of Sauce
and Cheese
Our Superb
Cheese Pizza
12' cheese S3 65
16" cheese $5 35
Domino's Deluxe
5 items for the price of 4
Pepperom, Mushrooms,
Onions, Green Peppers,
and Sausage
12' Deluxe $645
16" Deluxe $9 55
1980 Donrnes P zza Inc
The vegi
5 items for the price of 4
Mushrooms. Black Olives.
Green Olives. Onions and
Green Peppers
12" Vegi $6 45
16" Vegi $9 55
Any 1 item
Any ViVa
Any 2 items
Any 3 items
Any 4 items
12" 13"
$4.35 $640
$4.35 $640
$505 $7 45
$5 75 $8 50
$645 $9 55
Additional Items
Mushrooms Pepperoni
Green Peppers Anchovies
Ground Beef Sausage
Double Cheese Ham
Black Olives Onions
Green Olives
Extra Thick Crust
Hot Pepper Rings
12" pizza70
16" pizza $1.05
Greenviile hours:
11:00-100 SunThurs
11:00-200 Fri. � Sat.
Our divers ca"y less than $20 00
Lim.ted deltve-y area Pnces do not
include applicable saws tax.
Fast
Friendly
Free
Delivery
758-6660
1201 Charles Blvd.
1
I





5Jt?� !Eaat ffiarultntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
RichardGrh n, ���,� w
TtRRV HlRNDON, Dmctoro) -Wmm LlSA DREW, � �
Chris LiCHOK, ���,� ���, MlKE NOONAN, v ���,
David Severin, (md Mm- Chari es Chandi er, ���
Ami a Lancaster, mm David Norris, fm �.���� ii�
EAST CAROLINIAN SAYS
SECURITY IS AX A�AR 7W�
lNFt8.MAR.YI WtVE GOT
TO DO S6mETHMGI
Novembci 11. 1980
Opinion
I'ajjc 4
'Cultural' Problem
K'ce Chancellor Gets Mad,
Campus Security Gets Back,
SOULS Get Minority Seat?
When The East Carolinian ran
the story "Officials Disclaim
Responsibility For Center" �
about the problems associated with
the Ledonia Wright Afro-American
Cultural Center � we never guessed
the response would be so strong or
so negative.
We did get one positive response
from a concerned parent: "(T)hat
the college chancellor or the board
of trustees would permit a condition
such as reported to exist where doc-
tors andor nurses cannot reach the
Infirmary in emergency situations is
unthinkable (Nov. 4, page 4)
Along with public consumption of
alcohol and disturbing the peace,
it's unthinkable to us too. But Cam-
pus Security and Vice Chancellor
for St" ' nf T �"� lTT"�r Mever
weren't too thrilled about our con-
cern.
After last week's story and
editorial on the situation, an
"unwritten" agreement with Cam-
pus Security that allowed East
Carolinian employees to park beside
the Old South Building was forgot-
ten. The car belonging to the
reporter who wrote the story was
towed, even though she had been
parking there for the entire fall
semester and had never received a
warning that she was on the towing
list. When a passerby mentioned to
officers that the owner was an
employee of the paper, they chuckl-
ed and said they knew. It's too
damn bad that they aren't as
zealous in other areas of their jobs
that might be more "politically
touchy
A former managing editor of The
East Carolinian overheard Vice
Chancellor Elmer Meyer chastising
journalism professor John Warren
in front of the library about the
story. Meyer said that he didn't ex-
actly agree with the type of jour-
nalism Mr. Warren was teaching us,
and he mentioned something about
"social responsibility We at this
newspaper know the kind of jour-
nalism that Meyer and the ad-
ministration want: the kind that
never reports "bad" news or
criticizes their operation. This
newspaper will never stoop to that
level of puff and hype � unless we
were interested in training our
employees for jobs in the Soviet
Union.
What's Going On?
But it might be interesting to
evaluate and speculate some of the
recent actions in and around the
campus media just to try to get a
handle on the situation.
The ECU Media Board and the
SOULS organization have been in
cahoots to swing a "minority" seat
for the SOULS president. The
board wants the chancellor to re-
quest authorization from the Board
Of Trustees to create a voting seat
for SOULS. The trustees do not
meet again until January, and there
is no guarantee that Chancellor
Brewer will submit the request or
that it would be approved. But
Dean Rudolph Alexander said that
a SOULS representative will sit as a
non-voting member before the
trustees make their decision.
Sources in the administration
have told The East Carolinian that
the real reason behind this move is
to pacify minorities because of
federal law suits pending against the
university system. There's little if
any concern about proper student
representation on the Media Board
� it's just plain politics.
No wonder Meyer got so upset
over a good investigative story
about a problem at the cultural
center. Now the administration is
caught between a rock and a hard
place: It must remedy the situation
at the cultural center and risk seem-
ing "prejudiced or it can accuse
the student newspaper of being
"prejudiced" and use that to help
swing the SOULS seat on the Media
Board (to assure fair coverage, of
course).
We continue to oppose a SOULS
seat on the Media Board and refuse
to recognize it until approved by the
ECU Board Of Trustees. W;e will
also continue to print the news �
the truth � as we see fit. If the ad-
ministration wants puff, it can print
its own.
UJEIL HASSLE
THE EAST CAROUlNlANI
��Campus Forum
Handicap Story Poorly Edited
1 am writing in reference to an article
you printed in the November 6 issue of
The East Carolinian entitled,
"Handicaps Do Not Prevent Relation-
ships The staff writer, Dana Neill,
worked very hard and diligently in trying
to gather all the correct data by per-
sonally finding and interviewing most of
the handicapped students, both on cam-
pus and off, so she could write a factual
article on a very sensitive subject. I had
the pleasure of reading the article ap-
proximately ten minutes before she car-
ried it to you for publication. However,
the pleasure was from reading the entire
writing, not from the vicitimied, but-
chered version that appeared in the
paper.
By reading the version in the paper, it
was clearly evident that complete
paragraphs had been deleted from Ms.
Neill's original writing o' the article;
supposedK to preserve space. If it really
was too long, Ms. Neill should have
been called to the office and collaborted
with on what could be cut. As a result of
not consulting her, and of the insen-
sitive, unprofessional, editorial excess
that was projected, the article lost its
meaning.
Finally, since the article lost its mean-
ing, a grave disservice was done not only
to the author, but to the handicapped
students and tne entire student body �
to say nothing of journalistic principles.
BILLM1ZELLE
Senior, Psychology
Marching Pirates Commended
Editor's Note: the following is an open
letter to the director and members of the
Marching Pirates.
For two years now 1 have been wat-
ching the Marching Tarheel Band pre-
sent poor openings and half-time shows.
1 have many times been tempted to ex-
press my disappointment in UNC's band
to our Director. But after watching your
fantastic performance on Saturday, Oct.
25 in Chapel Hill, 1 am more inclined to
congratulate you.
I cannot be profuse enough in my
praise of your marching band. The
young man directing the halftime show
was dynamic and exciting to watch.
Your band brought enthusiasm and foot
tapping to UNC fans like I have never
seen our own band do. Your musical
selections were appropriate, exciting,
and technically flawless. The whole-
band displayed an enthusiasm which was
infectious to everyone around me. Many
fans waited till the end of your show
before leaving the stadium for their hot
dogs and cokes. You were captivating.
After your performance, 1 was rather
embarassed when our own band took
the field, claiming to be the pride of the
ACC. At the close oi your show , though
you may not have noticed, you received
a standing ovation from the majority of
the South seating area. A young man
near me commented. "It's a good thing
that their football team is not as good as
their marching band From a school
with a 7-0 record, could there be a higher
compliment? You were fantastic!
T1SH INK
Graduate School, I N -CH
'We're Number One'
We've always been number 1: no. 1 in
the export of military goods; no. 1 con-
sumer of natural resources (oil); no. 1 in
agricultural production (to feed animals
� not people); no. 1 home of the
multinational conglomerates; no. 1 liar
to the world
Nineteen hundred eighty is the year-
Conservatism has overwhemlmed us.
The common cries are: "Make America
no. 1 again "Let's regain the respect
we deserve" How? Not through a true
commitment to human rights; not by
setting the example o peace; not by
leading the way to a better standard of
living for the poor; But through strength
� increasing the already insane arms
race, scraping the Salt 2 treaty, hard-
lining the Soviets and doing nothing to
reduce the world's tensions.
This incredible contradiction reaches
its pinicle in the final verse of our Na-
tional Anthem: the land of the free
and the home of the brave We are not
free from the threat of annihilation; we
are not free from the horrors of poverty
and racism; we are not brave enough to
feed the hungry; we are not brave
enough to lead the peace race; We are
not free from the fear that confronts us
now. We are, in fact, not free enough to
control our own destinies nor brave
enough to admit it.
Our Congress is now in the hands of
the Conservative "leaders Main
"bleeding heart" liberals are gone.
What does this mean for the poor0 the
cities? education0 hopes of world peace
Mv optimism is fading. Americans are
determined to do all thev can to main-
tain their high standard of living. V
is our responsibility to the rest of the
world in 'his age of scarcity? Can we
guiltlessly continue our incredible
consumption of everything0 Do we
the right to abandon those less
tunate0 Are we the "chosen ones"
These are questions that we can
overlook. The economic order
world is tilting more out ol
every day. The rich get richer
poor die' Americans must take tl
ltiative. The weight ol I
our shoulders. We
challenge. Let's end I
"The time is now f
PATRICKO'NI II.1
Member, Greenville Peace Comm.
Glad To Be Graduating,
Even With Bitterness
1 put mv senior show up in
Mendenhall on Nov. 2. After finishing
that, I asked for the lectern so I could
leave a hook in which mv friends, cril
whatever, could sign. This was rathei
important to me. After all. the show is a
requirement for graduation and is sup
posed to comemmorate the past
years in which the student has worke
better his or her art. The book was to be
a memento o this event and 1 thought a
nice one. Unfortunately, someone else
also thought it was nice, and bv Mondav
morning, Nov. 3, it had been ripped off.
What I think o the person or persons in
volved is unprintable.
Since this letter is simplv a sound
off to make my opinions known, and 1
know that the thief will not change his oi
hei ways, and will probablv simplv
laugh this letter off (if they are capable
ol leading). I would simplv like to state
if that is the level of some o the students
at this university, 1 am very glad to be
graduating this semester and leaving,
even it ii is with a sense o bitterness.
SANDRA MOM! I I H
Senior. Interioi Design
the
hav
1
untui
w
1
des
To The Right
ERA Could Open Pandora's Box For Future Amendments
By STAN RIDGLEY
I note with increasing alarm that
we seem to be forever at the mercy
of the naive; thus it is with the con-
troversy surrounding the Equal
Rights Amendment.
Limiting a discussion to purely
the merits of just such an amend-
ment, this writer would be hard-
pressed to make an argument
against ERA�that is the task of
more knowledgeable scholars of
constitutional law such as former
Senator Sam Ervin. On the matter
of tinkering with the constitutional
process, however, I must speak out.
Verbum sat sapienti est.
Every proposed amendment to
the Constitution has its proponents
and opponents, all of whom
perhaps are convinced of the
manifest Tightness of their respec-
tive positions. Politically, perhaps,
there is nothing wrong with this.
Each side of the argument is funnel-
ed through the constitutional pro-
cess by which the proposed amend-
ment is either accepted or rejected at
any of a number of points along the
way.
Trying to end-run this process,
however, are the proponents of
ERA. Reaching to the very founda-
tion upon which our laws are laid,
the ERAers would have us make a
special exception for them�exempt
them from having to fulfill the re-
quirements by which the Constitu-
tion is amended. And a very touchy
subject it is, generating emotional
responses in otherwise rational per-
sons.
A previous column of mine on
ERA elicited the type of facile
response expected. Unfortunately,
though several good points were
made, the bulk of the letter concern-
ed extraneous issues and the fact
that 1 perhaps misquoted the
amendment. As to that misquota-
tion, the blame goes to Susan
Rouder, Professor of Political
Science at San Francisco State
University, and her book American
Politics�Playing the Game from
?
t
which 1 took the amendment.
But as to my basic assertion that
ERA proponents are perverting the
constitutional process, the only
response was an emotional tug at
the heartstrings: "Women are ask-
ing for a place in the constitution,
the Law of the Land, that says in ef-
fect that we can no longer be denied
equal rights as Americans because
we happen to be female
Aside from the fact that that is
not what the ERA states (some per-
sons seem to think that ERA will af-
fect only women; it doesn't say
anything about women), it doesn't
address the original thesis: namely,
what special significance attaches
itself to this particular amendment
that merits such a radical departure
in the procedure of its ratification?
ERA proponents do not appear to
have considered the ramifications of
their scheming to make their idee
fixe the supreme law of the land.
They are setting a dangerous prece-
dent which they will perhaps be
sorry for all too soon. Unfortunate-
ly, there appears no cure for ERA
myopia.
A word of explanation: With the
Republican landslide in the
presidential and senatorial elections
last Tuesday, Republicans now con-
trol the White House and the senate.
However likely this makes the
realization of Republican Party
Platform goals is a matter for
speculation, but one can't help but
point out that that party took a very
conservative stand in its platform on
abortion, calling for a constitutional
amendment "to restore protection
of the right to life for unborn
children
Ahh, now get the picture? What is
going to happen w hen Ban Abortion
groups start lobbying for their
amendment (which, by the way, I
am also against) and their time limit
of seven years for ratification is up?
Will ERA backers be as anxious to
extend the time limit this time
around? Or not allow states to res-
cind their ratification of an anti-
abortion amendment if they choose
to do so?
That is what is meant by
"perverting the constitutional pro-
cess If it is done once for what
some persons consider a "good"
amendment, what is their argument
if another amendment which they
consider "bad" is up for ratifica-
tion? They have no argument,
because the precedent has been set.
As to the alleged "paternalistic"
and subtle undercurrent in my
previous article, I have neither ex-
planation nor apjlogy. 1 assume no
special position from which to write
when tackling the ERA controver-
sy�as far as I know, my style never
wavers.
If one accepts that, then one
would logically have to assume that
paternalistic undercurrents through
all my articles whether they concern
ERA, Liberalism, or high school
football (a brief note here to
acknowledge the tacit compliment
that my articles have sufficient
depth to sustain undercurrents,
paternalistic or otherwise).
The alternative to that assump
tion is that any paternalism
registered with my work is a product
of the mind of that particular
reader, arising, perhaps, from a
search for a father-figure. But that
is idle speculation.
What should be realized is that
with the special treatment given to
this particular constitutional
amendment, a pandora's box has
been opened that ERA proponents
may very well wish they hadn't. By
initiating the perversion of the con-
stitution, they have set the stage for
its further perversion�for better or
worse.
Stan Ridgley is a senior Political
Science major with a degree in jour-
nalism from the University of Sorth
Carolina at Chapel Hill.
��i5itsRfc � i.
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I Ml I s i KOl IM-W
Features
N(I MM R I i 980
I .
I mr �
ts
i
Palm Reading
Lady's Talent Helps People
International Foods Festival
Photo by GARY PATTERSON
I ast week, the student I nion Minority Arts Committee sponsored the annual International and Jewish Arts
Festival. I he International roods Festival, held last Wednesday night, was part of the week's events. Guests
enjoyed such dishes as Hungarian cabbage rolls, blintes and Indonesian tried rice.
By TOM HALL
Muff Wnltr
The outstretched hand beckons
from the roadside. "Madame
Lurane the sign says. "Palmist �
Divine Healer
Is this the right house? Except for
the sign in front, the home looks no
different from the other dwellings
that line U.S. Highway 64 east of
Bethel. The driveway dips steeply
off the road; the house is nestled in
its own private valley. Tall pines
cast the house and yard in perpetual
shadow, and perfect doughnuts of
pine needles are raked around the
trees and shrubs. A stone lion
crouches in infinity near the plant-
lined sidewalk. A pale plastic jack-
o-lantern offers belated Halloween
greetings from a window.
The woman moves noiselessly to
the storm door. "Yes, I am
Madame Lurane she says, turning
and leading the way through the
cluttered living room. "I forgot you
College Classrooms Lack
Clocks, Flags And Intercoms
Bv DWII) NORRls
One j about college that
me when I arrived was
appearance of the
High school
� � :re always visually in
sometimes a bit
dy But, the colorful bulletin
wall posters, class projects
� years past and the ever-present
: Si pe arc completely,
lege classrooms.
Mai - here don't even
locks t stare at. (If there
irobably would
have the � me, anyway.)
V siting an elementary school
be a rich visual ex-
perie I mbarding the viewer
with bright colors, patriotic
knicknacks and maps. (The maps
fell " ' the wall often enough to
sensory bombardment a
literal one as well.) Class projects,
like flour-paste replicas of the
al and bug collections,
Saturn rockets and
Shah ire's Globe Theatre, and
untold acres o children's drawings
.ring the walls left very little
space for empty areas.
Even through high school, the
av full of things to
k al So, i! is quite a shock to ar-
ollege, expecting all kinds of
wonderful classroom visual aids and
finding only a spartan room full of
desks and only a trash can to relieve
the monotony.
The desks at college aren't so
good, cither. You can't put your
feel on the shell under the desk in
front of you, so your feel fidget ner-
vously for the entire period. The
desktops aren't even large enough to
open a notebook on without spilling
loose papers from the front of the
book. As for opening a notebook
and a textbook at the same time,
you have to hold one of them in
your hand to do it. College desks
don even have one of those little
grooves at the top of the desk to
hold pencils.
My second grade desk was
perhaps the most comfortable one 1
have had in any school. The desk
and chair parts were separate,
enabling one to slide the chair
around on the polished floor. The
desk part itself had a big draawer
under it, large enough to hold all my
books, paper airplanes, crumpled
reports and an orange that 1 forgot I
had for three months.
Maps are a wonderful decorating
accessory for any classroom,
although perhaps more appropriate
for a history class than a math class.
I hey are good teaching aids, pro-
vide color and also provide amuse-
ment when they fall off the wall
(which happens every time a teacher
even thinks about using a map.)
By the way, maps are one area in
which college classes are better
equipped than their public school
counterparts. Public schools like
tradition in the field of mapmaking,
and are slow about replacing maps
with nice countries like French In-
dochina. Anglo-Egyptian Sudan
and Austria-Hungary just because
the countries no longer exist. Keep-
ing old maps around made for some
interesting (but not accurate)
reports when I was a kid.
Have you noticed the difference
between a bulletin board, a type of
mural constructed out of construc-
tion paper and staples, was a
widespread art form during my
childhood. Despite the obstacles of
cutting paper with those ridiculous
scissors they give kids in school
(these scissors are cheap, too small
to hold and don't cut well), hardly
an inch of cork ever showed on a
bulletin board anywhere.
The bulletin boards in college
contrast sharply with this creativity.
A typical board here is decorated
with a couple of 1974 day legislator
campaign posters, an ad for
student-rate magazine subscrip-
tions, another ad for one of those
outfits that writes term papers for
students and a flyer advertising a
party that was over six months ago.
The rest is just plain old cork. There
is not much to look at, and if it
weren't for some strange sense of
historical preservation that keeps
anyone from removing obsolete
posters, there would be even less to
look at.
Besides bulletin boards, other
common classroom wall accessories
include flags, clocks, pencil
sharpeners (also called pencil
disintegrators) and intercoms. Most
of these don't exist here in colle
though, making it difficult to pledge
allegiance, stare at the clock or
disintegrate pencils. The lack of in-
tercoms is probably the biggest dif-
ference between the high school
See CLASSROOMS, Page 6. Col. 1
were coming she admits "My
husband just reminded me She
pulls back two chaus from her kit-
chen table and slides into one. I take
the hint and sit down.
"How about Reagan winning?"
she asks. "I said Ronald Reagan
was going in by a landslide, but the
people here in Bethel laughed and
said it would be a close race She-
adjusts the silver bracelets on one
wrist. Her hair falls about her
shoulders; it is brown streaked with
gray until it reaches her ears, where
it abruptly turns ruby-tinted "1 was
as surprised as anybody about
Morgan and Dr. Fast, though she
says, drawing on a cigarette.
"1 read the cards and tea leaves as
well as palms says Madame
Lurane. She vehemently denies that
she is a gypsy. "I am a rumney-
tell she explains. Her maternal
grandmother, a rumney-tell in
Wales, came to the United State
the late 19th century
"Palm reading isn't taught . it's a
gift she says. Her grandmother
and mother were psychics, and so is
Madame Lurane. "I only look in
hands to get the marriage line and
the life line. It says in the Bible
your life is known by the lines in
your hands It is a strain to take
notes under her intense stare, and
there is that uncanny feeling that she
knows your next question before
you ask it.
Lurane Branton was born in 192
in King's Mountain. She was
reading tea leaves in a Clevel
Ohio tearoom when she was 12
years old. Her father, a ma
carpenter, moved his family to P
smounth, Va. in 1940. She has lived
in Bethel "since Eisenhower went in
office Her husband, William
Robert Jones, is an asphalt contrac-
tor; they haw: two children and nine
grandchildren.
Madame 1 urane says there is no
formal organization of palmist
divine healers. "1 have to buy a
business license like anyone else
she says. She charges $10 lor palm
readings and $100 to $500 tor heal-
ings, depending on the success and
extent of the cure.
Her divine healing works through
faith, she explains. "I do have peo-
ple who come here that are sick with
cancer or heart trouble, and 1 make
sure they go to a doctor first She-
supposes that her treatment is a
form of psychiatry, but hasten-
add that it is also a gift.
"I have had people that an
sick that their families had to carry
them in Madadme Lurane says.
"I don't understand how I do it, 1
just know it happens. They hav
have faith People have come to
her from New York .Illinois and
Florida, and she will try to help
them over the phone if they cannot
come to Bethel.
Healers .ailed "mother" and
"sister" take religious names to
avoid buying a license or paying
taxes, according to Madame
Lurane. She says their money never
reaches the church. "They often use
a con trick with an egg or th
person's hair she adds. "I.
what gives pali bad name. I've
never done that; I make a very g
See I in v Page 7. Col. 1
Allen's Stardust Memories
Depicts Life's Absurdities
By DOUG QUEEN
In the opening scene of Woody
Allen's new film, Stardust
Memories, Allen is sitting in a stop-
ped train which is filled by grotes-
que people. Sandy Bates, Allen's
character, looks out the window and
sees the train that is stopped beside
them. The telling difference is that
the other train is full of beautiful
people doing beautiful things. San-
dy Bates would very much like to
ride in the other train; we all would.
The story is about a film-
writer director, Sandy Bates, whose
latest films have turned towards a
more serious subject matter which is
a major departure from his earlier
'funny' films. While lecturing at a
seaside resort in New Jersey, he is
constantly accosted by his fans and
critics who want to know why he
doesn't write 'funny' films
anymore. Bates answers them say-
ing, "How can I with all the human
suffering in the world Indeed,
how can a serious artist work in the
modern world when all around him
is misery?
Bates answers this question
although it leaves the viewer un-
satisfied. He states in one scene that
he doesn't want to die because there
are "women to pinch For Bates,
life is only grotesquely funny. and at
best, absurd, but with death as the
only alternative, it may be worth liv-
ing.
Allen drives this point home bv
interjecting scenes stolen from such
filmmakers as Fellim, especially the
party-on-the-lawn scene from Juliet
Of The Spirits that serves admirably
in illustrating the often
"disconnectedness" o life. Is there
a cause and effect in the universe, or
do we just blunder through stages ol
lives blindly mixing fantasy
me hybrid
Mien has taken a huge step, and a
great risk, with this film. Filme
black and white like Manhattan
Interiors, although with little of the
lyricism oi Manhattan, it is a long
mood-piece. I he mood is that ol
absurdists who see the vagratie-
life as horrifingly funny. In this
way, Allen is as funny as in his early
films, but with a significant chance
Gone is the slapstick and situa-
tional humor of the early work In
its place is a more profound nuance
which is the mark of maturity in the
artist. Manhattan, Interiors,
now Stardust Memories mark
Allen's move into the realm of
seriousness that could also be
dangerous from an artistic stand-
point. Allen is truly a funny man,
see M Rl)l ST, Page 7, Col. 7
Renowned Maestro
Mo n toy a Performs
Flamenco Recital
Carlos Mont ova, world-
renowned maestro of the Flamenco
guitar, will perform in concert in
Hendnx Theatre, Mendenhal! Stu-
dent Center on Nov. 12, 1980 at
8:00 p.m. Those here who heard the
power oi Montoya's music and felt
the charm of his personality in 1978
will be sure to return; newcomers
are encouraged to partake of this
most delightful experience.
Carlos Montoya asks himself,
and sometimes people who have
never attended a Flamenco recital:
How can an elderly gentleman play-
ing music totally outside of
mainstream culture hold the interest
of a general audience for an entire
evening? After 30 years of over-
whelming success, Mr. Montoya is
still amaed. Perhaps the answer lies
in some of the comments made by-
people from his audiences.
A girl in Longview, Texas said,
"You put your music inside of me
Amazing � that's the phrase Mr.
Montoya uses when an interviewer
asks what he thinks about while
playing: "I try to put my music in-
side of them
A middle-aged gentleman in a
small Pennsylvania town said, "I
don't think I've ever heard a purer,
freerer expression of the human
spirit than I did tonight
A young woman from Eastern
North Carolina stated, "The music
was elating, the personality,
mesmerizing
It seems that each person feels
that Montoya is playing specifically
for him or her. There is no need to
be knowedgeable about his music; it
reaches all audiences, young and
old, in big cities, small towns, in
America, Spain, Japan, Alaska, in
every place Montoya plays.
Montoya's improvisational gypsy
guitar has never been tamed. It re-
tains its fiery spontaneity in the
remarkable hands of the charming
Spanish gentleman who reads no
music but lives Flamenco guitar.
Flamenco is Montoya's ruling pas-
sion. "It is he states simply, "my
life
Tickets are priced at $2.00 for
ECU students, and $5.00 for the
public. For further information
contact the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall Student Center,
757-6611, ect. 266.
Carlos Montoya, world-renowned maestro of the flamenco guitar, will
perform in concert in Hendrix Theatre, Mendenhall Student C enter, on
Nov. 12, at 8 p.m. After 30 years of overwhelming success. Mr.
Montoya's music reaci.e out to all audiences.





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Ladies Night
with Allan
Avalanche
Friday
iDelbertMcClinton
Aquila

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NAV Y OFFICERS GET RESPONSIBILITY FAST.





1 HI I S I KOI IMW
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Stardust Memories Entertains

Man's Screenwriting Dream
Produces Film: Wise Blood
You're studying for your lit class when the
standard screenwriting fantasy overtakes you.
Wow, you gush to yourself, what a terrific movie
this book would make. And no one's done it
before. You see it all clearly: the credits, the
lighting, the climax
Then, of course, you sink back into reality, and
return to youi studying.
One student who didn't give up the fantasy was
one Michael Fitzgerald, who long ago figured he
could make Flannery O'Connor's Wise Blood in-
to a movie, although it had been so frequently
deemed uncommercial" that about the only
place a student could encounter the story was in
one of Fitzgerald's lit classes.
Well, it took Fitzgerald, who is now 29, years
to bring his screenwriting fantasy to life. But he
did if Hi "Wise Blood" was finally made on a
SZ million budget. Opening to critical raves in
New voik several months ago, it is just now go-
nto wider release around the country.
zgerald started b figuring the way to make
. - was to move to Los Angeles and become a
eenwriter. He made the trip with his brother,
find that "young" screenwriters who go
tend not to be successful, and they
�uc cessi ul
n 1 he heard that a Canadian investor
ghts to H ise Blood, and planned to film
nerv O'Connor had written the story while
Continued from page 5
and his departure from slapstick
humor may also weaken his impact
on the film-going public. Can
Wood) Allen go any further'7 I his
reviewer thinks so.
Allen obviously learned from his
mistakes in Interiors. A heavy Film
by a non-Swede is inpalable to the
tans and critics alike, at least to the
tans and critics ol Allen's work.
What he needs is a fine balance bet-
ween the austere vision ol the
modern artist and the playful
joyfulness thai characterize his early
films. I hat balance is closely ap-
proached in Stardust Memories. It is
the first film combining the two
seemingly divergent visions of the
artist into a unified whole.
Gone is the slapstick that used to
bring tears ol laughter to the eyes,
but in its place is the more sat' ?ying
humoi that i directly related to our
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Backpacks. � li lonXtr,
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personal lives. The questions he asks
are the questions any intelligent per-
son asks of himself and his universe
Is there a God? Can there be mean-
ing to our lives? What is value in the
apparent random shifting of time?
Ot course these questions are not
answered, but they are raised in the
course of the film with a subtle
power and presented to us so that
we laugh But the laughter, as we
tealie when we leave the theatre, is
directed at ourselves. Thus the artist
makes his point.
Stardust Memories is a thought-
provoking film by one of the most
engaging directors ol our time.
There is laughter and many one-
liners that we've come to expect
from Allen's films, but there is just
a bit more. There is serious thought
wrapped in the candy ot laughtei
that we may swallow it a little easier.
It is an altogether entertaining film
now being shown at the Park
But
it. 1
living with the 1 ltzgeralds in 1950. When Fit-
zgerald Canadian's sereenplav, though,
he vvvl- appalled. "It was one o the worst
travesties of a piece of literature I'd ever seen
Through family ties, he made his move at last.
O'Connor's mother, happily enough, transferred
the rights to the young Fitgerald. "So then I had
to make a picture he sighs.
First, he tried to interest a top-notch director in
the project, and chose John Huston. Fitgerald
remembered Huston from boarding school davs
when Huston lived in the west of Ireland. Huston
then was "a great personage, a flamboyant man
living in a castle, with a stream of world
celebrities coming by every day. He became
synonymous with films to me
But Fitgerald had to track Huston to Mexico
before getting the veteran's agreement to direct
the still-vaporous project.
Even landing Huston was no guarantee of pro-
gress. Huston's most recent films had been com-
mercial Hops. "He wasn't 'on the charts Fit-
zgerald notes. "And he wasn't under 30, and that
seems to be a criminal offense in Hollywood
So raising money for the film was a herculean
chore. "The years went by he recalls. At one
point, while watching t.v. together in a F.A. hotel
room, Huston told Fitzgerald, "Y'know Mike.
you can't spend your lite doing something that
can't be done
Fitgerald was undeterred. "1 had to do it
At last he went overseas, where he got 90 per-
cent of his financing. "When no one else will give
you money to make a picture. Italian television
will he smiles.
The resulting picture is almost as hard to take
as it was to make. Scrupulously faithful to
O'Connor's prose, the film tells a disturbing story
oi faith and cynical faith healing.
But Fitzgerald, like O'Connor, insists the story
is a "comedy "All true comedy O'Connor
once wrote, "is about matter of life and death
And true to form, young producer Fitzgerald is
planning further "impossible" projects. He's
currently producing Proust's Remembrance of
Things Pas! from a legendary Harold Pinter
screenplay that's languished eight years with a
reputation as "uncommercial
Next will be Lnder the Volcano, Malcolm
Iowiv's account of an alcoholic's "deliberate
descent into the pits of hell
Pulling such projects through "requires
becoming a professional Fitgerald counsels.
"You have to learn how, and schools provide on-
ly theory, which is only one-hundreth of it.
"If anyone wants to make a picture, find a pic-
ture that is worth making. The essential
significance o' (having made "Wise Blood") is
that anyone can make any picture he sum-
marizes.
Igrftt
s ir.ssfioi
REPAIR
J t.rai '
r )
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trot, artd problem preean
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Lady Uses Ability
To Help People
Continued from page 5
living without that She believes in
God and goes to church, but "not to
any one in particular
"I can talk to anyone unless
they're trying to be smart
Madame Lurane says, "it's really
up to the individual. If they're skep
tical, it won't help Someone
coughs in the room down the hall.
"My husband has a terrible cold
she explains. Her red-ringed
cigarette drops a clump of ashes on-
to the table. She pushes the clump
into an ashtray and hides the bulky
dish in the chair beside her.
"You see, you can change the
direction in your life, but you can't
change the way you're born or the
wav you end up she says. When
two women from Rocky Mount
visited Madame Lurane last year,
tne palmist "drew a blank" from
one of them. "I couldn't read for
her. I couldn't even tell her her
name, she says. 'The women
were in an automobile accident on
the way back, a mile outside oi
Rock) Mount, and she was killed
Others come with problems not
quite so severe. Madame Lurane
once read for a man who had
separated from his wife; she told
him that his wife would come back
to him. The man called Madame
I urane a few months later on
Christmas Eve, worried because his
wife had not come home.
"1 told him thev would have
Christmas dinner together she
"We laughed and talked, and I
told him to have a drink and go to
bed. His wife called him in the mid-
dle of the night and asked him to
pick her up, and they had that
Christmas dinner
�V the same time, a woman in
Bethe! asked Madame I urane to
find her daughter car, which had
been stolen from the ECU campus.
"I told her the car was still in Green-
ville and that thev would find it
before Christmas. They found it on
Christmas five, six blocks away
from where it was stolen
Her bedroom slippers patter soft-
ly as she moves to the sink of her
neat yellow kitchen for another
cigarette. "Smoking is the worst
habit I've got, but it certainly will
never kill you. I've been smoking
since I was 14
Madame I.urane's 14-year-old
graddaughter has inherited her gift,
the palmist says. "She can read the
cards and tea leaves. I don't want
her to go into anything else yet.
She's too young. It will come to her
naturally Madame Lurane points
out her granddaughter from her col-
lection ot family photographs.
"Send me a copy of your article,
will you, son?" she asks. "I save the
stories for her
"So many people come to me that
don't believe she says. Her eyes,
often too piercing to meet with my
own, are softened in earnest.
"When I tell them something that
has happened to them in the past, or
if I tell them something that will
happen in the future and it really
does happen, then they just have to
believe
wg�
s@3�J
s��55�
&&&$

SPORTSWOKLD
COLLEGE NIGHT
Tuesday Night

6.30-10:00
Bring I. D. and
Got In For Only f 1.25
WNCT-TV
GREEIW1IJLE
t
9 ALIVE SPORT TEAM
Carlester Crumpler Jim Woods
k
� ' � � - , '&�





1 HI- LAS1 CAROLINIAN
Sports
( i I 1HI KM. 1VVS0
Miami Fights Off
Pirates' Upset Bid
By CHARLES CHANDLER
sport, r dilor
MIAMI. Fla. � Halfback
Smokey Roan rushed for a school
record 249 yards in 33 carries to lead
Miami's Hurricanes to a hard-
earned 23-10 win over stubborn Last
Carolina in the Orange Bowl Satur-
day.
Roan's performance broke by 62
vards Frank Smith's 29-year-old
single-game standard o 187 yards.
The Pirates stayed within reach of
the Hurricanes until the end, Roan
going over from one yard out with
eight seconds left to stretch the score
to 23-10.
Miami had an awesome offensive
night despite the fact that starting
quarterback Jim Kelley missed the
game with a hip pointer.
Kelley's replacement, junior Mike
Rodgngue, directed the team to 534
yards total offense. But strong
defensive play in the clutch by the
Pirates kept the score close.
The Hurricanes opened the game
with possession on their own 37 and
quickly moved toward paydirt. A
28-yard run on a draw play by Roan
helped move the ball to the ECT 5.
The Pirate defense then kept
H I Miami� 7 � 3 13 03 N :
I MMilk-r W f.Hd goal
I MMilter 13 tirirj goal
K IHawkins 15 pass frum siewart tl ammkuki
t MHu.h :i run (MilWr Uck)
I MMiller 41 field foal
M t1 amm M fiHd goal
I M -Rom 1 run (Davis Urhl
K 1Miami
rirsl di'ssns " Passing ssrtls 11XII 2d si
Ponls10-) 1.� 42 "
tumhlrs-lust M Prnallirs �rds � otfll if fens �4 2 I 14
MH 11)1 1 t unx
Kush.n ECU: Mr-art U-40. t �� suiion
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Passing Ml Mfwarl UMM:i UM H.Klnitue
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Rrrrmng HI Ha�Wins h-fTUins 2-5. ann I 2V
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1-1"
Miami out of the end one for the
next three plays to set up a fourth-
and-goal situation with the ball on
the six-inch line. Roan got the call
but ran into a wall of Pirates as
ECU held.
The Hurricanes took their next
possession and again moved into
Pirate territory. Again, though, the
ECU defense stiffened as Miami set-
tled for a 35-yard field goal from
Dan Miller to go up 3-0.
Miami added to that total on their
next drive, this time being stopped
on the ECU 33 as Miller added a
33-yarder to put his team up 6-0
with 13:43 remaining in the First
half.
The Pirates struck back quickly.
Tight end Norwood Vann made a
miraculous one hand grab of a pass
from Stewart as the play covered 29
vards to get the drive going.
A 32-yard run by Stewart follow-
ed moments later and moved the
ball to the Miami 12.
After he was dropped for a two-
yard loss halfback Mike Hawkins
came back and connected with
Stewart on a 15-yard scoring strike.
Bill Lamm's extra point made it 7-6
ECU with 9:10 left in the half.
Exactly three minutes later
Miami's Roan came up with a
43-yard jaunt that moved the ball to
the ECU 29.
Roan's backup, sophomore Mark
Rush, capped the 79-yard drive two
plays later with a 21-yard
touchdown run that put the Hur
ricanes up 13-7.
Miami was not done for the half,
though. Miller made it ten points
for him in the first two periods when
he drilled a 41-yard Field goal
through the uprights at the end ol
the half to put his team up 16-7 at
intermission.
With Roan leading the way,
Miami took its first possession ol
the second half and marched to the
ECU six. The hero quickly became
the goat, though, as Roan coughed
up the football.
ECU defensive end Doug Smith
fell on the loose ball, giving the
Pirate defense two big goal line
stands in the game.
A third stand followed on the
Hurricane's next possession. Miami
took advantage of a 19-yard reverse
run b end Jim Joinei and moved to
the ECU 15.
Hie Pirates defense got tough
again to set up a fourth-and-one
situation at the six. QB Mike
Rodrigue tried to sneak for the yard
but got nowhere as defensive tackle
Nate Wigfall made the stop.
"On fourth down situations thev
just lined up and stopped us
Miami coach Howard
Schnellenbergei said following the
contest. "1 hey were a gutty football
team out there tonight
After being held to but 12 yards in
the third quarter, the Pirate offense
got cianked up early in the fourth
when a scrambling Stewart found
Mike Hawkins open foi a gain o 36
yards to move the ball to Miami's
36.
1 he Pirates got as tar as the 15
and had to settle foi a 32-yard field
goal from I amm that narrowed the
Miami margin to 16-10.
With 7:38 remaining the Pirates
took ovei on their own 10 with the
chance to move ahead. The Hur-
ricane defense was tough, though,
as Kl go: no further than its 22
and had to punt the ball awaj.
1 he Hurricanes then took ovei at
then 35 and marched 65 vards for a
game-clinching score. Roan ran for
39 ol those yards m .dpp the
drive with a TD dive From one yard
out.
The win pushed Miami's record
to 5-3 while the Pirates fell to 4-5.
I ollowing the game ECU head
coach Id 1 morv praised the Hur-
ricanes and especially Roan.
'�Miami has a hell o a football
team. 1 know thev missed Kelley,
though, l'hev have good backs but
nobody knew si because thev
haven't been tunning much this
year. Roan was just plain super
�V foi his own club the Pirate
Mauling Mike
ECU defensive tackle Hal
Stephens (93) and Doug
Smith (92) provide a big
rush of Miami QB Mike
Rodrigue (above) and move
in for the big kill (at right).
Rodrigue and the Hur-
ricanes won the
game,though. 23-10. The
Pirates lost out in two ways
as Stephens was injured and
may be out for this Satur-
days bout with Eastern
Kentucky. (Photo by C hap
(iurlev)
mentoi said his
defense "showed
lots ol c rtarac " but had harshei
comments about the offensive line.
��We're still vcrv young and must
improve he said. "But our offen-
sive line just looked like they'd been
stepping on Vietnamese mines
The Pirates return home tins
Saturday to host defending NCAA
Division I A A national champ
I astern Kentucky while Miami
travels to Yanderbilt.
Jayvees Win, Varsity Hosts Tough Colonels
Pirate Notes:
The East Carolina jayvee football
team got its first win of the season
Sunday afternoon, downing Fort
Bragg 7-0.
The Pirates scored on their first
possession of the game as running
back Eric Redmond raced 29 yards
for a touchdown. Greenville native
Ted King kicked the extra point to
make it 7-0.
The score was set up by a fumble
recovery by ECU defensive lineman
J.C. Plott in Fort Bragg territory.
The remainder of the game was
filled with errors on the part of both
clubs, though Fort Bragg threatened
to score several times and got as
close as the ECU two-yard line.
The win pushed the jayvee team's
record to 1-2. The club has one
more contest left, hosting Fork
Union Military Academy in Ficklen
Stadium on Friday, November 21 at
3 p.m.
The varsity football Pirates will
host defending NCAA Division
I-AA national champion Eastern
Kentucky this Saturday in Ficklen
Stadium.
The Colonels defeated perenially
powerful Delaware in the cham-
pionship game last season to claim
the title.
The club is enjoying another big
year in 1980 as it has a 7-2 record
coming into this weekend's game
and is ranked among the nation's
top ten Division I-AA teams.
ECU head coach Ed Emory ob-
viously thinks very highly of the
Charles
Chandler
-
Colonels despite the fact that they
play in a division below the Pirates.
"This year's team has continued
great coaching and great person-
nel he said. "Eastern Kentucky is
as good as Southern Mississippi and
better than the Richmonds, William
and Marys and Dukes
A quick look back reveals that
Southern Miss downed the Pirates
in Ficklen 35-7 and later defeated
Mississippi State, a club that went
on to defeat Alabama.
ECU fullback Theodore Sutton's
drive towards the all-time Pirate
rushing record was tarnished greatlv
in last Saturday's 23-10 loss to
Miami.
The Hurricane defense held the
Kinston native to but 17 yards, leav-
ing him 235 yards short of Carlester
Crumpler's standard of 2,889 yards.
Sutton must average 117.5 yards in
the last two Pirate games to equal
that mark.
Halfback Anthony Collins
jumped two positions among the
top ten all-time Pirate rushers Satur-
dav, moving from the seventh posi-
tion to the fifth.
Collins has 2,116 yards, only 39
shy o fourth place Kenny
Stravhorn's total. "AC ' moved
ahead o Eddie Hicks (2,101) and
Dave Alexander (2.112)
Placekicker Bill I amm is climb-
ing the ladde all-time I CU
scorers. He needs just seven points
to move ahead ol Butch Colson into
the fourth position.
Colson finished with 164 career
points while I amm has 158.
There will be 12 captains tor the
ECU team when it hosts Eastern
Kentucky. Each one of the club's
seniors will serve in that capacity.
Thev are: fullback 1 heodore Sut-
ton. halfback Anthony Collins, split
end Vern Davenport, linebac)
Jeffrey Warren and C buck Jacks
cornerback Willie Holley, kicl
Bill 1 amm, punter Rodney !
defensive ends Rock) Butler
Clifl Williams, safety James
and defensive tackle Nate Wigfa
Seniors Wayne Inman (guat
and Tim Swords (defensive tackle)
are injured and cannot suit up but
will receive special recognitii
The ECU men's basketball te;
will be on public displav tor the first
time this Saturday. The annual
Purple-Gold game will begin 30
minutes following the '
game.
The public is cordially invited
attend. No admission will be cl
ed.
Says A Disappointed Emory
We Should've Won'
"� �4M�
Miami halfback Smokey Roan
gets a rede awakening from ECU
safety James Freer (20) after
hauling in a pass. The 58" Roan
still finished with a school-record
249 yards rushing,
though.(Photo by Chap Gurley)
B CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports l iliiix
MIAMI. Fla. � "There's no
doubt, we should've won the foot-
ball game
ECU head coach Ed Emory sum-
med up his team's narrow 23-10 loss
to Miami's powerful Hurricanes in
the Orange Bowl Saturday very
simply.
"We had the opportunity to pull
off an upset. The stage and setting
was all there. The defense gave us
the opportunity. That's the way
upsets are made. That's how
Georgia lech tied Notre Dame
The first-year mentor was ob-
viously disappointed that his club
had stopped the Hurricanes three
times at the goal line only to come
away a loser. Emory said when
his club took over possession with
just under eight minutes remaining
in the game and down only 16-10, it
should have scored.
"The momentum should have
been on our side he said. "Our
guys should have realized that with
one score we could win the football
game. We wouldn't have won it
with statistics or yards gained but by
taking advantage of some breaks
As it turned out the Pirates could
move no further than their own
22-vard line on the forementioned
possession and had to punt the ball
away.
The Hurricanes took things in
their owns hands from there, mar-
ching 65 yards for the game-
clinching touchdown.
As Emory stated, had the Pirates
come up with a late score the win
would not have come via statistics.
The Hurricanes outgained ECU 534
vards to 224.
In fact, Miami halfback Smoke)
Roan single-handidly outgained the
Pirate offense, rambling for a
school-record 249 yards.
Despite the mass chunks of yar-
dage given up by the ECU defense,
Emory could be proud of its perfor-
mance after stopping the Hurricanes
twice on fourth-and-goal situations
and another time by recovering a
fumble on the Pirate six-yard line.
"Our defense played with a lot of
character he said. "We held
Miami out of the end zone for 29
minutes in the second half
The main problem foi his club.
Emory said, was not maintaining
possession ol the football. i"he
Pirates could mustei only one real
drive on the evening, an v yardei
than ended in a Greg Stewart-to-
Mikc Hawkins I 1) pass it came in
the fust half. Foi the game E( U
garnered only nine first downs.
"We just didn't move the foot-
ball. We've got to do that the next
two weeks. It hurt us against Miami.
On the other hand. Miami's offense
dominated the football. You just
can't expect a defense to stay on the
field all night
Though his club gained ovei 500
yards foi the evening. Miami coach
How aid Schnellenbergei was happy
to come away a winnei following
two lost fumbles, an ECU intercep-
tion and the goal line stands.
"Thank God we put this one in
the win column he said. "It's very
difficult to make mistakes against a
scrappy football team and win.
Thev were a gutty toot ball team and
plaved as well. On fourth down
situations, they just lined up and
stopped us
Both teams had injury problems
at quarterback coming into the
game, Miami's Mike Kelley our and
EC I 's Greg Stewart questionable
with an ankle problem. V
Rodrigue filled in admirably foi
Kelley but Stewari got the call
1I
"We didn't know until right
before garnet! me whethei G
would plav or not Emory said.
"We wanted to wait and wa m
in his warmups. He said he felt good
so we started him
1 he Pirate mentoi was impressed
with the sophomore's performance
"It was a real gutty effort on Grej
part. 1 had no idea he could have
played as well as he did
1 mot v added, though, that a
completely healthy Stewart or a
healthy Carlton Nelson (out for the
year with a neck injury) would have
made a difference.
"They gave us the quarterback. It
Greg had been 100 percent or it we
had had Nelson things might have
been different. That's no excuse but
1 would have like to have seen it.
Mississippi State (also a wishbone
team) was given the quarterback too
and beat them
H

i
t






p

I HI i AS I C AkOl INIAN
NOVI-MBIR 11, 1980
Lady Pirates Suffer
With Early Injuries
Fran Hooks
Monday Casualty
By JIMMY DuPREE
AsmnIhui Sports rdllor
The 1980-81 season
opener for the East
Carolina women's
basketball team is less
than two weeks away,
but head coach Cathy
Andruzzi and assistant
Sherri Pickard are
already shaking the
trees in hopes of
locating talent for
future Lady Pirate
campaigns.
"Sherri has been to
areas in the last few
weeks that we've never
been to before says
Andruzi. "We're go-
ing after kids in South
Carolina, Florida;
whereever they may be.
"As far as the
growth of the program
here, Sherri has meant
a lot to us. She's done a
great job recruiting
Before the coaches
can get too wrapped up
in the recruiting game,
the Pirates must
manuever their way
through an awesome
schedule featuring na-
tional powers such as
national champion Old
Dominion, North
Carolina State, South
Carolina and North
Carolina.
The Lady Pirates
host Atlantic Christian
College Wednesday
night at 7 p.m. in
Minges Coliseum in a
pre-season scrimmage
game.
Losing R o s i e
Thompson, who holds
nearly all ECU offen-
sive records, is an
obstacle in itself. But
aside from Thompson,
only freshmen Donna
Brayboy and walk-on
Sandy Raneiri do not
return for the '80-81
schedule.
The addition of
former N.C. State
guard Caren Truskc to
Auburn Sets Sights
On No. 1 Bulldogs
the Pirate backcourt
along with high school
Ail-American Lisa Fen-
nell of Goldsboro was
expected to provide
depth behind returning
starters Laurie Sikes
and I ydia Rountree.
As juniorsSikes and
Rountree combined to
form one of the most
talented duos in their
region. But neither
started in the Pirates
first scrimmage of the
season Monday against
Chow an nor are they
expected to be ready
for the official opener.
Sikes suffers from
recurring k n e e
ailments, while Roun-
tree sustained a pulled
hamstring in early prac-
tice.
Fennel entered camp
with a stress fracture
and has just received
permission to begin
light workouts. She and
Rountree are expected
to begin workouts to-
day.
Senior forward Heidi
Owen has missed the
last tew weeks of drills
with mononucleosis,
but Andruzi indicates
a blood test in the near
future will indicate
when she amy return to
practice.
"We're not going to
rush into anything
Andruzi states. "We
certainly don't want to
risk any type of perma-
nant injury to one of
our players. Sikes will
see limited action, but
that's on a day-by-day
basis.
We don't have
depth at any positions
with the injuries. But 1
think there have been a
lot of bright spots.
"The kids' dedica-
tion has been
phenominal. We've got
a lot to work on, but
they're really working
hard to progress to the
level we want to be at
Senior Ail-American
candidate Kathy Riley
and sophomore Mary
Denkler have emerged
as the top forwards,
while steady senior
Marcia Girven anchors
the center slot. Truske
and junior college All-
Am en v. an Sam Jones
round out the list of
possible starters for the
Pirates' pre-season
bouts.
Photo Oy jON JORDAN
Steelwheeler Richard Hudson
U M1KETULL1
l l'l sp.irlv Writer
�uburn must be rub-
bing its hands with an-
Thwarting Georgia's
- igai Bowl hopes the
as tun.
� �
Li row
Sal m �. .ould
add the satisfaction of
knocking oft the na-
tion's V I t am.
v teoreia knows it on-
oowell.
Some strange
�Jungs have happened
un a: Auburn
Georgia coach Yince
Dooley acknowledged
after the Bulldogs stak-
ed a claim to No. 1 with
a 26-21 victorv over
20th-ranked Florida.
If Georgia is voted
No. 1 b the L PI Board
Coaches, Auburn
ild wind up being the
rd straight team to
ow a banana peel in
. path of a No. 1.
1 ast week it was
Mississippi State
defeating Alabama and
this time, Georgia Tech
i Notre Dame 3-3,
leaving the Bulldogs as
the only unbeaten, un-
tied major college team
in the nation.
Georgia came from
behind with a last-
minute, 93-yard bomb
to Lindsay Scott to
avert a defeat against
Florida.
'We've definitely
got to be a contender
for it, ' said Georgia
c ornerback Mike
Fisher. "But, there's
been so much talk
about a national cham-
pionship, I'm afraid it
might take our minds
oft the Southeastern
C onference champion-
ship
Fisher sounds like a
wise man and his mates
would do well to listen
to him.
The Bulldogs, the
only SEC team without
a league loss, could win
the SEC title and an
automatic Sugar Bowl
bid by beating Auburn.
But they had the same
chance the past two
years and failed both
times � tying in 19s
and losing last year.
As Dooley celebrated
and began preparing
for next week, Notre
Dame was brooding
over its outcome
UPI Top Twenty
NEW YORK (UPI) The United Press
lnternational Board olCoachesTop Ten
ratings after 10 weeks, with first place votes
and records in parenthesis.
1. Georgia (34)9-0618
2. Southern C'al (4)7-0-1560
3. Nebraska (2)8-1505
4. Florida State (1)9-1495
5. Alabama8-1470
6. Ohio State8-1447
7. Notre Dame7-0-1402
8. Pittsburgh8-1355
9. Penn State8-1263
10. Bavlor8-1219
11. Oklahoma6-2175
12. Michigan7-2163
13. Brigham Young8-1101
14. South Carolina7-283
15. North Carolina8-182
16. Purdue7-250
17. Mississippi St.7-234
18. 1XI A6-232
19. Texas6-225
20. Washington7-219
against Georgia Tech.
Despite ascending to
No. 1 on Alabama's
loss to a weak team,
Notre Dame ignored
the lesson to be learned
and made the same
mistake.
The Yellow Jackets
intercepted two passe-
and recovered three
fumbles to shut down
Notre Dame. In fact,
following Johnny
Smith's 3 6 - y a r d
second-period field
goal, the Fighting Irish
needed Harry Oliver's
47-yard field goal with
4:44 remaining to
secure the tie.
Georgia Tech had a
golden opportunity to
win the game when
linebacker Robert
Jaracz recovered a
fumble at the Notre
Dame 12 with 8:39 left.
but Notre Dame's
Stacey Toran in-
tercepted a pass at the
1.
In other games in-
volving the Top 10, No.
3 Southern California
crushed Stanford 34-S),
No. 4 Florida State
beat Yirginia Tech
31-7, No. 5 Nebraska
walloped Kansas State
55-8, No. 6 Alabama
defeated Louisiana
ECU-NCSU
Tickets
A vailable
Tickets to the ECU-
N.C. State Nov. 22
football game are still
on sale and can be pur-
chased in the Minges
Coliseum ticket office.
ECU students, facul-
ty and staff can pur-
chase the first ticket at
a 50 percent discount
($4.50) and will be
charged the full admis-
sion price ($9.00) for a
second.
The game will be
played in Raleigh's
Carter-Finley Stadium
and will get underway
at 1:30 p.m.
.
H
i -
t RESTAURANT
Student
Happy Hour
Mon-Fri. 2 to 5pm
Sm. draft .35C
Lg. draft .50C
ECU ID. Only
Come In and Enjoy
The Hottest Game Room
In Town
State 28-7, No. 7 Ohio
State outlasted Illinois
49-42, No. 8 Pittsburgh
beat Louisville 41-23.
Nik 9 LCI A was upset
by Oregon 20-14 and
No. 10 Penn State held
off North Carolina
Stale 21-13.
Marcus Mien ran fot
196 yards and two I I s
to help Southern Cal.
7 - 0 -1 , extend its
unbeaten string to 28
games. LSC is ineligi-
ble for the conference
title and postseason
piav this year as are
tour othei conference
schools. The loss ended
Slantord's hopes tor a
Rose Howl berth.
Rick Stockstill threw
two ID passes to Har-
dis Johnson and plung-
ed 1 yard for another
score to lead Florida
State. The Seminoles,
9-1, found themselves
stymied by Pi's na-
tional) second-ranked
defense until late in the
first half, when they
scored two TDs in less
than a minute. Sam
Plati gained 108 yards
for his fifth (00-yard
game of the season, a
team record.
Classifieds
FOR SALE
FOR SALE Technics SA 500 60
watn SL 230 fully automatic
turntable With Empire ?000 E" Ml
Phase Linear speakers
Aluminum 'itennae Paid s
best oHei Co
Graham
FOR SALE Fuubuster multi
band Best ofter 7 52 8860 ask for
Kevin
FOR SALE 1972 CB 100 Honda
Many new parts, very good shape
85 MPG S30C Firm, Call ?S8 8124
FOR SALE Alvarei Guitar, 7
months old With case S430
7 58 6302
FOR RENT
CHRISTIAN FEMALE Seeks
responsible roommate for furnish
ed trailer $65 month naif
utilities 756 8664 after00 p m
FOR RENT Two bedroom
duplex, three blocks from campus
Gas heat and air Large kitchen
available Dec I S210 per month
7 58 6050
RESPONSIBLE FEMALE
ROOMMATE Needed im
mediately Two bedroom apart
meni hall rent hall utilities close
C�U "58 -
PERSONAL
CUSTOM CRAFTING and repair
of gold and stiver Buying and
selling of gold and silver by Les
Jewelers 120 E 5th St 7S8 2127
SUNSHINE STUDIOS offermg
classes .n Ballet Jazz Yoga and
Exercise Special student rates
Within walking distance of cam
ous 756 7235
PERFECT CHRISTMAS GIFTS
H.gn quality low cost portraits,
caricatures T shirts people, pets
you name it John Weyler
752 5775
ANYTHING YOU CAN WRITE
We can write better Typing pro
ofreadmg editing Write Right
7 56 9946
HELP WANTED RNs LPNs
and Technicians at Pungo District
Hospital needs you Opening on all
three shifts with shift differential
for 3 00 11 00 and II 00 7 00 Con
tact Dnector of Nurses. Pungo
District Hospital 943 2111
DOMINO S PIZZA Now hiring
part time help Must be 18. have
own car and insurance, must be
willing to work weekends Apply
m person 1201 Charles Blvd
WANTED Female housekeeper
to live m' and free to travel Call
756 3511 daily at 2 00 p m
FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE
CLASSIFIED ADS CAN BE PUR
CHASED AT THREE LOCA
TIONS:
Student Supply Store Lobby. MWF
10 00 11:00, TTM 11:00 12:00.
East Carolinian Office, MTTH
4 00 5:00. WF 2 00 3:00
Student Organization Booth
(Mendenhall) MWF 12001 00.
TTH 11 00 12 00
i
o
o
o1
Marshes
Surf-n-Sea
Grand Opening
Rivergate Center
O
o
o
o:
1
Nov. 15 10am-5pm
Door Prizes
Other Gifts
1
1
JMiJJMMMMMMMMMaMJE
I Classified Ad Form
I
1 PRICE �1 00 lor 15 words 05 lor
each additional word
I
I
I Mke cfcCCfcf payablt
� Carolinian
The Eai'
Abbreviations coun' as one wjrd
as do phone numbers and,
hyphenjl on
MAIL TO
The E.is' Carolinian
Classified Ads
I Old Sou'h Building
Greenville N C 27834
A
AvauaDie
All Day
Every Day
Open
11 A.M9 P.M.
Sun. -Thru Thurs.
11 A.M10P.M.
Fri. & Sat.
�v
j
J
Stet
I
W
3005 E.
10th Street
Greenville, N.C.
(Beside Hastings Ford)
Take Out
Service
Available
758-8550
Fast & Easy Delicious Lunches
Soup & Salad
$-99
thicken Filet Sandwich
Baked Potato or French Fries
Chllds Plate
4 0z. Chopped Sirloin
Baked Potato or French Fries
Toast
Diet Plate
4 Oz. Chop Sirloin J
Cottage Cheese & Fruit
Old Fashion Cheeseburger
$-29
No Potato
Banquet
& Party
Facilities
Available
Steak Sandwich
Plain. PeDDers & Onions
Mushroom Gravy, C 4fOC
Baked Potato or M J - �
French Fries
Steerburger
$-J9
Baked Potato
or French Fries
NO TAKE OUTS
ON DAILY SPECIALS
SPECIALS DAILY
Monday And Wednesday
Beef Tips
$�29
Dally Specials Served With Baked Potato or Frer & Toast
Tuesday Ana ihursoay
Chop Sirloin
$i89
8 0z
30 Item Delicious Salad Bar
TfcEAMERS
EAST CAROLINA PLAYHOUSE
STUDIO THEATRE
November 17-22, 24-25 8:15 p.m.
General Admission $2.50
ECU Students $1.50
?57-6390
STREAMERS IS A POWERFUL MILITARY DRA7
INTENDED FOR MATURE AUDIENCES

i
;





10
HI I M v KiM IM W
�) I UU KM, lv'
Lady Pirates
Close Slate
At Pembroke
Vviia�i Spot is i ditoi
uli onl one match
. on theii 1980
sen � 1 ad
Va: volleyball team
mil; vK begin to
foi a
towing at the
N( MAV:
l Ills
ah.
.nes
4 24
k, in-
V8, 15-6,
s at UN(
1 hurs
. v as not
I
a's v � '
. 1 ai
c margin
wen
i a id son
v.iw. " s a result, our
offensive came was not
as strong as we needed
it to be. We were on
defense all night
Both Davidson and
head coach Alitu Dillon
agree that defense lias
come to be one ol the
keys to 1 CU success,
but the feel the team
a) still overcome their
disadvantages through
intense practice and
make a solid bid foi an
"at large" berth to the
regional tournament.
��( Hii blocking still is
uist killing us admits
Davidson. "When you
don't get a hand on the
ball at all. then it's
coming straighl down
and it just makes it that
much hardei to dig
"Out defense is
looking good, though
1 he siil! havenM leam
ed how to die. I
they're getting there. 1 season
. think if thev could nisi " ��� mate
Booters 'Battle'
For Final Win
Senior Sharon Ferry (overs Net For ECU
an
d see v hat it'
th
e d :
then
down
1 he i aa
se out the
A
t � a
ilia:
ton
at P
do it once m
a came broke Stat
tllj scheduled to
. l rancis Marion as
well, but that match
since been cancell-
"(Pembroke) heat us
a n at the 1 rancis
Marion Invitational
earlier this yeai sas
Davidson. "They
shouldn't have, but we
weren't playing well. It
we don't pla well
(tonight), they'll beat
us again
1 ast ai ohna opens
competition in the
NC 1 W 1 OU1
against Appalachian
State 1 ridav, with the
dinner advancing to
face top Milked I .
Chapel Hill.
astarolina goalie
Steve Brown ran his
season shutout total to
five as the Pirate soccer
team equaled the
school record foi vic-
tories in a season with a
2-0 win ovei Cokei
College in its season
finale.
I he Pirate booters
finished the season with
a 7-14-1 mark after
winning then final two
games oi the sea on.
Brown was in the
goal during each win,
setting a new single-
season 1(1 shutout
mark.
1 he game with C oker
was interrupted b a
brawl thai broke oul
between the two teams.
1 aiis and players both
got into the act before
dei was restored
( oach Brad Smith's
young squad returns
almost intact next
season, senior Mike
1 awrence the only loss
. i aduation.
7&iS4
Goalie Brovsn Stretches -or Save
Sports
Calender
luesday, Nov. 11: Volleyball
d) at Pembroke Stale. 7
Krida. Nov. 14: Volleyball at
NCAJAW tournament in Raleigh,
Met d women's swimming
Old Dominion in Minges
. 7 p.m.
Saturday Nov. 15: Volleyball at
rnament in Raleigh
i BA,
(4-5) vs. Eastern Ken-
tucky, Ficklen Stadium. 1:30 p.m.
basketball, Purple-Gold
a 30 minutes after
eame in Minges Coliseum.
j
Fosdick's
INCREDIBLE
$1.99 LUNCH!
Monday:
Fish Fry a you can eat
Tuesday.
Salad Bar ali you can eat 1 �
Wednesday:
Shrimp Creole all you can eatl.99
Thursday:
Chowder and Salad
all you can eat 1.99
Friday.
Fish FrV an eat 1.99
Sunday Lunch Special:
MOM'S DAY
All Mothers EAT FREE
Ken accompanied by family
of 2 or more
ALL YOU CAN EAT SPECIAL
lo . ully Monday
00pm I tmaypurchax out
for only
$2.50
FOSDICKS
I890$eatood
"A Great
Seafood
Restaurant"
2311 S F vans St �Greenville
lEant (Eartflmfan classifieds
AVAILABLE AT MONDAY I TUESDAY IWEDNESDAYTTHURSDA'
THESE LOCATIONS:
FRIDAY
STUDENT
SUPPLY
STORE
il 0:00-1 1:00 111 :00-1 2:00 I 1 0:00-1 1:00 I1 1 �- 2:001 000" 1 0�
MENDENHALL
STUDENT
ORGANZATION
BOOTH
12:00-1:00 111 :00-12:00 12:001:00 111 :0012:00l2:00 1:00
EAST
CAROLINIAN
OFFICE
4:00-5:00 I 4:00-5:00 I 2:00-3:00 I 4:00-5:00 I 2:00-3:00





Title
The East Carolinian, November 11, 1980
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 11, 1980
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.92
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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