The East Carolinian, September 30, 1980






�he
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 55 No. 11
10 Panes
Tuesday, September 30, 1980
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 10,000
Task Force Criticizes
ECU Food Services
By MAKCRAKM-s
Mjtt Writer
According to the Greenville
( hamber ol Commerce, 1 Cl
students opted to spend $7 million
on off-campus meals during the past
year.
iki according to a report
pared recently b a university
task force committee, "the only
facility (at ECU) serving meals is
too small to accomodate even 25
percent ol the dormitory population
and leaves much to be desired in
general appearance, attractiveness,
menu selection and merchandising
oods
Ihis critique of lones Cafeteria
came from the Food Services J ask
Force, a group that was set up to
study ways in which the university
van improve its food services.
1 he report also said thai ��student
utilization of dining facilities is
The food Services Task Force
conducted a survey to find out how
many students cook in their rooms.
According to the report, 5,572 ques-
tionaires were distributed to dorm
students. (Thirty percent) or 1,665
were returned
poor 1Isconti bi. to
this are tl1 Vccei t ol
facilities tothe
mitories1 1
prepaioms.
Directoi oons
Dan ootenom
only f
ility
bill, fin hes and sen-
"Internallv.�'OKcauses
blackoutsVice( 1lancelloStu-
dent 1ElmerMeyer said.
Sanitation,saities are
2cest �' o n' t r iis. iik even-it .
Task Forces
i Imei Meyer, vice chancellor
tor student life, reminds
students thai only 17 applica-
tions have been received for a
total ol 65 vacancies on the Ad-
ministrative, faculty Senate
c ommittees, and Planning
Commissions 1 ask forces.
"I feel very strongly that stu-
dent impul into the decision
making process o the university
is extremely important. Not on-
ly for the university itself, but
for the benefit ol the students as
well 1); Meyei said.
"When student imput is not
there, we have to make deci-
sions without it. which 1 don't
think is right he added.
In a survey compiled this
summer, 90 percent ol the
dents responding said they
I then experience serving
on a university committee was
u orthw hile.
Applications will be screened
as soon as possible after a suffi-
cient numbei have been received
by 1) Meyer. Applications
may be picked up in room 204
v hichard or at the information
desk m Mendenhall Student
C enter.
Each student reported using an
average of four appliances. Ol the
surveys returned, the total number
of appliances in rank order was:
� 1,570 refrigerators;
� 1,473 hot plates;
� 1,345 toaster-broiler ovens;
� 568 electric fry pans;
� 382 soup pots;
� 209 coffee makers;
� 19 microwave ovens;
� 179 other appliances
stoves and freezers.
including
The task force projects that more
than 20.000 appliances are used to
prepare meals in the residence halls.
93 percent ol the respondents in-
dicated they prepared an average of
eight meals per week in their rooms.
Only one meal a week was reported
by the same group to have been pur-
chased at one o the tour campus
dining outlets.
Over 70 percent fell the university
should provide students with food
services, but only 51 percent said
they would patronize the facility.
Only 15 percent said that they would
prefei to pay board along with tui-
tion and other tees and have all
meals pro ided tor them.
' Things won't change anytime
soon Wooten said. "In our long
range plans, we plan to add kitchens
in every dorm. We have no plan- to
put one on everv floor, though
"One kitchen won't be very much
for four or five hundred, students,
though he said.
Photo by GABY fcr ' F P SON
Ronita Parrott and Pam Mitchell were among the man SOULS On The Mall Friday afternoon. Among the at-
1(1 students who enjoyed the festivities during tivities students enjoyed were art displays and music.
SO ULS On The Mall Brings
Minority Members Together
Ry MIKE NOON AN
SOl'IS. the Society of United
liberal Students, sponsored"
SOll S on the Mall' Friday from
4 7 p.m.
According to Mike Lockamy.
treasurer o' the organization, the
mam-issue involved in the celebra-
tion was a rejuvination of the
minority spirit on the ECU campus
Between 500-600 minority
members attended the event, which
featured art displays, music, danc-
Petition Focuses Radio Issue
A News Analysis
R IFKKV C,RA
Vtanaginji I
VYZMB. N heard it.
.15(H) 1 c i . its hav e
pei tion in recent weeks
� I i d rectly with these call let-
ter- � which beloi - ECU's INI
station, ccording to Van
is helped circulate the
the question asked most by
those who want more information is
What exactly is going on with
WZMB?"
The answei to the question has
confused bv the nature
tion. It calls tot the
� nda Killingsworth as
manager o the station, ask-
� n leter, the former
tnager, be reinstated until
person can be found
I � ie station.
� student put it, "I haven't
' irsl sound from our so-
ition, so it's hard to
judgements about who is
a ueu
n
: ficial point ol view . as
voiced by Media Board c hairman
David Creech recently, the person-
nel question has been settled.
"Glenda Killingsworth is the
general manager ol the station, and
the Media Board is hacking her 1(X)
percent Creech said.
But from a practical poinl ol view
according to supporters o John
leter � the personnel question still
needs examination. They sav that
Killingsworth lacks the technical
knowledge required to set up and
maintain an 1 M stereo radio sta-
tion.
Killingsworth responded Sept. 8
to this allegation, saying "They
should give me a few weeks. I'll get
it cleared up. I've got a job to do,
and 1 can't tight petitions and
newspapers. I've got work to do
To support their position. Jeter's
proponents point to his long ex-
perience with radio, beginning in
high school, and especially to his
four-year connection with WECl
and WZMB.
Jeter graduated from ECU in
Mciv, but recommended Kill-
ingsworth to take his place. Kill-
ingsworth had worked two years for
the station when it was still trying to
get its FCC license to broadcast. At
ing, free refreshments and a sampl-
ing ol paraphernalia from the dit-
ferent fraternities and sororities
represented in the club.
"It turned out very nice, and was
a great success 1 ockan � lid.
"I he talent was from within the
minorities on the campus. "here
was a dramatic monologue by fony
William- based on the thetne
"comming out ' ned alter the
song by Diana Ross 1: was c
cerned with the circumstances ol
trying to get the different minorities
out o the shell they're in now, he
added.
"Vi.kc Godlfrey displayed Ins art
talent, which is exceptional, and
Donavan Phillips and Connie
Hawkins spoke concerning the
hi st or v and foundation o
SOULS, Lockamy said. Ms.
Hawkins is the society's faculty ad-
visor.
According to (iracie W
dent ol sol l s. thei
no religious minorities repn
in the group. Howev
couraged to join.
"We're interested i i
minorities, not just Blacks, i
Hispanic, Orientals, they a
place in our group
"s( H 1 S is try ing
minority member aware ol '
as an indi idual W hal h
not what he is now . Eve
of any minority on cami
already considered a memb
club. It is their decision to come to
the meetings, " L ockamy ia
SOULS has weeeklv m
the Afro-American cult
located between Joyner 1
the Infirmary Wednesday ni
p.m.
GWZMB91.3
EM
QREENVILLE
Students Without ECU
ID Face Obstacles At
Ficklen Stadium Gates
the same time, the Media Hoard said
Jeter could stay on as adviser.
It was aftet Killingsworth in-
dicated to the Board that Jeter vas
allegedly overstepping his hounds as
adviser that Jeter resigned his ad-
visory position.
At this point. WZMB became an
issue of personalities instead of
legalities, as had been the case dur-
ing
Photo by JON JORDAN
the preceding years when its
license and budget had been battled
over.
Personalities aside, the station is
still not on the air. Earlier estimates
oi the debut air date have been pass-
ed because some of the station's new
equipment has been late in arriving.
When the equipment does arrive,
See WZMB, Page 3
By MIKE NOON AN
Students who attended the 111
SMU football game in Ficklen
Stadium Saturday night found that
:he ropes commonly used to reserve
seatsin violation o the seating
policywere absent.
On Tuesday, Sept. 16, 1980. The
East Carolinian ran an article repor-
ting that many campus organiza-
tions had been reserving sections of
seats on the student side for their
friends.
On the other hand, many students
had to eo to extra trouble to get in
Publication Boards Raise Constitutional Problems
i ditoi Note: Man hew M Davis
is the editor oj the Student Press
Law Center (SPLC) Report. The
following article appeared in the
Fall 1980 edition of the SPLC
Report
Ry MATTHEW DAVIS
I ollege newspaper staffs have
been known xo keep then eves on
the administration, Kit now the ad-
ministration has unleashed a wat-
chdog of its own.
The "watchdog" is called a
publications board, but most editors
call them trouble.
The average publications board
consists of representatives from the
student body, administration and
faculty. Usually, they have the
authority to hire and fire editors.
SGA Elections
Students are reminded that SGA elections for day and dorm
representatives and class officers will be held tomorrow. Students are
required to present ID and activity cards and vote at individual polling
places. Dorm residents should vote in the lobby of their dorm; and
day students may vote at the Croatan, Student Supply Store,
Mendenhall Student Center, Allied Health Building, or Minges. Polls
will be open from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m with the exceptions of the
Croatan, Student Store, and Mendenhall which will remain open until
7:00 p.m
A special student opinion poll will also be held on Wednesday.
When voting, students are requested to mark a special ballot in-
dicating their national presidential candidate choice. Results of this
poll will be announced along with SGA winners.
approve editorial policy and control
the paper's cash flow.
They're supposed to help the
paper, but often ideals take a
backseat to politics when editors
and board members clash over who
has the power.
It often takes a libel suit, or fear
of one, to foster a publications
board or cause the existing one to
tighten its grip.
Jim Gardner, editor oi the Miami
Student (University of Miami) fears
plans are in the works for his paper.
Gardner calls the UM publica-
tions board an apathetic group that
seldom meets and usually achieves a
quorum only for the final meeting
of the year, at which it selects the
editor and the managing editor.
He never had reason to worry
about the board's power until the
Student was threatened with a libel
suit in May.
An article in which co-workers ac-
cused a university employee of
harassment gave the board some
work to do.
The employee's attorney filed a
complaint with the board, threaten-
ing to have the editors fired.
Though no action has been taken,
Gardner believes the University
president is considering a policy re-
quiring editors to submit articles
leveling charges against employees
for approval and verification.
"Such a policy reeks of prior
restraint to me Gardner said.
SPLC Executive Director Mike
Simpson agreed that any attempt at
prior review would be unconstitu-
tional.
Gardner also questioned the con-
stitutionality of the board's practice
of investigating complaints filed
against the paper.
"On one hand, it is not censor-
ship as we normally use the word
Simpson said of the practice. "The
board is not prohibiting you from
printing an article. On the other
hand, such investigative powers
would have a chilling effect on your
ability to report the news
But all the board can do is in-
vestigate.
"They can complain about your
coverage, but they can't do anything
about it Simpson said.
Some members o boards insist
that general managers are universitv
employees and not protected by stu
dent rights. Also, many board
members and administrators think
the school is the publisher of the
paper.
Both of these claims are contrary
to the forum theory which says staff
members are not university
employees and the administration
does not have the rights of a
publisher.
This should apply equally to
publications boards, making it il-
legal for them to interfere with the
production of the paper because of
conflicts with staff members.
But Clifton Magazine (University
of Cincinnati) editor Chris O'Dell
calls publications boards a subtle at-
tempt by the administration to
"intimidate the press by cutting its
source of income
Funding for the Clifton is decided
See BOARDS, Page 3
to see Saturday's game at all.
More than 165 students showed
up at the gates o Ficklen Stadium
for Saturdav's game without tl
valid ECU ID, according to Joseph
Calder, director of campus security.
However. Dr. Ken Karr, directoi
of athletics at ECU, permitted the
students to enter the game upon
showing oi a valid III activity
card and drivers license at the ser-
vice entrance to the stadium.
Calder said. "Dr. Kan agreed to
let them in if they gave me their
name and ID number before enter-
ing, but I advised them to brii
their ID with them next time
because 1 don't know if they'll be
allowed in next time
Security officers checking 11V
the gate directed students without
ID's to the service entrance
"A tew girls came to m(
New Jersey drivers licenses which
don't have pictures on them
Calder said. "I asked them tot other
information and let them in if they
could answer what their home .iJ
dress was he added.
Most ol the students who had
forgotten their ID's were on I
sophomore level or up erv tew
freshmen forgot their IDs, accor-
ding to a police report being filed at
the request o Dr. Karr.
"1 only turned away one pet son
who showed up with no ID. no ac
tivity card and no drivers license
Calder added.
On The Inside
� in i '
Announcements ?
Anderson3
Classifieds10
Editorials 4
Injuries8
Letters4
Pinbali5
Third Loss8
1
I





VHl I AS I I KOl IN! N
SI I'll 1Bl K JO, IS)
Announcements
ATTENTION
I lir I�m Carolinian
� e lc i) m e n all i a in p u
i�rnaniainni to Mihmil items
to the Xnnouiueiin'nls sec-
tion Our to our space limita
lions, however, all future
submissions should be no
longer than SO wonts II a nil
wniicn submissions Hill also
no longer be accepted Items
must be submitted no later
than I p.m. on Mondas or
Wednesdavs
ECU DANCE CLUB
� . a mners
ACU I
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TABLE TENNIS
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Delta pre
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business meeting will '� Hi a
interested persi s sn nvited
All
PRE PHYSICAL
THERAPY
Di adline I i wsi adn � � pri
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� � . Iluenza va
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KAPPA DELTA PI
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SOC ANTH CLUB

WE'VE MOVED!
. inning and Plai �
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SHOGUN
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The Hugo Outdoor Theatre
Presents
STEVE HARDY'S BEACH PARTY
� ����
1st Annual
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Saturday, October 4th
Hugo Outdoor Theatre � 12 Noon until
(Off Hwy II. tutr Griffon - 12 miles North. Kinsti
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SPORTS CARE
11
PLAYHOUSE
POETRY CONTEST
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2818 E. 10th St. Greenville
LADIES!
This May Be Your Last
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Featuring
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Tickets: $7.00 Advance � $9.00 at Gate
TICKETS AVAILABl 1
919-527 4939
11 CON ESSIONS
D ITEM
POLICY
Ch o thaa-a ad�a�"tia�d
lt�me ta raqulrad to b� rMdlly
avallabla foe aaia in tch Qf Saron
axcapt �� apclf'oally r�ol�3 In thia ad N wa do
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ralncbac which will antltla you to purchaaa tha Btvaxtlaad Itaxrt at tha
adyaila�d pnea within 3C data
sss �"�; s s y Ss rs s
Before, During &
After the Game
Kroger Sav-on
has everything
you need!
PETER ADONIS
Traveling Fantasy Show
(With Six Male Dancers!)
NABISCO
Wheatsworth
Crackers
TUESDAY,
SEPT. 30
at the
Doors Open at 7:00
Show Begins at 8:00
and Ends at 10:30
ADMISSION: S5.00
ECU STUDENTS: S3.00
FOR LADIES ONLY!
Red White
Blue Beer
$1.49
6 12-oz. Cans
POST
Raisin Bran
U.S. NO. 1 EASTERN
Red or Golden
Delicious Apples
5.
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Ground Coffee
EADY 3?
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Phone 756-7031
B
In
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On Bl





i HI I s K H IMN
s I'I I MB! R
re
t
itii
� �4 �
r
S
SD ITEM
POLICY
� adv�rti��d
d to bm rMdlly
Krog�r S�1MX1
Vh-t ad If w� do
lour ch04C� Oi �
p� savings or a
a ad Uarrt at tha
Mrithlr 30 days
&
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0
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OFF
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Greenville
?
Boards Raise Questions
1 ontinued from page 1
b a system of student
committees, some of
which resent the school
media, he said.
oi onlj does this
system lead to mad
students and, more
dangei ous, student
government people, ex-
erting pressure to
change editorial con
tent, but it's a perfect
set-up for the ad-
ministration to pit
othei students against
the student media while
allowing themselves to
appeal uninvolved
CVDell said
t the Universitv of
Pittsburgh, the ad-
ministration is not try-
ing to appear uninvoh -
ed.
A new directoi of
student activities has
dissolved the old
publications board and
established a more
powerful one.
'1 he old board
worked pei tectl said
Pitt News editor Steve
( Hildas. "We never had
any problems with
them and the) had
nothing to do with the
selection of editors or
the editorial polic).
�� This new board
wants to approve
editorial policy, hire
and fire editors, and
the student activities
director has given
himself veto powei
oer board decisions
Guidas said.
"Before, we had
tour professional jour-
nalists on the board.
but now we're going to
have student govern-
ment people.
"I expect trouble
he said.
1 he stall ol the
C a v a 1 i e i 1) a i I
(University o t
Virginina) expected
trouble with then new
media board, so the
ictused to recognize it.
"Needless to sa, we
are opposed to any
form of media borad
said executive editor
Woody Holton.
"We have never been
sued for libel and have
never 'materially and
substantially disrupted
the university Nor
have we been charged
with legal obscenity
he said.
�� The student politi-
cians who claim we
could get the school in
trouble by committing
one of these offenses
are merelv disguising
their wishes to dictate
the paper's content
Holton said.
Judging from these
political conflicts, the
publications board-
newspaper staff duel
may be settled in court.
Editors are accusing
boards ol causing more
problems than they
solve, an accusation
often backed with
threats of a lawsuit.
i he courts may soon
decide whether the
publications board is a
benefit to the paper or
merelv an arm ot the
administration, con-
trolling the staff in
violation of the first
Amendment.
WESTERN SIZZLIN
STEAK HOUSE
THE FAMILY STEAKHOUSE
Scott Dorm Resident
Injured After Scuffle
Patronize
The East Carolinian
Advertisers
following a confrontation with
his next door neighbor, a 19 yeai old
ECl student was arrested Sunday
night on a charge of assault.
According to C ampus Police
reports, Jeffrey Scott Henley, ol
room HUB Scott Dorm, was taken
into custody at 10:30 p.m. by cam-
pus police aftei he had allegedly
assaulted David John Ehrlichman,
20, of room 104-C Scott Dorm.
The report states that Ehrlichman
had gone to the bathroom and
found Henley's girlfriend in the
bathroom at the time llenlev
allegedly then grabbed Ehrlichman,
knocked him to the floor, and
struck him several times.
�1 Gregg, of 406 Scott Dorm.
who had been visiting Ehrlichman at
the time, called the police and filed
the complaint against Henley.
Ehrlichman was taked to the Pitt
Memorial Hospital where he was
treated for an injury to his eve.
Henley was released undei a $50
secured bond, and the trial date for
the incident is scheduled foi Oc
tober 15 in Pitt County District
Court.
ATTIC ATTIC
Souths No. 6
Rock Nightciur
1 wed dynamic upsetters
THRUSH
STREET TALK
BADGE
2 THUR
3 FRI
4 SAT
5 SUN
WZMB Has Dual Problems:
Technicalities, Personalities
MR. GORHAM'S BEAUTY SALON
DONALD B. GORHAM
a net (iperatoi
V
( ontinued from page 1
the current over Kill-
ingsworth's ability to
put the station on the
will have more
meaning.
Considering t h e
Media Board's actions
so tar. the pro-Jeter
petition is unlikely to
have much influence.
But it the equipment reasonable time will be
es, and W MB is
still not heard within a
fmically reasonable
time, the burden of
prool falls back on
Killingsworth.
in this case, the
Media Board has the
power to decide what a
and this power can be
used to grant Kill-
ingsworth enough
breathing space to learn
w hat she alleged I y
needs to know � or to
find someone who
does.
TUESDAY SPECIAL
Beef Tips with Onions and Peppers
Baked Potato or French Fries
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Art and Camera
As Creech has noted.
Mine! policy is
regulated through the
Board's constitution,
and Killingsworth
. nothing so fai to
ite the regulations.
Anderson
Uncontested
On Ballot
C H API 1 fill 1
(UP1) � Independent
presidential candidate
John B. Anderson,
who won a legal battle
to get his name on the
North Carolina ballot.
will campaign at the
I niversity ol North
c arolina I uesday.
It will mark Ander-
,on's first trip to the
ite since announcing
his presidential can-
didacy .
Anderson is schedul-
ed to hold a news con-
ference at 11:15 a.m.
and will attend a rally
�it noon.
I he state Board of
1 lections ruled earlier
this year Anderson
would not be allowed
run in November
because he participated
in the Republican
presidential primary.
Anderson maintained
he did not participate in
the primary because he
had withdrawn as a
Republican presidential
candidate bv the time
ol the North C arolma
primarv.
U.S. District Judge
Franklin T. Dupree rul-
ed that Anderson's
name should be placed
on the ballot and the
4th U.S. Circuit Court
of Appeals upheld that
decision.
Democratic Party of-
ficials announced last
week they would not
appeal to the U.S.
Supreme Court, thus
guaranteeing Anderson
a spot on the ballot.
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CM? �a0t Qlar0lfnlan
Serving the campus community since 1925.
Kit. II KlK.kl 1 V
11 kk Hi kik). .
Chris Ik hok, .
Cil ORGl Hi I I l( H.
1 I t M I K.
Septembei JO, i1"
ri kkv. Gra . w, i
Lisa Drew, ,
CH Kl I s C HAND! I K. s
l II) NORRIS, .
Opinion
Page 4
Greensboro
CWP Makes Allegations
In the wake of the Greensboro
shooting between Klansmen and
Nazis and marchers from the Com-
munist Workers Party, and in light
of information revealed in the ongo-
ing trial, an unanswered call for a
full-scale congressional investiga-
tion continues. The East Carolinian
and the ECl Student Government
Association received a package of
printed materials on the Greensboro
incident. There was no return ad-
dress, but we assume the mailing
was from the Communist Workers
Parts.
Much of the information has a
"communist" tinge, but there are a
few important allegations that
would seem to merit a congressional
investigation: "On August 3, the
Greensboro Daily News reported
that Edward Daw son participated in
'planning and promoting klan
presence at the demonstration
Daw son has been a known
klansman for 16 years. This man
was an informer for the Greensboro
Police DepartmentOn July 14,
the Greensboro Record reported
that a man working for the federal
g o e i n m e n t named Bernard
Butkovich participated in planning
meetings which led to the Nov. 3
murder
If these alienations hold any
water at all, congress should cer-
tainly begin an investigation into the
possible collaboration of govern-
ment and the Klansmen and Nazis.
Along with several "analytical"
pieces, four resolutions condemning
the incident and calling for a federal
investigation were included from
four large, reputable organizations:
the National Conference On A
Black Agenda, the Trade Union
Educational League, the American
Public Health Association, and the
National Lawyers Guild.
The resolutions by these
organizations doen't necessarily-
mean there was government col-
laboration to the extent that is
claimed in the other articles: all
the hardships people have to en-
durecome from the system of
monopoly capitalism But the
resolutions do demonstrate a con-
cern for the whole truth to be told
about the Greensboro incident.
One ECU student recently made a
remark that sums up the fears of
those who only want justice: "I
don't really approve of the Klan and
the Nazis, but since when do Com-
munists have any rights in this coun-
try?" The answer to that one is sim-
ple: the day the Bill of Rights was
signed.
Ficklen Admissions Better
I hanks to the cooperation of Dr.
Kenneth Karr, director of ECU
athletics, and Joe Calder, director
of Campus Security, students who
presented only a driver's license
with their activity cards (not an
ECU ID card) were admitted to
Saturday's game.
More than 165 students stood in a
relatively short line at the service
gate to have their names and ID
numbers recorded before they could
enter the stadium. In the future,
however, it mav not be that easy.
Obtaining a new ID card is the only
Hire way to avoid any hassle at
me football games.
The charge for a new ID is $5.
That could be why so many students
haven't bothered to net one. Accor-
ding to the N.C. Highway Patrol, a
new or replacement driver's license
only costs SI. Talk about highway
robbery
Another interesting fact is that
few other places on campus require
that expensive ECU ID-the Student
Supply Store, the Croatan, the infir-
mary, the student bank, Hendrix
Theatre, just to name a few. Are
these places being slack, or
reasonable? Is the Ficklen Stadium
policy by-the-book, or overzealous?
Time will tell.
There will always be a need for
special consideration under the cir-
cumstances in question. Nobody's
perfect. At least an attempt was
made to improve the situation, and
students should be thankful.
OAhn!
WE LOST THE GAME AGAIN
GAri� llSTHERB
A GAME TOPAV?
w:ii
OL
2l
Odmtr
1 HI 1 sl k i INIAN
r�Campus Forum
Abortion: 'Decided In
Courts, Not Churches'
In response to the letter "Abortion Is
Murder" (Sept. 25 edition), Ms. Byrum
would have done much better writing a
surmon tor a Sunday service. The topic
ol abortion ha- absolutely nothing to do
with the context of the Bible, regardless
of whether it's worded m Hebrew 01
1 atiii. I he distinction between murder
and kilting was simp redundant.
As a mattet ol iw abortion should
not be judged totally on personal oi
religious beliefs. I he legalization
abortion is a mattet which will In- decid-
ed in the court- o! our land, not in the
churches. 1 et us not forget, the separa
tion of church and state i- clearly defin-
ed b out c onstitution. it is presump-
tuous ot M Byrum to declare abortion
as unmoral and m illegal purely on I
religious beliel s.
Noting the lettei b Mi Howe (Sept.
2s), "Abortion Is Not Murder his
argument is delineated, and supported,
b the Bioethics course taught on cam-
pus. 1 he course emphasizes that ethical
problems cannot be solved b instincti
gut reactions, but must be properly
analyzed, ethically and morally, before a
lust judgement ma be made. I must
agree with this point ot view.
The right of privacy, which a woman
certain!) has. must be respected In the
case of abortion, the fetus is much like a
tenant in the bod) ot a woman. I rue, it
has the right to life, but in this ease the
owner of the house (the mother) has
right to control who lives in the house,
and right to terminate the residency it it
is het will to do so.
The mother is not being immoral since
she's only exercising her rights. Perhaps,
it her reasons tor abortion ate weak
she is being indecent (that is another
issue).but notimmoral. 1 herefore,bas-
me margumcnl on pu iOUScom!deci-
sions(Roe Wade.l .sSupreme
l ourt, 1973; Washington. 1). C ourt
of Appeals, iM2) upholding the right to
privacy oi one's own body, she has a
right to terminate pregnancy.
Decency might be a mattet tor
philosophers to ponder, but morality
and law are judgements made by out
courts which, when consistent and fair,
we must abide by.
1 NRK o IM
Senioi. Biology
Electronic C oncert Not For
Rockers, Discoers
I would like to respond to a letter in
the C ampus I orum ot Sept. 25 in which
Mi. Brad rucker de-enbe- his reaction
to tlie titst hall ot my electronic music
concert ot Sept. 21. Mr. Tucker state-
that no. attitude towards the audience
and performance was "apathetic that
the -hde- of the firsl piece were "just
projected onto the stage curtain" and
that the mihu was so "unspired and
laconic" that he and his companions
were "unstimulated" and eager to leave
at intermission.
My concert was an intermedia event
with electronic music and visual effects
including photographs, painted slides,
color organs and optical effects projec-
tors. Perhaps I should have grabbed a
patchcord and wiggled my hips in time
to the music like they do a rock concerts,
but 1 confess I was preoccupied with
running the audio and projectors and so
gac little thought to those who like to
see performers shimmy and turn cart-
wheels on the stage.
As tor not using a screen tor the slides
that accompanied the first piece East is
lust), a 4 x 5-foot image on a wh
screen would have been wiped out by the
two 1000-watt color organs whi
evidently escaped Mr. "ucker's atten-
tion. Projecting onto the curtain with
folds and shadows enabled me to enlai
the kaleidoscopic images and -ot:
then outlines. Mr. rucker should have
gone to the movies it he expei
everything to be boxed into a patch
white sloth.
foi my music being unin
laconic, what can 1 say? Mi Iiu-
should have staved tor the second I
wherein two Altec speakers were blown
10 shred- (unintentionally). I regret my
music did not "stimulate" Mi l"ud
and his friends. Perhaps they departed
the concert in tune to attend one ot the
local discos.
I sincerely deplore the "i know wl
like" altitude thai some students have
on this campus, an altitude thai K I
Schumann labeled as "Philistine
OTTO Vk I i i k
Associate Professor.
School of Music
Forum Rules
I he Lust Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points ot view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
I etters must include the name, major
and classification, address, phone
number and signature of the author(s).
I etters should he limited to three
typewritten panes, double-spaced, or
neatly printed. All letters are subject to
editing tor brevity, obscenity and libel.
I etters by the same author are limited to
one each 30 dais.
Pi
To The Left
Maybe We 're Making A Mistake
By MARkCl LBRFTH
Presidential debates, which were
begun b Lincoln and Douglas and
made fashionable b then incum-
bent President Ford and Jimmy
C arter. seem to be impossible in this
1980 three-party presidential cam-
paign.
Initially, the presidential debates,
the most publicized sponsored b
the League ol Women Voters, were
to include President Carter and
Ronald Reagan. John Anderson
was to be included only it he attain-
ed 15 percent of the popular vote ac-
cording to major polls by a set
deadline. But this deadline was ex-
tended under the pressure of the
Anderson camp, and Anderson was
allowed time to rally this support
through an appeal to America's
sense of equal opportunity. The ad-
dition of Anderson as a participant
in the debates caused President
Carter to refuse to attend the first
debate scheduled for Sept. 21.
Carter felt that the extension was an
unfair allowance, and that Ander-
son would receive unwarranted na-
tionwide publicity.
The debate did air as scheduled
on Sept. 21, with an estimated 50
million viewers. CBS and NBC aired
the debate at 10 p.m while ABC
chose to show "Midnight Express"
instead. At first Anderson and
Reagan spoke of Carter's decision
not to attend, then moved on to
their own disagreements with infre-
quent hints at Carter's absence.
The debate was typified by
Anderson's factual, straightforward
approach citing many government
and political statistics, while Reagan
simply restated his original platform
with intangible rhetoric. On the
issue of energy, for example,
Reagan reiterated his theme on con-
servation as a pacifistic approach,
insisting that America is energy rich.
Anderson accused Reagan of being
ill-informed, and proposed an excise
tax on gasoline, carpooling, and
better urban transportation systems.
Anderson and Reagan also
strongly disagreed on abortion.
Reagan calls for a constitutional
amendment which would ban abor-
tion in almost all instances. In a
typically tongue-in-check comment,
Reagan added that all proponents of
abortion were alive, and that the un-
born child had rights too. Ander-
son, unaffected by Reagan's disar-
ming wit, responded that such a ban
would violate the mother's
"freedom of choice and that the
unborn child has the right to be
wanted.
Reagan's greatest blunder in the
debate was his proposed "urban
homestead act According to this
plan, old homes in urban areas
would be sold for $1, with the pro-
mise from the owner to renovate the
home. Anderson was obviously
amused by Reagan's outdated pro-
posal and responded with numerous
proposals to improve cities, in-
cluding improving transportation
and appropriating $8 billion for
renovation and incentive programs.
The summations by both can-
didates were typical and predictable.
Anderson argued that he was a
legitimate candidate, and that he
personified a third choice to
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America's disgruntled voters.
Reagan spoke of the American
dream and his belief in this coun-
try's future. The debate was a vic-
tory for Anderson and his realistic-
approach to problem solving. Of the
seven-member panel of reporters,
six felt that Anderson had won the
debate, the seventh called it a draw.
Since this debate, the League of
Women Voters has proposed a one-
on-one debate between Carter and
Reagan for the week of Oct. 12 in
Portland, Oregon, and a three-way
debate the week of Oct. 26 in
Cleveland, Ohio. But Reagan, who
seemed adamant when Carter refus-
ed to appear at the first debate, has
refused to debate Carter alone.
Reagan says that he will debate
Carter if Carter agrees to debate
Anderson one-on-one in the third
debate. Reagan also has accused
Carter of rejecting many debate of-
fers. This is simply untrue. Caiter
only rejected the first League of
Women Voters debate, but has ac-
cepted numerous debate offers by
othet groups in which he would
debate Reagan only. Reagan has
refused all of them.
Reagan's concern to allow Ander-
son to debate was only a pretense by
which he could avoid a direct con-
flict with Carter. Reagan and his
aides initially felt that Anderson
would damage Carter, but since
Reagan's defeat in the first debate,
Reagan has announced that he will
probably not participate in any
future debates. This has caused
dissension in Reagan's camp. I wi
Nofziger, Reagan's press secretary,
said after the debate, "1 think we
accomplished what we wanted to ac-
complish, including keeping John
Anderson as a viable candidate
Reagan and Nofziger feel that and
future debates will only be
detrimental to Reagan's campaign
Among those who disagree with
Reagan's withdrawal from anv
future debates are William Casey.
Reagan's campaign director; Edwin
Meese III, his chief of staff; and
Richard Wirthlin, Reagan's pollster
and chief strategist. They feel that
Reagan must confront Carter direct-
ly if he hopes to win in November.
Obviously Reagan is so miserablv
unprepared to debate Carter on the
issues that he is avoiding Carter en-
tirely. But as one of Reagan's cam-
paign aides said of Reagan, "If the
guy can't debate Jimmy Carter for
one hour, maybe we're all making a
mistake
Mark Culbreth is a sophmore
English major from Favetteviiie
N.C.
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I






H
Features
1 HI I s( RO! ISI
Ml' I I ViH! '�
West Side Story
A cademy A ward- Winning Musical
Soon Showing At Mendenhall
By STEVE BAC HM R
siatt Wnln
This Wednesday night, Octobei
1, at 8 p.m. in Mendenhall Student
Center's Hendrix Theatre, the Stu
dent Union Films Committee will
present the dazzling 1961 musical
"West Side Storv Admission is In
student ID and activity card or by
Mendenhall Student (enter
Membership Card for faculty and
staff.
Following the film there will be a
short, informal discussion of "West
Side Story" in room 221.
Mendenhall Student Center. Dr. 1 .
David Sanders of the English
Department will be present to give a
short talk about the overtones ot
Shakespeare in the film. All
students, faculty and staff are
welcome to attend and cot tee and
doughnuts will be served.
Mmost everyone must know by
now that this film is the successful
rechnicolor adaptation ol the hit
Broadway musical which, in turn,
was based on Shakespeare's
"Romeo and Juliet sot against the
background of a tend between two
rival New York street gangs�one
Puerto Rican and one native
American.
"West Side Story" remains today
a film ol extraordinary power,
beauty and impact. It does catch
lire. In the process, it literally dares
criticism to sound like anything
mote than mete cat ping
Down ttotn the I
'
up
from the cellars and leaping out
'Mils
:
Robert V i

� -
from the tenements come two ram
paging street gangs m l2 to prove
m this classical musical that dance
and music could interpret the role ol
the aggressive, bewildered slum kid
a no other dramatic form could,
that "Romeo and Juliet" was even
mote powerful when played out not
between two sparring families but
between two clashing races and thai d �
the contemporary musical film
could handle themes as complex and
dramatic as any oilier medium.
I rged on by the insistent, gravelly bala
rhythms of 1 eonard Bernstei
magnificent score and the bitii See WF.ST. pag
I
I
College Papers: Young Hopeful
By HELEN COKDES "more conservative" advertisers
noRK.M (( PS) It was a were "uncomfortable" with the
� � �v ov li and the
foi college students:
1 irst there was th
-p
pv inside, sav s ollege
iperative ele- Papers ad manager Billy David.
� � . � � i ,iv id h Tiv .tng fot the
� this fall, suffered
Nestled about c base, because ol it.
fashion, � i It 's just one ol the problems
� s � ntity as pow ei
v, drugs, can expect to
joint punctuated encounter when trying to push a na-
k. and a lac brassiere tional student magazine over the
was pressed against top.
vhich in turn was I he idea ot a national student
d in stereo headphones. publication has come up before.
1 verything was there and. not "It's a natural idea sas Bernard
surprisingly, it worked, some Feld, a publications analyst on Wall
300,000 college students picked up Street. "The market is easy to iden-
���� ol College Papers, tify, is lucrative, and has plenty ol
Uones slick new leisure time. It' also highly
Fui thermore, more than educated. "
passed along theii copy Many magazines have tried, and
many have failed, rhey've been tin
Yei base's blissed out beam done by the shifting tastes and at-
't work for evervbodv. C ertain titudes ol student readers, by the ex-
rock n
c hase's
br
i hast' �
pense ol selling to them, by com
petition from existing magazines
that already go to part ol the
"student market and. these days,
bv a sluggish economy.
Rolling Stone was probably the
fittest and most innovative concern
to face those perils when it announc-
ed plans for College Papers last
year. I he magazine was to be a
quarterly, and then was re-cast as a
three-times-per-year publication. Bv
the itme CP staffers were putting
together the fall, 1980 issue, they
knew that plans for the spring 1981
issue had already been scrapped.
1 he editors are now shooting for a
fall, 1981 issue.
"We realize most college
magazines fail acknowledges CP
editor Kate Wenner. Sitting in tier
small office on one of the tour
floors that Rolling Stone occupies in
a Park Avenue skyscraper, she ticks
off some of the other realities of the
trade.
"( ollege is an insular time.
Students are focused on their work
and o n community. I hey
don't have lots ol time to read
things other than textbooks, or ex-
tra monev to bu magame . That's
Any the successful magazines are
usually free
rackling controversial r ,ues can
he a problem in itself, ' tes
a iise in student pohiical con-
servatism, he says CP is careful not
alientate "students on either
political pole
"1 know how I feel about the
draft and abortion, but what
students want to know is not what
we think he emphasises. "We feel
that our stories are treated in a non-
partisan way, so that all spectrums
can identity with these human
is lues.
The verdict on College Papers'
success in drawing student readers
from its freely distributed com-
petitors is still out. But the
magazine's stittest competition lias
come from another direction
c p paren Rolling Stot
'The competition (with Rolling
Stone) is a problem admits Wen
ner, whose brother
and still edits Rolling Sto
says CP tries to differentiate ii
from its patent
stori s it ru " V.
stance, o many music dories oi
have a cover with music peo
Vet in view ot the cor
familial and artistic connections
cP gets some editorial and much
production assistance tor Rolling
Stone � similarites are inevitable.
CP has the same page size and paper
stock as Rolling Stone. Its first two
covers � ol Chase and Gilda
Radner � were reminiscent ol '
ing Stone's repealed use of former
"Saturday Night I ive" actors on its
covers.
And, of course, Rolling Stone
also garners a large college an
dienee
aceo
-aid
( P
I
I he
vear pub 'tis,
ll advert
l used to I
Ii ears.
" ! ha loesn't n
thev D
is quick to
endorsemei
Pinball Games Stem
From Historic Bud
B n id norris
Pinball, one ol today's favorite
for many ECl students.
has a long history. Bagatelle, a
popular nineteenth century game
played with a cue stick shooting
balls into numbered scoring holes,
was most probabh pinball's pro-
iotvpe. Charles Dickens' Mr.
Pickwick played the game. In some
parts of the world, pinball is still
called bagatelle.
I he fust breakthrough in the
histor of modern pinball came in
1871, when a man named Montague
Redgrave patented a game called
Improvements In Bagatelles. It had
,i spring-powered wooden plunger
similar to those used today in pin-
ball. scoring cups tor players to aim
a bells, and even a metal swinging
gate. Othet similar games followed,
but until the 1920, none were
ijreatlv successful.
man named Harry Williams
made main innovations m the early
19.10's on pinball machines.
Williams once saw a customer in a
drugstore cheating at the game bv
hitting the bottom of the machine to
score higher, and his first solution
was to hammer sharp nails in to the
bottom ot the game. A more prac-
tical solution came later, when he
invented the fust tilt mechanism
rhese early games were entirely
n echanical. B 1933, it was becom-
ing difficult to invent new games. In
that year, Harry Williams and his
paitncr introduced electricity to pin-
ball in a game called Contact. I he
electricity powered a little device
that kicked a ball out of a scoring
hole when another ball completed
t.v electric circuit bv falling into
an �ther hole.
Later, Wiliams added a bell.
primarily as a joke on his partner
but the idea soon ptoved to be SO
popular that it became a standard
feature.
It's interesting to ee early pic-
tures of pinball games; early prices
are interesting, too. One early game.
Baffle Ball, offered the player
balls for a penny; another, called
iiiias
co 90 eo
00,
Redgrave's 'Improvements in
Bagatelles patented in 1871, has
the wooden spring-powered
plunger, as well as other features
ol modern pinball machines.
Ballyhoo, gave ten balls tor a pen-
ny. One idea o! the 1930's pinball
game that didn't last was the
"pas-out" machine, in which a
plavei who reached a certain score
won monev. This idea was verv un-
popular with many people, who
considered these games to be gambl-
ing machines. Many areas passed
atiti pinball ordinances, and New
York City had one until 1976.
As the vears went b, one by one
the familiar pinball characteristics
came. I lie flipper was invented after
World War II. the colorful back
glass of the machine became a stan-
dard element, and "add-a-ball" and
"tree play" dc.tces t reward
skillful players were developed.
Pinball is verv popular in many
foreign countries; in tact, 60 percent
ot the machines made in the United
States are exported to other coun-
tries.
The British call their pinball
games "pin tables The French call
them "les flippers" (pronounced
"lay t'lee-pair"). The Spanish play
"las maquinasdel millon The Ger-
man expression tor playing pinball
is "Kampf Flipper which literally
means to tight the Hipper.
The Spanish games are different
from those that Americans are used
to; the games are much taster and
the playing fields are very steep. A
player must stay alert or lose the ball
in an eye-blink.
Pinball games are constantly-
changing, becoming more and more
sophisticated. One new game,
"Firepower talks to its plavers
with a synthesized voice, saying
things like "Enemy destroyed" and
"Mission completed It is also a
multiball game, giving the player up
to three balls going at once.
According to Bob Bastedo of
Aladdin's Castle, an amusement ar-
cade at the Carolina last Mall,
"Firepower" is the most popular
pinball game lor him right now. He
says a game such as that can cost
around S3.(XX).
The games have become extreme-
ly complicated compared to the sim-
ple ones of the 1930V Today's pin-
ball machines are like small com-
puters. Interestingly, Bastedo sas
the newer ones are easy to maintain,
since they have small circuit boards
instead of hundreds o tiny elec-
tronic parts like those o a few years
ago.
I he simple mechanical parts,
such as the flippers and bumpers,
are the parts that break down the
most. When it's time for a machine
to have its scheduled overhaul,
many of the new ones arc program-
med to tell what, if anything, is
wrong with them.
Bastedo also said that the new
video games are extremely popular
now, with "Asteroids "Space In-
vaders "Cialaxion and "Missile
Command" being the most played.
See PINBALL, page 6. col. 3
'Captain Fantastic a modern version of the pinball
table, was produced by Bally Manufacturing Cor-
poration in 1976. It is one of a eries of tables this
company has produced since 1932,
?
I





;
THE LAS I CAROL IN1AN
m imi mm k w, i�w
Pin ball's Modern Technology
i oatinued from page 5
some ol these video games feature
coloi picture screens Machines Mich
as these can cost up to $3400.
I hose who are addicted to pinball
ind video games would not be sur-
prised to heai thai more adults than
kid plav them. Bastedo estimates
is customer's average age is 23, and
college students make up a large
percentage ol the business at Aiad
Castle. At the time ol tins in-
kiew, Bastedo counted thirteen
t ople pla ing one game or another;
hret en children and the other ten
were adults. And one oi the children
was with his mother, who was also
playing.
We Were Wrong
As reported in last l hurs-
da 's I astarolinian, the
StiA is sponsoring a 1 all Fine
Aits Festival in the Flanagan
Sl;m 1 heatie on Oct. 22 and
23, at 3 pan 1 he article tailed
to mention the times scheduled
foi auditions for the show.
Auditions will be held in
Room 224 Mendenhall at 7:30
p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 8.
Natalie Wood stars in West Side Story, showing
at the Hendrix 1 beatre in Mendenhall at 8 p.m.
on Wednesday. Oct. I. For a closer look at this
film classic, see Steve Bachner's write-up on
page 5.
Surfing Team
Organizing
Want to get in on an unusual varsity spoi
in college group of students is trying to stat
suiting team here at EC I For interest
there will be an organizational n eel nj
Wednesday, Oct. 1 at 7 p.m. in R
Mendenhall.
Since sui fing is recognized b the N .
become a varsity sport at K I Oi ' Fa
oast, many colleges have surfii
some on the I ast t oast, including I N V and
i SC.
Competition suiting is organized something
like a tennis tournament individuals compete
one on one (or sometimes in groups ol thret
lour) with winners advancing furthet along. 1 he
more members a surfing team has. the bettei its
chance ol finishing high in the competiti
This Saturday, Oct. 4. there will be a surfing
competition at the Paradise Pier, ropsail
Vi against the University ol South c
and I C W It is hoped that a twelve membei
team from I c I will also compete there.
THE ECU FRATERNITIES
AND SORORITIES
PRESENTS THE 2nd
OF FOUR
CONCERTS
THE DYNAMIC
,
I
In the near future, surfing scenes such as this
one could be a part of ECU's sports program.
fK7spp-�sP7�lJJ.
ELECTROLYSIS!
Permanent Removal H I nwanted I lair
Kk. � M
The Electrolysis Center a
1
103 Oakmont DrOffice G
756-3780
TuesWedFri. 9:30-5:30
Thursday 9:30am7:00pm.
CLIFF'S
SPECIALS
E. 10th St. Extension
752-3172
MONDAY-THURSDAY
Oyster Plate3.95
Shrimp Plate3.95
Seafood Plate3.95
Ocean Perch2.50
Blue Fish2.50
Crab Cakes1.85
THURSDAY
Popcorn Shrimp2.95
UPSETTERS
admission only
IWSeyEE ���
WED0CT.ls
Beach and Dance
Pizza ixui
AMERICAS FAVORITE PIZZA
ft
K0.
PIZZA BUFFET
ALL THE PIZZA AND
SALAD YOU CAN EAT
$2.59
MonFri. 11:30 2:00
Mon. & Tues. 6:00 8:00
758-6266 Evening buffet 38.79
Hwy 264 bypass GrecnvlUejrC.
Thursday Oct. 2
Plum Hollow
Ladies $1.00
Tues.�Wed.
Truckers Delight
Doors Open 9:00pm Music Starts 9:30
Men-$2.00 Ladies-Free
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised .terns is required to be readily��iLai,1e L"1 �f )
below the advertised price in each AaP Store, except as specifically noted
in this ad
SSPJESrEffKi IVnJOVHS OR WHOLESALERS
CTN OF
MwWrl IftJl� lM�rONLY IN GREENVILLE
PUT OIB-EOIONHI 5P�
!1
Start Playing
Today!
The Old Fashioned Bingo game Is available at 120 Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea
Co. stores located In North and South Carolina. Washington County. Va. and
Fannln County. Ga. This promotion is scheduled to end on November 29. 1980
Old Fashioned Bingo will officially end, however, when all game pieces are
distributed
7
122,330
CASH WINNERS!
' It's easy to play
Pick up FREE OW Fashioned Bingo concealed
ticket on every visit to AAP
� Mate) straight row of 5 numbers vertically,
horizontally or diagonally on any one of the 4
8ames on master card.
lo purchase necessary to participate
See game card for complete rules.
48 WAYS TO WIN!
$250,000
IN CASH PRIZES!
tjOO �� �" �' �U"�" )'
A&P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN GRAIN-FED BEEF
SIRLOIN
STEAKS
U.S.D.A. INSPECTED
FRYER
LEGS
LB
ASP QUALITY CORN FED FRESH
PORK ROAST
. 99
RIB END
LOIN
A�P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN GHAIN-FFC BEEF
-
T-BONE STEAKS
OR
PORTERHOUSE C0Qfi
STEAKS yJI
LB
A SUPERB BLEND, RICH IN BRAZILIAN COFFEES
EIGHT O'CLOCK
BEAN COFFEE
CUSTOM
GROUND
1-LB.
BAG
�FEES I
$199
. 60C
A BUS?
40 COUPON
!t"
FU"
PLAIN. SELF-RISING OR BREAD FLOUR
PILLSBURY
FLOUR 5
LB
BAG
LIMIT ONE WrTH THIS COUPON
GOO0 THRU SAT. OCT 4 AT A&P IN GREENVILLE
fHpFgly 654
r a.
G
47 COUPON
ANN PAGE REFRIGERATED
ORANGE JUICE
-GAL
CTN
LIMIT ONE WfTH THIS COUPON
GOOD THRU SAT. OCT 4 AT A�P IN GREENVILLE
FROZEN
� PEPPERONI � HAMBURGER
� SAUSAGE & CANADIAN BACON
TOTINO'S PIZZA
99
SAVE 50c
12-02
PKG
FROZEN
BANQUET
FRIED CHICKEN
2 KO $
99
SAVE
$1.10
r
THE NATURAL SNACKS
RED TOKAY
jMtFAJW
FOR FRESHNESS AND
SAVINGS
GRAPES iflri
nousl
EASTERN GROWN
ED OR GOLDEN DELIC
APPLES �
3 79 "

I
I





�j.89
I III

I
"1
IHMJ
9
t
:C!
I
cni
SAVE
SI 10
J
ELICIOUS
Mill r
i� feour CoLLec�. � Hard (Ami
57 PNipUo
; f( iHLr-
.�
. &�T Oi� fg�� I
VJO,THAICS CfST
GATEMOUTH BROWN
West Side Story To Play Soon
' unlinued from page 5
across the playground, halt abstracl tone. oi the Sharks, and
a commanded a basket rhen the 'Romeo tragedy becomes in-
mg ball briefly, and then and Juliet' legend un evitable.
into a beautiful folds, kill's friend I he film won an
ballet prowl through "ony (Richard Beymer) outstanding 10
he city street altei falls in love with a Academy Awards in
nately cowing and be Puerto Rican girl nam- 1961 and has gone on
�nemy ed Maria (Natalie to become one ol the
N - which sets Wood), whose brothei most sucessful box
bit moie' hall real, Bernardo is the leadei office hits ol all time.
fT Delight
752-5878
OPEN TILL MIDNIGHT
AND FOR SPECIAL OCCASIONS
Nexl ro Mike's Bike Shop
In Archadc
( Kir ogurt Is In
Gritterttficates
Arc Available
R E �'�VEST ICE CRT � Y T HIS SIDE OF THE RAINBOW
FIC TASTE TANT1LIZING TOPPINGS
E N � R T F ROM CAt I
'� DENA DARlf
VILK SI ODAS ; m FRUIT ADES
N R IC E C k � �. y f n ' : N iQV.E TO LIFE
BACKGAMMON TOURNAMENT
NO ENTRY FEE
ALL THE K I- CREAM YOU AND H)IK DATE CAN EAT AM)
TICKETS ro A C( NCER1 AT JJ'S FOR FIRM PLACE. MUS1 S,GN up BY OCT.3.
PIRATES rREASURE CHESTS FOR SECOND PLACE AND PLAY BEGINS OCT. 7.
IHIR1) PLACE
Greenville, NX.
WED OCT. 1
Doors open 830
HAVE AHAPPY 830-930
beautifully fashioned
denim jeans by Wilkins-
Rumble Seats as advertised
in Vogue, Glamour,
Baza! and Mademoiselle
EC U signature
emblem embroidered
,K 1�( k pocket
reo, $27 00
traffic light
pitt plaza
Most Anything Away Through
Classifieds
For Your Convenience Classified Ads Can Be Purchased At 3 Locations
Student Supply
Store Lobby
MWF 10-11
TTH 11-12
Student Organization
Booth (Mendenhall)
M-F 3-4
East Carolinian Office
MTTH 4-5
WF 2-3
Classified Advertising Rates:
1-3 Lines $1.00 Each Additional Line $.25





Sports
Eagles Down ECU, 35-7
Pirates Suffer Third Straight Loss
Charles
Chandler
U II K! SII M) u
Pirate Shite To
Get Tougher ?
pi
Another One Bites The Dust
i ' ; aai hultba k Vnthomollin.s j�el trip
up Saturda in the team's 35-7 loss to
I M while trin� to repeal his l(M-ard
��!t return f one week earlier (against
Horida Mate). ollhis hat! seeral shoh at
Ihe tit! as the I i sn their third straight
game.
Injuries Plague Young Pir
MMn hul'KI I
Hooters Having Trouble
Creating Scoring Punch
ihiuiM iiwmiK

.
lolN( (
I. ai
. I i
1


i

-
I
I
: � �


V
i
r
u
Ml senior defensive end Rock Butler sik dejectedh
during team's third straight loss aturda.





!HI i -s I XKOl IMW SF I'll MH1 k 30, 1980
V

dejeiledh
Southern Mississippi quarterback Reggie (oilier (L) and (.olden Eagle fullback Sammy Winder (R)
played big rolls in the club's 35-7 vin over ECU Saturday, (oilier had a II) pass while Winder rushed for
136 ards and three other touchdowns.
ffiflDQUflRTERS
W OROERING 4 OtUVtRING YOUR
QOLDLfllKI
CLRSSRIHQ
2-4 week delivery
CAROLINA
EAST
MALL
MILL OUTLET
OPEN
MON. THUR.
FRI.
SAT.
PRICE
�Ik
30 6
30 8
30 6
Ladies Name Brand
WOOl SkirtS Fully Lined$32.50
Ladies Name Brand
Wool Blazers Reg.$50$77.50
Guys & Gals Jogging
Suits Reg S125$13.98&UP
Men's Ski Sweaters-$19.99
AY AWAY PLAN AVAILIABLE
BEACH PARTY AND SHAG
CONTEST SATURDAY NITE,
OCTOBER 4th ($100 and other
valuable prizes to winners)
� �� � � � ���
Bring your blanket or lawn chair
' 8A0 OF Qz
CUFF�D CURRy
Concert begins at 1 1:00 a.m.
OCTOBER S. 11H0
HOLIDAY TRAVEL PARK
EMERALD ISLE. NX.
(on the beach)
Adm.
$10.00 adv.
$12.00 gate
Adv. tickets at;
Call now for your
camping reserva-
tions:
354-225G
Apple Records
Have a Coke and a smile.
&���
Phone:
752-5025
Home of Greenville's Best Meats
M0RRELL Pride
T Bone or Sirloin
Steaks
$2.59 lb.
Upton
Tea Bags
48 a. pkg. 98C
Kraft
Macaroni Cheese Dinner
7 ozbox 3$ 1.00
Compare our prices; A FEW WORDS ABOUT FOOD
SHOPPING. It's the Total cost ofyour food bill that really
counts. Some stores claim to be the cheapest on this or that;
that is they have super low prices on just enough grocery
items to confuse the issuethen they sock it to you on the
meat prices and other grocery items. We don't claim to have
the lowest prices on every item in our store, no one can truely
make that claim we will save you money, day in and day out.
Our prices are right and our services are Greenville's best.
No one can put it all together like Overton's can.
DANNON
ALL flavor:
YOGURT
8 Oz. Cup 3 $1.00
SOFTN
PRETTY
Toilet Tissue
4 Roll Pkg. 98c
SqfinPX&
m
t .
HI-DRI
Paper Towels
Gaint Roll
38
TIDE TRAIL SIZE
DETERGENT
7 Oz. Box 5 $1.00
GRADE A FRYER
PARTS
Breast With Win��
IB89
Only one cent per ounce
COCA COLA
32 Oz. Btl. Plus Deposit 32c
.� to . - ta ?� .
s
SUPER BUCK
FAB DETERGENT GAINT
BOX $1.00
With this coupon and $7.50 order
excluding advertised specials.
Without food order $1.79. Limit one
per customer. Expires Oct. 4, 1980
FRESH, LIVE
FLOWERS
Carnations Per Stem 3 $1.00
PEPSI COLA
2 Liter Btl.
Limit 4 with $7.50 food order
Without food order $1.29
99
t






10
IHt t M t. .kOl ll W
M CM Nl HI k UJ
At NCSU Invitational
. � , , McDonald Presents:
Lai) Pirates Fifth The Campus Crisis Collection
By JIMMY IhiPRKh eventually doomed the
t s,),iri�iiinr Pirates
Placing fifth in the lthe ,�, ,tu, ba�
North Carolina State hU hard� s.ud
I niversit Invitational Davidson. "We puked
Vollevball tournament
ip a lot of then spikes
ma) not sound like an haJ , wasn sure we'd
I arth-shattenng ac We to bu thcv
complishment, but for were awfu,u strong
the I ad Pirates o!
'In the last game, we
las; Carolina, the teat led foj awhUeandthey
a step in the nghl ed fQj a wnile and then
we led again and the)
led again fhe) just
direction.
The 1 ad
opened the tourne)
'irate-
openea me iournc happened to be leading
with losses to c. ollege a he d K,
oi Charleston and
George Washington ' Servin had Kvn a
I niversity, but bounc
ed back
Vii einia
Com
monwealth and highly .
touted Miami Dade , ,
t. ommunit) c ollege to
finish in the top three
ol the qualifying
competition and ad
he champii
und.
1 c l opened
w ea k link in the
Pirates' performances
againsl N State and
ii in the Mi si
l)ais was the top
defensive performer ac-
cording to the coach,
while senior I oretta
Holden drew praise for
her hitting.
"We introduced a
new intense Wednes-
day, practiced Thurs-
day and used it in the
tournament Friday
explains Davidson. "I
called the plays from
the bench and when I
signaled tor a certain
play once. 1 oretta said
she could put it on the
floor it the set came her
way. 1 changed the
play, the set came
perfect and she nailed
it. She's a goou, ag-
gressive hitter and she
let go with everything
she had
The I ady Pirates
host Duke Wednesday
at 7 p.m. in Minges
Coliseum in their First
home match of the
season and the coaches
consider the contest
with the Blue Devils a
"must win" proposi-
tion.
"We're 0-2 in the
division, so we've got
to win against Duke to
get back into the race
reasons Davidson.
"They do some
tricky things, like try-
ing to block the serve,
but 1 think we can deal
with that. Our girls are
taught to place the
serve around the cour
Blocking would be
more effective on a
team that serves hard
and low to the net.
"We need to work
on court movement; we
got caught out of posi-
tion a couple oi times,
but the other team just
didn't take advantage
of it
Davidson
layers foi
re the
ing got a
c admits.
bv
Classifieds
tournament with a (N( Vl xVv ,
15-6, 1 5-6 loss to eve
ru unei -up
t hat lest on . a n d
followed with anc
loss to tourne) i
P j on v.ieoi ge
Washington 15-1, 15-6
IK Pirates g I
the winning trad
a 15-11,
ov er Virginia
monwealth a
tinned with a
8-15, 15-11 win
NPan: in
final twi
It
Ea Cai
I
we'll be oi
mgest serving
'he
import a nl
i can be used
is a tool to keep the
from runn-
fe n se.
rt ol
tie season, Davidson
and :oach Alha
I n were unsure who
b the starting
sophomore
I iyd has im-
d through the ear-
d sOlkllV
tour-
FORSALE
FOR SALE PE ARL Snare di um
6 � 14 in tJ3S new Bes' OH. '
Call 7S8 3076
FOR SALE Technics SA 500 60
waits SI 230 1 u11v automatic
table With Empire 2000 Elll
Phase Linear speakers
Aluminum antennae Paid SHOO
best offer Can 752 8860, ask tor
Gr aham
FOR SALE 196� Ford van Semi
Custom insulated standard V S
Call Mar v Duqqan at 758 5057 aftet
6 00 p m
FOR SALE Garrard 42 M Turn
table Kenwood 3200 Amp two
Utah Speakers with wood'
Tweeter two Mid Ranges) S400
Call 756 8850 between 9 00 a m
and 5 00 p m
WATER BED Must sell, never
rj.�. n used Complete with mat
tress liner frame headboard
ded heatei Wni Sacrifice loi
S.Ti Can Oov.d ?56 175
FOR RENT
KlSPONSiBLE FEMALE
ROOVw'L wanted to shan a
two bedroom mobile home S100
per month includes all utilitiese�
opt �uel oil m wintei Ch. .
752 8747
ROOMMATE NEEDED IM
MEDIATELY Thin Bedroom
house on Memorial Dri.i SUS
per month plus utilities Call
757 4652 8 00 5 00 p m or '56 1558
after 5 00 p m
PERSONAL
CUSTOM CRAFTING and repair
ol qold and silver Buvinq and
si ll.nq of qold and silver bv Lfs
Jewelers 120 E 5th St 758 2127
ANYTHING YOU CAN WRITE
we can wr n. "ei Typmq. pro
ofreadinq editing Write Riqht
756 9946
SUNSHINE STUDIOS oflennq
classes in Ballet Jan Yoqa and
Exercise Special student ra'es
Within walkinq distance of cam
pus 756 7235
LOST Gold Rope Bracelet ol
qreat sentimental value on
September 22 REWARD Call
757 6731 dav or 758 4260 niqh! Ask
tor Janet
MOVIE MATES WANTED No
1 .perience necessary Apply 264
Movie Mates across from Buck
Stoves 756 9929
HELP WANTED Partt.m.
Seen'anal posrtion available
Bethel Required sk.ils Typmq
and knowledge m Accountmq
Call 625 99M
GENTLE Mature quy dewres
fem.ve trrend who is as lonely as
he P O Bux 4163 Greenville
WANTED Photoqr aphers. must
have 35mm Camera Transporta
iron and tx? very dependable Call
anytime Hubie Tolson 758 3658
OVERSEAS JOBS Summer year
round Europe South America
Australia Asia All Fields
S500S1200 monthly Expenses
paid Sightsi eing Free info
Write IJC Box 52 NC4 Corona
Del Mar CA 92625
FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE
CLASSIFIED ADS CAN BE PUR
CHASED AT THREE LOCA
TIONS
Student Orqanuation Booth
(MendenhalU M F 3 00 4 00
Student Supply Store Lobby MWF
10 00 n 00 TTH 11 00 12 00
Eas' Carolinian OHic. WTTM
4 0C 5 00 WF 2 00 3 00
Free poster with purchase
of any large sandwich
and medium or large size Coke

j nur. 1 . ' iste, com
. 1 pat trig Ms I onald's purcl
arge sandwich and a medium oi larg
UL sioned Greg, ke, and u will �
" he collection - Home Uame,
Lord of the � "Ffwhmai ins, inB Tu
,r Blind Date
u"PJec� . W lent vou will he p'1 !
nan;
1
How 1 woi
f
brack
j.j
Pirates tell
15-12.
E( I assistant
I David ion
little cold at
up as �
should h
match. I hev tho
thev co .
i but we cam
?n them and
won the fit s; game.
1 )a states in
the sec i d . ame, Clem-
son unleashed then
fensive barrage which
"We had
. real smart
she hit to " .
SoDhomore Miw
Nobody can do it
like McDonald's can
�McDonalds
S AD'SSHOE
RfcPAIR
������ ' .
2 2N
: 1�, ' J
ARMY MAVYSTOR6
I �cfc�cm. aVIS. KMitber.
� FiaW, Oacfc, FliflM. Snorkel �
� Jacket. Peace?, �.
? Shoo. Cofitoat Soot. Pin.
m
1K1.S. Evan Street
AkORTIONf PTO
11th WEEKOf
PREONANCY
$,?6 0C"�lllnclu�l�t'
pregnancy te$t birtf con
troi and protolern pregrvan
cy cour�eLns Fty hjrther
.ntor-rnatlor caH �32 OS35
(toll frat numrer
800 2?i 7568' setwaen 9
A M S P M yveendayi
Ralaigh Watiani
Haaitn Orgaruia'to
? '7 Wal�Aortan S�
Raiaigh, N C 37M
Susan
alary Anne
Carroll
Ellen
Loretta
Pam
Meliasa
TerTy
Lynn
Demise
We ire the women wbo cmjxb tbe Plamtoii
Oenter a sped! place offering frlancQy.
personal, confidential oare at a reasonable
cost and at Umee oonvaraant to yoa
Saturday abortion hoars
rra prsMancy tmXm
Vary aarly pragnancy tart
Bvanln birth oontrol hours
Call 781-6680 In Raleigh anytime
The Flaming Oeruer 3613 Hawortt, Ortve Raieigh. N C 27806
ir :ampus Cris , . ers It
t write i the Hil lei rai it brothers �
the artfulness of ' ' ' �
1 let
GO!
THIS FALL
COLOR ME PURPLE'
Beautifui fall colors and refreshing, new fall fashions
� itement and cheering from the crowds purple, purple
everywhere a great luscious color that pervades the ECU Pirate
hor "g m Ficklen Stadium You'll want to look right and feel
right as a part of the m crowd' You will, too, with your
coordinating fashion and make up Shades of purple are a favorite
this season in all ladies fashions and setting the pace with these
the beautiful shades of lovelv purple found in the new fall
cosmetics colors And what could be a more appropriate color?
t our cosmetic department this Thursday. October 2 from
v 9pm and our cosmetic Beauty Advisors will be glad to
give you a complimentary consultation
ECU FRESHMEN
IT NOT TO LATE
YOU CAN STILL BECOME A PART OF THE AIR FORCE ROTC FOUR YEAR
PROGRAM. TAKE TIME TO INVESTIGATE A CHALLENGING AND REWAR-
DING SECOND CAREER OPPORTUNITY WHICH OFFERS A CURRENT STAR-
TING SALARY OF $13,800 PER YEAR INCREASING TO $23,000 IN FOUR
YEARS,30 DAYS ANNUAL VACATION WITH PAY, FULL MEDICAL AND DEN-
TAL COVERAGE, AND MUCH MORE. ALL YOU NEED TO DO IS TO PRE-
REGISTER FOR AERO 1102 AND AERO 1103 FOR THE SPRING SEMESTER.
STOP BY OUR OFFICES ON THE SECOND FLOOR OF WRIGHT ANNEX AND
CHECK OUT THE DETAILS. WE WILL BE GLAD TO EXPLAIN THE FOUR
YEAR AIR FORCE ROTC PROGRAM TO YOU. AND REMEMBER, THERE IS NO
OBLIGATION FOR THE FIRST TWO YEARS OF AIR FORCE ROTC.
CONTACT: CAPTAIN BARTON J. MOYER
ROOM 209, WRIGHT ANNEX
ROTC " 757-6597 or 757-6598
DEFENSE DEFENSE DEFENSE1 f! 1WE LOVE YOU PIRATES
II II� 11 II
U u1Ii li
r
�-
For the first
customers
Make a S5 cosmetic
purchase any
brand and receive a
Color Me Purple T
Shir'
FREE
-ai
kA
h�
pia
U
L�. o

Goteway 'o a greo� -ay of life.
ESTEE LAUDER LANCOME
FLORI ROBERTS CLINIQUE
ELIZABETH AROEN ULTIMA II
GERMAINE MONTEIL REVLON
CHARLES OF THE RITZ

T
Shop Monday Through Saturday 10 am Until 9pm Phone 756 B E L K 1756 2355!
i
?





Title
The East Carolinian, September 30, 1980
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 30, 1980
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.80
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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