The East Carolinian, September 9, 1980






Pirates
Mow Down
Blue Devi
By CHARLES CHANDLER
sport- I dllur
DURHAM � "No words can tell
you. I'm just so proud of you
Following his successful debut as
head football coach at Hast
Carolina, Ed Emory could think of
nothing more fitting to say to his
team after it had finished
humiliating Duke, in hot sultry con-
ditions, Saturday, 35-10.
The Pirate offense came on
strong in the second half, scoring
three touchdowns and rolling up 267
vards while the ECU defense
swarmed over the Blue Devil
back field like bees in both halves to
get Emory started out on the right
foot after replacing Pat Dye last
December.
All- American candidate at
halfback Anthony Collins scored
three TDs in the win despite some
badlv bruised ribs that had threaten-
ed to keep him out of the game
altogether.
Though the offense tallied a
whoping 396 yards for the after-
noon, it was the Pirate defenders
that put the Blue Devils in the grave.
Thanks to seven sacks of Duke
quarterback Ben Bennett and some
tough play in the trenches, the
Pirate defense held its opponent to a
mere two years rushing.
"The defense was definitely the
key for us said a jubilant I mor
following the contest. "We rotated
fresh people up front that day. The
real key was getting to Bennett in
key situations. I knew we needed a
big rush, and I was very pleased
with what we got
The Pirate defense also played the
offense when it came up with what
might have been the game's key play
late in the first half. With the score
times at seven, Duke had the foot-
ball on its own 35-yard laine when
an ECU rush got to Bennett and
forced a fumble that was recovered
by Pirate defensive end Mike Davis
on the Duke 25.
With starting quarterback
Carlton Nelson ailing from heat ex-
haustion, the Pirates went with
reserve Greg Stewart to direct the
offense that would try to at least
salvage a field goal with the 30
seconds that remained in the half.
Following two no-gain plays.
Stewart completed a pass over the
middle to Anthony Collins that
went for 11 yeards, giving ECU a
first down on the Devils' 14-yard
line with 13 seconds remaining in
the half.
On the very next play Collins took
a pitch from a falling Stewart and
went untouched into the end one as
ECU went to the locker room at
halftime with a 14-7 lead. Collins
had also scored his team's first TD
Ste PIRAIK, Page . col. 1
Collins Scores
�he lEast Carolinian
Vol. 55 No. 5
12 Pages Toda
Serving the lias! Carolina campus community since 1925.
Tuesday, September 9, 1980
Greenville, N.C.
Circulation 10.000
Petition Calls For WZMB
Station Manager To Quit;
Asks Former Head Back
Over 600 Students Signed Petition
calling for resignation of M MB manager
PhoTO by GARY PATTERSON
Beer Blast, Concert Considered
For 1980 Homecoming Event
A beer blast and a concert on C ol-
lege Hill ma follow the Homecom-
ing Hep Rallv ii plan- arc approved
in a September llth meeting, said
Dean Mallory.
On October 18 at 2 p.m East
( at'ilma Pirates will host Western
( arolina Mountaineers for the an-
nual homecoming football game
The beer blast is onl a part ol
this year's Homecoming Celebra-
tion. Concerts, contests, parades,
parties and a cross campus run will
fill out the 1980 ECU Homecoming
Schedule.
This year's theme for homecom-
ing is "Pirate Spirit of the 80V and
the homecoming committee is work
ing hard to start off this decade with
the best possible homecoming.
A decorative contest will be held
Wednesday & rhursday, October 15
and 16 for the dorms and all sorori-
t and fraternity houses. Each entry
participating will be alloted forty
dollars and will be judged on design.
color combination, originality,
completeness ol theme, workman-
ship, and overall evaluation.
On 1 riday, October 17 at 8 p.m.
there will be a pep rally.
An lumni Open House kicks off
Homecoming Day festivities on
Saturday, October 18, at 9 a.m.
At 9:30 a.m the Intramural Of-
fice is hosting a Cross Campus Run,
consisting of a 5 mile and a 2.5 mile
run.
The homecoming parade will start
at 10 a.m. from Rose High School
and move down Fifth Street.
At 8 p.m. following the 2 p.m.
football game, a band jamboree will
be held at Mendenhall Student
Center. Beach music, bluegrass.
jazz, and soul are on the agenda.
The Student Union will conclude
homecoming with a concert, by
Mike Williams on the mall at 2 p.m.
Sunday, October 19.
Decorations, Entertainment and
Bands. Parade and Advertising are
the five sub-committees which form
the Student Homecoming Commit-
tee.
Anyone wanting to work on a
committee should contact Dean
Mallory 757-6824.
By TERRY GRA
V-w 1 �1il�r
Approximately 600 ECU students
signed a petition Mondav that calls
for the resignation of the present
station manager of WZMB and the
reinstatement of the former station
manager until a "qualified ECU
student with a broadcasting license"
can be found to manage the station.
The petition, which was address-
ed to the ECU Media Beard, the
Board of Trustees and Chancellor
Thomas Brewer, stated that
WZMiJ's station manage LcA
Killingsworth, should resign her
position "for the good of the stu-
dent bod and WZMB
Van Brown and lorn Zielinski,
both friends o Jeter's, initiated the
petition.
The petition resulted from the
resignation of John Jeter as special
adviser to the station last Wednes-
day in a closed session o the Media
Board. Jeter was the station's
manger until August 1, when Kill-
inesworth succeeded him to the
post. He had been staving on as an
unofficial adisor to Killingsworth
until the station's new equipment
could be set up and the first broad
cast aired
According to sources. Kill-
ingsworth appeared betore the
Media Board Wednesday and said
thai Jeter had been oerstepping his
authority. David Creech, chairman
ot the Media Board, said Monday
that the board had "made it clear"
that Killingsworth was in charge of
the station.
"Cilenda is the general manager
of the station, and the Media Board
is backing her 100 percent said
Creech. "1 don't see where there
should be any question about it. -V
this point, we have all the con-
fidence in the world in her he add-
ed.
Van Brown, who helped start the
petition, said Monday that the
Media Board "did not consider the
ramifications o (Jeter's) resigna-
tion
Brown, a graduate o ECl , said
that without Jeter's technical
knowledge ot the new equipment,
the station would have a hard time
setting up.
Killingsworth has responded to
charges that she might be unable to
get the station on the air. 'They
should give me a few weeks. I'll get
it cleared up. I've got a job to do,
and 1 can't tight petitions and
newspapers. I've got work to do
she said.
Killingsworth said that she had
been the station's business manger
tor two years and assistant manger
for six months before Jeter recom-
mended her for the general
manager's job.
"I know the station. 1 know how
hard John has worked, but 1 have to
be responsible for what goes on
The petition also asks that Jeter
"be reinstated to oversee placing the
station on the air, as was originally
agreed upon by the Media Board
See PETITION, Page 2, Col. 1
"Affair On Mall" Rescheduled
"Student life Celebrates � n
Affair On The Mall" an ef-
fort to familiarize students with the
different services provided by the
E.C.U. Division of Student Life �
will be held Wednesday, September
10.
ECU Students Charged

In Motorcycle Larceny;
Auto Also Reported Stolen
B MIKENOONAN
suit nlir
Two last Carolina University
students have been charged with
felonious larceny of a motorcycle,
bringing the total o' on-campus
vehicle break-ins to three since the
beginning of fall semester.
Michael Jerry Kirbv, 18. and
Bryan Keith Kelly, 18, both of 135
Jones Dorm, were apprehended b
E U C ampus Police after allegedlv
stealing a 1973 Honda motorcycle in
front o the lnfirmirv August 28.
Value of the motorcycle was
estimated at $750.
Kelly was also charged with
assault on a police officer and plac-
ed under a $900 bond.
Smith, charged with no operators
license, was placed under a bond of
$400. Preliminary hearings for both
have yet to be determined.
The preceeding night, Aug. 27, a
1976 Datsun was reported stolen
from the Eighth Street parking lot
between James Street and Cotanche
Street.
Value oi the car was estimated at
3,000
According to police reports, the
car had been straight wired, and was
later recovered, still running, in a
parking place on Maple Street.
The recovered vehicle had receiv-
ed $250 worth o damage. The car
was damaged on the passenger's
side from front to rear, according to
the police report.
I here were no suspects in the case
pending identification of finger-
prints. Joseph C alder. Director of
Security, expresses his concern over
the number of auto break-ins this
semester.
"The main cause of so many
thefts is that people leave their keys
on floorboards or under the sun
visor. These people stealing cars
look in those places first he said.
"We usually average five or six
auto thefts a year he added. "In
the past, there have been more
vehicles stolen from the area around
Minges Coliseum than any other
location he said.
The celebration, originaliv plann-
ed for September 3 was interrupted
by an afternoon thundershower and
had to be rescheduled.
Ms. Nancy Mie. Associate Direc-
tor o Intramural and Recreational
Services and coordinator of the
celebration, said the event will take
place as originally planned and will
include the following schedule o
events
3:00-4:00 Frank Reilly. guitarist;
4:00-4:30 Just For Fun, Interpreters
for the Deaf; 4:30-5:00 Jeff
Blumberg, BIO WOW disc jockey;
5:00-6:00 Fd Collevecchio,
guitarist; 6:00-6:30 Just For Fun;
and 6:30-7:00 Billy and Sandra
Stenson. guitarists.
At 5:00 Chancellor Dr. Thomas
Brewer and Dr. Elmer Myer. Vice
C hancellor of Student Life will an-
nounce the winners of a drawing tor
tickets to the UNC-ECU football
game.
Other attractions include a
wandering mime and face-painter.
In addition, a wheelchair basket-
ball exhibition game will be played
with chairs available for students
who want to trv their hook shots
from wheelchairs, said Ms. Mie.
A Pizza Hut pizza-eating contest,
a Mellow Yello chugging contest
and a Miller 6-pack toss will be
available for those wishing to try
their hand (or stomach) at contests.
The event is a joint effort bv the
U various departments of the Divi-
sion of Student I ife.
Prosecutors Set Stage To Show
Slow-Motion Movies To Jury
Rush Week Gets Off The Ground
with a balloon from the sororities
Photo by GARY
-EHSON
C.RFFNSBORO (UP1) Pro-
secutors have set the stage for show-
ing a jury slow-motion videotapes
of the shooting deaths of five com-
munists in the trail of six Ku Klux
Klansmen and Nazis charged with
the slayings.
Two FBI videotape experts
testified Monday they had made
slow-motion copies of television
film of the Nov. 3, 1979, Death to
the Klan" rally that erupted into
shooting after a caravan of
Klansmen and Nazis had arrived to
heckle the demonstration.
Several up-to-speed videotapes
have already been shown to the jury
hearing the case. Prosecutors were
expected to introduce the slow-
motion tapes into evidence today.
The defendants are Klansmen
Jerry Paul Smith of Maiden; Col-
eman Blair Pridmore of Lincolnton;
Gene Morgan of Lincolnton; and
David Wayne Matthews of Newton;
and Nazis Jack Wilson Fowler and
Roland Wayne Wood, both of
Winston-Salem.
Also Monday, District Attorney
Michael Schlosser said he has filed a
motion asking that the jury be taken
to the Greensboro intersection
where the shootings occurred. No
ruling was made on the motion.
In other testimony Monday, FBI
firearms expert Gerald F. Wilkes
said an unfired shotgun shell found
at the site where the shooting occur-
red was from a shotgun carried by
Pridmore.
OrTfheTnside
Announcements2
Classifieds12
Defense Key9
Editorials4
Letters4
Pirates Win9
Spring Mills6
Store6
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Cj' ' . ' '
fall with me ' new Design Cu?
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OFF ail Curly Perms or B
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rvith ALL H
Call today foi . ri eni or consi
752 3419
2800 E 10th St
r
Petition Asks Station
Managers Resignation
Continued from Page 1
finaih approved this spring, and the
ccording to Killingsworth and stations equipment was ordered
ands. - summei.
"Ii to have John take i!n
Mthough the student -funded sta
a and put the station on the tion is not yet on the air, Jeter had
desei ves it but he
iimated earlier this month thai the
iny I
ant '� 'til date should be sometime in
Settling into campus
� - 'he station an more
h said.
earl) October, bin Killingsworth
that she was not going to name
Since WLC U, the formei radio a date until all of the equipment is in
lei. was taken ofl the and operating.
Brown and Zelinski said the)
would continue to circulate the pen-
1( license was tion this week.
was taken oit the
rked to gel
ti pei ation
life doesn't exactly
mean settling down.
Sell It Faster
Through
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Call 757-6366 for information
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t
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Irv
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1 Ml 1 s K()1 IMW
SI I'll MHI K9. I WO
Governor
it .
i
s
GOT
FROM
D
?s
�pi 9
1980
,EN
B DAN LOHWASSER
RALEIGH (I PI) - Republican
gubernatorial candidate 1 Beverly
lake Jr. used Monday night's
televised debate with Democratic
Gov. .lames B. Hunt Jr. to launch
an aggressive attack, accusing Hunt
ol engaging in machine politics and
creating an explosive growth in state
bureauci acy.
Hunt responded by saying he
wanted to wage a campaign that
dealt with issues such as jobs,
education, crime control and
energy.
During the hour-long debate, ear-
ned live from the Meredith College
auditorium b the University ol
North i arolina television network.
I ake repeatedly tried to take the of-
fensive, preferring to fire ofl ques-
tions at his opponent rather than ad-
dressing questions posed to ill by a
four-member panel.
Hunt repeatedly ignored lake's
questions about his stand on the
Panama C anal treaty, his involve-
ment in a controversy surrounding
Comprehensive Employment and
Training Act contracts, and
statements 1 ake attributed to Hunt
about supporting a proposed Si5
billion federal jobs program.
Communist Workers Party leader
Nelson Johnson, who had threaten-
ed to disrupt the debates, appeared
outside the auditorium with four
other CWP members, but left
without incident when told he would
be arrested for trespassing.
l he debate began with a dispute
between the two candidates over
several posters lake had hoped to
use to illustrate his opening state
ment. After he placed the first
poster, which was titled "Hunt's
Political Machine Hunt quickly
objected, saying it was a "clear
understanding" that no props
would be allowed.
Lake then said he was advised on-
ly two minutes before the debate
began that he could not use the
displays, but agreed to leave them
out of sight behind his speaker'
podium.
At the conclusion of the debate,
Hunt said he was not disturbed by
Lake's tactics.
"1 didn't know what to expect
Hunt said. "It didn't bother me.
The set-up for the debate was for
them, the panelists, to ask the ques-
tions
Lake said the ban on his displays
"very seriously inhibited my ability
to get my message across
In his opening statement. Lake
blasted Hunt, saving he had made a
deal four years ago with state ALL-
OC) leader Wilbur Hobby, promis-
ing him CETA contracts inexchange
for political support. The State
Auditor's Office earlier this year
questioned $260,000 in CLTA con-
tracts awarded a firm headed by
Hobby.
Hunt said he preferred to address
"the issues but said the state did
have problems with the CLTA pro-
gram. Hunt said he had moved to
correct the problems, replacing two
top officials and appointing a con-
troller to tighten the reins on CLTA
funds. Hunt said he was "really
sorry that Sen. Lake is using these
kinds of tactics and recited his
record on bringing jobs to North
Carolina as well as his state reading
program.
"I am running on my record
Hunt said, adding that in 3 years,
$7.2 billion in new industry had
been pledged for the state that
would create 110.000 new jobs.
On education. Hunt said children
in grade 1-6 were now at or above
the national average in reading abili-
ty.
lake also accused Hunt of in-
creasing state spending bv 62 per-
cent during his administration,
although Hunt said there had ac-
tually been a decrease each vear in
the number of new jobs added to
state government.
Hun said thai during the
previous administration there had
been an annual 4.8 percent increase
in state jobs each year. He said the
rate was reduced to 3.2 percent in
his first year, 3.1 percent in his se-
cond year, 2.5 percent in 1979 and
0.48 percent this year.
lake also said he was strongly
against gubernatorial succession,
while Hunt pushed through a con
stitutional amendment that is allow-
ing him to become the first governor
in modern times to succeed himsell
I he two men dittered on a possi-
ble state gasoline tax increase,
ratification of the Equal Rights
Amendment and gubernatorial suc-
cession
1 ake said he was strongly oppos-
ed to increasing gasoline taxes,
while Hunt said there were not any
"easy answers' to declining
highway construction funds and
that he had appointed a task force
to make recommendations on how
to raise money. He implied an in-
crease in the gasoline tax would be
an option.
Hunt said he supports ERA,
while I ake called it "a blank check
to the federal government, and
that's why I oppose it
Cycle Race Scheduled For
Sept. 11: 20 Teams Expected
CXROl iN CRU-CH
stall ��'�
Shades of the movie
Breaking Away ma be
witnessed on lhursdav
at Bunting I tack, when
up to 120 cyclers will
compete in a 50-mile
event.
Registration is still
underway at 10-4
Memorial Gym for
those interested in com-
peting in the September
11 bicycle race. The
race will begin at 4 p.m.
and will continue until
one team completes 50
mile-
Bob Fox, assistant
director of Intramural-
Recreation Services at
Kl . expects between
15 and 20 team's to
register before the s
p.m. Wc dnes d a y
deadline. Bob explain-
ed that racing bicycles
on a track is new to this
area. He said he hopes
that the movie. Break
ing Away, which was
s h o w n in t he
Mendenhall Student
C enter last weekend.
generated more interest
in bike racing.
The movie features
about ten minutes of
footage from a race at
Indiana University
where this type of spor-
ting event originated in
the United States.
" rhey've had a lot o'
success at Indiana
University Bob
points out. The "Little
500 as it is called at
Indiana I is now the
focal point for a
weekend of events.
learns from
residence halls, frater-
nites, sororities, or in-
dependents may have
four, five, or six riding
members. Each team
will also include a cap-
tain and a "catcher"
who are nonriding
members. The captain,
by holding up a
chalkboard, tells the
riders their speed and
the number of laps they
have completed. The
catcher will aid the
riders after they have
completed their laps.
1 earns may use any
type of bicycle, but it
must first be certified at
the intramural office to
ensure that it is in good
riding condition. Men
and women will com-
pete in two separate
events.
Any student may
enter the competition
with the exception of
those in class one or
class two of the U.S.
Cycling Federation, or
those who have com-
peted m any inter-
collegiate bicycle races.
Bob Fox feels that
this will be an exciting
spectator event. He
believes the beginning
of the race and the first
four or five miles will
prove especially in-
teresting. But he feels
that the most exciting
parts will come during
the relay passing of the
bikes. At this point, the
rider must dismount
the bicycle and literally
throw it ahead to the
member of the team
whose turn it is to take
over. This must be ac-
complished with a great
deal of precision,
because the exchange
can only take place
within a relatively
small, designated,
stretch of the track.
Student Graduate
Assistant Mike
Melehiorre is in charge
o' the bicycle race, and
he vsill be assisted by
Mr. Fox.
Study Shows Water. Alcohol Don't Mix
s DN1 . ustralia
ll'i I ifesaving ol
Ocials wanted to show
that drinking an d
swimming don't mix.
So they gave amateui
swimmers five can- ol
beet each and had them
sw mi 60 lap- in a pool
about a mile.
've nevei seen
anything like it said
Dr. Ian Mackie, who is
working on the stud
lap b e c a use h i
breathing became un-
coordmaied
which is funded bv the
New South Wales state
had reached his 60th
lap
"In fact, one swim-
mer completed 60 laps
and thoughi he'd done Mackie said the pro-
20. Another stopped gram was important
swinimirn: at the
!nd
because about half the
government. 1 hev lap because he thought drownings in Australia
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i���j
i





Qttre 3E&0t QIaroltnfan
Serving the campus community since 1925.
RichardGri i w �
Terry Herndon, am �� iivDki
Chris i k hok. � Chari i s Chandi i r. ,
Georgi Hettk h, . Ferry Gray, v i
Ami x I m siik, � DavidNorms.

Scptembei 9, 1980
Opinion
Page 4
Debate
Hunt Sticks To 'Issues'
Lake Attacks 'Machine'
Perhaps the best entertainment
on television last night was an hour-
long program which started at 7
p m the North Carolina guber-
natorial debate between Gov. James
B. Hunt Jr. and state Sen. 1. Beverly
I ake Jr.
The fiasco began when Lake
opened with an attack on Hunt's
"political machine Only a few
minutes into his allotted time. Lake
unveiled a poster with pictures of
Hunt, siate AFL-CIO leader
Wilbur Hobby, and other members
of the "machine Hunt objected
and 1 ake reluctantly continued
without visual aids.
1 ake was obviously unprepared
to discuss such topics as education
and government spending, with
most of his energies directed at
Hunt's alleged involvement in
misuse o C E I A funds, his stand on
the Panama Canal treaty and his
proposed SI5 billion federal jobs
program. Lour times Lake cut short
his answers to reporters' questions
and directed a question o' his own
to Hunt.
Hunt countered his opponent's
aggressive tactics casually, ignoring
Lake's questions and even making
jokes about Lake's ignorance of
subjects and failure to answer
reporters' questions. Hunt said he
preferred to address the "real
issues referring to jobs, educa-
tion, waste disposal and crime
prevention.
If a winner must be chosen from
the debate, it would have to be
Hunt. He dealt quickly and
smoothly with I ake's probing ques-
tions, incorrect facts and interrup-
tions. He chose every opportunity
to use such tired but oratorically ef-
fective phrases like "my fellow
North Carolinians" and "we (the
ivernor and N.C. citizens) have
accomplished a lot Flashing a
cocky grin, Hunt gracefully
sidestepped Lake's feeble efforts.
Despite Lake's poor showing, he
did raise an all-important question
about the CETA controversy, which
has been the centerpiece of Lake's
charges against Hunt and his
"machine When Vic Carter of
WRA1 -TV in Raleigh repeated
Lakes opening question to Hunt.
Hunt admitted there had been
mistakes, but insisted that Hobby
had obtained contracts in the same
manner as others, through bids.
The debate wasn't very infor-
mative, and little was mentioned
other than both candidates'
repeated campaign jargon. What
the debate did show was Hunt's ex-
perience � and 1 ake's inexperience
� with the media and the issues.
More On WZMB
In our recent editorial "Jeter
Resigns" (Sept. 4 issue), we stated
that 'Chancellor Brewer called a
meeting with the (media) board and
requested that the station manager's
position be filled b a professional,
state employee, thus eliminating
student control That was two
years ago.
According to Chancellor Brewer,
WZMB was being proposed as a
100,000-watl FM station at that
time. With the requirements of a
station that large. Brewer said he
deemed a full-time "manager'
necessary to keep the station on the
air 365 days a year. He added that
he checked university stations of
that sie and found that none
operated without full-time
employees.
As long as the station remained a
campus station. Brewer said he saw
no need for a full-time manager if
that's what the students wanted.
z

2?
T
3
7 C
'THANKS. NOW GET LOST
Campus Forum
'ECU, WZMB Suffered Great Loss'
The ECU conitiHiP.il. particularly
WZMB-FM, has suffered a great loss
with the acceptance oi John Jeter's
resignation as a WZMB advisor. Instead
ot being berated b his former col-
league, Glenda Killingsworth (now sta-
tion manager), John should be issued a
note o appreciation from every EC I
student who has ever dreamed ot finally
getting a community-oriented, rock and
jazz station on die air.
Foi years John has used to provide
the Greenville area with the ultimate
radio itation, one thai would be listened
to and appreciated, having ��something
tor everyone He put his personal and
academic reputation on the line when he
asked Congressman Jones to support
our petition foi an FC license when
tnan E( I administrators did little or
nothing lo support the new station. John
lias dedicated many personal hours, in-
eluding hours that could have been spent
with his academics, to further his efforts
to get WZMB on the an. Because of
John's efforts, ECU students will now
have an upbeat radio station. Because ot
his efforts, students interested in radio
broadcasting experience will now have
an opportunity to gather on the job ex-
perience before they seek that fust job.
I agree with John thai whereas Glenda
may have an excellent business
background, she is too inexperienced to
run WZMB without his backup. The
Broadcasting Department should not be
expected to pick up the slack because
Glenda no longer wants John to in-
terfere in her new domain. The Media
Board will be hard-pressed to find
anyone with John's broadcasting
knowledge, experience, and dedication
to work for a mere $80 month. It
anything, the Media Board should in-
vestigate everv possibility to hire John's
professional services now that he is a
graduate and is ineligible to receive pay-
ment for his services.
1 empathize with Glenda in that she
has a hard road ahead of her in assum-
ing John's former managerial position.
Instead ot resenting his "interference1
1 would think she would appreciate his
assistance and accept his suggestions as
constructively as she can, realizing that
he is only acting in the best interests ot
the radio station.
As for the closed-door Media Board
meeting discussing John's removal:
WHY weren't the students notified
about this meeting in advance? Obvious-
ly, John must have felt isolated in his
defense since we weren't aware ot Glen-
da's intentions to have him removed
from his advisorv position. As a student
paving mandatory student fees that sup-
port boards such as the Media Board. 1
feel well within my hunts m demanding
that these meetings be opened and an-
nounced, including a pre-planned agen-
da so thai in future incidences, when we
feel our voices need to be heard, we arc
able to be there in person, prepared to
offer our opinions.
I think 1 speak for all I t I students
when 1 say that it's high tune tot Star
( hamber" meetings to come to an end
1 lie administration and the enure
Greenville area is watching the station
and now is the time that everyone must
do his her part to act constructively
like winking together to get Z-91 ON
IH1 MR
Ml 1 AMI BENTLE
Formet WZMB News
and PS Dirt
We need to unite ourselves on a com-
mon feeling about our hopefully to be
radio station WZMB.
It all started with one young am-
bitious student who started at the bol
torn like the rest of us and through sheat
determination managed to get us, the
students, a radio station to be proud of.
A feat that no one else dare attempted
since our university has been establish-
ed.
I hrough our funds and support. John
Jeter has established a radio station with
the best equipment and legal contract
with the FCC. Never once did John
break his spirit although now thai we
have our dream at our doorstep the
deadboll is stuck and we can't open the
door.
One week it was a changed lock on the
station door leaving John helpless to do
technical work vital to meet our airdate.
Next it was a week later and our Media
Board and newly hand-picked, Glenda
Killingsworth, set conditions causing
our gallant founder to resign in order to
keep his self-respect.
John was performing a job as official
consultant with no pay yet doing the
work of installantion and preparation ot
the station which otherwise would cost
us the students thousands of dollars.
Our new management didn't think she
needed the help.
Well, it was a sad dav tot me and
hopefully a lot of students feel the same
way because WZMB is our station and
dream which we've all waited a long
time for. In essence, the station manager
is nearly a representative of us the
students. A poor representative Glenda
Killingsworth turned out to be!
1 ask the question, "Why did W 1 jusl
resign a man who was hterallv worth
millions to our university in gifts and
was priceless to US?"
THOMAS I I I I INSKI
Leo Edit: 'Congratulations'
( ngratulations on youi warm and
human editorial salute to Chancelloi
1 eo Jenkins! 1 eo, like Hear Old Dad. is
probably belter appreciated now that
we've "reached age 21" and see him in
clearer perspective. Students and faculty
alike used to give him hell, from time to
tune But lie handled it well.
Sometime in the early 70's, just alter
completion of one of the new men's
dorms, up on the Hill, students had
draped a huge banner on its east wall,
stating something like "Leo's last r
tion I hey sure were wrong!
some of the "eggheads" said I eo wa
too much a politician. Bull! Leo simpU
appreciated the fact that he had more
than one constituency; the faculty and
stafl were his constituency and the peo-
pie of the eastern third ot North
Carolina were his constituency. They
didn't all know it! But he laid claim to
thetn and preached to them ail, telling
them how great they were and how thev
needed to rise up and, by Golly, get their
fair share o the benefits of our fair
land.
Leo could relate, as you have said, to
the student. He related also to John Doe
on the courthouse steps of Podunk
County, or wherever John happened to
be. 1 eo was for real and people saw it
and loved it because he inspired them to
believe in the unbelievable.
I eo had his enemies, as anyone who is
worth his salt is apt to have. 1 cussed
him, admired him and supported him, as
did the vast majority of the campus
population. 1 miss him. And 1 nrav that
his "retirement" is as much fun for him
as were his days at last Carolina.
BII I BYKD.SR.
community Health
Error In Editorial
It you will check, I believe that you
will find that the C roaian was paid I
out of the operating funds of the Stu-
dent Supply Store. It was not "built with
bonds that were backed and are being
paid off with student tees as stated in
your editorial in the September 2, WHO
edition.
JOSEPH O. CLARK
Managei
Media Board Founder Questions Last Week's Closed Session
By ROBERT SWAIM
,sii leifcrOwnlMsaaipf
As one of the four founders of the
Media Board, 1 was deeply saddened and
thoroughlv disgusted at the board's actions
u the fast'meeting. They seem to have no
appreciation for the four years of hard
work that John Jeter put into the campus
radio station.
Jeter slaved for WECU (WZMB) everv
dav of the last four years, and what thanks
did he get? Insults, a kick in the rear end.
and a punch in the face, as the Fast Caroli-
nian so aptly put it.
I recall very vividly the day John ap-
proached the Media Board in the spring of
1978 with his dream of an FM radio sta-
tion. He received no help or encourage-
ment from them. It was the newspaper
staff who, like John, saw the need for and
the possibility of a good radio station that
would cater to the musical tastes of the
students. And since that day it has been
evident that John had few supporters out-
side o the newspaper office.
He worked tirelessly for many months,
often without pay. He wrestled with the
ICC. a hostile administration, and a
bureaucatic Media Board.
Despite all the obstacles placed in his
path and despite being stepped on by ad-
ministrators, who at best could be called
cruel, he trudged on. His faith never
faltered. Onlv those who knew and worked
closely with John over the last three years
can begin to realie the torture he went
through for the radio station, the radio sta-
tion he was building for the students of
ECU. u ,
There were many times when C harles
Sune, also a founder o the Media Board,
who later became one of its members as
president of the Student Union, was the
lone voice o encouragement and support
for John and WECU. U ' not been foi
Sune, Jeter would probably have been
done in by the Media Board a long time
ago.
What happened to John Jeter at that
Media Board meeting last week was the
height of disrespect, ingratefulness, and
bureaucratic buck passing. The board in-
correctly took the position that Jeter could
be dismissed by Killingsworth. Kill
ingsworth did not appoint Jeter as an ad-
visor to the radio station; the media board
did. Since thev appointed him to that posi-
tion, only they had the authority to remove
him.
It is inconceivable that anvbody with
even the smallest heart and brain could act
so cold and callous toward Jeter after his
vears of dedicated service. The board put
on the facade of backing general
managers' rights to run their operations as
thev see fit. That is a warped joke. Where
is all of their righteous support for general
managers when it comes to this
newspaper's general manager0 And where
was their support when Jeter was the
general manager of WECU and Kill-
ingsworth overstepped her bounds as
business manager?
In fairness to the Media Board, it must
be noted that most of the members are new
and were hay, at best, about the whole
situation with the radio station. Unfor-
tunately, the new members were led astray
by one or two hardline anti-media
members. The current management of the
Media Board can be described as only as
uncompromising, dictatorial, and insen
sitive to the needs and best interests of the
media on this campus.
The only hope for the Media Board and
the media is for each member of the board
to think for themselves a little more and
listen to the chairman and the administra
tion a little less. To this founder of the
Media Board, the future for the media on
this campus looks very bleak and stormy.
Now we are stuck with a radio station
manager who is technically and
mechanically ignorant of the broadcast
media. Killingsworth trying to get that sta
tion on the air without Jeter is tantamount
to sending a plumber to the hospital to do
open heart surgery.
"One
that a
the 5
. potiti
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I Ml EAS1 CAROLINIAN
SI I'll MBl Ry. 1980
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Other Opinion
To The Right
'Goldwater Knew In I9609
By STAN RIDGLEY
"One does not have to take the view
that a communist regime will never
'evolve' into a non-communist one
(though I tend to it) in order to see that
this is practically impossible as long as
the Soviet Union possesses the military
and political power to prevent it. "
�Barry Goldwater
March, I960
While it isn't fashionable in certain
naive circles to quote Barry Goldwater
� especially the early, "scary"
Goldwater � the continuing upheaval in
Poland and Afghanistan brings to mind
a number of Goldwater aphorisms that
ring with frightening and timely truth.
But the usual tack taken when quoting
Goldwater is to ridicule his 1964 bid for
the presidency by citing his numerous
gaffes, how he torpedoed his own cam-
paign with off-hand and outrageous
remarks. News and Observer
Washington correspondent Ferrel
Guillory dredged up some less-than-
flattering remarks b Arizona's seniors
senator (see Sept. 5 N&O) to show, I
guess, that Ronald Reagan isn't the first
politician to fall victim to his own verbal
indiscretions.
Vet Goldwater, in fact, was � and
still is � a highly principled public ser-
vant believing strongly in limned
government and the maximization of in-
dividual freedom. A -munch anti-
communist, Goldwater made some poig
nant and unsettling observations in I960
about what he perceived as the com-
munist menace. At the time, main
dismissed Goldwater as dn alarmist in
the backlash of the recently-ended Mc
t arthv era. but his insight gains fresh
prestige in light of the Soviet Union's
renewed belligerence.
Granted, it may not seem timely to ap-
pear frightened by something as mun-
dane as communist aggression or repres-
sion, as long as it happens in places most
of us aren't concerned with on a daily
basis. It is more common to overhear so-
meone parrot Michael Doonesbury's
latest misgivings concerning a Ronald
Reagan presidency, which usually con-
sists of the cartoon character threatening
to shoot himself or leave the country.
()ne can only hope.
But Barry Goldwater, the old warrior,
has kept his sights trained on what he
perceives as the communist menace, a
perception that until recently had re-
mained buried in the American subcons-
cience. Perhaps the Vietnam experience
desensitized Americans to the very real
prospect that Russia again might take up
the gun.
T hat complacency was shattered in
December when Soviet troops moved
against Aghanistan. Soviet troops, not
proxy thrid-world mercenaries. What
has happened to the strategic deterrent
of global nuclear war we've relied upon
for set many years to keep the Soviets m
check Goldwater knew in I960.
"The horrors of all-out warfare are
said to he so great that no nation would
consider resorting to nuclear weapons
unless under direct attack by these same
weapons. .Yon the moment our leaders
really accept this, strategic nuclear
weapons will be neutralized and Com-
munist armies will be able to launch
limited wars without fear of retaliation
by our Strategic Air Command1
military and psychological situation is
fast developing in which aggressive
( Omniums! forces will be free to
manuever under the unbrella oj nuclear
terror. "
Goldwater favored encouraging East
European countries thaf were striving to
throw off the Soviet yoke. That, admit-
tedly, isn't possible in the context of
1980. But Goldwater did oppose giving
economic aid to Soviet surrogate states
for reasons as valid now as they were 20
years ago. Apply his 1960 reasoning to
the unrest in 1980 Poland:
"The Kremlin may, for its own pur-
poses, permit certain 'liberalization'
tendencies in satellite countries; it may
even permit small deviations from the
approved Soviet Foreign Policy line. But
it will never let things go too far.
Hungary proved that. The moment a
Communist government threatens to
become a non-Communist one, or
threatens to align itself with the West
against the Soviet Union, the Kremlin
will take steps to bring the defecting
government into line. "
Goldwater realized that a policy of
continually bailing the satellites out of
economic crises caused by defects in-
herent in the communist system does
nothing to advance the cause of
democracy and only prolongs Hast
Europe's subservience to the Soviet
Union. Perhaps it's time we listened to
Barry Goldwater.
Strengthening their (East
Europe's) captors can only postpone
that upheaval within the Communist
I mpire that is our best hope of defeating
Communism without resorting to
nuclear war. "
Stan Ridgley is a senior Political Science
manr with a degree in journalism from
the I niversify of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill.
Student Union
SUPPORT
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Features
SEPTEMBERS 1980 Pa��
THEEAS1 i AROl IN1AN
?rill;
Taking Entries Soon
I w o nationally recognized
special isis in contemporary'
American arl will judge the Springs
vt Show (his fall.
rhe show, the largest non-juried
exhibition in the Southeast, will be
n to the public Oct. 24 - No. 17
I ancaster, S.C.
Entries from amateur and profes-
sional artists iu the twoarolinas
will be received Oct. 3-12, according
to Stephen K. McCrae, directo! o
an services foi Springs Mills, who
ects the show.
Barbara Haskeil, curator o the
Whitne) Museum o' American Art,
id William S. Lieberman, chair
man o the Department of lwen
I Gentry Art at the Metropolitan
Museum o Art, will determine win-
ners in the 22nd annual art competi-
tion sponsored b Springs Mills.
Ms. Haskeil joined the Whitney
New York City as curator in 1975
from the Pasadena Museum of
Modem Art in California. During
six years in Pasadena, her respon-
sibilities included being director ol
exhibitions and collections and
curator of painting and sculpture.
Ms Haskeil is an ait
historyhilosophy graduate ol the
University of California, 1 os
Angeles. In 191 she won the
Mademoiselle Award lor Achieve-
ment in the field oi Centemporary
Art.
1 leberman was named chairman
o the Department o Twentieth
( entry Art at the Metropolitan in
lew York City in 1979 alter being
ociated with the Museum o
lodern Art (MOMA) foi over 35
�is t MOMA he established the
Department o Prints in W4� and
the Department ol Drawings in
1971.
I ieberman is a graduate ol Swai
thrnore C ollege and has done
duate work at Harvard Universi-
He is a trustee of the American
at ion of Arts and the
c ismopolitan Aits foundation.
.asi yeai the Springs Art Show
attracted nearly 900 entries from ai
- in North and South Carolina.
lop award is a �2,000 purchase
prize for best-of-show. Springs also
awards $500 prizes to top winner in
each oi five categories: easel pain-
ting, mixed media, graphics,
sculpture and paintings and draw-
ings on paper.
Some 25-30 honorable mention
works also will be selected by Ms.
Haskeil and I ieberman, with
awards oi $50 each. These work
together with the six top award win-
ners, will make up the Springs
Traveling Art Show which will
follow a six-month itinerary oi ex-
hibitions after the 1 ancaster show
closes.
Springs I raveling Show exhibi-
tions this year will be in Atlanta,
da Charleston, Columbia and
Rock Hill, S.C; and Asheville and
Greensboro, N.C.
1 he sponsoring company, Springs
Mills, is a major manufacturer of
finished fabrics, home furnishing
products and froen foods. Springs
employes 22,500 people in 44 plants
in 12 slates. Mexico and 1 ranee.
Sales in lrv exceeded MOO million.
Corporate headquarters are in 1 ort
Mill.
truck will be at the 1 eo W.
Jenkins I ine rts Center on campus
to pick up ait works tor the show on
Monday. October 6. I here will be
extra entry forms on the truck for
anyone who needs one. There is no
entry fee.
Drawings, graphics, and mixed
media pieces must be framed for the
show. (Easel paintings are exempt
form this.) All 2-D works must be at
least 12" and no more than 66" in
any dimension.
Sculpture must be free standing.
Bases will be provided for any
sculpture thai requires them. The
sculpture must measure at least 12"
and no more than 60" in any dimen-
sion. Also, the sculpture must weigh
no more than 1 50 pounds.
Everyone is united to enter, and
n is not necessary thai you be a stu-
dent.
The Solitude Of This Quiet Afternoon
contrast wkh the throng of student who crowd this street during clones.
This Grocery Store Really
Has Everything You Need
MINNEAPOLIS (UPI) - It's not
exactly a Ma and Pa Grocery store.
In fact, Ma and Pa's store wouldn't
even fill up the produce section.
It's one oi the most lavish super
markets in the world the latest in
Don Byerly's growing chain of Twin
Cities-area "retail complexes
He launched a 90,000 square foot
store in the affluent St. Louis Park a
couple oi months ago with an open-
ing rivaling a Hollywood premier It
had floodlights, traffic jams and
elderly women in their Sunday best
gawking at the mall area in front of
the store or in its various depart
ments.
LARMlMG Afcour CouutU rnc HhHO lAH
W Dwo aW�3
PAf)r0 I MIL WOKTIMt'rl
GOJNCr TO 0�U�& TW�
,V0f0�l TO THObt
MDrtWMLS T0a)I6HT?
H� vJWTf TO (O00U)
s tax DepJcrieL� I
A customer can purchase tresn
trout or lobster � both live in tanks
� from a fish selection featuring a
more than 100 varieties, taro root
from the produce section, fresh-
baked bagel from the bakery, candy
from Wood's Chocolate, and ice
cream cone or one of 100 arieties
ol coffee.
He or she can also eat a meal,
take a cooking course or purchase a
$25,000 pair of diamond earii gs
from the gift shop.
"I honestly feel that this is the
finest supermarket in the world
Byerly said , looking down the busy
mall area. "1 really think this is our
finest hour
Byerly opened his first super-
market in suburban Golden Valley
in 1968 and several others since then
in Minneapolis suburbs and St.
Paul, but he may have reached his
pinnalce.
"We've been doing a lot of these
things in our other stores, but there
they're just spread out he said.
"Here, we've tied it all into one neat
package
The store employs more than 500
persons � about half oi them full-
time
Besides the usual carpeted grocery
aisles, the new store has a card shop,
ice cream shop, pharmacy, candy
shop. 24-hour restaurant, flower
shop, attached liquor store and gift
shop. There is also space n the front
for the cooking school.
"Customers from all ol
can sign up for the cooking classes
We offer classes evenings, dd.
and some Saturday classes B
said. "We have classes on how to
run equipment classes on
Chinese or French cooking
how
Byerly himself attends a session
on microwave cooking.
The gift shop, with prices ranging
from S5 to S50.000, is a pet project
of Byerly and his wife. Marlys.
"I'm partial to the gift shop he
said. "That's where m wife and 1
spend our Friday evenings work-
ing
Among items sold at the gift shop
are a marble fireplace for $20,000.
TV Detective Shows:
Predictable But Fun
B DAVID NORMS
fr�lurf idilor
Most genres of American televi-
sion are based on a solid foundation
of traditional cliches, and the detec-
tive show is certainly no exception.
Although new detective shows ap-
pear on TV every year, new ideas
for them never do.
TV detectives and cops differ
from each other only in the fact that
each one has to have a gimmick � a
rumpled raincoat; a pet cockatoo;
being a deputy U.S. marshal from
Taos, New Mexico, on loan to the
New York Police Department to
study modern police techniques (for
seven years); having a wheelchair;
being in Hawaii � so they won't
look so obviously alike.
The things most TV cops have in
common (besides bad scripts) are
numerous. They spend endless
hours driving in huge, black
official-looking limousines or
souped-up sports cars, despite the
gas crisis faced by the world of reali-
ty. One might say that the
automobile is to the detective what
the horse was to the cowboy. Guns,
though, are to the detective what the
gun was to the cowboy. (Some
things never change.) Few detectives
are married, since their fiancees are
usually gunned down by criminal
elements during the season
premiers.
The "car is to the detective as the
horse was to the cowboy" analogy is
a pretty good one, but there are
some flaws in it. A horse's brakes
don't ever fail while driving down a
winding mountain road overlooking
a 1,00-foot plunge to the ocean.
Neither does a horse explode every
time someone puts the key in the ig-
nition or slams the door Horses
don't have trunks for tying up peo-
ple and stuffing them into. In fact,
horses have almost nothing to offer
a modern detective.
Police marksmanship on these
shows is, to say the last, inconsis-
tent. Think of how many times
you've seen the hero in a narrow
alley being chased by a huge gas-
guzzling limuosine, which he shoots
at six times and misses. Then, at the
end of the episode, the same hero
will kill a running blackmailer at a
range of 2,000 yards with the same
pistol that can't hit a car at ten
paces.
The courage of video gumshoes is
certainly beyond question. Besides
having the steel nerves necessary for
driving brakeless cars down winding
mountain roads, they have the
bravery to go unarmed into a
building where an insane gangster is
holed-up, in order to talk him into
giving himself up for life in prison.
And any TV cop worth his salt
wouldn't blink an eye at the pro-
spect of going up to some syndicate
bigshot (usually a childhood pal �
it's a small world on television, too)
and not only telling him he's under
arrest, but that he eats too much
and has crummy taste in suits.
The best way of getting across
some of the flavor of these crime
melodramas may be to use a sum-
marv of an imaginary script. There
are several different scripts
available.
There is the old protection-racket
ploy, with the police trying to get
small shopkeepers to testify against
the gangsters at a grand jury hear-
ing. Police protection is always pro-
mised, but on some shows such as
The Untouchables, the witness
either has his store blown up or calls
the cops from a phonebooth that is
run over right then by a truck.
The undercover police operation
is often used, especially on shows
about beautiful female detectives.
It's surprising how much crime goes
on around swimming pools in lux-
urious beach resorts, glamorous
modeling agencies, or beauty con-
tests.
See TV, Page 8, Col. 1
Tardy Students Hurry Along
.iiishing that they had never signed up for that early morning rUi.
Il
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Student Union
Offers Travel
A Peaceful Interlude In A Busy Day
is a good time to relax in the afternoon sun and read a newspaper, 'ege
The E.C.U. Student
Union Travel c ommit-
tee announces tour
great vacations for the
1980-81 school year-
New Yo r k, For I
L a u d e r d a 1 e. Fort
I. a u d e r d a I e a h a m a s
Cruise, and Myrtle
Beach.
The New ork trip
will again be sponsored
during the Thanksgiv-
ing break. Participants
will depart on Wednes-
day, Noember 26 and
rei urn Sunda .
November 30. Ninety-
two places are available
at SI 10.00 per person.
This price includes
transportation and
lodging, lour days in
the Big Apple are hard
to beat at any price, hut
at $110.00, it's impossi-
ble.
The traditional col-
acation is ottered
at an econom) price �
enjo the sea and sand
o! 1 on 1 auderdale
during spring break. It
days in the sun aren't
appealing, nights on
the town maj be. Nine-
teen pi aces ai e
available for 1 ()
wonderful days in Fort
1 auderdale at $219.00
quad occupanc) and
$309.00 foi double oc
cnpanc.
I he glamoui trip ol
the I ravel C ommittee
ret in ns this yeai 1 he
1 or i l audei �
dale Bahamasruise is
back. Spend pan ol
spring break in Forl
1 auderdale. then com-
plete the vacation b
ci uising to the beautiful
Bahamavosl per per-
son is $499.00 foi a
quad room cabin and
$549.00 foi a double
room cabin. Space is
available for nineteen
people.
New this year is the
faster weekend in Myr-
tle Beach, lour days
and three nights in a
beautiful ocean front
motel, and transport a
tion to Myrtle Beach.
cost onlv $79.00 in a
quad room and Si09.00
in a double room.
Space is available for
ninetv people.
Choose the vacation
thai best suits your in-
terests and bank a
count, then see the
world with the Student
I mon I ravel Commit-
tee. I rips are open to
I .CM . students, facul-
stall, alumni, and
their immediate
families.
I'm Dancing: Gordon's Tale
Of Tragedy And Survival
Bv JOHN LDFN
It i h
ev cry one is selling th
stori(
these days Some ol
books
celebrities ai e
terestmg. while
dull
-
ids out iiom the iest
It is
. Bat
bara Gordon
"Tm Dancing as 1 asl
as I Can" Ms. c ioi don
is : Met
confession sior about
closet life.
is hook is the tale of
a woman struggling to
refind herself when hei
wot Id has fallen
How she recovered a
triumphed to build a
new life is her true
'V .
�i the age ol fo
Bai bai a (iordon Mad
aii ol what m a
w omen could evt i
from life. She had good
h ea It h, plenty of
a brillia
sj! eet as ,i 11 'I v . . .
produce and sharei
home with a loving
man.
Still, something was
wrong with her world,
she began to have in-
creasingly heavy anxie-
ty attacks. On some
days, she fell too ter
nfied to even enter a
clothing store. Hei
psychiatrist had
prescribed vatium for
her condition, but the
pills were no longer
working. She fell into
an even greatei depres-
sion when one of her
best friends died ol
cancer
SMe knew what had
to be done with her life.
Against the advice ol
her doctor, she decided
to stop taking the Iran
quihers foi her anxiety
attacks. t first, Gor-
don seemed to be able
to handle going 'cold
turkey she even
: ecei v ed encou rage -
ment and help from her
live-in com pa n ion,
Eric. Bui then i
withdi aw a I became
and hei aniety
u until she was
afr; ive hei
apartment.
� not hei tragedy
began to lake place.
he n her m i nd
iduatly cleared from
the pills, I i is began to
do strange things. He
would lock hei in the
apartment, and let hei
see no one. Soon, even
it she attempted
� a walk, he would
beat her senseless. I he
man she had loved and
depended on was
becoming insane. She
- ,u she had to get
away from him, and
nally escaped with
the help ol some
tr lends.
oubles did
thoramc tablet. She
was diagnosed a s
"schizophrenic, mank
depressive. a
cyclothymic personali-
ty, borderline
psychotic, an agitated
depressive, hy sterical
and just plain
neurotic Gordon felt
that she didn't tit into
any ol these descrip-
hospital from a pa-
tient's viewpoint is very
interesting. She gives us
new insight into an age-
old shrouded institu-
tion. Noi does Gordon
leave oul ol her ac-
count the stigma that
accompanies a mental
pa! lent returning to
normal life.
V. the end ol the
book, one feels that
Barbara Gordon may
not have found herself
vet. but that she is still
searching. She pro-
bably will not stop until
she has. Somehow Bar-
bara Gordon managed
10 survive the many pit -
tions, and kept sear-
ching until she found
the right people and the
right help.
Although Gordon
may be rough on the
people in her book, she
can be just as harsh
with herself. S h e
describes herself as a
nervous woman con-
stantly looking for the
easy way out; a woman
wanting a 'magic pill'
or so m e s i m p 1 e
psychological truth to
solve all o f h e r
troubles; a woman who
would fly into tantrums
at the slightest things.
Gordon's writing is
just as honest about her
environment. Her
description o' a mental
tails around her, but
she wonders how many
did not survive. Thus,
her book provides us
with both good reading
and a warning.
end
i h c r e
though she was tree
ol hei lover, she still
did no free ol
herself. Gordon began
asking hersell why she
had not noticed Eric's
distui bed mind before.
More important!v. w hy
had she let him do these
things to her
Gordon knew she
needed help. It was
here that, through her
struggle, she began to
discover i . self. It
was a fight thai took
her through many
psychiatiists, hospitals.
and menial institutions
Along the way. Ciordon
exposes some ol the in-
eptitude of the medical
profession. She met
doctors who nevei real-
ly under stood, oi cared
to understand, their pa-
tients She found
psych ia t r ists who
answered every pro-
blem vv ith a v ahum or a
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H.L Hodges Co-Choice of Rack Clothing
Apple Records-Record Album
Art Camera Shop-Two Nikon Coffee Mugs
Bigg's Drug Store-Timex Watch
Bissette's-Westbend Popcorn Popper
Blount Harvey-SIO.OO Gift Certificate
Book Barn- $10.00 Gift Certificate
Brody's-$25.00 Worth of Cosmetics
Catos-$25.00 in Merchandise
Central News-$15.00 Gift Certificate
Certain Things-$15 00 Gift Certificate
Coffman's-$25.00 Gift Certificate
College Shop-$15.00 Gift Certificate
Cox Floral Service-Green Plant
Cozart's Auto Supply-10-Speed Huffy Bicycle
Coin Ring Man
of Key Sales, IncOne Silver Dollar
Curry Copy Center-Personalized Stationery
D. A. Keliy's-SlO.OO Gift Certificate
Diener's Bakery-Birthday Cake
C. Heber Forbes-$20.00 Gift Certificate
Freddies-Dinner For Two ($10.00 maximum)
Friendly Wig Shop-Earrings
Gaxebo-$10.00 Gift Certificate
Giant Discount-$5.00 Gift Certificate
Globe Hardware-Waste Basket
CLIP AND SAVE
Hollowed' Drug-Desk Lamp
Harvest Natural Foods -2 Gal. Apple Juice
House of Hats-Raincoat
J-Sue-Jan-$15.00 Gift Certificate
Jason's-Dinner for Two ($10.00 maximum)
Jean's Glory-$5.00 Gift Certificate
J. Herring's Mens Weor-$25.00 Gift Certificate
Lautares Jewelry-Watchband
V.A. Merritt Sons-Small Appliance
Morgan Printers-Personalixed Stationery
Mushroom-Surprixe Gift Packoge
Park Theatre-Movie Passes
Proctor's LtdGift Certificate
Pugh's Tire Service-Free Lubrication
Riggan Shoe Repair-Choice of Leather Belt
Robinson's Jewelry-$10.00 Gift Certificate
The Shoe Room, IncPair of Boots, Pair of
Shoes
Smith Electric-$5.00 Gift Certificate
The Snooty Fox-$25.00 Gift Certificate
Steinbeck's $10 00 Gift Certificate
Taff Office Supply-Pen, Pencil Set
Toft rurniture- 2 Table Lamps (2 Winners)
University Book Ex2 Nikon Coffee Mugs
Western Auto Supply-Tire Rotation
White's Store $10 00 Gift Certificate
Downtown Greenville Association, Inc.
t
r





8
THl EASI CAROl ININ
si I'll 1Hl K 9, 1980
Television Detective Shows:
Predictable, But Still Amusing
Continued from page 6
The opening scene ot a mad-killer
story has an innocent victim (1 wish
that mad killers could at least limit
themselves to guilty victims) being
stalked and murdered in an at-
mosphere of darkness and spooky
music.
The next scene, if it's a private
detective shovs, has the victim's
sister asking for help in finding the
murderer. In these shows, the police
always insist that the death was a
suicide and that the detective should
drop the case. It the murdei is on a
regular police show, this second
scene takes place in the police head-
quarters, with the hero sticking col-
ored pins m a huge map of the cits,
marking the latest in a series ot
unrelated, mysterious killings.
At some point in the show, the
phone rings It's him the Mad
Killer! "Don't bother with a trace,
cop' I'll hang up long before you
can find me 1 ots ot insane
laughter tolling, topped ott by a
loud click N on see, even mad killers
Madrigal Dinner
Tickets On Sale
rickets are now on sale for the
1980 Madrigal Dinners. Because
tickets are usually sold out b mid-
October, all patrons are urged to
reserve and purchase tickets as soon
as possible.
Mendenhall Student Center spon
sors Madrigal Dinners each year to
open the Christmas season in tradi-
tional English fashion. The dinners
are modeled after an Hiabethan
feast in a country manor house. The
1 ord and lady of the Manor
preside over the entire feast; they
are dressed in luxurious period
costumes of velvet and lace and
stand readv to greet their guests.
Iim and Franceine Rees are the
gracious host and hostess.
I ntertainment is provided b
magicians, tumblers, poets, and
musicians. The Madrigal Singers
highlight the evening. Resplendani
in their beautiful costumes, thev
sing a number o traditional
madrigals and Christmas selections.
In addition to singing, lhe also pel
form it aditional 1 lizabethan
dances.
Dinner it sell is served bv costum
ed waiters and waitresses. Wassail
and roao beet with ail the trimm-
ings provide a delicious meal to
complement exciting entertainment,
lone feasting tables covered with
snowy white cloths add to the feel-
ing ol a ttue royal least.
I hose who have attended before
attend this feasl again and again,
and tickets sell out verv quickly,
long before the event i scheduled.
Don't miss Madrigal Dinners.
Reserve youi tickets now. Vhev are
priced at S8.00 foi E.C.I - students
and $10.(X) tot the public, rickets
must te picked-up within 2 hours
after thev are reserved, rickets may
be reserv ed o
watch television, and know it takes
time to trace a phonecall. We don't
get to see the Mad Killer at this
stage; all we get is a shot of an emp-
ty phonebooth with the receiver sw-
inging back and forth. (These insane
criminals never bother to hang up
the phone.)
In a private detective show, there
is usually a scene where, just as he's
given up on the case, someone tries
to kill the private detective with a
machine gun. This makes him feel
better, since he's getting closer to
solving the crime.
1 ven the smartest mad killers
screw up sometime, and finally drop
some kind of a clue. "Take this in-
dex card and check every store in
Los Angeles that sells them. Then
find the store that sold this par-
ticular card. And find out TO-
DAY says the tough police
lieutenant. After a montage o'
shopkeepers shaking their heads,
one is found who remembers selling
a pack of index cards to a guy about
three weeks ago. The name and ad-
dress are conveniently in the stores
files.
Now, the police arrive at a seedy-
looking transient hotel. They break
down the door of the suspect's room
and find boxes of rifles, bullets,
grenades and maybe a cat for a
touch of comic relief. Alas, the Mad
Killer is out doing his laundry.
So, the hero decides to become a
decoy to lure the Mad Killer out into
the open. In a city of millions of
people, it takes only a few minutes
for them to find each other, since
the show is about over. So, justice
triumphs, unless the show is going
to be a two-parter. Then , it would
be learned that this Mad Killer is the
wrong one and the search would go
on.
Well, that's the detective show. In
a world where we arc bombarded
daily with news of inflation,
unemployment and impending
disaster, it certainly is nice to be able
to escape into a world of extortion,
murder, bombings and blackmail,
even if just for a little while.
Short changed?
The Student Union offers a variety oi events lor
just pennies or Ions. Films sponsored by the
Films Committee and the Minority Am B
Film Series are absolutely tree. Foi 50 ami
For 50 cents there is live entertainment MMMt
at the Coffeehouse. So when you're I HP
short on cash. . .
STUOfHT UMIOfJ
!� 'HKXJM JH�f�V"
Look for the Union label.
tral I
Stude
Charg
foi ma
irehased ai the c en-
i Mendenh ill
y'
S A AD'S SHOE
REPAIR
I 1 S Grande Ave.
758-1228
Qualitv Repair.
n
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preflnefKy ���, Nfif csrv
trot. and problem pr�9A�t
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TYPE SETTER NEEDED
� Must be able to type between
60-65 w.p.m
� Must be able to learn
� Must be able to work nights
� Experience on Compugraphic
machinery Helpful, but we will
train
Apply at the
EAST CAROLINIAN Office
between 8a.m. and 5p.m. MonFri.
Learn a ski that can earn you
big bucks in the business world
fh
JUST (�-) 7c�'5U

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Wt
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Wanted:
Writers
for our News, Sports and
Features columns.
Experience is desired,
but we will train applicants with
strong basic language skills.
Apply at our offices
in the Publications Building.
The
East Carolinian
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Jyping at Reasonable
Rates
( all:
emporary Secretary
Services H ilson AX.
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SPORTSWOKLD
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6:30-10:00
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Sunday-Friday
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I HI I ASIRoi ININ
Sports
si i-11 Mm K v. ivmi Pagey
Defense Pounces On Devils
B 11MM DUPREE
Mstart Sports r llitoi
DURHAM 1)1 -1 1 ENSE
DEE I I NS1 "
Ihc cts oi '1)1 I 1 I NSl " can
be heard am Saturday during the
fail at any college football game.
Often it is a pica from disenchanted
tans to their favorite team in hopes
they will eventually put an end to a
persistent offensive drive.
On a few occasions, it is a cheer
foi a talented unit to continue to
retire the opposition aftei three
plays 1 oi the Blue Devils oi Duke
I niversity. the fii st example was the
case Saturday; for East Carolina's
Pirates, the latter
rhe Devil's first possession of the
afternoon was to forecast what
could be expected foi the rest oi the
contest
s expected, Duke offensive
coordinatoi Steve Spurrier called
tor freshman quartet back Ben Ben-
nett to drop back into the pocket
What wasn't expected was for
senior ECU linebacker Jeffrey War-
ren to blitz on the Devil's first play
from scrimmage in 1980.
For hast Carolina, the results
were impressive, with Warren and
end Mike Davis charging in for the
first oi seven sacks the Pirates
would accomplish.
I or Duke, the results were
devastating. Bennett failed to com-
plete a pass in the first five minutes
oi the game and connected on just
11 out o' 23 attempts on the after-
noon, for 128 yards.
That statistic alone wouldn't seem
so dismal compared to the ECU
total passing yardage of 85 yards,
but taking into consideration the
embarassing two (2) yards net
rushing amassed by the Blue Devils
backs and it's hard to figure a way a
team could possibly win. Bennett
starts the season owing the the net
rushing column 55 yards, courtesy
oi East Carolina University.
"1 thought they would block the
back side end better than thev did
said sophomore defensive end Brian
McDaniei. "When you don't, it's
like setting a wild dog on meat. He
just can't get enough
McDaniei sacked Bennett once
for a tne-yard loss, though coming
off the bench in relief oi Rocky
Butler.
"Our strategy was to get after
him early and stay after him
McDaniei explained, "and we
managed to keep the heat on him.
We (defensive players) got what we
were looking for
Warren, a senior from Snow Hill,
concurred with the assessment of
McDaniei.
"We knew we had to have pass
rush and that just three up front
couldn't do it Warren states, "so
we kept showing different blitcs.
We just kept coming at them
With 8:57 remaining in the game,
senior defensive back Willie Holley
intercepted a pass which eventually
led to the final touchdown by
fullback Theodore Sutton. Ironical-
ly, the Pirate pair had to wait until
Friday to receive final word concer-
ning their eligibility for the game
from the NCAA.
"That (interception) comes from
putting pressure on the quarter-
back reasoned Holley. "I just
came on at the right time. There
were a couple of more times when
the ball could have been intercepted
if (Bennett) had gotten it off
Sophomore tackle Doug Smith
was pleased with the overall defen-
sive performance, but added that
there was a long season still ahead.
"It's a different season now
said Smith. "We played just how we
wanted to play. The effort was just
what we wanted. We have to start
all over now.
"We need the effort we had to-
day; that's what counts
Warren speaks for his defensive
comrades when he speaks of the
1980 Pirate unit.
"We'll be 11 bodies out on the
field he says. "But we're going to
play as one person
CHAP G ( O . E
ECU'S Cliff Williams (90) Zeros
kii On Duke ()B Ben Bennett
Pirate Lines, Backs Mow Down
Helpless Blue Devils In 35-10 Rout
�.� -
PhO'O tW CHAP GUKLfc T
Halfback ntlionv Collins scores ECU's first TD of game Saturday
A Successful Start
The Ed Emory Era
Continued from page 1
when he went over from one yard
out, aided by a superb block by spin
end 1 arry O'Roark.
The second Pirate TD, though,
may have been the game breaker.
"It definitely gave us momentum
going into the second half Emory
said. "If we hadn't scored on that
play we would have went for a field
goal
1 he Pirates picked up where thev
left off in the second half, scoring
on drives oi 74, 80 and 50 yards.
I he 80 vaider used up nearly ten
minutes and consisted of 20 plays.
The score came early in the fourth
quarter as the drive culminated with
a two-yard run by Collins. 1 hat
score followed an earlier third
quarter 41-yard TD run by Mike
Hawkins.
Following Collins' third TD of
the day. the Pirates were up 28-10
(Duke's Scott McKinney booted a
thud quarter field goal). Emory
then began playing some oi his
reserves bur make sure that fullback
I heodore Sutton was in the game in
the laic stages oi the 50-yard drive.
Sutton, whose eligibility for the con
test had been hotly contested by
Duke but approved by the NCAA,
scored the game's final touchdown
on a one-yard jaum late in the
fourth period
Following the contest Sutton said
the sorc mean: a great deal to him.
"1 feel like 1 was due at least one
he said with a smile. "Ihis whole
thine (questioning ol eligibility) has
been something el
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One ol the keys tor the Pirate of-
fense, said Anthonyollins, was the
use ol many reserves. "We just
wore them down said the Perm
Van, N.Y. native. "In heat like to-
day you need fresh people in there
and we had thai . I hey didn't
( ollins, though still hurting from
"the rib injury, said he had full con-
fidence in the team's young offen-
sive line. "I wasn't worried to begin
with he said. "I hey have so much
heart and Wayne (All-America In-
man) is such a great leader. They'll
do a fine job this year I'm sure
Duke coach Red Wilson was
evidently down after his team's loss
and said that his club had simply
been beaten all over the field. "It
was a long afternoon he said.
"We got a lesson in an old-
fashioned, ball-control, taii-
whipping tvpe of game
Wilson had began his career at
Duke last season with a 28-14 win
over the Pirates and saw Emory turn
the cards on him Saturday with a
likewise successful debut.
"Purple don't mean gen though
Emory said to a press group follow-
ing the game. "Can anyone tell me
it Bear Bryant won his first college
game' It's not how you start off.
It's how you finish
�eg icts
special
here
('lint
BvH-XRITX HANDLER
SpM, ,1,1
"Can anybody tell me if Bear
Bryant won his fust game It's not
you start but how you finish
rhose were the words from new
East Carolina head football coach
! d 1 mory follow . successful
, Pirate mentoi Sal urday,
( to in- club's 35-10 win over
-ugh he made sure not too
h emphasis was placed on his
beginning, I mory could not
hide his personal joy " I tus is pro-
bably one oi the (nippiest moments
ol my life he said. "It's just a
great feelinj
I he rookie coach was not without
either. "I just wish four
people could have been
he said. "1 wish my dad, i)r
Prewetl (chairman oi the
ommittee that lured I mory
and who died two months ago) and
(nnger Parker (wifeoi Pirate defen-
sive coordinator who was paralyzed
in a wreck during the faster
holidays and is still recovering)
could have been here to see this
game. I feel very proud and I know
thev would too
I mory said that a big lump came
in tus throat as he departed from the
Wallace Wade Stadium field follow-
ing the game, and was greeted bv
tumultuous cheering and ap-
plauding from the Pirate tans on
hand. "There are no words to
describe that kind of feeling
Emory said. "1 know I'll always
remember that moment because
there will probably be some when
the fan reaction is the exact op-
posite
Emory described Saturday's game
as a "peak" and said thai most like-
i here would be some "valleys"
ahead in the future. 'That's the way
this game is he said. "Sooner or
later everybody catches it
Though the week prior to the
Duke game was full of problems, in-
cluding injuries to several members
ol the offensive line and star
halfback Anthony Collins, in addi-
tion to the question oi Theodore
Simon's elegibility, Emory said that
he was run nervous. "People kept
asking me it I was nervous he
said "1 was not nervous. 1 was
more in a state oi anxiety � man or
something � over the Sutton ease
and everything
Emory said one of his main con-
cerns entering the game was making
sure the team looked together and
organized. "Face it he said,
"everybody was there to praise or
condemn the new staff. You only
have one chance to make a good
first impression. I felt we had to
look solid and organized That the
Pirates did, as no mixups occured
and only one turnover, an Anthony
Collins fumble, was committed.
Not only was it important to pro-
ve something to the fans, Emory
said, it was also important to prove
something to the players themselves.
"I ots oi them had to have ques-
tions he said. "Heck, last January
and February we held 5:30 a.m.
workouts. At the start of fall prac-
tice we held four-a-day. Some of
them must have wondered what we
were trying to do
Emory said the big success at
Duke made all the work worth it.
"Coming back home on the bus
he claimed, "1 heard someone say
they remembered those 5:30
workouts when they were on the
field. Those workouts are worth it
because it's hard to give up
something you've had to bust your
butt and sacrifice for
Though he was happy with the
oriener, Emory warned against a let-
down. "Our guvs went over such a
great hurdle at Duke he said,
"that I'm concerned thev will be a
little content. Heck, we've got to get
better, a lot better.
"Our schedule is tough he con-
tinued. "This Saturday we play
Southwest Louisiana, the 'Ragin
Cajons That's a super name. A
guy could really get up to play under
a nickname like that. 1 hey
(nicknames) do make a difference.
That's why I like 'Pirates' so
much
following Saturday's game, it ap-
pears those Pirates like their new
coach a great deal also.
ECU fans greet Emory. Pirates following win Saturday
Pho'o by Cnp Gurlev
Ex-Coach Impressed Saturday
last Carolina's 35-10 win over
Duke proved a number oi things.
Among them was that the Pirates
will again field a respectable team in
1980.
There had been doubts that this
was possible after the club suffered
greatly from graduation losses
following the great '79 season.
Saturday's game showed, though,
that all is not lost in Pirate Coutry.
All on hand were impressed with
the aggressive style of play
employed by new head coach Ed
Emory's troops. There were even
whisperings of "Pat who?" in the
stands following the contest. The
fans were referring to Emory's
predecessor, Pat Dye. who resigned
in December after six successful
seasons at the ECU helm.
Charles
Chandler
Emory was not willing to forget
Dye, though. "1 or my staff cannot
accept all the credit for this win he
said. "It's a lot easier to teach and
work with kids who have good work
habits. The players here had good
habits and that's a credit to Pat. He
and 1 have the same philosophies
and that has been a big help
No doubt when he heard of the
Pirates' big win, Dye was a proud
man. One ot his former assistants.
Ken Hutcherson, certianly was
Hutcherson. once the running
back coach under Dye and now an
officer in the Pirate Club, said he
was very impressed Saturday. "It
was great he said 'Thai staff
over there has done a super ob in
molding those players
Hutcherson said he felt the win at
Duke was probably the biggest he
had seen at ECU. "When 1 was on
the staff with Pat he said, "we
had some big ones at State. Duke
and Carolina. But 1 think this might
be the biggest one ever here because
of the doubts everyone had.
Everyone had their eyes on that
game. The team really impressed
lots and lots of people
Hutcherson said the game should
end all the regrets of Dye's depar-
ture. "Pat Dye and our group is
history now he said "Id and his
staff proved that. This program is
still on the rise
Those are high words oi praise,
especially considering the fact that
Hutcherson was a part oi the Dye
regime. He speaks the truth,
though.
The Pirate offensive live, which
had been questioned following the
graduation losses, put the Devils in
the dirt, so to speak.
The ECU defense looked as good
or better than it did at any time last
year. The pass rush looked better
than it did at anv time in '79.
t
f





10
I Ml I sl C XKOl IM
si l'l I MM K si. ls�ht)
Pirates Open Home Slate Against Caj
By JIMMY DoPREE
Ami. Sporu Ml�or
When the Ragin' Ca-
juns of Southwestern
Louisiana take the field
Saturday against the
Pirates of Hast
Carolina, they will be
coming off with a 14-12
upset win over New
Mexico State and look-
ing to continue to pro
ducc under first-year
head coach Sam
Robertson.
The Cajuns finished
4 -7 in W79 under Augie
I ammariello, who call-
ed it quits after six
seasons a l the
Southland Conference
sdiool.
Robertson doesn'1
have the size up from
that ECU mentor Ed
Emory enjoys, but in
the back field the Ca-
juns have an abun-
dance oi competition at
quarterback.
Senior Phillip
Reynolds sat through
the PT9 campaign in
the chair of the third
string signal-callei. but
moved past bot h
sophmore Dwighi
Prudhomme and senior
Hal King to start for
the Cajuns against New
Mexico State.
Sophomore Da id
Chat man and senior
Rodney Smith line up
at runningback, with
s o p h o mores David
Frost and Norris Ham
set as the top reserves.
Defense will be the
key to the Cajuns' suc-
cess in 1980. Robertson
enjoys the benefit of
nine returning starters
from a year ago, in-
cluding - Southland
Conference nose guard
Dale T h o m a - and
honorable mention All-
S1C tackle Kent Head
and linebacker Mike
Buckles.
"Our character and
attitude that we've been
showing should carry
us a long way savs
Robertson. "If attitude
and hard work
Dd measuring sticks
to go by. we should go
undefeated.
"We still need to
develop more con
sistency with our of-
fense he admits, but
adds, "our defense nas
done a tremendous job
so far. They've provid-
ed our offense with
man opportunities, we
just haven't taken ad-
vantage of them"
Southern
Mississippi
When the Golden
Eagles of Southern
Mississippi roam into
Ficklen Stadium
September 27, the
Pirates will hve ample
motivation for a sound
victory.
The last meeting of
the two Southern In-
dependent schools end-
ed with the Pirates on
the short end o a 17-16
score; a loss which
some feared would
keep the Bucs out of
the Independence Bowl
running.
The Pirates could
have a tough time get-
ting ready for the
Eagles mentally if it
weren't for the 1978
loss, as they will have
jus! returned from a
showdown with na-
tionally ranked Florida
Suttc the previous
week
Bobby Collins enters
his sixth season at
Southern Miss with a
career mark of 30-25-1.
including their 1979
record of 6-4-1.
I he Eagles opened
with a 17-14 victory
ovei Iiilane. but Col-
lins' youthful squad
will come to Pirate
country a the under-
dogs.
Collins has had to
replace 13 starters, six
of oi tense and seven o
defense. But Collins
has confidence in
sop li om or e s ignal-
callei Reggie Collier,
who is pressed for the
position by junior let -
terman Davy Sellers.
Juniors Sammy
Winder and Ricky
Floyd return as the top
runners from a vear
ago, although neither
held a starting position.
Winder led the Eagles
in carries and vardage
with 173 for 44 vards.
Floyd tallied 78 points
to lead the team and tie
a school record of 12
rushing TD's.
"We'll be young,
mighty young says
Collins. "But we'll just
hitch our belts a notch
and work that much
harder
Western
Carolina
The Pirates hold a
slim 15-13 edge over the
Catamounts of
Western Carolina in the
series which dates back
to 1936, but East
Carolina has
dominated the past five
meetings of the in-state
rivals.
Head coach Bob
Waters has posted a
68-42-3 record in his 11
seasons at the
Cullowhee school, and
looks to 1980 to be
more successful than
the 6-5 outing of a year
ago. Only four starters
are lost from the Cata-
mount squad which
placed seventh in the
Southern Confenece in
1979.
The Cats must
replace quarterback
Mike Pusey, who guid-
ed the Multiple-1 WCU
offense for the past few
years, as well as center
David Willingham and
three top defensive
ends.
Fullback Mark
Womak and tailback
Leonard Williams
return in the backfield,
with Ronnie Mixon
listed as the top QB.
One position solid
for the Catamounts in
1980 will be wide
receiver, with Ail-
American candidate
Gerald Harp leading
the field of veteran
ends. Harp caught 142
passes in 1979 for 2,441
yards and scored 25
touchdowns to earn
All-Southern Con-
ference honors.
Juniors Jeff Dean
and Dwayne Norman
provide depth and ex-
perience at wide
receiver, with Dean
snaring 31 catches for
456 yards and Norman
averaging over 20 yards
per catch.
Defensive end
George Alston and
lineback Ricky Smith
return as All-Southern
Conference per-
formers, with tackles
Larry McClain and
John Strong,
linebacker Charlie
Hughes, and corner-
backs Lee McCall and
Willie Wells all having
started at their posi-
tions for the past two
seasons.
William
And Mary
Not since the 1977
21-17 upset at the
Oyster Bown have the
Indians of William and
Mary been able to
penetrate the armour of
the Pirates, but new-
head coach Jimmy
Laycock hopes to im-
prove on last year's
38-14 drubbing by ECU
at Cary Stadium
"There are a thou-
sand things we stil need
to correct said
Laycock following spr-
ing drills. "But the kids
are hitting. They're
showing ag-
gressiveness, and that's
a good sign
Senior Chris Garritv
returns as the only im-
pressive quarterback in
the Indian camp. Garri-
ty threw tor 916 yards
and five touchdowns a
vear ago.
Keith Best is the
leading rusher return
ing, with 126 vards to
his credit in 1979.
Senior tailbacks Mike
Brown and Tom Fran-
co wil round out the
backfield of the
(�formation Indian of-
fense.
Only guards Doug
Martini and Dennis
Fitzpa trick return to
the offensive line, giv-
inga r r i t y ample
reason tor concern up
front.
Srr llHPOM S v
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I HI 1 ASIC AHOI IMW
St I'll MB! K V. 1980
11
s
ndiai
Dennis
'
8:00
.79



�W �o
Former Pirate Stars
Excel As Professionals
By CHARLFS
CHANDLER
sports I� itu ii
s the N a t i 0 n a I
football 1 eague season
opened Sunday four
former last Carolina
Pirates remained
members of their
respective clubs, having
survived all preseason
CUts.
One of the four, run-
ning back Eddie Hicks
of the New York
Giants, gained a star-
ling nod for his club's
opener. Two others,
Zack Valentine of the
Pittsburgh Steelers and
defensive back Reggie
P i n k n ey of the
Baltimore Colts, saw
limited duty.
The fourth Pirate in
the pros, running back
Sam Harrell of the
Minnesota Vikings, has
been placed on the in-
jured reserved list after
suffering a hip pointer.
Harrell will not return
to action this year
because to bring him
back the Vikes must
first put him on the
waiver list. Harrell
must then clear waivers
before he can play for
the Vikings this season.
Minnesota officials say
that are not willing to
risk losing the former
Pirate and are therefore
waiting to use his ser-
vices next year. Harrell
will continue to prac-
tice with the club.
Hicks saw his first
regular season action at
running back Sunday.
The Henderson native
did not rur any last
year as he was used
strictly on special
teams. Starting in place
of injured Billy Taylor
Sunday, Hicks gained
39 yards on 15 carries
in his club's win over
the St. Louis Cardinals.
Hicks was used ex-
tensively in the first
period, carrying the
ball six straight times
and catching a ten-
yeard pass in one seven-
play seriers. Ironically,
Hicks made the tackle
on the ensuing punt.
Linebacker Valentine
still waits in the wings
as he begins his second
season on the talent-
laden world champion
Steelers. He is used ex-
tensively by Pittsburgh
on special teams,
though.
Pinkney impressed
Colt officials in pre-
season and earned a
spot on the club. The
former Pirate defender
sat out last season after
spending several years
with the Detroit 1 ions.
Pirate Opponents
( untinurd from p 10
Eastern
Kentucky
The Pirates close out
the 1980 home slate
November 15 against
Eastern Kentuck
University, the 1979
NCAA Division 1-AA
national champions.
The two squads have
met only once in the
past, a 1962 meeting
which the Pirates won
29-12, but the outcome
of the 1980 matchup
could be different.
The Colonels return
their three top rushers
of a year ago in
fullback Dale Patton
and tailbakcs Alvin
Miller and Anthony
Braxton.
Patton, a two-time
All-Ohio Valley per-
former, returns for his
senior season as the top
rusher with 777 yerds
adn nine TD's to his
credit in 1979. Braxton
added 290 yards and
two touchdowns as the
starting tailback early
in teh season before in-
juries forced him to the
sidelines.
Quarterback Chris
Isaac will have second-
team All-OVC flanker
Jerry Parrish as his top
target again this
season. Isaac grabbed
25 passed for 549 yards
and four touchdowns a
year ago and is touted
as one of the top retur-
ning Division 1-AA
receivers. The versatile
Parrish sprinted for 111
yards on 11 flanker
reverse plays for
another three Colonel
TD's, and led the Divi-
sion I-AA in kickoff
returns with a 28.7 yard
average.
Junior All-OVC guard
Kevin Greve leads the
offensive line returnees.
Hick� as a Pirate
Herrmann Leads Irish Win
B 1R KAUFMAN
1 SputU W Ml, r
�s expected, it was a
senior quarterback who
spelled the difference in
Saturday's Purdue-
Notre Dame game. His
name, however, was
not Mark Herrmann.
Senioi Mike Courey,
who didn't know he
would start until late in
the week, threw tor one
I ouchdon n. scored
anothei and set up two
more scores while
sophomore Phil Carter
ran fot 142 yards and
one 1 D to spark 12th-
ranked Notre Dame to
a 31-10 triumph over
!h-rated Purdue,
highlighting the first
big weekend of college
football action.
Herrmann, the Big
10's all-time leading
1 asser, was sidelined
with a sprained thumb
suffered in practice
I uesdav and was
replaced by freshman
scott Campbell who
was hounded by the
Fighting Irish defense
and sacked six times.
Courey, who com-
pleted 10 of 13 passes
for 178 yards, sat on
the bench for most of
his Notre Dame foot-
ball career behind Rus-
t v Li sen, who
graduated last season.
He refused to look
back in anger, though.
Notre Dame Coach
Dan Devine, in his final
season before retire-
ment, tried lo minimize
the pressure for his in-
experienced quarter-
back.
Herrmann sprained
his thumb on his throw-
ing hand in practice
early this week and is
doubtful for the Big 10
opener next week at
Wisconsin.
Courey, who had
completed only 8 of 15
passes for 141 yards in
his first three years with
the Irish, hit Tony
Hunter with a 9-vard
scoring pass on Notre
Dame's first scoring
drive of the second half
to ensure the victory
after the Boiler-
makers, who were
down 17-0, closed to
within 17-10.
Campbell wound up
17-for-26 for 175 yards,
but passed for only 30
yards in the second
half.
In other games in-
volving top 20 teams,
second-ranked
Alabama rolled over
Georgia Tech 26-3, No.
13 Penn State routed
Colgate 54-10. 14th-
rated Stanford topped
Oregon 35-25. 16th-
ranked Florida State
blanked LSU 16-0, No.
17 North Carolina beat
Furman 35-13, New
Mexico upset 19th-
ranked Brigham Young
25-21 and No. 20
Georgia edged Ten-
nessee 16-15.
Ninth-ranked Texas
beat eieht-rated Arkan-
sas 23-17 last Monday
night to kick off the
1980 season.
Billy Jackson scored
on runs of 15 and 5
yards on his first two
possessions to help
Alabama extend the na-
tion's longest winning
streak to 22 games.
With 32 seconds left in
the first halt, a 39-yard
ID pass from quarter-
back Don Jacobs to
James Mallard put the
Crimson 1 ide ahead
19-0 and the final
Alabama TD came with
2:30 left in the game on
a 4-yard run by backup
quarterback A1 a n
Cray.
The game marked
the 297th career
triumph for Alabama
Coach Bear Bryant,
who is now only 17
behind the all-time
leader, the late Amos
Alono Stagg.
Cieorgia lech's Bill
Curry, making his head
coaching debut, was
dripping with com-
pliments aftei being
engulfed by therim-
son Jide.
rail back Curt
Warner scored three
first-halt touchdowns
on runs of 5v and 11
yards and an 89-yard
kickoff return to lift
Penn State to an easy,
v ictorv. Warnei ran foi
101 yards on seven car-
ries in the first halt
alone and ended with
149 yards.
John llway passed
lor a pair ot 1 l)s and
also ran 1 yard for
another score to help
Stanford open up with
a triumph. 1 he Cat
dinals scored three
s e c o n d -quart e r
touchdowns to break
the game open.
Bill Capece kicked
three field goals and
tailback Sam Plait
scored on a 3-yard run
to lilt Florida State
over tumble-plagued
1 ouisiana State. All
four I SI scores came
after 1 SU turnovers m
the first game foi new
1iger C oach Jerry
Stovall. It was the lust
tune in 30 years 1 SU
was shut out at home in
a season opener.
BUY 3 TAPES GET FREE CASE
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TODD'S CENTER
The Fast Carolinian !
Vf ' WHi; the tu"iu ,�� .
umt 192
Published every Tuesday and
Thursday dying The academic
year and every Wednesday dur
ing the summer
The East Caroinian ,s the o(
ticial newspaper of East
Carolina University, owned.
operated and publ shed tor and
by the students ot East Carolina
University
Subscription Rates
Business $35 yearly
All others S25 yearly
Second class postage pa.d a1
Greenville, N C
The East Carolinian offices
are located in the Old South
Building on the campus of ECU.
Greenville. N C
Telephone 757 JW. �J�7 3Cr�
GORDON FULP'S
LOCATEDAT GREENVILLE
SALE COUNTRY CLUB
ALL SUMMER MERCHANDISE
ON SALE NOW
Short Sleeve IZOD LA COSTA Shirts
Quanity Discount Buy 2 or More and Save
GOOD SELECTION
ALL WATER SKIES HALF PRICE
� ALL GOLF BAGS CLUBS HEADCOVERS
STRAIGHT SALE 20�oOFF
ALLTENNIS JOGGING DECK SHOE S HAL f- PRICE
� ALLTENNISDRESSES HALF PRICE
SOME AS LOW AS $5.00
SOME GOLF SHOE S HAL F PRICE
NEW AAERCHANDICE AR R IVI NG DAI LY
SNOW SKI EQUIPMENT AND APPAREL
LARGE SELECTION OF IZOD SWEATERS
ANDVELOUR SHIRTS
JUST ARRIVED
REVERSIBLE JACKETS
BY IZOD
ALL SIZE SMALL MEN AND LADIES
GOLF GLOVESHALF PRICE ALL MENS AND
LADIESGOLF GLOVESFOR ALEFT HANDED
GOLFER HALF PRICE
GOOD SELECTION OF IZOD JR. SHIRTS
SHORTS. LONG SLEEVE, ALSO IZOD J.R
SWEATERS BUY 3 or MORE OF ANY STYLE
AND RECIEVE 15�o DISCOUNT
756 0504
(Presenting our Designer Diamond Collection.)


Jk This week only, ArtCarved presents its
A' dramatic new college ring concept for women
in 10K and 14K gold. On display only while
the ArtCarved representative is on campus.
The new Designer Diamond Collection,
reflecting the importance, value, and rare 4
beauty of genuine diamonds, is an v
ArtCarved innovation. f4
This collection is also available with a new
diamond substitute, Cubic Zirconia, which
creates the same dazzling elegance for less.
if
rT
KOFVED
VcOLLEGE RINGS
Symbolizing your ability to achieve.
Sept. 10,11,12
DESIGNER
DIAMOND
COLLECTION
Students Supply Store Lobby
Wright Bldg. 9:30-4:00
�also available with Cubic Zirconia. a diamond substitute
HI Deposit required Master Charge or Visa accepted
�1980 ArtCarved College Rings
t

t
gg MMWM r '�





12
I HI I AM �. AKOl ii AN
s I'll NtBl R9, ISXO
Soccer Team
Loses Twice
The East Carolina
soccer team got off to a
disappointing start this
weekend, dropping
consecutive matches to
George Mason and St.
Mary's in its first two
games of the season.
The Pirates fell to
George Mason 3-0 on
Saturday and to St.
Mary's of Maryland
2-1 on Sunday.
The two losses left
ECU head coach Brad
Smith, who had been so
optimistic about this
club, in a state of
disaray and disappoint-
ment.
"The people we have
to have doing well did
not do well he said.
"We just didn't seem
to be into it
The losses will have
an effect on the team's
lineup for this Wednes-
day's home opener with
Guilford and this
weekend's Mayor's
Cup tourney in Chapel
Hill, Smith said.
"We're going to
make some ad-
justments he said.
"There will definitely
be some new faces in
our starting lineup
Smith was most
disappointed with his
team's defensive play.
He was especially
displeased with the fact
that the team gave up
four breakaway goals
in two games.
Photi
Stewart (15) follows Pirate offensive line
Photo bv Chap Gurtey
ineligible Holley. Sutton eheek eoin toss
Youthful Blue Devils
Wot Ready To Plaf
DURHAM, N.
UP1 Duke coach Re
Ison 1iMKta sai
"It also lakes Mine charisma, and a strong
foi a team to jell arm. and hc"s a
lind a freshman scrambler. He has a
M quarterback Wilson chance to be a fine
. dn't ha added. quarterback
"We need this open Bennett did not get
date he said. "We much time to throw,
will do a lot ol scrim- Wilson noted, predic-
maging and head nne the offensive line
knocking and work on will improve.

.� a better time.
et a 10 "
y Eas arolii a
i ni" s season
ilson
Ad need- is oU mental touehness1 "The hardest post-
ion.

his wee
rhe one bright spot tion io coach is the of-
saw in Satin fensive line he said.
s performance was "The line did not give
pla ol freshman Bennett much time to
erback Ben Ben thro and this is
nett, who completed 11 something we are not
� 23 passes foi 128 proud of. We have a
.auU great deal of youth and
'Ben Bennett is trul) inexperience on the
� for in a line, but they should
. � � . said improve with each
WiUon. "He has eame.
ppesbttirian stopeah- CENTER
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First
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Topics lor Discussion
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 9, 1980
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 09, 1980
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.74
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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