The East Carolinian, August 26, 1980






She lEaat Carolinian
Vol. 55 No. 1
32 Pages
Tuesday, August 26, 1980
Greenville, V(
Circulation 10.(MM)
?
Business School
Tightens Doors
School Replaced Education As ECU's
Most Sought-After Degree Program
An aerial view of the main campus here at East Carolina University
Decades Of Growth
Since Its Founding In 1907, The Small Teachers1 College Has Developed Into A Major University.
By PENNY AUSTIN
vuslam Nim Kdilor
I9S0 � Anyone looking at the
campus of hast Carolina University
today might have a hard time
visualizing it as it once was in 1907.
In 73 years, the campus, as well as
the university, has changed greatly
and experienced tremendous
growth. What stands today as North
Carolina's third largest university
may indeed have had very meager
beginnings, but never narrow or
shortsighted ideals.
During the first decade of the
twentieth century, the country saw
an expansion of the public school
system. During this time, nearly
3,000 schools were built in North
Carolina: this was an average of
about one a day. Adequately trained
teachers were needed to meet this in-
crease in public education.
In 1902 a state association of
county superintendents was organiz-
ed. The purpose of this group was to
explore the idea of establishing a
training school for teachers to be
located somewhere in the eastern
part of the state.
of the school at Elizabeth City fur-
ther strengthened the move to
establish the school at some other
location.
In 1906 Senator James L. Fleming
worked to get a bill passed through
the state legislature which would
guarantee the establishment of the
training school. The exact location
of the school was not mentioned in
the bill, but former Governor
Thomas J. Jarvis hoped the school
would be located in Greenville.
The Greenville Chamber of Com-
merce appointed a committee, or
task force, of 80 people to study the
possibility of establishing the school
at Greenville.
The school bill was finally passed,
and the committee really got to
work to make Greenville the site of
the school. Through the efforts of
Jarvis, William H. Ragsdale, Flem-
ing, D. J. Whichard (editor of The
Daily Reflector), as well as in-
terested Greenville citizens, the site
of the school was finally chosen; it
was to be in Greenville.
Land was chosen along Fifth
Street for the school. Forty-seven
School was founded on March 8,
1907. Ground was broken for the
first building on July 2, 1908 East
Carolina Teachers Training School
opened October 5, 1909 with 104
women and 19 men enrolled.
By the time the school opened, six
buildings had been completed: an
administration-classroom building
(later to be named Austin), two dor-
mitories (later Jarvis and Wilson
Halls), the 'Refectory Infirmary,
and a power plant with laundry.
The school was authorized as a
two-year normal school and the first
president was Dr. Herring Wright,
who served in this capacity until
April 25, 1934. There were 13
members on the faculty at this time.
The first class to graduate with
the two-year degree graduated on
June 6, 1911. On November 20,
1920, the school was authorized to
grant a four-year degree. And in
November of 1921, the name of the
school was changed to East
Carolina Teachers College. The first
four-year degree was conferred in
August of 1922.
See ECU Page 8, Col. 1
By TERRY GRAY
�j tdilor
For much of its history, East
Carolina University, originally East
Carolina Teacher's College, was
known as a training ground for
educators. But in the last several
years, the size of ECU'S School of
Education has been slowly shrink-
ing, losing its No. 1 status to the
School of Business.
According to data compiled by
the ECU Office of Institutional
Research, more than one-fourth of
all declared majors here are in the
School of Business. At the beginn-
ing of last fall, 2,240 of ECU's
8,750 declared majors were studying
economics, accounting or business
administration.
Education students were the se-
cond largest group, with 1,466 ma-
jors.
An important factor affecting
these overall figures is the way
education students are counted. Ac-
cording to Mrs. Ridenour of the
Registrar's Office, "The only
students who are considered educa-
tion majors are those in early
childhood or elementary educa-
tion Students who major in an
academic area and also receive
teaching certificates are counted as
majors in their academic area, not
as education majors.
The number of business majors
promises to grow this fall if the
trend of the last several years con-
tinues. However, the Office of
Academic Affairs recently suspend-
ed any further admission to the
business programs due to the high
number of students.
Assistant Director of Admissions
Ron Brown said, "Based on
preregistration figures and the
number of applicants from new
freshmen and transfer students, we
determined what kind of enrollment
pressures the School of Business was
facing, which led to the decision to
suspend further admittance
"Our enrollment has been rising
since 1974, and we started curtailing
Films, Fun, Family Days
At Mendenhall This Fall
A proposal was made to the state and nine-twentieths acres were pur-
senate in 1905 to establish the school chased at $200 an acre, or for
at Elizabeth City; however, this pro- $9,490.
posal was not accepted. The denial East Carolina Teachers Training
Renovations Underway
On Drama Buildings
By PENNY AUSTIN
AttUunt News l.diior
Students returning to campus this fall may find
things have stayed the same at ECU. However, they will
find that there have been some changes made at
Mendenhall Student Center.
The Mendenhall staff, in an effort to serve the univer-
sity community better, has instigated some changes in
programs, as well as in policy.
Beginning this fall, students will have a place to eat
Another new program at Mendenhall this fall will be
the Family Fun Day. Yuhas explained tnat one Saturday
each month. Mendenhall will sponsor the family day in
an effort to provide programming for the non-
traditional student (that is, the student with a family).
The first Family Fun Day will be Sept. 20 from noon
to 3 p.m. and will offer reduced rates at the recreation
centers, games, prizes and a movie geared for family
viewing.
This fall will also see the return of the lce-Cream
Bingo program. Beginning Sept. 9 at 7 p.m the univer-
Beginning this fall, students will have a place to eat community will have the opportunity to come out to
their lunches and to enjoy a film or two. According to M:ndenhaH for some ice cream and bingo. This pro-
By JADE GORMAN
Staff Writer
The towering steel beams that
form the skeleton of the new
McGinnis Auditorium are visible
evidence that the long-awaited
theatre complex is becoming a reali-
ty-
"This will be one of the finest
theatres in the Southeast said
Edgar Loessin, professor and
chairperson of the ECU Drama
Department.
The renovations consist of two
completed in June of next year and
will cost approximately $1.9
million, according to James Lowry,
director of the physical plant at
ECU.
The second phase of renovations
involves the other Drama Depart-
ment buildings and includes the con-
struction of a separate scenery shop.
Phase 11 will cost about $1.12
million and should be finished in
December of 1981, Lowry said.
According to Loessin, the main
purpose of the renovations is to pro-
Wanda Yuhas, assistant program director at
Mendenhall, several film shorts will be shown in the
Coffee House weekdays from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Admission is free for the film shorts, and any student
or faculty member is welcome, she said. Among the
many shorts to be shown are the Flash Gordon serials,
Abbot and Costello, W.C. Fields and excerpts from the
Ali-Shavers fight.
The first five weeks of the fall semester will be a trial
run for this program, Yuhas said. If the program cat-
ches on, then it will be continued, she added.
Mendenhall for some ice cream and bingo. This pro-
gram is also scheduled for once a month. Both the ice
cream bingo and Family Fun Day are free and open to
the university community.
These programs may take a while to catch on, Yuhas
added, since they are new.
The handicapped student will also find some major
changes a' Mendenhall according to Yuhas. This sum-
mer, a hydraulic lift was installed in the bowling alley.
The lift allows the wheelchair-bound student to have ac-
See MENDENHALL Page 3, Col. 1
it in 1977 by increasing admission
requirements said Dr. Charles
Broome, associate dean of the
School of Business. "It is true that
all over the country more and more
students are opting to study
business he said.
According to the Admissions Of-
fice, the suspension will probably
remain in effect until spring, 1981.
While the School of Business
must now turn new students away,
the School of Education has been
experiencing a small but steady
decline in its enrollment figures.
Since fall 1976, enrollment has
dropped eight percent.
According to Furney James, who
keeps the pulse of national job
trends in his work as ECU place-
ment director, there are several
reasons for the decline.
"First of all, there was a tremen-
dous shortage of teachers in the
1960s, and that attracted a lot of
students into education Furney
said. "But in the 1970s, we are see-
ing an oversupply in that area.
"Another reason is that since
ECU became a full university, we
have a greater variety of major of-
ferings that are drawing students
that might earlier have gone into
education
Mr. James also believes that other
factors have had an influence on the
size of the School of Education, in-
cluding the relatively low starting
salaries of career educators, and the
See SALARY Page 2, Col. 1
WITN Gives
Tall Tower
To University
The East Carolina University
Foundation has received a gift of a
1,500-foot steel television tower.
North Carolina Television Inc
operators of W1TN-TV,
Washington, Greenville and New
Bern, presented the gift of the
19-year old tower near Grifton, NC,
and deeds were signed by company
and university officials in the offices
of ECU Chancellor Thomas B.
Brewer Friday.
Dick Paul, president of North
Carolina Television Inc John F.
Minges of Greenville, president of
the ECU Foundation Inc and
Donald Lemish, ECU Vice
Chancellor for Instiftional Ad-
vancement and Planning, s gned the
legal documents. Lemish is secretary
of the ECU Foundation and and
acted as liasion from the committee
in accepting the tower as a gift.
Minges said the tower is "a
magnificent gift" which is "tangible
evidence" of growing support of the
university's educational and service
goals. He said it would be used to
enhance and enrich ECU's
development.
"You are a maximum citizen in
ever) scitec of the word Minges
told William R. Roberson, Jr
chairman and chie executive officer
of N.C Television.
Roberson said WITN-TV
recognizes the positive and creative
See STUDY Page 3, Col. 1
Students Face Shortage Of Housing
By TIM GILES
Staff MM
phases according to Loessin. Phase vide a good practical working place
I entails the renovation of the for theatre productions.
auditorium and the ballet studio.
This first phase is expected to be
OnThe Inside
Housing will once again be a pro-
blem this semester, as ever-rising
enrollment figures at ECU put in-
creased pressure on the available
off-campus and dormitory housing
units.
"This is a long overdue process
Loessin said. "The plans began
eight years ago, but there were com-
plications with money he added.
There were three main problems
with the old theatre, Loessin Fall semester, with a projected
pointed out. student body numbering over
First of all, the stage was too 13,000, is expected to be another
Announcements 2 fg and pooriy equipped. The new record-breaking semester for enroll-
Editorials4 stage wm be much larger: 40 feet ment. Approximately 2500
Hollywood Reep25 d witn a 32 fOQt wide pro- freshmen have been admitted along
Inventor Cain27 scenium and a 40 foot wide wing with 500 to 600 re-admissions, 850
Jenkins Remembered25 e to'store scenery. transfers, and 200 visiting students.
Job MarketJ �It ls much easier to produce big The remainder of the enrollment
Liquor Petition10 shows when yQU nave room for figure is made up of continuing
Non-credit CoursesJ1 scenery Loessin said. students.
Pirates At Duke 3 expected t0 5500
Steer Resigns sight p Cq students living in the dormitories. In
I I I I
i it
�MHHK;
nurid
some situations three students may Sophomores to live on campus has
find themselves assigned to one been suspended for the 1980-81
room. Also, in the women's high school year.
rises, the social rooms are being Another problem contributing to
converted to living quarters for up the overcrowded dormitory life is
to six coeds per room. that increasing rent and utilities for
Freshmen are being given a off-campus living apparently make
preference in room assignments, but dormitory life more appealing to
the rule requiring Freshmen and upperclassmen. Rent for a one-
)
bedroom appartment usually ranges
from $170 to $225. A year ago, rent
was usually between $160 and $175.
According to information
reported during the summer, the
off-campus housing market will also
be crowded this year. As of mid-
July, Eastbrook Apartments,
Village Green and King's Row � all
of which cater mostly to tC i
students � were already full for the
fall. River Bluff still had a few
openings. The management of
Eastbrook and Village Green Apart-
ments, advise students to apply well
in advance, since they had just been
able to fill some requests for August
that had been on their waiting lists
since last November.
According to Joe Laney of the
Greenville Housing Authority, the
Sec HOUSING Page 2, Col. 1





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 26, 1980
Announcements
SU MEETS
The Student union Maior At
tractions Committee will meet on
Thursday August 28, at 3 p m. in
Room 238 o Mendenhall Studenl
Center All members are required
to attend Anyone interested in
concerts programming are invited
to attend also
APPLICATIONS
Applications are now being ac
cepted tor Chairperson for the Stu
dent Union Special Events Com
m.ttee Please come by the Stu
dent union Office Room 234.
Mendenhall Student Center for
more details
CO-OP
EAST
Tuesda September 2nd at 7
p m there will be an organua
tional meeting of the Students for
East team at the Reagan for
President Headquarters 526 S
Cotanch SI (next to the Universi
v Book Exchange) All interested
s'uoents are invited
The Co Op Office. 313 Raw!
Building. 757 6979 or 757 6375, is
looking for students for IM
MEDIATE fall placement with the
following agencies
OFFICE OF PERSONNEL
MANAGEMENT Office of the
Secretary. Healtti and Human Ser
vices. Washington. D C is looking
for students who are interested in
a career in personnel and who
have some office skillsex
perience First work period, the
student will be primarily involved
m general office duties and the se
cond work period the student will
be involved in specialized ac
tivities A rismg iunior should app
ly immediately
CAROLINA BARGAIN
TRADER Students interested in
selling ads on a 15�� commission
basis for a new Greenville weekly
publication Students will have a
brief framing period
EAST CAROLINA UNIVErSI
TY A department needs a student
with good typing and office skills,
including experience in use of of
fice equipment
U S ENVIRONMENTAL PRO
TECTION AGENCY Washington.
D C A computer science student
should apply
These Co op positions are
salaried Watch for listing of Spr
mg and Summer 1981 Co op open
mgs in future "Announcement"
columns in The East Carolinian
Register with Co op now and be
ready for Spring placement
COLLEGE BOWL
Registration for ECU In
tramural competition College
Bowl, the competitive sport of the
mind opens September 8 and ex
tends through September 30 Col
lege Bowl features knowledgeable
college students, tour on a team,
competing in answering questions
from all academic areas Ques
tions may concern any of the
liberal arts. science,
mathematics, sports, current
events and inumerable other
areas
Mendenhall Student Center
sponsors both our own mtramurai
competition and participation in
regional and national tour
yiaments If anyone has questions
'�concerning College Bowl, come by
the Program Office in Mendenhall
Student Center or telephone
717 6611, Ext 213
cso
If you have or intend to declare a
major m a science or health
related curriculum, you may
qualify for COST FREE services
made available through the
Center for Student Opportunities
(CSO)
CSO currently has openings for
students wishing to receive
tutorial services There are also
openings tor students to par
ticipate in individualized or group
speedreading, notetaking and test
taking techniques, effective
organization of lecture notes, and
Active Reading � knowing more
about what you read in a shorter
time Counseling services include
career planning assistance,
academic, personal, financial, test
anxiety, andor group counseling
If you would like to be con
sidered for participation in any of
the COST FREE services, contact
Dr Frye, Center for Student Op
portunities, 217 Whichard Annex,
or call for an appointment at
757 6122, 6075, or 6031
TUTORS WANTED
The Center for Student Oppor
tunities (CSO) currently has open
ings for part time tutors in the
following subiect areas medicine,
pre medicine, nursing, allied
health, biology, chemistry,
physics, and related science and
health professions You may earn
an income at standard campus
rates Contact Dr Bodwell CSO,
216 Whichard Annex or call
757 6122. 6081. or 6075 for an ap
pointment
SOCIAL WORK
September 22 is the deadline for
Fall Admission to the Department
of Social Work and Correctional
Services Students who plan to ap
ply to major must submit an ap
plication to the Department Chair
and complete two interviews prior
to the deadline Students within
ten hours of completion of general
college credits who have a
minimum 2 5 grade average are
eligible to apply Applications and
additional information may be
secured in the Department Office.
Room 312, Allied health (Carol
Belk) Building Phone 757 6961
Housing Future In Private Market
( ontinued From Page 1
the future in student
housing will lie in the
private market. ECU is
already looking into
this matter by exploring
the possibility of leas-
ing commercially own-
ed apartments to rent
to students. As it is,
housing in Greenville
has a vacancy rate of
1.8 percent according
to I.aney. Another in-
teresting fact is the high
percentage of apart-
ments compared to all
housing. Out of 12,000
units in Greenville,
about 3400 are apart-
ments or about one-
fourth of the housing in
Greenville. Rising con-
struction rates and in-
terest on financing have
slowed down apart-
ment construction.
Older houses are also
available for rent to
students, but they are
often overpriced and
suffer from landlord
negligence, Laney said.
Some low income
housing is available to
students if they meet
certain requirements.
The basic problem lies
in the fact that this type
of housing is aimed at
families. Married
students could possibly
qualify. But, unfor-
tunately, the single stu-
dent does not.
Student housing is
definitely a problem
that will continue to
grow. One big factor in
off-campus accomoda-
tions is that the people
with the money to build
do not want to overex-
tend themselves. These
people are looking ten
and twenty years in the
future when enrollment
will doubtlessly
decrease. The cause of
decreasing enrollment
is that which has
plagued many educa-
tional institutions for
the past twenty years,
that is, the baby boom
after World War 11.
Since the birth rate has
leveled off and today's
college student is on the
last of the fringes of
that boom.B'ut until
enrollment decreases,
Greenville will continue
to be a tight squeeze for
housing.
Salary Part Of Reason
For School's Increase
Continued From Page 1
effects of organizational changes in
the university that have placed
former education departments in
other schools. For example, voca-
tional rehabilitation was once in the
School of Education, but is now in
the School of Allied Health.
On the other hand, James pointed
out that the corresponding growth
in business majors had much to do
with the acceptance of women into
those fields.
"Several years ago, it was hard to
find a woman in the School of
Business. Now, I'd guess 30 percent
of business majors are women
James said. Of the 2,240 business
students in 1979, over 700 were
women.
Another way of measuring the
size of ECU's various programs is
by the total number of student
credit hours taught. In those terms,
the School of Business is still the
largest in the university, but the
department of English takes second
place from the School of Education,
since all students must take English
courses.
Wanted:
Writers
for our News, Sports and
Features columns.
Experience is desired,
but we will train applicants with
strong basic language skills.
Apply at our offices
in the Publications Building.
The
East Carolinian
a For people who love the
taste of chicken there's the
good taste of Wendy's Chicken
Sandwich. The real taste, the
full flavor of 100 fillet of
chicken with your choice of
toppings. Now Wendy's gives
you another great taste
to love. W
I
I
BUT A
z
i
5
c
o
9
SANDWICH
. FOR ONLY
$1.19
OLD fASHIONCD
CUP COUPON
Good at all 3
participating Wendy's. "
Expire Sept 30, 1980 i
CHEESE AND TOMATO EXTRA
NOT VALID WITH ANY OTHER OFFER I
Let HJ?e lEafit (Earnlfman
write home for you every
Tues. and Thurs.
Every Tuesday and Thursday you can read the most
informative stories about the news events of the day
at ECU and in Greenville the best sports coverage,
and interesting features about the people, places and
things surrounding youso can your parents. For $25
your parents can get a one year mail subscription to
the East Carolinian.
Serving the campus community since 1925, the East
Carolinian provides valuable insights into student
life at East Carolinia University for your parents.
Twice weekly, we can tell your family about the
most current campus and local news. Student free
flicks, concerts and sports events are all covered in
the pages of the East Carolinian, as well as state and
local news that affects the lives of ECU students.
Our experienced, award winning news staff can br
ing your parents the news wherever it is happening
in eastern North Carolina, plus the most dynamic
behind the scenes investigative reporting.
Our features section will bring them fascinating and
often humorous human interest stories about the peo
pie of the university and the surrounding area. It also
covers the cultural events that enrich student life, as
well as presenting interesting slices of area flavor.
Spanning the entire spectrum of ECU'S athletic ac
tivity, our well trained staff of enthusiastic sports
writers will bring your family comprehensive
coverage of ECU'S exciting football schedule, in ad
dition to highlighting the rest of an impressive sports
program.
Our remarkable staff works around the clock to pro
duce the best possible newspaper, containing the
most essential news, features and sports of interest
not only to you, but to your parents and friends as
well, wherever they may be. The East Carolinian. . .
let us inform them.
Your parents, friends, and relatives can subscribe
to the East Carolinian for one year by sending a
check for $25 to: George Hettich, Circulation Dept
The East Carolinian, Old South Building, East
Carolinia University, Greenville, N.C. 27834.
If you wish, you may subscribe for them by mailing
a check for $25 aing with the coupon below to the
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sal





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Mendenhall Student Center
expanding facilities and services this semester.
Policy Changes Beginning
Continued From Page 1
cess to the bowling alley, she said.
Also, a close-captioned machine will be in-
stalled in the television screen at Mendenhall
tor the hearing impaired student. The machine
will be installed sometime soon, she said.
A C-phone has also been installed at the in-
formation desk at Mendenhall. This phone,
which is connected to the main switchboard,
will allow the deaf student to "call in" and find
out what programs are being offered at
Mendenhall. According to Jackie Jackson,
secretary for the office of programming, each
day's activities will be listed on the phone.
Several policy changes have also been made,
according to C. Rudolph Alexander, director of
Mendenhall. Beginning this fall, if a student
loses his university I.D he may present his
driver's license and activity card when getting
tickets. In the past, the student had to present
the valid university ID before he could pick up
tickets. But Alexander pointed out that the stu-
dent should have his university l.D. since it is a
general university requirement.
Another change in ticket distribution con-
cerns the amount of tickets a student can ob-
tain. In the past, a student could only pick up
one ticket for an event. However, this fall, as
long as the student has proper ID. and activity
cards, he may pick up as many tickets as he has
identifications, Alexander said.
Also, according to Alexander, university
departments and organizations will no longer
have to pay for all the technicians they use. In
the past, Mendenhall charged for all technical
help. Now, one technician is provided at no
cost. However, if more than one technician is
needed, then the group or organization must
pay for the additional services. Off-campus
groups and non-university organizations must
pay for all technical help, he added.
On Aug. 25 and 26 the Mendenhall staff will
sponsor an open house. The first day is set aside
for faculty and staff and the second is set aside
for students. Mendenhall will provide free beer
and everyone is welcome, Alexander said.
Study To Determine Tower's Use
Continued From Page 1
role ECU holds in the
eastern North Carolina
region and that he
hoped the gift would be
used "to further educa-
tional purposes
"Use it in any way to
further your develop-
ment and help attain
your purposes
Roberson said.
Chancellor Brewer
said he echoes Minxes'
expression of apprecia-
tion on behalf of the
university and promises
that the gift would be
put to "best use He
said a study would be
made to determine how
to use the facility.
The television station
put a new, taller
transmitting tower into
operation earlier this
year and Roberson said
the hoard of directors
had voted to offer the
tower as "an outright
gift" to ECU.
"It is our hope and
desire that this gift
would be used for
educational purposes at
ECU Roberson said.
"In exploring the
potential of this gift,
we found that a brand
new similar structure
would cost approx-
imately $1 million
Lemish said.
During the past two
years, the ECU Foun-
dation has received
gifts in kind which in-
cluded a boat, a collec-
tion of gems and
precious stones and
some real estate.
"A television tower
is somewhat unusual
I emish added.
�:�� �:
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�te East Carolinian
Serving the campus community for 54 years.
Richard Grei n, Gfw ��,
Terry Herndon, umm tftmum, Charles Sune, tdm, pot, &�.
CRIS LlCHOK, Busine Manager CHARLES CHANDLER. s�, ��
George Hi ttich. Mta u Terry Gray, ,�,���
Anita Lancaster. � ��,�,� Steve Bachner t�unLd��,
August 26. 1980
Opinion
Page 4
Leo Jenkins
East Carolina's Builder
In today's edition of The East
Carolinian we pay special tribute to
Dr. Leo Jenkins, ECU's chancellor
emeritus.
This year seniors at ECU are the
last undergraduate students who
had the pr'vilege of attending ECU
during Leo's tenure as chancellor.
Those of us who can remember
him know what a delight it was to
run into him walking down Fifth
Street or across campus. He would
always stop and speak to his
students, tell an interesting story or
ask a student what he thought about
a certain problem or topic of the
day.
We can remember the "Beat
Carolina" pep rally that he led at
the top of the hill during his last
year as chancellor.
Leo was always in the forefront
of the battle, like a seasoned general
leading the troops in defense of his
beloved ECU. Also like a general he
was always looking for a new con-
quest, whether it was a new nursing
school, a medical school, or a bigger
and better football stadium.
Our Leo was a man who loved
everybody, and those who knew
him loved him right back.
As an administrator he was well
liked by his students, who found in
him an open ear and an open heart.
Leo is best remembered as an ad-
ministrator who kept in touch with
his students. His door was always
open, no appointments were
necessary. If he was in then you
could talk to him.
He was down to earth. He would
go up the hill to give pep talks to the
football team before the big games
at Chapel Hill and Raleigh. He went
to those little informal gatherings
with the football team in his "ECU
No. 1" tee-shirt, not a three piece
suit. His talks were genuine and had
meaning. He preached the winning
sermon. Leo loved to win.
During his 31 years at ECU he
became something of a legend in his
own time, and rightly so. Few men
can boast of his accompishments.
The students owe Leo the most
thanks and gratitude. It was his love
of the students and his concern for
our future that drove him to move
the mountains that built ECU into
what it is today.
He was always the champion of
our cause, whatever the cause hap-
pened to be. If he thought that his
students needed or wanted
something then he did his damndest
to get it for us, and usually with a
great deal of success.
We are able to attend a great state
university today, instead of a two-
year teachers college, because of Dr.
Leo Jenkins' aggressive leadership
and his burning desire to make a
better wa of life for us and all the
people of North Carolina.
The memory of Leo Jenkins will
live forever in the hearts and minds
of those who hold ECU near and
dear to their hearts.
The Campus Forum
Do you ever feel like getting up
on the soapbox? Have you ever had
a great idea or some hot informa-
tion that the rest of the campus
should know about? Do you ever
get mad as hell and can't take it
anymore?
Then sit down with your favorite
typewriter or pen and put it on
paper. We'll be glad to print and
deliver it to 10,000 people twice a
week.
If you are a student, a professor,
an administrator or anyone af-
filiated with ECU, you must have
something to say about campus,
state, national or international af-
fairs. You can't possibly agree with
everything we say. Everyone has an
opinion, and your opinions have a
much higher readership than ours.
Contained in a small box in every
issue of the paper is a little message
with a BIG meaning: "The East
Carolinian is the official newspaper
of East Carolina University, owned,
operated, and published for and by
the students of East Carolina
University
Just think about it-you too can
contribute to the newspaper without
having to work long, hard hours for
low, low pay. All you have to do is
write it down in your spare time, no
deadlines to worry about except
your own. Keep it around 300
words, don't libel anyone, make it
legible, and we'll take to the street
for you.
And not only to the street. Top
administrators, the ECU Board of
Trustees and powerful alumni read
The East Carolinian regularly. For
many of them, it's the only source
of student and faculty input. Don't
let them think everything is fine and
dandy if you think it isn't. Silence is
equal to contentment.
The East Carolinian is your
newspaper and a campus
newspaper, not the exclusive pro-
vince of a handful of journalism
students. After all, students pay
about three cents for each issue.
Why not get you 3 cents worth?
Old Times Not Forgotten
"1 wish I was in the land of cot-
tonOld times they are not forgot-
tenLook away! Look away! Look
away! Dixie Land
This lively old tune was written in
1859, believe it or not, by a yankee,
Daniel Emmett.
It is a popular song that reflects
the customs, culture, and way of life
in the South, where indeed Old
times are not forgotten.
It is a song about the slow, easy
and leisurely way of life in our
region. It also reflects the intense
pride that seems to be inborn with
native sons and daughters of the
South. "In Dixie Land I'll take my
standTo live and die in Dixie
The old tune has roused many an
audience throughout the South and
across the nation. When Abraham
Lincoln first heard the song at a
New York performance in 1860, he
shouted, "Let's have it again
from his box. And on the day the
Civil War ended he ordered the Ar-
my band to play the song in the
streets of Washington.
In 1863 a newspaper reported that
the song was "as popular in New
York as in Richmond
We, as southerners, have always
taken great pride in our history and
our unique and very distinctive
lifestyles. Our close ties to the
church, family, and community
have endured through the years. We
are famed throughout the world for
our hospitality, gracious manners,
and of course the good food.
The song Dixie is a reflection of
all of this nostalgia about the South.
It would be nice to hear this rous-
ing and vibrant old melody at our
home football games once again as
it was in years gone by.
Dixie is a song that we all love to
hum along to and it makes a
Southerner's heart swell with pride.
"Away, away, away down South
in Dixie
&OILT ECO ,OT0 a
6H�AT UMlVfctoiTf
East CW-Olioa
Mendenhall: A Student Center?
By CHARLES SUNE
tdilorial P��f 1 dilur
Mendenhall Student Center? The next
time you enter Mendenhall keep in mind
that student fees are paying for the facility.
With the exception of the salaries for the
professional staff, and the land that the
building was constructed on, Mendenhall
is entirely supported with student activity
fees. Yet, there is no direct student involve-
ment in the operation of the facility.
Every full-time student pays in excess of
$15 per semester to pay off trie Mendenhall
bonds and to operate the facility itself.
Even those who are classified as part-time
pay a proportionate amount to the center.
Mendenhall Student Center should not
be confused with the Student Union pro-
gramming organization. The Student
Union, which is supported with student
fees, has approximately 75 students involv-
ed who make programming decisions. The
Student Union organization, though it is
housed in Mendenhall, has nothing what
soever to do with the operation of the Stu-
dent Center.
Recently, Rudolph Alexander, Director
of the Student Center, proposed that an
Advisory Board be formed to give the
director a better feeling of community in-
volvement. Though it may appear other-
wise, Alexander's proposal is a poor one.
Seemingly, his plan would allow for stu-
dent input as well as faculty input-
however, the key to understanding the pro-
posal is with the board's name. Alexander
proposes an "Advisory" Board. By defini-
tion, the Board would only advise. There
would be no students, or faculty in policy
making positions.
Some might think that placing students
in policy making positions is a bit too
radical. Students are presently represented
on all faculty and administrative commit-
tees as well as standing departmental com-
mittees. It is interesting to note that there is
a voting student member of the Board of
Trustees, the highest policy making board
of the university, yet there is no student in-
volvement in the operation of the Student
Center.
Why should students be allowed to for-
mulate Student Center policy? For one
thing, if Mendenhall is indeed the Student
Outer, students should help formulate its
policies For the iast twenty years one man
has been solely responsible for the opera-
tion of the Student Center. Even before
Mendenhall was constructed, while still in
what was known as the old College Union,
Rudolph Alexander was formulating his
own policies as well as doing his own pro-
gramming.
There has never been any outside in-
volvement in the operation of Mendenhall
Student Center. The overriding question
that immediately arises is, why hasn't there
been any outside involvement? There are
many reasons and few adequate explana-
tions for this.
To begin, Alexander has been making all
of the decisions for a long time. Alexander
is a conservative man and doesn't like
change. Until his new boss (Dr. Elmer
Meyer, Vice-Chancellor for Student Life)
arrived, he had free reign.
Alexander does not want to give up the
power that he has enjoyed for the last 20
yearshowever, he can see that he will be
forced to open-up the Student Center if he
doesn't do so of his own volition. Alex
ander, being no fool, proposes a plan that
would least errode his power. This is whv
he proposes an "advisory" Board instead
of a board that would make actual policv
decisions.
In fairness to Alexander it should be
mentioned that he has managed to hire an
excellent staff. They work hard because
their boss is demanding. Though his staff
is quite competent, it needs to be
remembered that Alexander is unques-
tionably the boss and his staff must follow
every command.
There is an alternative to the Advisory
Board plan. It's called the University
Union. By combining the Student Union
organization with Mendenhall Student
Center there would be students placed in
every area of the Student Center opera-
tion. Students would be responsible for all
programming done with student fees. The
present Student Union Board of Director-
would serve as a Student Center Board of
Directors. The Student Center would then
become responsive to the needs of those
who are footing the bills. For the first
time, students would be placed in actual
decision making positions instead of token
advisory positions.
It's high time that Mendenhall became a
Student Center, instead of a rigid dictator
ship.
The Press Rolls On � Sometimes
Neighbors and friends � that special
group of people who always seem to be
there when you need them.
It was the good fortune of this
newspaper to have a friend and neighbor,
The Havelock Progress, this past week.
When the computerized typesetting
machinery broke down last week we found
ourselves in quite a predicament. We had a
32 page newspaper to produce within just a
few days and our whole production system
was paralyzed.
The only other system in this part of the
state that is compatible with that which
produces The East Carolinian is owned by
The Havelock Progress.
When our call for help went out ot the
Havelock paper they responded quickly
and graciously. Editor Stephanie Hailey
and Publisher Eugene Smith opened the
doors and invited us to use their facilities
in order to get our paper out to the
students of ECU.
Mrs. Hailey stayed late, after the normal
5 p.m. closing time several nights to allow
us the use of their machinery and offered
any and all assistance that she could
possibly render. Her help and hospitality
was most welcomed and greatly ap-
preciated.
We owe a great debt and tremendous
thanks to the fine folks at The Havelock
Progress who enabled us to bring this
newspaper to our readers today.
For three consecutive nights our staff
made the hour and a half drive to that
small "marine village" between New Bern
and Morehead City. Not once when we
called was there any hesitation on the part
of the Progress to extend a helping hand.
Certainly, if the opportunity ever
presents itself, we look forward to the day
when we may in some measure repay our
debt of gratitude.
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v4x.
n
to give up the
for the last 20
that he will be
lent Center if he
volition. Alex
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Board instead
ike actual polk)
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maged to hire an
Irk hard because
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It needs to be
Inder is unques
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to the Advisory
the University
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Idenhall Student
udcnts placed in
Center open
esponsible tor all
udent tecs The
ard of Directors
Center Board of
enter would then
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Is. For the first
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Idenhall became a
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It once when we
ation on the part
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portunity ever
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THE VAST CAROLINIAN
OD-Ed Other Opinion
JL ALL'1, - i 26. r 5
UNC Desegregation
Case Continues With
Govt. Witnesses
In its desegregation case agianst
the University ol North Carolina
system, the federal government is
offering a parade ol witnesses
recommending ways to bolster
racial balance that almost certainly
would impair educational oppor-
tunit) foi both blacks and whites.
Many of these witnesses have no
special knowledge of problems in
North Carolina, and their recom-
mendations arc not consistent
among themselves. A few examples
from the government's shopping list
are instructs e.
One witness recommended open
admission for all black high school
graduates a UNC's most selective
campuses. 1 his would mean that all
black high school graduates who ap-
plied for admission to UNC-Chapel
Hill or NC. State would have to be
accepted. 1 his is educational
nonsense.
With an extensive remedial pro-
gram, the university might be able
to carry some clearly unqualified
students tor foul years and grant
them diplomas. But without educa-
tional standards, a degree is mererlv
a piece of papei. Such students are
better served bv programs more at
tuned to their needs And the
deliberate erosion of academic stan-
dards would dimmish the oppor-
tunity tor a meaningful education
for both blacks and whites
Anothei witness suggests that
UNC's predominantly white cam
puses could achieve a 15 percent
representation o blacks on then
faculties. 1 his is notwithstanding
the fad that, according to the
witnesses" own statistics, only 2 pei
cent ol the PhDs in the countr are
black and Ml percen: ol those
have degrees in education, which
means that less than 1 percent of the
doctorate-holders in other fields are
black.
I N( can and must work to in-
crease the number of blacks in its
doctoral programs and to improve
black representation on
predominantly white faculties. But
the witness' own data suggest that
the goal could not be attained even
it black PhDs were hired without
regard to their qualifications. And
who, black or white, would be well-
served bv the hiring of unqualified
teachers?
Such recommendations go lar
beyond anything the federal govern-
ment has seriously espoused in near-
ly a decade o wrangling with the
university over desegregation. Main
o them appear to go beyond the
bounds ol allowable affirmative ac-
tion set by the Supreme Court in the
Bakke case. About the most one can
conclude is that government at-
torney hipe that such a shotgun
bias! ol impractical proposals will
make their position seem reasonable
bv the tune they finish presenting
their case in October.
Ihe fact that people in responsi-
ble positions make such proposals
and the fact that educationally
unsound ideas could find their way
into a court order illustrates how
crucial it is that the university
demonstrate that it can carry out a
legally acceptable, educationally
sound desegregation plan. But when
faced with proposal that obviously
would be destructive, the INC
system clearly should resist and
assert the necessity ol retaining the
right lo govern it sell.
OAJT r-Hf i M
Trl� CWPUS l KfDl BUioP, &uT THE TUiTiOMb CHCAp
States Rights Eroded Beyond Recognition
V �
,1lh-CTc
Campaign Breakfast
Turns to Indigestion
p . vv
.
One thing you have to sav for
Charles Rose, the congressman
from the 7th District, he doesn't
hesitate to beard the lion in his den.
Swinging about the district this
week currying favor tor the general
election in November, Rep. Rose
stopped in Wilmington for
breakfast with the Chamber oi
Commerce. Besides differing sharp-
ly with the congressman's views on
basic issues, many of the Chamber
members would like to see New
Hanover County excised from
Rose's district. There is strong senti-
ment for returning the congressional
seat to New Hanover, where it used
to rest duing the 'enure of Alton
Lennon. There is equally strong
feeling that Rose is a touch too
liberal for the region, and, for that
matter, for North Carolina.
The breakfast didn't figure to be
comfy-cozy under the most cordial
of circumstances.
Rep. Rose ostensibly was there to
seek the Chamber's endoresment of
his re-election, or at least to gather a
lew votes. In keeping with that pur
pose, he might have been expected
to trv to mollify those disenchanted
hv his congressional performance �
stroke the gathering so to speak.
So, what did Rep. Rose do Well,
he lectured the Chamber on the
danger of bulding an oil refinery in
Brunswick County, across the Cape
1 ear from New Hanover. He recall
ed the oil tanker fire near Houston
last spring and the near-spill in May
when a tanker foundered off Frying
Pan Shoals, and dwelled on the
threat an oil refinery in Brunswick
would pose to the North Carolina
coast.
Then, rounding out nicely his lit-
tle breakfast pep talk. Rep. Rose
said he would do nothing to help the
Brunswick oil refinery along and
would do everything he could to
stop it. To the consortium planning
the refinery, he said, "leave us
alone
As it happens, the Wilmington
Chamber o' Commerce is a bastion
of support for the refinery. If
Rose's breakfast campaign chat
didn't give the members indigestion,
nothinu will.
Ihe nation's blue-suited,
buttoned-dow n governors are
unlikely revolutionaries. But they
have begun grappling anew with a
question that preoccupied those
revolutionaries who founded this
country two centuries ago � how
� national" and how "federal" is
the government established by the
Constitutions
At its recent session, the National
Governors' Association approved a
resolution asserting that "the
tederal system has reached a
crossroads" and that "the role of
the states has been eroded to the
point that the authors of the Con-
stitution would not recognize the in-
tergovernmental relationships they
crafted so carefully in 1789 The
governors called for the establish-
ment o a National Commission of
federalism to make recommenda-
tions, possibly including constitu-
tional amendments, for
redistributing power among the
various levels o government.
Though the governors, as politi-
cians, are riding the crest of a wave
of anti-Washington sentiment, this
is not an old-line, "fergit, hell
type of states rights campaign. The
federalism resolution was approved
unanimously, with both liberal and
conservative govoernors speaking
out for it. Further, the governors'
position is bolstered by an ex-
haustive three-year study by the
non-partisan Advisory Commission
on intergovernmental Relations,
which concluded that American
federalism is in "serious disarray
In the governors' view, states
have become little more than branch
offices or subcontractors of the
federal government. The AC1R
found the federal government now
has nearly 500 grant programs,
costing S88 billion, for state and
local governments. Tied to this
monev, according to AC1R, are
about 1,260 "mandates" either in
the form of direct orders or condi-
tions for receiving the aid.
Democratic Gov. George Busbee
of Georgia declared ihat "there is
no doubt that the federal umbilical
cord is beginning to strangle us
Republican Gov. Richard Snelling
of Vermont spoke of finding ways
to achieve "fiscal restraint without
abandoning our social goals
North Carolina Gov. James B.
Hunt Jr. joined the chorus by urg-
ing governors to work out a
reassessment of roles in cooperation
with Congress and the White
House.
Perhaps the most outspoken of
the gubernatorial "revolutionaries"
was Gov. Bruce Babbitt of Arizona,
who described himself as a
"committed liberal in social affairs,
as an unapologetic Democrat
"The Congress no longer even
asks the question that preoccupied
Hamilton and Madison: Is this
legislative proposal an appropriate
function for the federal govern-
ment?" Babbitt said. "They would
ask, Is it the role of the national
congress to fund programs for jelly-
fish control? A comprehensive pro-
gram for rat control? They would
ask, Is it appropriate to have a na-
tional program that buys
typewriters, desks, guns and patrol
cars for local police agencies across
the entire continent?"
It is unrealistic to expect that the
United States will ever return to the
unadulterated vision of the writers
of the Federalist Papers. In
Federalist Nos. 45 and 46, for exam-
ple, James Madison argues that
"the state governments will have the
advantage of the federal gover-
ment" and that should the tederal
government ever try to "extend its
power beyond the due limits
states would have the "means ol
defeating such encroachments
How quaint those words seem.
There has indeed beei a progfound
shift of power to the federal govern-
ment, which in turn has found the
means to require states and local
governments to follow its dictates.
This shift has varied and complex
causes. States often sought federal
help and they sometimes failed to
assume responsiblities. The shift is
not, as some conservative critics
would have it, the result simplv o
liberal do-gooding. ACTR analyst
David R, Beam points out that the
effort to win World War 11 brought
about expanded federal intervention
in the economy and the response to
the Soviet "Sputnik" led to the ma-
jor federal involvement in educa-
tion.
W hat the governors are now seek
ing is a trade. 1 hey want the fedei il
government to takeover lull resp
siblilv tor programs, such
welfare, for which national objec
lives are clear. In exchange, they
want the federal government to
divert itselt o certain tasks in, I
example, education and crime con-
trol and allow states and cities more
discretion m accomplishing them.
To the extent thai they are not
seeking an abdication o govern
ment's responsiblity to protect con-
stitutional rights and to help pei
m need, the governors have raised a
significant question in asking
whether a rejuvination ol fedcralsim
could result in improved delivery
services. Ihe United States cannot
turn the clock back to 1789, but il
can consider in contemporary terms
Madison's point, in federalist No
39, that the "Constitution is, in
strictness, neither a national nor a
federal Constitution, but a composi
ion of both
�Trenpllers- lake a dive
Triangle Area Turns Off To Prep
By ROBERT M. SWAIM
�! in Ihr (.rneml Mjnaurr
Recently 1 read in The News and
Observer that believe it or not, there
may be a few folks in the Raleigh-
Durham-Chapel Hill triangle who
are sick of "prep
The triangle area, well known tor
its abundance of Kelly green pants,
pink shirts (with little alligators ol
course), weejuns, khakis, two tone
belts, pink hair ribbons and add-a-
beads, may be coming of age by
beginning to turn away from the
"preppy" scene.
The world of prep is a strange cult
that thrives on the nostalgia of the
early 1960s college scene.
Have you ever noticed the likes
and dislikes of "preps their at-
titudes and clone-like personalities?
They are a strange sort of people,
who carry about them an air of ar-
rogance and snobbishness. The
looking-dow n-thc-nos e
characteristic is most noticable.
They love to get sloshed. This has
several benefits if you are a "prep
1) It gives you an excuse to "gator
2) You can be obnoxious and have
an acceptable excuse when apologiz-
ing for your actions the next day; 3)
It gives you something to talk about
at the next party.
Then we have the "Charles Elliot
Worthington 111" syndrome. This
syndrome reflected in the male
preps' habit of going about trying to
convince the world thai they are in-
dependently wealthy - part of the
country club set. "My car is more
expensive "I own $5,000 worth ot
beach music "1 vvent to a private
school "1 have alligators on my
jocky shorts" etc.
And oh, how they love to shag,
bee-bop. and jig-a-loo all around to
the tune of the Embers. The Tarns,
or the Georgia Prophets. Thev love
to shag the night away and roll back
the clock in their minds until they
convince themselves that they are
back at the Deke house in 1960 at
Carolina.
If you ever get to know a really
devout prep, he or she will probably
confess in a drunken stupor one
night that they applied at Carolina,
but were rejected; Chapel Hill is the
Mecca of the North Carolina prep
society.
Getting back to beach music -
which is nothing but a modern day
version of a Negro minstrel - what
is so appealing about bopping
around listening to "I got sand in
mv shoes or "1 love beach
music
What is really hilarious about the
true preps is that they honestly
believe in their own minds that they
are trendsetters, setting the pace for
others to follow in fashion (God
forbid!), music, and culture.
lzod and weejun will never be in
the same league with Yves Saint
Laurent, Pierre Cardin, or Calvin
Klein.
1 remember that shortly after Jim-
my Carter took office Time
magazine did a profile on Hamilton
Jordan, Carter's chief strategist and
aide-de-camp. Time described Jor-
dan's appearance as immature and
outdated "still looking like a
preppy fraternity boy Penny
loafers and alligators are not im-
pressive, or chic in any set.
Fortunately, ECU has a small
preppy population in comparison
with schools in Raleigh and Chapel
Hill,
It is the sincere hope and dream
of this writer that prep will, like
zoot suits, raccoon coats, and
swallowing goldfish, fade away and
die a peaceful death, never to be
seen again.
?
- - -





6 fHE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 26,1980
An Educational
� �
rtuni

If money for college at ECU is
a problem,
the GUARD can help! A
A
$1,500.00 BONUS
$500.00 tuition assistance
per year.
$56.80 pay per month.
�:
THE NORTH CAROLINA LEGISLATURE HAS ESTABLISHED A TUI-
TION ASSISTANCE PROGRAM FOR NATIONAL GUARD MEMBERS.
As an ECU student you can remain in school while receiving a $1,500
enlistment bonus, plus $500.00 per school year to pay for tuition. Your
monthly pay while staying in Greenville of $56.80 can also help with the
costs of college.
CONTACT:
FTTH
NATIONAL
GUARD
JERRY JENKINS
752-9653
GREENVILLE
The Guard Belongs
x
STAT�
.
20
3?
X
V
QUAM
�fr
T
a
s
Re
ii





THI EAST C AROl INIAN AUGUST 26, 1980
Weekend values
stance
nth.
The shirt
at a great
sale price
Reg. $8
The shirt that's great for golf, great
for tennis. Suited for back yard
sport and lounging, too. A soft
blend of cottonpolyester wifh a
branded Knit collar, three button-
placket. And an extra long tail for
plenty of tuck-in room. In great
fashion colors for S,M,L and XL.
Sporting Goods Department.
J�&
i
"vif-gt
5SHZ
-
�;
v " U
The Fox"

r
�v'
mm: -
W i

��
Only $13.
Only at JCPenney.
The Fox shirt for women Sportmg the favorite details
you ve admired in the higher-priced knit Like easy,
banded sleeves Classic placket front and sh.rtta.l
bottom Poly cotton m lights bnghts and basics
for sizes P-S-M-L
Men s sizes $14
Women's sizes $13
Children's sizes 7.50 & 8.50.
Toddler $7

t
i
V i
5)
Cushy
comfort
14.99
Three styles to choose foom. C lassie san-
dal stvlmg on a common ground of sued-
ed cushioned in sole limns sturdv man-
made Kraton soles. For hours of happv
comfort. Hull leather done in a variety
ot ways. Misses' sizes.


S
ES9

Z5�Z
Sale
$11.88
30 plywood footiocker with vinyl covering, nickel
plated hardware, tongue-n-groove closure Great for
college home or garage
reg. $17.00

�i

IS:
-3&3�33a2
�&
� is
$21.99
JCPennv 20" three speed box tan. 5 plasm blades, with
white safety grille. Harvest Gold.
16.99
TJ
&)m
Lean back and relax. Watch TV or read a book
With our cushy arm-style bedrest covered in
colorful cotton'corduroy Plumped full with
cottonkapok to help keep its shape
Two great ways
to charge
XPewy
VISA
22"x22'5 34'
Think SchoolThink XPenney
Shop 10a.m. til 9p.m Phone 7 56-1190- Pitt Plaza.
.ii . urnmijwi�H!iiiiWir'ilWMWMw m





8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN f AUGUST 26. 1980
Tobacco Prominent In Area History
C H �� P
K I has contributed to the growth of (ireen- vital part of the area's economy. Pitt County is
ille since 1907. h-it tobacco has always been a the flue-cured tobacco capital of the world.
ECU
War Years See Smaller Enrollment,
School Gets Full University Status
Continued From Page 1
On August 22, 1929, the college was
authorized to grant the Master of Arts degree.
The first masters degree was conferred in
August of 1933.
On April 25, 1934, Dr. Leon R. Meadows
was elected president of the college. During the
war sears, the college saw decreased enroll-
ment. On May 1, 1944, Meadows resigned and
Dr. H. J. McGinnis was elected as president.
McGinnis served until August of 1946. Dr.
Dennis H. Cooke was appointed acting presi-
dent for the academic year 1946-47. On
September 1, 1947, Dr. John D. Messick was
elected as the fifth president of the college.
Although the school was established for both
men and women, the college was not really
coeducational until the veterans began to enroll
in the 1940s. In the fall quarter of 1947, the
enrollment of men exceeded that of women for
the first time. There were 728 men enrolled at
that time and 676 women.
In April of 1951, the name of the college was
changed again to East Carolina College.
In November of 1956, the Board of Trustees
approved social fraternities on campus.
On January 1, I960, Dr. Leo W. Jenkins was
elected president when Messick resigned. By the
1960s, the college had become the state's third
largest institution of higher learning.
(�round was broken for Ficklen Stadium in
May of 1962 and the stadium was dedicated on
September 21, 1963. The East Carolina Pirates
played the University of Maine in the Tangerine
Bovsl the following year and the University of
Massachusetts in the Tangerine Bowl in 1965.
The Pirates won both bowl games.
On July 1, 1967, the General Assembly of
North Carolina approved university status for
the college and ECC became East Carolina
University. On October 30, 1971, ECU became
a constituent part of the North Carolina
University system.
A culmination of efforts, which began in
1964 by physicians and college officials, saw the
opening of the School of Medicine in 1977.
There were 28 students enrolled in the School
of Medicine at this time.
On July 1,1978, Thomas B. Brewer became
Chancellor of East Carolina University, East
Carolina University now offers 105 bac-
calaureate degree programs, 73 masters pro-
grams, and doctoral degrees in medicine and
basic medical sciences.
ECU has the largest art school in the
southeast and the only art school in North
Carolina to be accredited by the National
Association of Schools of Art. ECU also offers
the largest undergraduate program in dance in
North Carolina.
The university provides employment for 1900
residents of eastern North Carolina and has an
annual faculty-staff payroll of $33 million. The
university adds more than 12,000 students to
the local population who spend over $30
million each year off campus.
What began as only a small teachers' training
school with a limited curriculum and meager
space has now become a leading university in
North Carolina and promises to continue striv-
ing for growth and improvement.
0PittP
XGreen
Plaza Shopping Center
ville, North Carolina 27834
STUDENT
SPECIAL
Cut, Style &
Conditioner
$9.00
Reg. $15.00
OFFER GOOD
THRU AUG. 30
Call one of our hair stylists fc
a free Consultation
756-2950 or 756-4042
PITT PLAZA
HELP SEND
ASTUDENT
TO ECU
For Each Student Who Opens an
(Account, We'll Give ECU One
Dollar for Unrestricted Use as
(Scholarship Money
Come by and open a checking account at any
one of our three close-to-campus locations.
With a regular checking account, you qualify
for free checking as long as you keep a $200
minimum in a Planters checking or savings
account.
If minimum balances are not your strong
point, we have a budget checking account for
you, too.
Planters National Bank in Greenville. When
you consider service, convenience and all
the extras, you'll find we're the logical
choice.
Planters National Bank
PLANTERS
NATIONAL
BANK
Downtown. Pitt Plaza. & Carolina East Mall.
C
By J
The Ma)l
tee, which i
jor concert
ding at EC
devastating!
there will
concerts 01
semester.
Charles
committee
budget pro
that indicat
has hit the
"VW're
problems,
to a front
issue of
headlined:
Films, Coi
He contini
universities
faced with
dance.
The last
the Major
bst appro?
certs, said
America
ECU last
November!
$15,000 loj
tions Comi
plain wh
loser, but
Virginia 1
money or
played h
the pe I
The nexl
and Moth
Of
Fo
The lnt
vices Deps
need of
sports pri
tant Direc
During
over 90
in the vat
Approxii
out in waj
whom hal
until begij
program
Trainn
the beginj
During
malls tai
sions of H
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a
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 26, 1980
is an
One!
e as
my
is.
lify
?200
ings
ng
for
en
all
ical
Mall.
Concert Committee Faces Program Problems
By JADE GORMAN
M�ff Wrilfr
The Major Attractions Commit-
tee, which is responsible for all ma-
jor concert programming and fun-
ding at ECU, is faced with such a
devastating budget problem that
there will probably not be any big
concerts on campus during the fall
semester.
Charles Sune, chairperson of the
committee, explained that the
budget problem is part of a trend
that indicated the nation's recession
has hit the concert market.
"We're not the only ones having
problems said Sune, as he pointed
to a front page article in the July '80
issue of Billboard Magazine
headlined, "Like Records and
Films, Concert Business Drops
He continued saying that other
universities across the state are also
faced with the drop in concert atten
dance.
The last academic year, 1979-80,
the Major Attractions Committee
lost approximately $25,000 on con-
certs, said Sune. The rock group
America was the first concert at
ECU last year, appearing in
November, and resulted in a
$15,000 loss for the Major Attrac-
tions Committee. Sune could not ex-
plain why the group was such a
loser, but said that the University of
Virginia lost the same amount of
money on the group when they
played there just a few days after
they performed at ECU.
The next concert was Nantucket
and Mother's Finest, who perform-
ed at the first of December. This
show resulted in a profit of about
$5,000, said Sune.
The rock group Toto appeared at
ECU in the spring. According to
Sune, this concert lost between
$5,000 and $6,000. He said the fact
that the concert was on a Thursday
night, and close to exams, may have
affected the poor turnout. "We
can't select the days for the con-
certs said Sune. "We had to get
the group at the first of a tour and
we felt Toto was a good selection
At the end of the spring semester,
the Major Attractions Committee
had $8,000 left in their budget. Sune
said they scheduled the Mother's
Finest concert in the summer to
make some money for the upcoming
year, Mother's Finest usually being
a big money maker. But things did
not go as planned. "Mother's Finst
failed miserably said Sune. The
remaining $8,000 left in the budget
was lost.
Sune explained that unlike other
Student Union Committees, such as
the Films Committee and the Artist
Series Committee, the Major At-
tractions Committee gets no part of
the Student Union fees appropria-
tions. "We work on a break even
basis said Sune. A concert is
funded by the committee and they
just hope to break even on the deal,
he explained.
"The concert business is very
complicated said Sune. "Croups
decide they will tour to make
money. Then, ECU will get an offer
from that group to appear. They
want a flat fee and then a percentage
of gate money. For example, Toto
got a flat fee and then 60 percent of
the gate. This percentage was con-
servative as most groups get
about 70 or 80 percent. Firefall got
70 percent Sune emphasized.
Sune also explained that the
facilities at ECU are not large
enough to attract major groups
here. There are 6,000 seats at
Minges Coliseum, compared to
17,000 at Greensboro Coliseum.
Obviously, groups will want to go to
larger facilties when they are coun-
ting on a percentage of the gate.
"We can't get superstars; we have
to get either rising acts or those that
are falling Sune said.
Furthermore, claimed Sune, the
location of ECU is undesirable. This
is a rural area that is not a major
money market. There are no major
airports here. "If the choice for a
group is to come here or go to Duke
University, they'll go to Duke
because it's a major money area
with three large universities near-
by Sune said
Sune explained that there are a
few options for the prospects of
concerts at ECU for the coming
year. One alternative, Sune said, is
for ECU to get out of the concert
business. But he feels this alter-
native would not be a popular one
witn the students.
Another option is for the Major
Attractions Committee to get
money from the Student Union Pro-
gram Board, which is made up of all
the Student Union Committees.
"For this to be a viable alter-
native said Sune, "other commit-
tees would have to make sacrifices
A third alternative is to terminate
the present University policy of not
allowing outside promoters on cam-
pus. But it could mean higher prices
and perhaps dissolving the Major
Attractions Committee, Sune said.
"If it meant dissolving the commit
tee to keep concerts going, v
would he said. "We may decide
to go that route sometime during the
coming year and then get back in it
the next year
Sune went on to say that ad
ministrators at EC I vsould prefer
that the Student Union get out ot
the concert business because rock
groups' contracts are demanding
and complicated and difficult to
negotiate,
As for the immediate future, Sun
said that nothing can be done until
school gets back in and the Majoi
Attractions Committee can meet
Magazine
To Be Issued
In September
The Rebel,
magazine of
Officials Needed
For Intramurals
The Intramural-Recreational Ser
vices Department at ECU is again in
need of officials for its intramural
sports program, according to Assis-
tant Director Bob Fox.
During the 1979-80 school year,
over 90 persons worked as officials
in the various intramural activities.
Approximately $11,000 was paid
out in wages to the officials, most of
whom had never officiated sports
until beginning with the intramural
program last year.
Training clinics are held prior to
the beginning of each sports season.
During the clinics, which are nor-
mally taught in three or four ses-
sions of two hours each, prospective
officials are given the necessary in
formation and training to prepare
them for officiating.
The sessions include proper
techniques and procedures, proper
positioning, rules coverage, signals,
mechanics and other information
concerning the intramural program.
The pav scale for the remainder
of 1980 will be from $3.10 to $3.50
per hour. In 1981. the rate will rise
to between $3.25 to $3.75 per hour.
Officials are paid by the game,
which are slightly less than one hour
in length. The rate for an official is
based on experience and the ability
to learn quickly and apply the rules
correctly.
Interested persons should contact
Bob Fox at room 204 in Memorial
Gymnasium.
ECU'S
student
artwork and literature,
is expected to be
distributed on campus
sometime in
September, according
to Walter Griffin,
chairman of National
Printing Co.
The magazine was
originally supposed to
be distributed in May,
but Rebel staffers
returned the first prin-
ting to National Prin-
ting Co. because of
dissatisfaction with the
way the cover and some
of the color prints turn-
ed out.
Sue Aydlette,
associate editor of the
Rebel, said that in the
first printing, the
magazine's cover ap-
peared splotchy and in-
consistent in color. The
inside color plates of
student artwork also
contained too much
blue, Aydlette said.
National Printing
Co. agreed afterward
to reprint the Rebel,
but has not been able to
do so until now
because of other con-
tracts.
This year's edition of
the Rebel will be 60
pages of drawings,
prints, poetry, short
stories and
photography.
III
AND GET THE SAME
HEAPING PORTION
AT A NEW
LOWER PRICE!
Now
your favorite
meals cost less at S&SJ
r ery week, we choose our most
popular entrets, combine them with
your choice off two vegetables, and mark them with
a new LOW price. Thanks to volume purchasing power, S&S
is able to offer you these Favorites for a price that all America can afford!
FRIDAY 8-29
rUESDAY 8-26
Smothered Chicken
2 Vegetables $1.89
WEDNESDAY 8-27
liver and Onions
2 Vegetables $1.89
THURSDAY 8-28
C'oun�r Steak
2 Vegetables $1.89
Trout Alinondine
2 Vegetable $1.89
SATURDAY g.j�
Country Steak
2 Vegetables $189
SUNDAY 8.3
Roast Turkey and Dressing
2 Vegetables $1.99
MONDAY 9-1
Smothered Chicken
2 Vegetables $.�a
Where America Comes Home To Eat
Carolina East Mall
Daily IIam - 8pm continuously, f 1:36Fri. & Sat.)
WELCOME BACK
ECU STUDENTS
s �
.Get ready for
fall with an exciting new Design Cut and
take advantage of fantastic savings.
sp,V
o4
Thru Sept. 30
$10.00 OFF all Curly Perms or Body Waves
Free Shampoo Blowdry, or Shampoo Set
with ALL Haircuts
Call today
for appointment or consultation
752-3419
2800 E. 10th St.
A FEW GOOD REASONS WHY
YOU SHOULD SHOP A T THE
STUDENT SUPPL Y STORE
Wright Building
. Student Supply Store is owned and operated bv " blast Carolina University.
2. 100 ot the distributed profits are use tor scholarships awarded by the r acuity
Scholarship Committee.
3. Student Supply Store has the largest used textbook inventory in this area.
4. We otter many services such as check cashing, charge card plan, special orders ot books and
other items not normally carried in stock, year round book buvback program, and tree coin-
return lockers.
5. We carry a complete line of art supplies, imprinted wearing apparel, Greek
jewelry, and school supplies.
We also stock a complete line of
school supplies, art supplies,
room accessories, and imprinted
wearing apparel.
FOR THE FALL RUSH
WE HAVE EXTENDED
OUR STORE HOURS
From 8:30 am til 6:00 pm
Aug. 28, 29 and Sept. 2. 3. & 4.
For Your Shopping Convenience
We will also be open Sat Aug. 30 from 8:30am 1:00pm.





10
THHEASI CARPI INIAN
l GUS1 26, WHO
Liquor Petition Runs Dry
By PENNY AUSTIN
Asisunl Nawi Kdiior
This past summei
was hot and dry in
several respects. In ad-
dition to the weather,
Pitt County residents
seemed once again to
be destined to remain
dry.
In early July, the
Greenville Chamber of
Commerce voted down
a request for a referen-
dum concerning liquor-
by-the-drink.
This action led to a
petition drive by several
Greenville area
restaurant owners. The
drive, which at one
time appeared to be
successful, ran into
problems
It seems that
restaurant owners did
not follow proper pro-
cedures regarding the
petition. Cliff Everett
Jr chairman of the
Pitt Board of Elections,
said that the Alcoholic
Beverage Control
Board had certain
statutes regarding peti-
tioning for a referen-
dum.
The procedures in-
cluded requesting a
special petition form
from the board. It was
this stipulation which
the restaurant owners
failed to adhere to.
Because of this over-
sight, the restaurant
owners' petition was
Sight Lines, Seating
Improved In Theatre
Continued From Page 1
The second problem with the
theatre was poor sight lines. All of
the seats did not provide good stage
visibility. The number of seats will
not be increased, but seating sill be
improved because of the better
slope, according to I oessin.
The new theatre will have 6"
seats and will provide facilities for
the handicapped.
The third major problem wih the
old theatre complex was that there
was no scene shop. The basement ol
the theatre was used to store
scenery, thus posing a problem since
the stage was on the second floor ol
the building. The renovation plans
include a separate building
specifically for scenery.
The new building will have an
elevator to bring scenery to the
stage, according to Loessin.
Also under renovation is the
ballet studio. The floors are being
redone to make them cushioned,
c ushioning floors will make it safe
for the dancers to work on. The
room has also been enlarged by
knocking out a wall to combine two
rooms. The dance studios will be
completed by the time classes
resume for the fall semester, 1 oessin
said.
This in a complete plan said
I oessm. "At one point, years ago.
we were in nine different
buildings'
not accepted by the
board as being valid.
In July, Margaret
Register, supervisor of
the Board of Elections
said that the petition
group had an unlikely
chance to complete the
necessary requirements
in time to hold the
referendum prior to the
November 4 general
election.
The board had not
been contacted by the
petition group since the
July petition ran into
trouble, Register said.
As far as she knew,
there is nothing going
on with the movement
at this time. She added,
however, that the peti-
tion movement will
probably pick up later.
College Costs Rise
Slightly This Year
The cost of higher
education is going up
this fall, but a survey
by the College Board
indicated that the rate
of increase will be
slightly less than it was
last year.
According to the
survey of more than
3,200 schools, con-
ducted by the board's
College Scholarship
Service and released
Tuesday, total costs for
the 1980-81 academic
year at a private, four-
year college or universi-
ty will average $6,082
for a student who lives
on campus. That's an
increase of 10.3 percent
over the price for the
1979-80 academic year.
From the fall of 1978 to
the fall of 1979, the
cost of a year at a
private, four-year
school went up 10.6
percent.
1 he latest increase in
college costs, however.
is less than the overall
inflation rate, that is
expected to average
about 12 percent for
1980. Joe Paul Case,
director of program ad-
ministration for the
scholarship service,
said he was surprised
that the rise wasn't big-
ger, "considering the
way the rate of infla-
tion has escalated
Case said, however,
that students and their
parents � who pay 56
percent of the college
bill on the average �
will have increasing
trouble making ends
meet.
"If parents' incomes
don't keep pace with
inflation he said,
"the gap between the
amount they can pay
and the rising cost of
college will widen
Case said he did not
expect any increase in
federal aid programs
this vear.
Buy One
Sanainiich .
ne Free!
itic -k-k-k-kir-kirick














Right now. when
you buy an Arby s Roast Beef Sandwich
you'll get a second one Free1
ARBY'S IN GREENVILLE
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IN GREENVILLE SQUARE
LIMIT ONE PER CUSTOMER PLEASE!
WITH THIS COUPON
BUY
ONE
ARBY'S ROAST
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OFFER EXPIRES
SEPT 2. 1980




ir






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THE MONOGRAM IS
DOWNTOW N
PITT PLAZA
FREE!
f
A Warm up to those chilly autumn days
. ahead. Layer on our great tail classics-
they'll wrap you in warmth and style all
winter long. And we'll monogram them
free!
"KJ
-


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The biggest stars in Hollvwood are coming to Hendrix Theatre in Mendenhall Student Center this Fall. The
Student I nion Films Committee brings you the year's top box-office hits ail semester long plus a diver-
sified line-up of special American and foreign classics from this year and ears past. We also offer weekly
double features starring such legends as Gary Cooper, Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton, and, of course,
The Duke. Don't miss seeing the Best Picture of the Year, Kramer s Kramer and Best Foreign Film win-
ner, La Cage Aux Folks or such blockbusters as Apocalypse Now and Alien. See them in our plush theatre
and hear them on our new and improved sound system. For your convenience, we have added a special 5
p.m. showing of our Friday and Saturday evening popular films in addition to the regular 7 and 9 p.m.
shos. Admission? ID and Activity Card. The Student I nion Films Committee-We Play the Hits!
mm
STUDENT UNION
IA5T CAROLINA UWIVWVTY
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THEtASTCAROlIMAN
AUGUST 26, 1980
11
I





!� � �
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XPIRES �
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W
INION
wvwsrnr
Salaries And Prospects Brighter In 1980s
Job Outlook Improved,
Especially For Engineers
College graduates this year will be looking
for starting salaries some 5 to 9 percent
higher than those of their 1979 counterparts,
according to a recent Northwestern Universi-
ty Placement Center survey.
Most in demand by employers will be
engineers, who can expect an average star-
ting salary of $20,136 a year. Next in order
with bachelor's degrees are computer
science majors, $17,712; math and statistics
grads, $17,604; chemistry, $17,124; sales
and marketing, $15,936; accounting,
$15,720; finance and economics, $14, 472;
business administration, $14,000; liberal
arts, $13,2.
The job outlook continues to improve for
college graduates, with 16 percent more posi-
tions available this year for holders of
bachelor's degrees and 4 percent more jobs
for those with master's degrees. An M.S. in
engineering will command an average star-
ting salary of $23,136; and MBA. in a
technical field, $22,632.
Incidentally, when the interview stage ap-
proaches, many job counselors are telling
students to leave their resumes at home.
Most interviewers, according to these con-
sultants, are not comfortable in the inter-
viewing process. Thus, by leaving the resume
at home, the job applicant denies the inter-
view this "crutch" or support, and the grad
has a better chance ot directing the interview
to his or her advantage.
The unsuccessful job applicant may find
the following reasons for rejection helpful.
Responses from employment and personnel
directors from one hundred major business
firms cited the following factors, in order of
frequency, as leading to rejections of job
seekers:
1) Poor grades or accomplishment level;
2) Personality problems; 3) Lack of goals
and motivation; 4) Lack of general en-
thusiasm; 5) Lack of interest in firm's
business.
Slight Improvement In Liberal Arts Market
(CPS) � "Don't talk it up too much
begs Karen Blakey of the U.S. Personnel
Corp. in Washington, D.C. "Too much talk
could make it go away
She is talking about a slight improvement
in the long-depressed job market for liberal
arts majors this spring. "With a bit of hustl-
ing and concentrated job seeking counsels
Gordon Gray, Career Services director at
George Washington University, "A liberal
arts graduate should be successful.
"The average liberal arts major has it
much better than his predecessors of the last
six or seven years, especially in the private
sector of hiring he adds.
Experts point to several factors that have
improved, at least tenuously, liberal arts ma-
jors' job prospects. One is that students have
stayed away from liberal arts so long that
they've created a shortage.
The phemonenon is most noticeable in
education. "We find (school) districts are re-
quired to go out of state for new teachers
says Ralph Graves of Maine's State Educa-
tion Commission. "Until about 1977, we
had people pounding down the doors" for
jobs. Then "it leveled off for a while, and
now it's a problem of actively recruiting to
keep quality (of education) up
Other areas of the country are also repor-
ting current or imminent teacher shortages,
especially in the Sun Belt stales. The
Southern Regional Education Board expects
its "current oversupply of new teachers" to
dwindle into a teacher shortage by
the end of the decade.
Yet job hunting for liberal arts
majors largely remains a catch-as-
catch-can proposition. The federal
government, traditionally the big
gest recruiter of liberal arts majors,
has a hiring freeze. Most state
governments have drastically reduc-
ed hiring. So in general a liberal arts
major must "look for blips in the
market" to find gainful empkn-
ment. savs University of Illinois
Career Development Director Dave
Betchel.
Gray of George Washington
University uses language majors to
illustrate the "little bit of hustling"
he recommends. "Language degrees
are very seldom sought after, except
for teaching and translating posi-
tions. More often a prospective
employer may be searching for a
language as a secondary qualifica-
tion, for example, looking tor a
librarian with a language degree
Way Ion Called Cowboy Hero
A University of Alabama pro-
fessor says this summer's populari-
ty of cowboy stuff � brought on b
the movie "Urban Cowboy" � is
more than a passing fad. and its
hero is Waylon Jennings, not John
Travolta.
Professor Jim Salem as
cowboyism has reversed the unisex
trend. Says he, "For about 10years,
we didn't know who anybody was
but, he says the cowboy movement
is a trend that has re-established (he
fact that "there are men and
women
He explains thai quote
"I adies love cowboys. Ladies love
outlaws. These cowboy guvs are just
men. The) drink too much they go
out at night and are hard lo hold on
to, and sometimes they're a little
mean. Women don't control them
Short Courses Cover Many Interests
Two divisions of
East Carolina Universi-
ty are offering credit-
free mini courses this
fall. The course offer-
ings range from
aerobics to bicycle
maintenance and
repair.
There will be 30 short
courses offered by
Continuing Education,
according to Dr. Worth
Worthington, director
of the Office of Non-
Degree Programs.
Students, as well as the
general public, are
eligible to take the
courses, he said.
Of the many courses
offered. Worthington
said, the classes in
dance, sailing, and
scuba-diving are among
the most popular with
students. A course in
calligraphy is also
popular, he said,
because many use the
skills learned in the
class to produce their
own Christmas cards.
There will also be
several practical
oriented courses of-
fered. Two such
courses are in buying
stereo equipment and
saving money through
the use of coupons, he
said.
Most courses are
spawned through
public interest, Wor-
thington said. "People
call in saying they'd
like to take such and
such a course, then we
try to find someone to
teach it he said.
"We're trying to
build a variety of pro-
grams he said. "Next
spring we hope to offer
courses in conversa-
tional foreign
languages
Worthington sug-
gested that anyone
wishing -to register for
the courses should
register at least a week
in advance of the first
class meeting. Classes
begin the first week of
September. Registra-
tion may be conducted
by mail, phone, or by
stopping by the office
of Continuing Educa-
tion.
Mendenhall Student
Center is also offering
non-credit courses. The
Non-Credit
Courses
Following is a partial list of courses offered
through the ECU Division of Continuing
Education. Average tuition is $25 per course.
For further details, call 757-6143.
Calligraphy � Mon Sept.15-Oct.27,
7:00-9:00 p.m. 7 sessions.
Basic Aerobic Exercise � Mon. v Thurs
Sept.15-Oct.23, 6:30-7:00 p.m. 12 sessions.
Buying Stereo Equipment � Mon
Nov. 10, 7:00-10:00 p.m. 1 session.
Drawing For Fun � Tues Sept.9-Oct.l4,
7:00-9:00 p.m. 6 sessions.
Basic Scuba Certification � Tues. �
Thurs Sept.l6-Oct.9, 7:00-10:00 p.m. 8 ses-
sions.
Camera I � Tues Sept. 16-Oct.l4,
7:00-9:00 p.m. 5 sessions.
Leaded Stained Glass � Tues
Sept.16-Oct.21, 7:00-9:00 p.m. 6 sessions.
Jazz Exercise 1 � Wed Sept.l7-Nov.l9,
6:30-7:30 p.m. 10 sessions.
Guitar � Wed Sept.l7-Nov.5, 7:30-9:00
p.m. 8 sessions.
Clogging I � Wed Sept.17-Oct.22,
7:00-9:00 p.m. 6 sessions.
Ballet I � Wed Sept.17-Nov.19, 7:30-8:30
p.m. 10 sessions.
Basic Sailing � Thurs Sept.ll � 25, and
Sat Sept. 13,20.27. 5 sessions.
Speed Reading � ThursSept.i8-Nov.6,
7:00-9:00 p.m. 8 sessions.
Home Furnishings � Thurs Sept.25,
9:00-11:50 a.m. u 1:10-3:40 p.m. I session.
Acting I � Thurs Oct.2-Oct.30, 7:00-9:00
p.m. 5 sessions.
How To Save On Groceries � Thurs
Sept.18 Fri Sept. 19. 2 sessions.
crafts and Recreation
Center is sponsoring
four short courses, ac-
cording to Tara
Nobles, Crafts and
Recreation director.
I he tour courses are
CPR training, clogg-
ing, bicycle
maintenance and
repair, and shag danc-
ing.
Individuals must
register in person at the
Mendenhall Central
Ticket Office between
the hours of 10 a.m.
and 4 p.m. Monday
through Friday, she ad-
ded.
The Crafts and
Recreation Center will
also sponsor six
workshops; the
workshops, which are
restricted to Crafts
Center members, in-
clude Quilting, weaving,
and photography, she
said.
To become a member
of the Crafts Center, a
full time student must
pay a $10 fee. The fee
allows the student to at-
tend one workshop.
Seminar Openings Available
Freshmen and
sophomores with a
g.p.a. of 3.5, or a rank-
ing in the top ten per-
cent of their high
school class may still
register for two Honors
Seminars being held
this fall, according to
Dr. David Saoders,
coordinator of the
Honors Program.
The two seminars
still open are-
HSEM 2020 tollo-
quim in Election Vear
Politics: This seminar
studies contemporary
politics through the
various resources
available in an election
year (i.e. Public opi-
nion polis, campaign
literature, news ac-
counts, and partisan
views.) 3 credit hours.
Instructor: Dr. John
Howell, Department of
Political Science.
HSEM 2050 How To
Be An Old-Time
Wizard in Modern
Times (or Extracting
Cents from History):
This seminar is a non-
traditional "historical"
exploration of the prac-
tical applications of
organized and playful
creative activity to the
formulation of alter-
native human systems.
3 credit hours. Instruc-
tors: Drs. Ralph Steele
and Karl Rodabaueh.
The class credit may
be put towards the
General Education re-
quirements, Sanders
added.
Qualified students
may register for the
seminars along with
their regular courses.
Any questions about
the seminars or the
Honors Program may
be addressed to the in-
structor or to Sanders
in Austin 117
TRUCK LOAD PLANT
SPECIAL !
Choose From A Fantastic Selection Of
Florida Foliage That Will Enhance Your
Dorm Room Or Apartment!
10" HANGING
BASKETS
10" FOLIAGE
FLORIDA
$3.88
$6.88
Free cups of
fountain Pepsi
are back
just ask!
Order any targe pizza and get up to
4 free cups of Pepsi! If you order a
small pizza, you can get up to 2 free
cups of Pepsi!
No coupons are necessary-just ask.
Fast, Friendly
Free Delivery
758-6660
Fast, Friendly, Free Delivery
1201 Charles Boulevard
Hours:
11:00AM 1:00AM Sunday-Thursday
11:00AM-2:00AM Friday and Saturday
Ask for a free phonestfeker,
also!
Menu
All Pizzas Include Our Special
Blend of Sauce and Cheese
Our Superb Cheese Pizza
12" small $3.65
16" large $5.35
Domino's Deluxe
Pepperoni, Mushrooms, Onions,
Green Peppers, & Fresh Sausage
12" small Deluxe $6.45
16" large Dsluxe $9.55
Additional Items
Pepperoni
Mushrooms
Olives
Onions
Green Peppers
Ground Beef
Sausage
Ham
Double Cheese
Extra Thick Crust
Anchovies
Hot Pepper Rings
12" small $.70 per item
16" large $1.05 per item
Stated prices do not include
applicable state sales tax.
We reserve the nght to limit our delivery area
Copyright 1979
i Emergency
Numbers
Campus Police
757-6150
Fire
752-3116
Pizza
758-6660
0060635530





12 THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 26, 1980
Grand Opening Giveaway
Tuesday August 26th
Wednesday August 27th
(two days only)
FREE- Pepsi Cola -FREE
FREE- Doughnuts -FREE
FREE- Desk Blotters -FREE
FREE- UBE T-Shirts -FREE
(1st 100 customers each day)
FREE- Pepsi Cola T-Shirts -FREE
(1st 100 customers each day)
FREE- Frisbees -FREE
(1st 100 customers each day)
2 Litre Pepsi
or Mt. Dew
All Regular
$3.50
T-SHIRTS
$1.95
All Regular
$3.49
Gym Shorts
$1.95
Book Rush Hours
Open All Day
Labor Day
Tuesday August 26 9:00-6:00
Wednesday August 27 9:00-6:00
Thursday August 28 8:00-9:00
Friday August 29 8:00-6:00
Saturday August 30 9:00-6:00
Monday September 1 9:00-5:30
Open All Day
Labor Day
UBE-516 S. Cotanche St Downtown
(
)





I HI I AN I c ROI INIAN
Sports
Al CUS1 26 i wo
Injuries Add To
Early Pirate Woes
HII KI I s( IIWDI IK
n inexperienced offensive line
and a young quarterbacking corps
along with several injuries are
among ihe woirie ai nev 1 as)
( arolina head football coach 1 d
mory faces as Ins team prepares to
take on bably the
toughest r edule in the
school's histoi s
"We defii a challenging
scheduling �' ' mory
"esp one like
I o prepai squad for
the season i s and ms
"contactful"
fall n ' probably
s yeai than ever
Dej i iinm aid following
' 1 hat's the
learn, though,
i ng. We'll
on film
. � and ovei
aj e showed
offense, an
a thougl lem region
by n "Th fense definitely
moN ay than we had an
�ated Emoi v said.

va
poo
had not
elatively
e of the
ed
ses ond
love the
our fii st
was aKo
sC was
brakes on the
1 c l offense when it began passing.
"i were imitating Duke's offense
foi out defense he said, "but we
were very successful.
"I don't know what to think he
continued, "when you have a
wishbone team like ours completing
passes on the defense. What the
heck do you think is going to hap
pen when somebody that specializes
m passing, like Duke, gets to pass
mg on us
Still, Emory and the staff feels the
Pirate defense can capitalize on its
quickness and become a good
group. "When the defense wants to
run, it can the first-year coach
said. "We've got guvs that run like
horses, rhey jusl have to got it in
then minds thai they want to put
out
1 he inexperienced line and
quarterbacking problem on ottense
still takes precedence as Pirate tans
await the upcoming season. "It's
hard to say how we'll do Emory
said. "1 hat's what I like about this
game. ou get to see how a kid
responds under pressure. I hat'll be
a real kev for us
Injuries are also beginning pile up
and cause worry for Pirate
hopefuls Reserve back Marvin
Cobb is down with a knee ailment
that may sideline him for the
season. I his would be a big loss as
Cobb was the team's top backfield
reserve and could play cither the
fullback or halfback position.
Also down at the moment is star-
center 1 odd Hensley. Filling in
is Billy Parker.
Not helping the situation at
quarterback is the fact that reserve
Greg Stewart is injured, leaving
starter Carlton Nelson aided bv only
freshmen. Stewart's leg injury is
not believed to be serious, though,
as he is expectged back in the camp
soon.
With IS starters gone from last
season's 7-3-1 squad and with teams
like North Carolina. Florida State,
defending NCAA Division I-AA
champ Eastern Kentucky and N.C.
state on the ECU schedule, many
would give up on the season to
come. Not Emory and his statt,
though.
A backfield that includes An-
thony C ollins, a 1mhi yard-plus
rusher last year, and All-Southern
Independent pick 1 heodore Sut-
ton,there is optimism. Along with
this dynamic duo is last year's top
reserve, Mike Hawkins.
Nelson is set to start at quarter-
back and brings great quickness and
athletic ability to the position.
Most of the returning Pirates sav he
already is a better passer than last
vear's star QB 1 eander Green.
On the line the Pirates plan to
start returning All American Wayne
Inman and lee Cut tin at tuiard.
and footie Robbins and Mark Ervin
at the tackles. big blow came to
the line when Gary Gambrell, a
touted sophomore and part-time
stai tei a u ago, lefi school.
Henslev is the top prospect at
Parker has impressed
irl al least until his
Sutton 's
Ineligible
Says Duke
Sutlon (36) could miss Duke game
centei bur
and will
return.
W ill Saunders has earned the nod
a! tighl end with Norwood ami
backing him up.
Starting on the defensive front are
Doug Smith, George - rump. Mike
Davis And Rov.kv Butler. Ierry
1 ong will start at nose guard and
has impressed ihe stalt.
Ihe linebackers are returning
startei lettrev Warren and Glen
Morris, strong backup help comes
from Chuck Jackson and Moe Ben-
nett.
Ihe secondary is comprised ot
returning starters Willie Hollev and
Freddie Jones along with Marvin
I lliott and James freer.
rhe kicking game remains iden-
tical to last vear's, with Vein Daven-
port and Bill 1 amm handling the
placekicking chores and Rodney
Allen punting.
IS�KO t M K()I ISA
FOOTBAI I SCHFJM Lt
al Duke; n
I l ISIANA; .i!
II Mil mi RV
Sept. t
sol 1 1 sll K
I Iorida Stale.
MISSISSIPPI
Ocl 11 at Richmond; 18 WESTERN
k(�l INA; 25 at Northarolina;
Nov I WIN AM & M K 8 at
Miami it la i. 15 I AMI k kl-s
rUC'KY: 22 at N. State
By CHARLES CH A Ml IK
Spofl, I 1M1
rhe availability ol "heodore Sut-
ton, last Carolina's star fullback,
tor the team's opener with Duke on
September 6 is m limbo because ol
some accusations made bv the Blue
Devils
Sutton was injured in the firsi
I I jayvee game oi the season dui
mg his first vear as a Pirate. He
then appealed tot a hardship 10 the
NCAA and received it, giving him
tour years ol eligibility lefl.
No problem, right? Wrong 1
NC AA rules sav that hardship can
be grained it the player is injured in
the first hall ol the season and has
played in no more than two games
All's set then, correct ?
Ihe Blue Devils sav no because
the injury occured in the firsi jayvee
game thai was played alter the I
halt of the varsity season Nt
rules do not specify on wl
schedule will be in use in such a
case.
rhe reason Sutlon could miss the
Duke contest is that the two con
cerned schools have il in their con
tract that only athletes eligible foi
NCAA championship competition
(such as a bowl game) are eligible
tor a Duke II matel up.
rherefore, it Sutton is ruled in-
eligible tor championship competi
lion bv the N which is whai
Duke would like to see. then he is
lust as ineligible tor the Blue Devil
contest.
Ai the moment, though, things
look to be in Sutton favoi
nothing has been turned in to the
NCAA. Faculty advisors from the
two schools are currently studying
the matter.
A Commentary
Changes Good,
Critics Cursed
V
Starting QB Carlton Nelson 6
unchallenged with sub dreg Stewart hurt
Emory Has Been Through It!
Bm ki � x H M)1 I k
Fron ai : 1 nted
ai ! asi
Ed I n �� � ha?
?untei ed n ng pi
ns
"1 g' '
h as possible I n
��Ii seems like we've had a
.� � ca ests "
Emory said. " -��'
staff, ai ' ave grow,rl
� expei 'W taken
and met each chal t
tion he sa d "W e've made
�� and �
because I
mong the
fcmory encoun as I he
onestepr
toy: ECl Fol I rmer
head coach IV Dye's Nov 29
resignation, the entire athletic pro-
gram at the university seemed to go
into turmoil. Dve came out publicly
dnd denounced the ECl ad-
ministrate �
1 mory stepped into the situation
and had to smooth out man
wrinkle in the football program
Though, the Pirates had gone 7-3-1
in 1s�sj and led the natioi fling
nse, there seemed to be little to
� � rward to
total of 18 iettermen were lost
to graduation, most ol them
starters �"The worst thing Emory
said, "is that this ear we have only
foul true seniors returning. We'll
have to develop leadership
With Dve gone but all the con-
troversy still in the air. Emory
to hurry and busy himself vvith
recruiting. "When I go; here in
December he said. "I had only
two names on the old recruiting st
We had to go out ar i scratv �
Kd Emon
� -elves
rhose problems were eventually
ironed out. Emory said, as the
Pirates have several top recruits
coming in this fall.
Much about those First tew mon-
ths still bothers fcmory. though.
"Pat Dve did a great job here he
said "It bothers me. though, that
people keep bringing up the past.
They keep bringing up the dead.
Many seem to be at raid to mention
Pat's name in my presence. It
shouldn't be this way. They seem to
think 1 hold something against
him "
V a matter ot fact, said Emory,
he had no hard feelings towards the
former coach at all. "Heck he
said. "I'm tickled to death that
Pat's at Wyoming. I've got a great
opportunity here because ot it.
�"There's no animosity between us
at all fcmory continued. "As a
matter ol fact, we talk on the phone
almost weekly
One o the early problems he en-
countered that does not bother
fcmory so much is academic
"When 1 got here he said, "things
were in a shambles academically.
The guvs are reallv working hard.
though, i think they all realize now
See EVOPs- r 7
As everyone knows, a change in
the top position at any business or
institution will eventually result in
some other changes. Inter Easl
Carolina University.
It is year three now tor Dr.
Thomas Brewei as let's
chancellor. His influence is now be-
ing reflected all throughout campus
as the influence of his predecessor,
Dr. I eo Jenkins, is beginning to
�wear off. Nowhere is Brewer's ai
rival on campus brought more
changes than in the athletic depart-
ment.
Major changes throughout the
department have occurred in the
past three years, many of them not
as a result ot him,ot others the op-
posite.
Jusl take a look at them. Since
Brewer's arrival on campus, there
have been changes in the following
positions: athletic director, head
football coach, head basketball
coach, head baseball coach, wrestl-
ing coach, sports information direc-
tor, sports promotions director, to
mention the more important ones
Ihe problem is that all the
changes have been unjustlyu criticiz-
ed by many.
�nvwav. whv all the facelifts'
There were different reasons m each
case, some oi them personal moves
some of them housecleaning moves
bv the athletic department.
Last year alone the -D. head
� otball coach. SID and promo-
tions director resigned. The last
three ,gnd coach Pat Dye. SID Walt
Atkins and promotion- man Wayne
Newnam. made moves as a result ot
displeasure with the way things were
being run within the department.
Their moves probably played a big
part in the resignation ot AD Bill
Cain Dye's surelv did
But so what1 Over the past 12
months, fcc I has been in the news
because ot all the changes and
cotroverseys thev caused. People
seemed to forget all the ac-
complishments that occurred in the
ECU athletic department during
that time
Brewer obviously agrees with this.
"ECU is coming off what is pro-
Charles
Chandler
babiy its most successful yeai ever,
he said. "I'm afraid, though, th i
lot ol that has been overshadowed
bv all the resignation
Brewer pointed to the fad thai
the football team led the nation in
rushing offense, that the basketl
team posted its firs! winnii i
in live years, that the womc
basketball team won 20 games, the
baseball team took a Tip to the
c playoffs, the track team's
mile relay squad earned natioi
�ion. the women ftball
team won the Easten
that the swim and wrestlii .
made big advances
We have a highly d
of coaches he Brewer said
"who do more with less '
place I've ever seen bet ore-
above and beyond the call o! dul
Despite the changes ol the pasi
the EC I program ha continued -
grow. Often il is changes lha
needed to correct the problem- ol
the past.
So to those that have cracki
down on the Pirate program in the
last vear the word should be "bug
off"
The past is just that�the pa � �
new era is about to begin at EO
the Brewer and Karr era. In year
past it was the Jenkins and
Stasovich (ex-AD the late C larc
and the Jenkins-Cain era- N
doubt exists that Jenkins did much
for ECU athletics But just because
some changes have occurred under
his successor does not mean thai
they were for the worse
Unfortunately, you can't prove
this to some. The only way to do
that is by performance Here's a bet
that all those folks that did the
bellyaching will end up with their
feet in their mouths.





14
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 26, 1980
?
Helmic Optimistic About Recruit
By
CHARLES CHANDLER
sport h l-dmr
"1 look tor a much
better performance
than last year. 1 really
feel good about the
program now
The warning is out
from East Carolina
golf coach Bob
Helmick as he looks to
the future of his
Pirates. A poor 1979-80
season had backers
down but following a
good recruiting year
Helmick said the future
looks bright. talent, though. We
"We brought in a lot simply must develop
of caliber golfers he experience from the top
said, "a lot better than
we had before. With
the caliber of golfer we
have now, we have the
capability of playing
with anybody in this
district
Though the recent
recruiting season was a
success, Helmick said
the upcoming year will
present some dif-
ficulties. "We'll be
short in experience
he said. "We've got the
of our team to the bot-
tom
Helmick said it is
vital that he play as
many people as possi-
ble during the fall
season, which begins
September 22 at the
Methodist College In-
vitational. If he can do
this, the Pirate coach
foresees a super team in
'8182.
"If the guys get the
proper experience he
proclaimed, "e
should have a
powerhouse of a team
next year
Though the
recruiting yeaT was a
good one, Helmick still
looks to a number of
returnees to lead the
way this fall and again
in the spring. The top
returnee is senior Steve
Jones of Greensboro.
Jones was the Pirates'
number two golfer a
year ago when he
posted a seasonal 74.5
stroke average.
Melvin
Months
Even though the
I nited States boycot-
ted the Summer Olym-
pic Games in Moscow
nullifying any chance
1 asl Carolina had at
claiming a medal win-
ner, former Pirate
sprinter Otis Melvin
continues to excel on
the track.
Melvin concluded a
tour of duty in Europe
with the Muhammad
Ali Track Club in July,
giving him first-hand
experience of the talent
participating for the
coveted Olympic gold.
'Most everyone 1
ran against was getting
ready for the Olympics
in Moscow said
Melvin. "Everyone was
up everytime you step-
ped onto the track
Melvin admitted be-
ing at a disadvantage
by not attending the
Games.
"We had been runn-
ing all year and gone
through the nationals
and the (Olympic)
trials he said. "The
Europeans were just
getting underway. We
were on our downward
trend just while they
were beginning to
neak
1 he entire huropean
trip began as a
frustrating and fatigue-
ing experience for
Melvin.
"1 went to Europe
immediately after the
Olympic trials ex-
plains Melvin. "1
finished the Olympic
trials on Wednesday.
Thursday 1 was on a
flight to L.A.Thursday
night, 1 was on my way
to London.
Melvin returned to
Europe in August, but
his future as a world-
class sprinter is cloudy
at best.
"At one point, 1 had
lost interest in track
and field Melvin con-
fesses. "But now 1 am
enjoying it more than
ever. 1 hope 1 can stay
interested at least until the way for us
1984 so 1 can have Also returning
Helmick feels those
figures will be better
this year.
"Steve has the poten-
tial to qualify for the
NCAA finals
Helmick said, "if he
puts forth the effort
needed. That's all he
needs to do
Jones had a big sum-
mer with the sticks, his
fourth place finish in
the N.C. Amateur top-
ping his achievements.
Jones actually led that
tourney heading into
the final round but
posted a six-over 78 on
the last day to finsih
fourth, four strokes
back of champion
Todd Smith of
Greensboro. Jones also
finished fourth in the
Mid-South Invitational
� at Pinehurst. Of .1 ones'
summer exploits,
Helmick simpl) said.
"1 expect him to lead
from
shot at the Olympics. last year is Mike Move,
a sophomore from
Greenvile, Move strug-
gled though a rough
spring season last year
but had a big summer
himself, winning the
North-South Invita-
tional in Raleigh. He
posted a 2-under score
for the four-day event
and is expected to con-
tribute m u ch this
season.
Becoming eligible foi
the first time this
semester is St. John's
transfer John Derrico.
Derrico had to sit out
last season following
the transfer. He was the
top golfer for the
Redmen in '78 and
Hemlick says he is ex-
pecting big things.
Also returing from
last season's team are
Mike Helms. Jerry I ee
and Steve Wheeler.
The recruits, ol
course, are a favorite
topic t discussion for
Helmick. "We have six
freshmen who should
be capable of giving us
great assistance he
said. "Each ol them
did big things in high
school golf last year
1 he six are Jim
Delgrego olonnec
ticut; Kris Keiser ol
w inston Salem; Dan
1 awruk from Mtoona,
Pa William Mollo
Crofton, Ki . Don
Sweeting olhapel Hill
and lames 1 ippit! from
Washignton, D.
rwo transfers also
should give a big boost
to the Pirate golf
squad. Helmick said.
1 eonard 1 ox comes
from a Philadelphia
minor college that com-
peted in the nationals
las! yeai
( rmi i ng t o t he
Pirates from national
powei 1 ouisiana State
is junior Don Gafnei
"Wo expect him to be
one of our top three
goiters Helmick said.
One problem. thou
Gafnei will miss the fall
season as he bec
eligible onl following
the first sen
dek
�'1 got to London at
about noon and had to
run at 9 o'clock that
night. Everything was
kind o pushy and 1
never got a chance to
recuperate. 1 didn't
even have time to think
about it.
"But, 1 ran in that
meet and did well he
admits. "1 finished
third behind Don
Quarry, the 1976 Olym-
pic champion, and one
'o his teammates
Melvin recorded
ihree second place
finishes in the seven-
meet tour through Nor-
wav, Italy, France,
England and other
western European
countries.
savs
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Present this coupon and show your ECU ID
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16
I HI EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 26, 1980
Anthorn Collins Forge Yardage
Pirates Seek
Floor Leader
U 1n Dul'KH
. I
to: a
i ad . olleyball
� of ihe
; ta
,
: new
1
find
ea i �
epi .
im
ouisbui -�: c oUege in
I or bes
ap-
:
: '
k p i�s i
irrell
in hei

Burrell
offense
fen-
two
-hip
P a 11 i
homore
Dianne I �und
� of
W esl
i High School
12 record
� - lour
ci pat ion,
. - as a
irtei eai ! in
i sclV -
Pirates'
a
lifoi m
lion
to the ECU lineup.
headed by senior All-
State candidate Sharon
Perry. Perry, another
ansfer from
1 ouisburg, is the Bucs'
'allest player at 5-9 and
one of the strongest hit-
ters
Seni or 1 oreti a
H olden and
sophomores Stacj
V enel and Miti
Davis round out rhe list
etui ning stai tei s
Holden. the team's
onh southpaw spiker,
saw limited action on
defense a yeai ago but
will be counted on as an
all-around performei.
Da � earned Most
aluable Player honors
in liri tor excelling on
defense and passing,
while Weitzel is listed
as a strong hitter and
solid defensive player.
Rounding out the
curreni roster is
soph om ore Gi nger
Rothermel and
f r e shmen Lex ann e
Keeter and Revardale
1 a ant.
Rothermel joins ih
team alter a successfn
tour ol dut at second
base tor Dillon's
regional champion
sottball team. Both
Keeter and I a ant will
be used primaril) on
� tense.
" e've got to scrap-
py on defense to make
up for our lack of
height said Dillon.
"That's going to have
to be our savior. The
game of volleyball is
like anv other sport in
that what you lack in
one particular aspect ol
the game you can make
up for in another.
' 'Offensive! we
have a couple of op-
tions, but 1 think we'll
stick with our 5-1 ap-
proach. We're going to
hae to be quick offen-
sily.
I he Lad Pirates
have only tout home
matches on their slate
along with the third an-
nual ECU ln itational
1 i'ii rnament. but
Hi lion prefers I he
rigorous road schedule
over a home schedule
against less competitive
opponants.
"I'd just as soon be
20-22 with this kind o
tough schedule says
Dillon. " I he type of
schedule we have helps
w ith rei i uiting because
girls see that the) will
be playing against the
best teams It also helps
keep the girls working
hard 'ore's a
challenging team that
thev have to get up
for
I he I dd Bucs will
travel to tournaments
at N.C. State. South
i arolina, Francis
Marion and Maryland
before preparing lor
the N(. MAW Tourna-
ment in Raleigh No
14 iv
'Kll I - � VR��! V
1 : � � � v it i 1
M HI IH I t
Sept. I" at c State;
20 .it ppalachian Mate.
2f- 27 at State Invita-
nal in lamenl.
Oct. 1 1)1 Kl i 4 ai
South i. arolina Invitational
1 out namenl; 8 N i
STATL; 10-11 ai I rancis
Mar ion ln itational I ourna-
men t; 14 N()RI M
K()1 INA; 17 1'
PALACH1AN STATt;
17-18 EAST CAROLINA
IN VIT A TI ON A1 II K
N AMI N I . 24-25 at
Maryland hHiUiihMi.il Iiur
namenl. 2s at Duke;
Nov 6 at North
i arolina. 11 at Pembroke
State (1 rancis Marion); 14-15
a: N( l W State lour
namenl. Raleigh; 21
al
�1 W Region II rourna
mem
AC
1,000-Yard Rusher From
1979 Returns For Finale
By JIMMY DnPREE
Wisiani Spurt Idilor
Prior to the 1979 football season, a running
back by the name of Anthony Collins was
recognized by Pirate fans as the other guy in the
backfield with standouts Eddie Hicks, Theodore
Sutton and Leander Green.
Hicks and Green have graduated and Sutton
returns for his final season after another steady
performance a year ago, but the star of the 1979
backfield returns in the person of Anthony Col-
lins.
Collins, a native of Penn Yan, N.Y ranked
among NCAA leaders in yards per carry
throughout the season and finished with a 7.3
average. The senior speedster netted 1,130 vards
on 154 carries while crossing the goal line 14 times
for Pat Dye's final Pirate squad.
What does a three-year veteran of the wishbone
offense worry about when the coaches close simp
and the future is uncertain?
"When I first heard Coach Dye was leaving, I
was really worried that whoever came in might
change the offense admits Collins. " oach
(Wright) Anderson has coached wishbone for
vears. He was here when Coach Dye put in the
wishbone, so he has had plenty o experience
"They changed little things like techniques, but
the approach is still the same
Collins confesses he has set the 1,000-yard bar-
rier as one of his personal goals, but many skep
tics believe Pirate ballhandlers will find yardage
on the ground hard to come bv due to the loss ol
most of the front line.
last Carolina stacked up strong in rhe trenches
in 1979 with the front line o tackles Matt
Mullholland and Joe Godette, guards Mitchell
Johnston and Wayne lnnian and center Jefl
Hagans.
Unfortunately for Collins and the remainder of
the running corps, only All-American Inman
returns to open vita! holes. But nonetheless. Col
lms has confidance in the new edition ol the ol
tensive wall.
Junior Fee Griffin is hkelv to till the vacancj at
left guard, while senior Tootie Robbm- and
sophomore Oscar Tyson are top candidates at
tackle. Juniors Todd Hensley and Billy Parker
lead the field for Hagan's center slot.
"Those are all names nobody has ever heard
of savs Collins. "But they were in and out of
games all year. 1 have the same confidance in this
line that I had in the line last year.
'They are not as big as the guys we had last
year, but they have the same heart; the same
character
The void left by the graduation of speedy
veteran quarterback l.eander Green has been a
major question mark, but sophomore Carlton
Nelson has stepped in as the leading candidate.
5 "Carlton is a super athlete says Collins
"He's a better passer right now than I eander
was. We'll probably be doing more passing than
we did last year
Should Collins need a rest during the rigorous
schedule the Pirates will face, juniors Harold
Blue and Roy Wiley will be called on for their
running talents.
"Our underclassmen, especially Roy and
Harold, are as good as any of us (starters) said
Collins. "They could probably start for a lot of
the better teams, anyway
Collins is billed as the outside threat, with
powerful Sutton acclaimed as the inside carrier.
"I don't run inside as much as he does, and he
doesn't run outside as much as I do Collins
said. " I hat's just the way the plavs arc designed.
"What people don't realize is that Toad
(Sutton) has exceptional speed and is effective
outside, and 1 think I can run inside as well
I earn goals lor the coming season, according
to Collins, are to win every game and try to repeat
as the number one rushing team in the nation.
"We really ejoyed that honor last year and I
think we have the potential to do it again he
savs enthusiastically. "I think we can beat any
team on our schedule.
"Right now. we're concentrating everything on
healing Duke (Sept. 6). That game really hurl our
pride lasl vear. I've relived that fumble I made on
the goal line over and over.
"It we're not ready tor any other team, we'll be
readv tor Duke "
Critics aigue mat with a new offensive line and
quarterback, as well as a new coaching stall. i
( arolina University football tans may be in to; ;i
long and disappointing season. But with talented
speedster Anthony c olhns in the backfield, tl
will plenty of open field excitement throughout
the season
Steers Resigns
As Mat Head
last Carolina wrestl
ing coach Ed Steers an-
nounced his resignation
for the post last 1 rida
and said he has ac
cepted the head wrestl-
ing job at the U.S.
Military Academy at
West Point. N.Y.
"My wile and I did
not want to leave
Greenville and last
C arolina1 Steers said,
"but we tell this oppor
tunny in my career was
just too great to turn
down I he recruiting
budget and operating
budget at West Point is
just super.
"1 feel Last Carolina
will continue to develop
a strong program he
continued. " I here is
great potential here
Steers joined the Easi
C arolina program just
one vear ago alter five
successful seasons at
W illiam and Marv IT
i in medial civ turned
around what had b
a dormant team
vear earlier into
squad resembling the
old EC I powerhouse
wrestling teams o the
late 60's and ea
"We at 1
C arolina very m .
hate to see a coacl
I d Steers' caliber le
our program
new Pirate thlei
Director Dr ken, k,
"At the same tim
give 1 d a big pal
bak as he leaves
pursue vet an
challenge in his c i
rhe move to W
Point is obviously
credit to Ed and a. n
tor ward
karr said tl
hoped a succe
Steers could be c!
almost immed �
Course in
Wtchovia
An easy course in applied economics
that could win you twenty bucks
worth of free food from McDonald's.
1979 Volleyball Action
It's the easiest course you'll take all year.
All you have to do is show up at Wachovia's
University Office at 802 East 10th Street, any
time between now and September 8. We'll show
you how7 Teller II works and demonstrate all the
many tilings it can do for you wliile you're here
at ECU.
You'll learn a lot.
You'll learn how you can get cash from your
checking or savings account, 24 hours a day.
How to make deposits or payments. How to get
a balance on your accounts. How to get Fast
Cash - $20 from your checking account with just
one push of a button. How to transfer money
from one account to another. And how to get
money from your MasterCard v balance.
Teller II does it all.
And maybe win $20
worth of free food from McDonald's.
WTiile you're there, be sure and register for one
of the five McDonald's gift certificates wTe'll be
giving away at 4:30 pm on September 8. That's
$20 worth of free hamburgers, shakes and fries
with your name on them.
It'll only take about
10 minutes to pass the course.
So stop by Wachovia's University Office before
4:30 on September 8 for your demonstration.
You'll be glad you did.
Wachovia
Bank&Trust
Em





I Ht i su -k(�l ! N
t .l s
17
rom
ale
ne a,id
� I asi
'� a
i!en ted
. there
igns
ead
He
ned
been
earn one
1 a
the
� the
"O's
ea v e
said
etic
cnK
ve
the
to
her
eer.
Wesi
.
o v e
he
tot
� chosen
itelv
1CS
it
s.
tion.
Member F I11 C
Emory has been through much in short time
' nued from p 13
' 'or his hiring,
oi had to bring in a
stafl I hough he came
up with one tie liked
well, it soon began to
disband "We've had
� coaches leave foi
tei jobs he ex-
plained. "1 hat's whai
happens when you hue
good people. You i un
the risk oi losing
them
Mtei filling in the
aching ,i, a
iieu and complex pro
m came to 1 mory's
attention. In pril, the
Greenville Police
Depai tment conducted
a mass drug raid ol
iI campus. (me ol
t hose an ested v� as
Pirate stai linebackei
leffi e W ai ten.
("harged w ii h posses
sion ot marijuana,
ai ten claimed in
� cence, but faced ti ial
1 left his coach ith
a most difficult situa
lion.
I ha! situation, oo
has begun to look bet-
� " I moiv and the
it iftei a long,
hai d sti uggle. " Jet! re
ecu found inno-
: : ol one chai ge
iach said. "He has
thei misdemeanoi
i me np in court.
I hings look good foi
n, though, and he
will be a pan ol the
cam this
ith the W ai ten
. it ion finalh behind
in now , 1 moi
simplv look to pro
c : i e s t
! I
fter a I 98i I
Bowl partici-
i da State,
Bo a va inner
though, has crept into
the life t 1 mor) thai
piobabK gives him
ulcei s 1 heodore Sut
ton, the team's leading
rusher in 1978 and se
cond leading i ushei last
season, ma be inehgi
hie for the club's
openei with Duke on
sept 6.
1 he Blue Devils ma
h.ne found a wa) to
keep but l fullback out
ol the contest
"IK re was hurt in
his fji si ja vee game in
76 Hmorj said
"C oach l)e the got a
hardship tor him, giv-
ing him foui more
vears ol eligibility
left
I he rules sj
that hardship can be
granted it the player is
injured in the first halt
ol the season and has
played no more than
two g -i m e s.
1 etthing's oka then
right?
Not really. SuttorTs
injury came in the
jay vee opener. ol
course. But that openei
came alter the first halt
ol the ars!i season
had past.
" l he NCAA rule
book does not vn
whether the rule ap
plied to the jayvee or
xarsit season Emory
said. "It Duke pushes
the matter, there will
have to be a ruling b
the NCAA eligibility
committee
I he reason a ruling
may occur is because
the Pirates and Blue
Devils have it in their
contract thai only
players eligible for
championship competi-
tion (such as bowl
games) are eligible tor
the Duk- I:( I mat-
chup.
Should the NCAA
rule that Sutton is in-
eligible for champion-
ship c o m p e t i t i o n
because of the time of
his injury, he would
then be just as ineligible
tor the Duke game,
though he would be
allowed to play in the
other ten regular season
games
With all this on his
mind Emory still has to
prepare a young and in-
experienced squad for a
tough season.
Among the major
problems. Emory said,
is at quarterback and
the offensive line. 1 ast
year's star QB. I candor
Green, has graduated
and all that is left is a
group of interested
sophomores and
freshmen. On the line.
only one starter, All-
American guard Wayne
Inman, returns.
That makes it
tough on us he said.
"I would be okay it we
had an experienced line
and a rookie quarter-
back or an experienced
quarterback and a
rookie line. But we
have both. If the line
doesn't perform the
v oung quarterb a c k
(probably Carlton
Nelson o Portsmouth.
Va.) won't gain con-
fidence. It the quarter-
back doesn't perform,
the line loses con-
fidence
Emory looks on the
bright side though.
"The biggest thing is
that the talent is
there he said. "It's
just that that talent has
never lined up in front
o 50.IKK) fans.
"That's what makes through so far, you can
football so in bet Emory is expecting
teresting he con- the unexpected
tinned. "You get to see ���������
how a young man will
react under pressure.
I'm excited about fin-
ding out what's going
to happen
w h -til he has been
N o r i
i
1979
N( Division I
lion I astei n ken-
am N. St
ii muh won ies
LUITS
TRADING CO.
Welcomes Back ECU Students
Featuring:
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m Tyter
1
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wine and cheese shop
The
More-Than-Wine-and-
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Delicious imported and domestic
cheeses, tasty biscuits and crackers,
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Ask About Our Party Trays and
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10a.m. Until 9p.m.
Phone 756-B-E-L-K(756-2355)
Fosdick's
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Every night from 5 till closinr we will feature
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18
THE HAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 26, 1980
New AD Karr
Sets New Goals
B CHARLES CHANDLER
Now that the moving-in process is over, the
work of working on an entire athletic program
has come to the forefront of the attention of new
I CU Athletic Director Dr. Kenneth Karr.
Karr, who took over tor the resigned Bill Cain
on August 1. said that the opportunities ahead of
him and his new university were challenging yet
enticing.
"I'm ei happy and excited to he here he
said "1 feel this affords me a real challenge. It's a
good administrative opportunity
Karr, who served as D at San Diego State
from 1969-79, expressed pleasure with the qulity
ot people that will work under him. "I'm tremen-
dousl) impressed wit) the quality of coaches and
supporting staff members he said. "There is
obviously a wealth ot dedicated and talented peo-
ple here
1 hough he is happy with his aides, Karr did
name a numbei ot areas which he hopes some im-
provements can be made. "Presently, we're ver
much in a catch-up role he said. "Our first con-
cern, though, is to get the total department func-
tioning as an efficient unit. An important concern
also is to attempt to put the total program on a
sound fiscal basis
Kan went on to say that any big changes in the
athletic department would come only after the
completion of a total departmental evaluation
process, which is presently in progress.
Kan, who turned things around at San Diego
state from an average Division 11 program to a
strong Division 1 program, has his share ot goals
foi the ECU department. Main o' those goals
concern areas that most Pirate fans are interested
in that of football scheduling and the total
athletic budget.
Ot the scheduleing, Karr said he had hopes opt
continuing and improving some ot the resent ties
and creating new onews. "As we look to the
future he said, "our number one priori! is to
continue the present relationships with the Big
Four schools in as main sports as possible.
"Beyond that he continued, "and particular
iv in football, we will attempt to schedule more
people in the top 1(H) schools of Division 1
()! the athletic budget. Karr said that he had lit
tie to do with the budget for the upcoming season
due to his late arrival but that he would make
some changes in the future.
Basically, the budge! for 'SO-SI was set b
campus personnel prior to my arrival he said.
"We will function as closely and effectively as we
can under those guidelines. AS we project into
'8182 I'll have the opportunity to have a far
greater influence on the formation of the budget.
1 here will be some changes.
"In essence Kan continued, "this budget
doesn't reflect Ken Karr. Future budgets will, in
all probability
Kair speaks sternly and has earned the respect
ot the entire athletic department. The halls ot
Minges C oliseum hum when his name is mention
ed.
Dr. Kenneth Karr
1 hough he senses the respect he receives. Karr
knows why it comes his way. "I've been fortunate
enough to work with a number of different in-
stitutions he said. "I hat gives me a broad base
ot experience to bring to this particular situation.
I'm just happy to have the opportunity to
hopefully affect some solutions to some o the
problems here.
Indeed, Karr's credentials are impressive. Dur-
ing his decade as D at San Diego State the Aztec
athletic rogram increased greatlv in stature. A
Division II school when he took over in 1969,
San Diego Sate was in Division 1 and ranked in
the top 20 in football by 1977.
lor two of the last five seasons, the Atec
basketball team competed in the Western
Regional ot the NCAA Championship Tourna-
ment 1 he baseball team has averaged 45 wins
over the las! four seasons and the women's pro-
gram has improved markedly.
Karr was also involved in some sidebar acv-
tivities during his days at San Diego State. He was
instrumental in obtaining NCAA sanction for the
post season II tliday ! wl and since 1975 has
been on the N( AA Division I Basketball Com-
mittee, to name only a tew ot the main outside
acti ities.
V the announcement ot his hiring. ECU
Chancellor "homas Brewer was jubilant. "We
are extremely pleased that a man with the stature
arid experiecne ot Dr. Ken Karr will be providing
the leadership to carrv an already fine athletic
program to even greater levels of quality and
achievement Brewer said. "When we began
taking applications Ken Karr clearly and quickly
emerged as the most gifted and to lead the pro-
gram. We are extremely blessed
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mt EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST26. 1980
11
nt
lit
Student Speaks
Out On Athletics
Bditors's Note: The
? allowing is the
response of Ashland
College student Ken
h Murphy on behalf
nine shland
tdents who were tn-
ted into the col-
lect 5 Robert
Brownson Student-
Xthlete Honor Society
s year.
1 relly appreciate this
opportunity to stand
before you representing
the student-athletes of
1980 and to reflect on
what the last tour years
,i Ashland College
have meant to me and
to express my own per-
sonal feeling on what
involvement in athletics
on the college level has
meant.
1 h r o u g h o u t a n
athlete's career, the
question often arises as
to whether his or her
dedication is worth it.
We are all aware that
sporting competition
provides exercise, tun
and an outlet to direct
our attention from
more serious subjects.
However, competi-
tion on the varsitv level
involves more than
pickup games or show-
ing up once a week tor
a son ball game. The
time and work required
�o be a member of a
varsity team place
numerous mental and
physical demand on a
person. Ana iien that
person happens to be a
student enrolled in col-
lec ' re
intensil led.
1 think back to when
1 was a young child,
around eight or 10
years old. 1 he question
of mv devotion to
athletics arose quite
frequently. 1 had the
opportunit) to spend a
great deal ot tune with
m g r a nd m other,
whom I admire, love,
and from whom I have
learned many a lesson;
but one thing we could
never see eye-to-eye on
was my involvement
and interest in sports.
1 ookmg out for my
best interests, grand-
mother felt the physical
demands o sports far
outweighed an y
benefits that could be
derived from simple
games. Being very ap-
preciative of music, she
thought it would be
more appropriate for
me to be banging on a
piano rather than bang-
ing into people.
So the question
arose. Whv sports'? In
my case, why football?
And, finally, where
would it get me? At
that time, 1 couldn't
answer with more than,
"Why? Because it's
tun and "Where will
it get me? To the pros,
o course
Y ell, now I'm
prepared to address
those questions in a
somewhat different
manner.
1 irst, 1 believe the
people one meets
through involvement in
athletics are the best
around. Individuals
vuch as the people in
this very room � the
athletes, the coaches
and those who have
supported us, our
parents and friends. No
value can be placed on
the camaraderie that
exists in the world o
sports. That alone had
made it well worth mv
hile
I hen there ate those
great intangibles that
you have
c o a c h e s
t h le t i c s
chara c t e t
dedication,
heard all
m e n 11 o n :
builds
requires
discipline
and in t e g r 11 v and
develops a sense of
responsiblity. All this
sounds good, and 1 was
prepared to tell you
that college athletics
can do all these things
when an article ap-
peared in a recent
Sports Illustrated that
made me begin to
think. In fact, it was
the cover story and
read like this: "The
Shame of American
Education: The
Student-Athlete
Hoax
The article deals with
circumstances such as
transcript alterations
and other violations
that do not exist on the
small-college level. But
the point is if athletics
builds character and
does all these wonder-
ful things as we have
been led to believe,
then how can such
atrocities occur? And
how can they be com-
mittted by the very peo-
ple who sing the praises
of athletics, the
coaches?
Furthermore, it
should upset us to see a
statement such as the
one by the article's
author, John Under-
wood:
The rash of
phony transcripts and
academic cheating
spells out the fact that
athletics are now an
abomination to the
ideals of higher educa-
tion
In actuality, athletics
should exemplify the
ideals of higher educa-
tion, as our gathering
here today
demonstrates.
So now I'm faced
with this conflict. Can 1
tell mv grandmother
that sports are
beneficial and have
been good for me or
should 1 tell her that 1
should have stuck with
the piano way back
when I was first advis-
ed ?
I have finally realized
that, in fact, athletics
does not b u I d
character, nor does it
make a person more
responsible or disciplin-
ed or anything else.
Those qualities have to
come from within one's
self. Athletes can mere-
ly help to bring those
qualities to the surface.
When those qualities
do surface, it is the in-
dividual's duty to apply
them to every facet o
his or her life.
Although athletic in-
volvement never will be
considered a prerequi-
site for success, the
same intangible
qualities required for
success in sports are
also prerequisites for
success in almost any
other endeavor.
The problem is that
sometimes the athletes
and coaches do not ap
ply the same standards
they have toward their
sport to other areas of
their lives and in par-
ticular to academics.
I he true student-
athlete will realize that
athletics and academics
should complement one
another, not work in
opposition, and that
the ingredients for
achievement in both
areas are inter-
changeable. As a result,
the student-athlete can
bring honor, not
shame, to the institu-
tion he or she attends.
So, as 1 reflect on the
last four years and ask
myself, "Was it worth
it? the reply is an em-
phatic "yes College
athletics and Ashland
College have given me
the opportunity to
develop and let these
qualities surface. So,
v e s, grand m othei ,
sports have been good
for me, and where has
it gotten me? Well, it
had put me right here in
the midst ot all these
quality people, lor
this, 1 always will be
grateful
Attic Enters 1 Oth Year
Greenville has the distinction of housing the No. 6 live rock night club in the South:
The Attic, located at 103 E. Fourth St. For nine years, quality and diversification in
music has been the Attic's goal.
Last year the Attic presented 92 different bands to its customers, more than any other
club in a three state area. Such nationally famous names as Wet Willie, Griderswitch,
Black Oak Arkansas, Amazing Rhythm Aces, Savoy Brown, Sea Level, Stillwater, The
Romantics, Dixie Dregs, Nantucket,and Louisiana's Le Roux have all performed upon
the Attic's stage in just the past yrar. Regional favorites such as Brice St Super Grit,
Nighthawks, Fat Ammons, Tain't, The Eaze, Choice, The Pedestrians, Jesse Boit,
Badge, and Suffer s Gold regularly fill the Attic to capacity. In addition to the whole
spectrum of live rock music including album rock, country rock, southern, show, blues,
fusion, jazz, and New Wave, the Attic also offers a large dance floor and your favorite
beverages at easy to swallow prices. Pinball and footsball are also available. The Attic,
who introduced footsball to Greenville in 1972, has hosted the N.C. State Footsball Cham
pionship for the past two years.
Located in the back room of the Attic is the Phoenix Room which presents live music
specializing in Blues, Jazz, and Fusion Rock on Tuesday nights. The Phoenix also offers
a 7 ff TV Screen showing selected live and recorded musical acts and sports events and
is open to Attic customers on most nights of the week.
Tom Haines and Stewart Campbell, managers of the Attic, feel that the clubs
downtown are important to most of the students at ECU because they fill a void in the
students' curriculum. It provides them with an alternative to work and study: a place to
relax, unwind, and socialize. "After a big test, a long term paper, or a grueling
academic week, nothing beats a cold one, a large crowd, an accomodating date and good
band - all readily available at the Attic
As Chip Gwynn (Staff Writer) said in a past article in this paper, "The Attic seems to
have reached a certain plateau of success. It has remained a favorite nightspot of
students for several years and has remained successful because students know the Attic
is going to book good entertainment, even if they have never heard of the performing
band " Open seven days a week, the Attic's low cover charge (generally $12), student
oriented specials and Friday "Afternoon Delights" make it a favorite gathering place
for ECU students.
SAT. AUG.30th
A&M Recording Artist
TORONTO
&
Epic Recording Artist
The Young Invaders
THUR. SEPT.4th
Ovation Recording Artists
R0BBM THOMPSON
ATTIC
WED. SEPT. 10th
Mercury Recording Artists
The No.6
South's Rock Club
TUES: BRICE S I .
WED: SIDEWINDER
THURS: SIDEWINDER
FRI: YOUNG INVADERS
S
F
Pizza lull
WELCOME BACK
ECU
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ALL THE PIZZA AND
SALAD YOU CAST EAT
$2.59
MonI ri. 11:30-2:00
Mon. & Tues.
6:00-8:00
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758-8266 Hwy �64 Bypass Greenville, N.C.
�PEPSPPEPSICOI.V AND CATCH THAT PEPSI SPIRITARE REGISTERED TRADEMARKS OF PEPSICO. INC.
ICHASE. N.Y.





20
1 hi SI CARPI 1NIAN
AUCil SI
t
Odom Confident
Despite Youth
Spill Iv I Jlll
"I think that rookie
stuff is ovcrtdone a lit-
tle hit
likeh story. Alter
all, uhai would you ex-
I eel from a basketball
coach who returns only
' ur players from last
ison's 12-man squad.
dd to that thefact that
,ie ol the tour
returnees are guards
i you'd have to have
I jith in roolies.
1 his is exactly the
uatio that last
I arolina cage coach
Dave Odom tinds
rtself in as he looks
the 1980-81 season,
i ve seniors graduated
ve.u and three
hers left foi various
isons, leaving the
I' rates with seven in-
ning recruits that
v ill be counted upon
avily.
Returning are centers
m Szymanski and
Mike (obson along
th forwards Dave
I nderwood and Mark
Mel aurin. Ihe five
io graduated were
iding scorer George
iav nor. I eading re
1 'under Herb Cirav.
� ps hooter Herb
Krusen and two top
serves in Kvle Powers
d 1 rank Hobson.
I our guards were set
to return to the Pirates
for the upcoming
season but none made
it back. 1 ast veat
starting point man,
Tony Byles, left school
due to personal pro-
blems while Raymond
1 vson, Bryant iggins
and Quail Roseboro
lefl with academic dil
ficulties.
Ihe i n c o ming
back c ours m en ,
therefore, are the entire
backcourt. Ihey in-
clude Herbert Gilchri it,
an -Ml State performer
from 1 illington; Mike
I ox from Raleigh;
Mike Bledshoe from
Cars ; and Ha. rr
Wright from Port
smouth, Va.
The frontcourt
newcomers include
center .left Be si from
Pikeville: forward Bill
McNair from Dunn.
(who was quite im
pressive in the I ast
West All Star Game in
July as he scored 15
points) and forward
Morris Hargrove from
Southern Pines
"Obv ioush we could
well be the youngesl
team in the country
()dom said realistically.
" Ihe bulk of oui roster
are new . mexpener.
euys
Adding to the inex
peiience, Odom said, is
the tact that returning
(.enter lorn Szymanski
is "totally untested
I hat leaves Gibson,
I nder w ood a nd
Mc Laurin, a nd as
(Kiom sav s, none of
them were game-to-
game starters a yeai
ago.
I lungs will be dif-
ferent h' those let-
ter nun this time
around, though, said
the second-vear Pirate
head man ' 1 hey all
m u s t c ont ribul e
mote he said. "1 hen
contributions are just
much more important
this yeai
I he Pirate
backcourt, totally new
and untried, could be
better than main might
suspect. (dom said.
" AI e ng out
summer
he claimed, "I'm very
pleased lhev'ie all
a nd
runn
athletic talent. 1 hey
also seem to have good
quickness and savvy
Odom said that he
knew not what to ex-
pect as far as a record
tor the upcoming
season, but that he did
expect the club to be
competitive. "Heck
he said, "this may be ,
totally rebuilding year.
I hope not and I don't
think it will be. I wil
sav that I don't expeel a
step backwards. I think
it's reasonable tor us to
shoot for a winning
season
Some might considei
that quite a n a c
complishmeni con
sidering the numerous
tough away games the
Pirates will face. Trips
io Duke. N.C. State,
l N c harlotte, ok
Dominion and Illinois
Slate do! the slate tha
gets underway Nov. 29
when the Pirates trave
io Vthens, Ohio to face
Ohio I Iniversity
Mon � Fri 4 AM to 11:30 AM
Student Special � 2 pancakes,
2 eggs, meat, coffee� $1.75
MONDAY - FRIDAY
11 AM to 7 PM
Chicken Special
with fries & Slaw $1.49
Hamburger Plate
with lettuce & tomato
& fries $1.20
lumpei
ii
Magazine
Predicts
Grid Mark
Girls' Try outs
Are Announced
Girls interested in
:n tryouts tor the
so Lady Pirate
Hey ball team or serv-
a s managers,
riould get in contact
with head coach Alita
Dillon or assistant
I ynn Davidson in
oom 162 of Minges
� oliseum, or b calling
6161 Irvouts will
conducted at 5p.m.
I uesdav and Wednes-
day.
Curls desiring to
trvout tor the I t t
w omens basketball
team should contact
head coach Cathy An
drui in IfS Minges
Coliseum, or call
757-6384. The 1 ady
Pirates also have open
ings for managers tor
the coming season.
I lie 1 asl arolina
til Pirates have
bet - ed io finish
ieason
i 6-4-1 slate by
Streel ami smith's Of-
ficial IVNOollege
Football Yearbook, a
well r e s p e c t ed
thai
;�� h lied a n nually
prioi to the collegiate
gridiroi season
rhe publicat ion rates
ea h majoi college
he season ans
1 � two ol the Pu ate's
f(cs. Noith arolina
and 1 lorida State, pick-
ed to finish the year at
Ihe Pirates are rated
underdogs to the abo t
two squads, as well as
to Duke and N.
State I he Pirates'
game with Miami is
rated a toss-up
Head Coach
1 mory s first ECl
squad is favored in
h ome games with
S uthwest 1 ouisiana,
Southern Mississipi,
Western Carolina.
W illiam and 1ar and
Eastern Kentucky. Ihe
Pirates are also picked
to down Richmond on
the road.
SAM
hu
STUDENT WEEKLY
SAVINGS PLAN
CLIPCOUPONS
BELOW AND SAVE
EVERYWEEK
FOR FOUR WEEKS
Hot Sam Pretzels
Carolina East Mall
This coupon good fo
Buy One Pretze
Get One for 5C
Offer expires Sept 23, 1980
Not combinable with any
other offe
This coupon good for
Buy One PretzelJ I
Get One FREEj
ffer Expires Sept 9 1980-
Not combinable with any� �
other offer I K
IHtHMIieDwlhli
1
This coupon good fo
Buy Any SizeB
Soft Drink, GetfJ
One Pretzel FREE-j
er expires Sept 16, 1980�
Not combinable with any
other offer.H
���������
This coupon good tor I
One Hot Sam"j
Pretzel for 5C�
er expires Sept. 30, 1980 �
Not combinable with any
other offer. j
Blllllllrf
AT FIRST STATE BANK YOU'RE
MORE THAN "JUST A FACE
I fJ f fl tc 1 �mAl � Standing in line is part of every student's life. Just like
I J � � V W w Lw � making neu friends, going neu. plac es. getting used to
your new. hometown! At First State Bank you're more
than just a face in a line. . and ue want you to knou it
FIRST STATE BANK HAS A BETTER
WAY OF BANKING. . . JUST FOR YOU
There are a lot of reasons to c house a bank
. . . bank locations. . special services. . . free checking
. . . and of course. I irst Stite Bank offers all of this to
you.
THERE IS A BETTER WAY OF BANKING
FIRST STATE CLUB
Better than free c hec king!
Our club ace mint is a spec ial pac kage of banking services
designed just for you. For one low monthly fee you get
such services as no minimum balance checking. . . at
tractive club checks. . . accidental death insurance. . .
special discount coupons (good at local merchants and
theatres) and 24 hour BankAround!
YOU MAY NEVER HAVE TO STAND IN LINE AGAIN!
Now you tan handle your banking 24 hours a day. every
day with a First State BankAround card. You can use
your card at both BankAround locations in Greenville or
at any BankAround interchange location in North or
South Carolina. All at no charge to you!
PLUS WE HAVE SATURDAY MORNING
BANKING AT OUR WINTERVILLE OFFICE
No other bank in town offers a better banking bargain or
lower costs. The hometown bank wants you to feel right
at home. . . friendly servic e. . lower costs. . . better
banking.
It's worth changing banks for.
THE HOMETOWN BANK INVITES YOU TO
ITS DOWNTOWN OFFICE ON THE MALL
FOR REFRESHMENTS AND AN OPPORTUNI
TY TO VISIT YOUR HOMETOWN BANKER
No matter which banking plan you choose. . . student
checking. . . or our regular club account. . . you won't
find a better way of banking!
First State Bank
"THE HOMETOWN BANK 756-2427
Downtown branch. Corner of
3rd and Evans. 3 blocks from
campus.
Northwest branch: Memorial
Drive, across from hospital
complex.
Greenville branch: Memorial
Drive, beside Parkers
Barbecue.
vVinferville office: Main St.
Winterville.
Member FDIC





lOHCharlesSL 752 1373
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Now with
second
location
To serve you
105 Airport;
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&�
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MENU
BISCUITS
Ham99
Sausage99
Steak1.59
Chicken1.59
Cheddar Cheese79
Fried Egg79
Plain30
Buttered40
Ham Cheese1.39
Sausage Cheese1.39
Steak Cheese1.89
Chicken Cheese1.89
Ham Egg1.39
Sausage Egg1.39
CHICKEN
2 Pc. Dinner.
3 Pc. Dinner.
SPECIALS
One Piece Special99
Two Piece Dark 1.59
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Three Wings1.59
Chicken N Gravy Biscuit 149
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One Rib Snack
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FEATURING
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24
HI hASr k� '1 IM W
l lil'Nl
Lady Pirates Face Killer Slate
H JIMMN IU I'Kll
-�- ,
f t e i i u s t two
seasons ai the helm ol
the I ad Pirate basket
ball squad,ath -n
m I face
the tot
an
lime cope ith oi e ol
the toughest scheduler
the nation
1 he 1979 �
marked the
a new all time
SCO
t:C L ; R
1 mpson. Bui
M ints Creel
ow I in
hi
Iowa - oi onets ol
Women' Pi

-
on I 11
u
K
Sht doe
kath K .

in nu followed
1 hompson in the final
N l st its b a
le p Rile
urns with a pro
Olympu in out
belt.
I (. I the
season No 23 in
1 Coliseum
nia rech
� cd b .i
I'hanl trip to
-
Pi ites' next
be the
easi
y I a n w ith two
impion
1 ad M olM ld

Bucs will
the
i C lassii
I ! ��
Dec.
C o 11
nameni ec.
1 c I stai is the new
I ' llorii .
S md I loi uia
State 1 he Pirates will
have five days to
prepare foi theii an
nual showdown with
tru I M 1 at Heels at
c a ' in i c li a e 1
uditortum
ithin a pei iod ol
two weeks, las!
(. ai olina will host N.C
State, Southernal,
ppalachian State and
I N( Chapel H II.
along with a road trip
to powei! ul I as! 1 en
lies see and p
palachian stale.
P ites Jose out
the season against N (
State in Raleigh and the
finale I ebi uar 2 at
h om e wit h W a k e
i o r
' ui home schedule
is evscllan says n
,i. �� This has he i
a ital part ol the plans
i came here. It's
i fan could want;
11' - certain! the
toughest we've evei
had
"It's important foi
national recognition
that you have a tough
schedule
1I will siill have lo
relv on speed and hustle
to ov ei come the lac k ol
height, but iniiu.vi
added forwards Sam
lone- and I isa 1 ennell
along wnil guardaien
11 uske to the i ostei
I ones, a 5-9
southpaw i ransfei from
I ouisburg, comes w nh
impressive credentials
hoih m college and al
S iuthei n W av ne 1 lij
School.
1 en nell
characi I b
new coach as having
Ljtikk hands and "an
unorthodox shot that
nisi goes in the hoop
1 he Goldsboro II;
produt l ' ecentlv led her
I ast squad in scoi ing in
the annual 1 as! ,
Ml Si ii game.
Sen oi guards I ydia
k �unt i ee and 1 aui ie
Sikes and centei Marcia
(. iirv en retui n from the
starting lineup ol the
1979 80 unit w Inch
posted a 2 I 10 mark foi
iheii final campaign in
the purple and gold
Senioi 1 leidi ()wen and
sop h om oi e Mary
Denklei return a- the
iop reserv es.
IVXll-HI I sl KOI ISA
WOMI N'SBASM IBM I
s( HI IM I I
No 2? VIRGINIA
lit H; 28 at Queen i ol-
2y at w agnci ol
Dec 3 OLD DOM I
. IN; H I MPBI I I .
- ;u .i � .ii ol ina
slmas I oui ne. 2 24 �
ai Q leei i allege 1 ourney .
at ! lorida; 6 al
Su � K .ii iorida Mate;
at North arolina; 1"
WI1.LI M v M K1 . 1
DUKE; 21 WES1
MRCilNIA; 24 at lames
Madison; 25 al irginia;
N STATE ; 30
si 11 I HI RN M link
M
1 l'
I'M Hi AN STAT1 . 5
N IRTH R H INA; "
at p
State; 10 al
l w ion; 18 al
t State; 2' w KI
(ORlSl
Marcia Girven Squares To Shoo!
Tickets9
Sale Dales
Announced
rickets foi la
Carol ina' " '
opener with I)uke .
now on sale in I lie I I
ticket office in 1
C oliseum and those
latet Pirate garni
rivals Not th Cai
and Stai
on sale soon
Student ti 1
Dul
5 ' apiece
mav purcl i
ticket : 11
this game
1 ii. ?
and Carolina � i
w ill I
student
a in I
tickets will be
each while
may put cha
for !4
foi ' '
game
Person
furthei in I or i
concerning I
sale b
I ickel Manag t Hi
1 dwards al 75
1 vans st. billboard reflects feelings of man) Pirate tans
w
MAKE
YOUR MARKS
WITH MUSIC
We havebuyer who has put in an order for 2,500 class rings.
We desperately need to fill that order as soon as possible, so for
the coming week Coin and Ring Man will be offering a SPECIAL
PREMIUM on all class rings . . from High Schools, Colleges.
Armed Services, Fraternities. Sororities, Technical Institutes,
Organizations all class rings will be bringing an EXTRA HICH
PRICE all week. Take advantagp of this offer.
Ir
If.
? Record Bar has
a few suggestions to make
the next year at E.C.U. happier.
1) Avoid last minute cramming as this could make you
cranky irrrtable, and no tun
2) Donl put all your farm in disasters like earthquakes
ro get you ocr of exams
3) Dorl dnnk anything stronger than beer
before lunch.
4) And whatever you do. do rf to music
You II probably ignore the first three, but at the
Record Bar. the fourth suggestion is easy
Record Bar has a wide selection of rock.
an. soul, dance music and more
Record Bar has a complete line of
blank tapes to get your lectures
painlessly, and crate krts that will
tit any dorm decor
So, mark these words
with Record Bar!
ALSO BUYING GOLD & STERLING FRATERNITY AND
SORORITY PINS, RINGS. ETC AND ANY GOLD OR
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Pin PLAZA � CAROLINA EAST MALI
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i j �
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OPEN 9:30-5:30 MONSAT.
PHONE 752-3866
MiM'tr Minim





Features
Al Cl SI 26. IMO 25
l'Hl t si (. KOI INIAN
Ex-Chancellor
In Retrospect
Leo Jenkins Led Us
From ECC to ECU
B STEVE BACHNER
KOBERI M.SW MM
ssl In Iht (.
tl M.tMdm t
For 1 eo Jenkins, the dream of a
better education for North
Carolina's young people has never
dimmed. Hi vision o a great
university rising from the status ot a
teacher's college has been, at last,
realized. His dream for a better way
of life tor his students and the peo-
ple of North Carolina lives on. and
the dream shall never die.
I eo Jenkins was inaugurated as
chancellor on Ma 13, I960. Under
his leadership. 1 ast Carolina would
grow from a small school of 4,(XH
students to a full multi-faceted
university with 12,000 enrolled on
campus and thousands more enroll-
Duld
ed al off campus centers. !i wc
also become a center for training
medical professionals including doc-
tors and nurses. nd its Schools of
Art, Business, Music, Drama and
Athletics would achieve state and
national acclaim.
Ml added up, East Carolina
would become a focal point of pro-
gress in this state Knd 1 eo Jenkins
would -tcp. not only into the annals
o education, but also into the
history of leadership in North
c arolina.
Some people ma) have doubted
Jenkins' genius in accepting a
dean's with a backwater
teachers college, but that never stop-
ped 1 eo Jenkins. The first thing he
did when he hit town was to jump
feel first into state politics.
i,I went i campaigned for
Kerr Scott's road bond issue he
said, "even though 1 was just a
greenhorn. People campaigning
against the bonds - their number
included a good-sized hunk of the
same power structure Jenkins was to
challenge later when he went after a
medical school for his university
and its region � charged, among
other things, the expense would be
too greal "They said he would
bankrupt North C arolina Jenkins
said, "but we didn't bankrupt
North Carolina, and those roads
paved with the money from that
bond issue are still carrving people
from the farms into town all across
Eastern North Carolina
When Jenkins jumped into the
medical school battle years later, go-
ing around the higher education
superstructure to the General
Assembly, his opponents were rais-
ing the same cry: the cost would be
too great, the state could not afford
the millions of dollars such a project
would cost. "There's always been a
gang of dark clouds that didn't want
things to happen he said.
In the fight for the road bonds,
Jenkins was convinced the cause
was right, just as convinced as he
was o the need for a medical school
in the expanse of tobacco and corn
fields that surrounds his university.
"We could prove everything we said
about the medical school Jenkins
said. "Everything 1 said, 1 could
back up with the facts. We kept
pumping the truth at people. We
told our people not to go out unless
they could prove what they would
say.
His case, on the face o' it. was
simple. Just as in 1948 there were
not enough paved roads to get the
farmers into town, there were not.
in 18. enough doctors to serve the
needs of the poeple in the rural parts
of the state, and Greenville was the
only place in that sprawling I ast
that made logical place for a
medical school specializing in family
practice training. There was a
school of nursing at ECl 1 here
was a health sciences building as a
support for his medical school.
But as plain as the need was to
Leo Jenkins, it was not plain to
others. The fight lasted a halt dozen
years or so in the halls of the
I egislative Building in Raleigh. The
university power structure was un-
convinced until Jenkins convinced
the legislature and the legislature-
ordered the school built. In the
course of convincing the legislature
he was right, Leo Jenkins became
more than a chancellor for a small
university. He became a folk hero
for the people of the East
At last, in 1975. after heated
debate in newspaper editorials and
in legislative committee rooms, the
General Assembly appropriaated
the funds to develop a four-year
School of Medicine at East Carolina
University. For Leo Jenkins, it had
been a 15 year fight against
sometimes heavy opposition. But in
Leo W. Jenkins, Chancellor Fmerilus, in his office shortly before his retirement in June, 1978
those 15 years. Jenkins had con-
structed a solid foundation that
would have hardly been complete
without the approval for the
medical school complex.
In 196 Jenkins faced a decision
that had concerned him for many
months; the 1976 gubernatorial
campaign.
His friends told him. "Your place
is right here where you are
"You have a greal record. You
have spoken for education and for
practical education for all citizens
from the mountains to the sea. The
people trust you and will follow
you. Lead them in the direction of
better education and greater oppor-
tunity he was told.
�you can do mure at LCL than
you could ewer do in Raleigh
Jenkins listened to their advice
and announced that he would re-
man at ECl until his retirement on
June 30. 1978.
"My philosophy as Chancellor of
Last Carolina University is to main-
tain a 'two-way street' of com-
munication with the community, the
region and the state. By doing this,
by communicating with people.
listening to their likes and dislikes
and by offering programs that are
needed, Last Carolina University
will be fulfilling its motto 'To
Serve To that. 1 am forever
dedicated he said.
'Daddy Leo'
Jenkins: The Family Man
By HUGH P. STANLEY
Rrpnnird h p�rmi�Mn lar Mrrl Migiiinr
Immediately after commencement in May of 1978,
I eo Jenkins stepped down as Chancellor of East
Carolina I niversity. Hi thirty-one years here, first as
dean and vice-president, then as president and later as
chancellor, were marked with major accomplishments
foi both the university and the people of eastern North
Carolina.
Needless to say. Leo Jenkins was a controversial
leader. To those ot us here in the east he has been a
gift-gier who has bequeathed to us a new sense of pride
and identity. On the other hand, to some other people in
this state he has been an overbearing and uncompromis-
ing arch-rival.
Both o' these images, however, related only to Leo
Jenkins the public figure. They depicted him as a hard-
nosed politician, a forceful leader, a tough-minded
educator. What these images did not depict was Leo
Jenkins the man.
A rather difffereni image is that held by the six
Jenkins children. The six are adults now and have made
accomplishments of their own.
Jimmy Jenkins is chief of staff in anesthesiology at a
St. Louis hospital. The second son, Jeff, is co-owner of
Buckman's Clothing Store in Washington, NC.
Suzanne lives in Charlottesville, Va. where her huband
is a lawver. Patty teaches driver education at Cary High
School in Raleigh. Third daughter Sallie recently
completed master's in special education at ECL. Jack,
voungest of the Jenkins children, is an ECU graduate
and second-year law student. What the children have to
say about their father affords a glimpse of the man
behind the images.
One might imagine that when the Jenkins family
moved into the president's home, a new life-style wouid
be forced on the children. It would be most important
that they do nothing to make their father appear less
than dignified.
And so it was that as Leo and Lillian made plans for
See EX Page 26, Col. 1
ECU Professor
Once Designed
For Hollywood
Wall Disney visits Ed Reep's studio at the Chouinard Art Institute
(nm the California Institute of the Arts) about 1960. Disney was
Chairman of the Board of Direetors at Chouinard during that time.
Reep remembers him as a very kind man and says, "I was very fond of
Disney For a picture of ECU's Artist-ln-Residence Edward Reep as
he is today, See Page 30.
Bv DIANE HENDERSON
Si�ft Wmrr
An art professor at East Carolina
for the last 10 years, Edward Reep
has a past filled with unusual events
ranging from the vision of
Mussolini, dead, hanging by his
heels, to an introduction with a
Pope. He brings to his art and his
teaching a world of vibrant and
tragic experience.
From junior high school through
five years at the Art Center College
in California, Reep was steeped in
technical training. An unflinching
drive to learn the art kept him going
even during the Depression.
"Some of the students today
complain of poor facilities Reep
remarked with a chuckle. "I used to
ride across town (to art school) in a
street car for an hour and a half,
then transfer and do the same again
at night. Then I'd stay up most of
the night working on the kitchen
floor.
"After my first year, 1 won a
scholarship, which meant if I clean-
ed up nine Johns three times a day, I
had my tuition � $300. That was
more than my whole family had at
that time.
"So I cleaned Johns for the next
four vears, and I went to art school
for five years night and day � and
Saturdays
But with all this technical train-
ing, Reep felt lacking as an artist
without the understanding of the
deeper implications o painting
which could come only with ex-
perience. He began to achieve this
understanding after he joined the
Armv.
"I always felt that I could not
draw 1 knew in my heart that 1
wasn't composing and drawing as
well as 1 ought to. 1 did learn to
manipulate media and became a
rather good technician. And then
the War came along
A few months before Pearl Har-
bor, Reep volunteered for a year's
service, which turned out to be five
years. But his dedication to painting
did not cease.
"We'd get up at 5 in the morning
and fall out, and we'd be through
with our hiking in boot camp after
about 2 in the afternoon. In the long
summer days in July and August, 1
would take a shower and then put
my art materials on my back and go
up in the hins to paint
The work the young artist did
during those months brought him
national attention. Besides winning
first place in one Life magazine con-
test, Reep won fourth place in Life's
All-Service competition.
See REEP Page 30, Col. 4
?





26
TH1: FAST C AROI INI AN
AUGUST 26. 1980
Ex-Chancellor Jenkins: Family M
( on tinned From Page 25
their first big reception, the children were especially cau-
tioned to be perfect ladies and gentlemen. It was to be a
strictly formal affair, and it was very important to Leo
that everything go perfectly.
Initially everything did seem to go very well. But sud-
denly, some disruption occurred in the dining room.
1 eo checked to see what was happening. He discovered
three-year-old Jack, hiding beneath the tablecloth with
a water gun in his hand and an impish smile on his face.
1 he boy was having the time of his young life squirting
the guests as they passed the hors d'oeuvres tables.
Gradually the general shock subsided and smiles
began to creep across the faces of the guests, but
everyone watched for a reaction from the newly-
appointed president. He caught the amusement in their
eyes and smiled himself.
1 he ice was broken, the time was set. Leo and Lillian
decided then that never again would there be such a
strictly formal affair in their home. From that moment,
the house was to be a place where the family could live a
full life and where close friends could visit and feel com-
fortable. As I illian says, "It was a good way to be in-
augurated into this house
1 hough most people know Leo Jenkins as a "doer
ver few people know him as a "do-it-yourselfer Jim-
my recalls that, "When we lived in Brookgreen (a
Greem ille subdivision), Dad taught himself to be a fair-
Is good carpenter. His first project was to finish off an
upstairs bedroom. Evidently he was pleased with his
work because a short time later he added an extra
bedroom
BOTWIN ' (AT
DOC QUIXOTE
The do-it-yourself bug evidently stayed with Leo, for
another project soon materialized: a backyard swimm-
ing pool, Jimmy relates.
"All in all it was a three-or-four-year project and was
built in stages. The first year it was round, but Daddy
was not content with it and changed it to an oblong the
second year. Still not content, he deepened it by two feet
the third year. The next year he built a deck around it
and left it pretty much alone after that
Swimming pool? Jeff does not quite go along with
that term. "Actually, it was more like a big cement
pond built up off the ground. There was nothing pretty
about it at all. Like everything else Daddy does, he put it
up in a hurry. But it had a filter and a pump and was
very functional. Really though, it didn't matter what it
looked like as long as it held water. To us, it was the
greatest thing in the world and we loved him for
building it
In the making of that pool seems to lie a key to Leo
Jenkins' personality. Everything he was to undertake,
he would undertake with an intense impatience to com-
plete the job as quickly as possible. Hand in hand with
the impatience would go the everpresent discontent to
create, to expand and to make better. It would be this
commitment to continued development that would
characterize his entire career.
Not one of the Jenkins children remembers ever being
spanked. It was not that they may not have needed it �
Leo had his own brand of justice.
"He handles himself like Andy Griffith on the old
television show notes Jack. "When I was playing Lit-
tle League baseball, I'd go out to the park and act like a
big shot. One day I took a watergun, and was squirting
the smaller kids and even the umpire. They kicked me
out of the park for a week. Though I knew it was fair
punishment, I was upset � mainly worried about what
my parents would say. But Daddy just sat down and
talked to me. 'I know you're upset he said, 'and I can
tell I don't need to scold you That impressed me. Since
then, I've never tried to act like a bully or tough guy
again.
Patty remembers a slightly different case When she
was sixteen, she went to a beach party with forty other
girls her age. As will happen, some of them decided to
experiment with beer. Patty and six others, unable to
handle "strong drink were caught after they became
sick. Their chaperones notified the parents and the
seven girls were sent home.
"Daddv and Momma were away at the time Patty
remembers. "So Daddy called Doris Lamm, his
secretary, and told her to keep me at home until they
could return. That woman nearly worked me to death. I
think 1 cleaned everything in the house, he simply said,
'Patty, there's a beer in the refrigerator for you. I want
you to drink it. If you're going to drink away from
home, you may as well drink while you're here Just the
thought of drinking another beer made me sick.
'Please I pleaded, ' please don't make me drink that
beer Daddy didn't respond. The longer 1 thought
about it. the sicker 1 got. Soon I was begging. Finally
Daddy backed off, and 1 was so relieved 1 don't think 1
ever drank another beer until I had graduated from col-
lege. I'm not sure a spanking wouldn't have been easier
to take than just the thought of a can of beer
Leo Jenkins' children have known the criticism of
their father and his opponents' efforts to "put him in
his place They have known him in his happy moments
and in times when he was downright chagrined. They
have heard him labeled as egotistical, power mad and
even crazy.
Sallie feels that "egotistical" is the adjective most
commonly used to decribe her father. "It comes on as
arrogance to those who don't know him she admits.
"1 agree that he is egotistical, but his egotism is very
positive. It's not that he's the greatest and can do
anything he wants. It's just that he has confidence and
self-assurance. You have to admit that his record is hard
to beat
Jeff recalls that he was a student at Chapel Hill dur-
ing the fight to change ECC to ECU in the sixties.
"Every day the newspapers woudl carry cartoons and
very negative articles about this character who was try-
ing to get university status for that little school in the
east. I would put them in our hallway. He always acted
like he got a kick out of them
Sallie recalls the controversy over visitation rights at
ECU dorms several years ago. "Even though the Board
of Trustees had denied them, the students blamed Dad-
dy. They marched all over the campus and even
gathered in our yard to protest. The criticism itself
didn't bother Daddy. His position on such matters is 'If
This series of photographs and cartoons depict Leo
Jenkins' career as Chancellor of East Carolina
University. Clockwise, from upper right: Jenkins ad-
dressing an audience in Mendenhall Student Center,
1976; Leo Jenkins speaking with then-Governor
James Holsouser in Raleigh, 1974; ECU'f chancellor
shaking hands with President Richard Nixon at a
White House Reception, 1973; a selection of editorial
cartoons from various North Carolina newspapers il-
lustrating the opposition of much of the western part
of the state against Jenkins' fight for universisty
status from East Carolina College and his later drive
for a medical school at East Carolina University; Dr.
Jenkins and his wife Lillian at the 1976 ECU com-
mencement exercises.
you get to take the credit, shouldn't you also take the
abuse?" What did bother him was that the demonstra-
tions scared my mother. She didn't like people mar-
ching, chanting and throwing things in opuf yard. Dad-
dy didn't take it personally, but it upset him that his
family would be subject to such abuse
Still another side is Leo the storyteller, the tease and
the drv wit.
would do. Bui Jack tells him, 'No, I don't want youi
help I can do things on m own I hen Daddy feels thai
he is not needed and thai really hurts him. His attitude is
" hat have I worked so hard tor it I can'l help my own
sons?' rhough each one respects the other's position,
neither is willing to bend an inch, and therefore the)
into some pretty hoi debates I he really funny thini
ipleteiy admires the other s ability
that each o! them com.
i �� m rrv � noint oi argument to its tines! degree
"He's entertaining-almost a comedian, says Jeff to carry a point �gunic children is thai
He loves to tell stories about his days as a Marine I he .rony ol eo i desire tohelp.hi cl
h� ) iiiian have reared children v
ndependeni o their parents
Sallie adds Thai he is full of risque stories and has been he and illian have reared children who are
known to pass on a bit of nifty gossip. "But he'll tell
you a really neat bit, get your curiosity up 'til you're dy-
ing to know who the story is about, and then he won't
tell you any names
"Daddy had an old checkered vest she said, "and
each night he would put it on when he came to tell us a
story before we went to sleep. Some of the stories were
from the I Iliad or the Odyssey, and they would be about
heroes, strange places and magic. Just before he kissed
us goodnighr, he would remind us of his magic vest.
Each person had to earn his own magic vest, he would
tell us, and the only way to earn it would be to work
hard and be good. And to him who earned it would
come good fortune, safekeeping from wild beasts, and
trips to faraway places
As the children reached their teenage vears, they were
told that their parents would provide th necessities o
life, but any luxuries, such as cars, would have to be
purchased out of their own pockets, and they would
have to work to earn the money. They were also told
that, if they ever found themselves in trouble, the only
assistance their father would give them would be to help
them find a job. Yet, like the others, Sallie discovered
that when the chips were down, her father and mother
would be more than willing to help her in any way they
could.
When Sallie was eight months pregnant, she and her
husband decided to separate. Not really knowing what
to expect, she called her parents. "They could have
made things really rough on me she says. "They could
have called me stupid and irresponsible. Instead, they
told me to come home right away and offered to pay for
everything that 1 would need. After I was home, they
asked me what went wrong with my marriage. At first 1
told them I'd rather not talk about it; they didn't push
the issue. Later, I talked with them. Daddy simply
responded, 'That's okay. You're welcome to stav with
us as long as you want to. We love you. We'll love your
child And that was it. He ireated the whole situation as
a mistake � not the end of the world � just a
mistake
According to the children, their lather's favorite past-
times include painting, cooking and fishing. But their
dad is no leisurely hobbyist. The words "intense" and
"impatient characterize his behavior in every project
he undertakes.
When the mood strikes. I eo will slip away to his base-
ment. There he throws his total energy into his painting.
Sallie swears to the fact that "Daddy can go down into
the basement just alter supper, and by eleven o'clock he
will have whipped out five or si paintings. Mostly, his
subjects are beach scenes, oceans and seagulls. Daddy
gives them awav as wedding presents. While they may
not be great as art goes, his friends value them and have
placed some of them in pretty expensive frames
The same qualities that produce the paintings are also
evident in Leo's forays into the kitchen. As Patty
remembers it, "There's never been one complete meal
that he cooks, but if the rest of us are in the kitchen
preparing a meal. Daddy will come in, grab a spoon and
go to work. He has little dishes that he learns to cook,
and after he has learned to prepare a particular item,
we'll have it every meal for two weeks. Once it was Dad-
dy's Famous French Fries; then it was scallops that melt
in your mouth. Last Christmas it was Daddy's Famous
Omelettes, and this year it was Daddy's Famous Golden
Brown Pancakes According to Suzanne, "He takes
everything out of the refrigerator when he goes into ac-
tion. Everything! He'll use ten knives to do one job, and
every time he needs to stir something he will go after a
clean spoon. After everyone has eaten and every dish
has been used, he'll leave. Then the girls are left to clean
up the kitchen
The same impatience that is present when he paints
and cooks is magnified threefold when he becomes Leo
the fisherman. Unless his luck is with him, he does not
remain Leo the fisherman for long. "He likes it fine if
the fish are biting laughs Patty, "but if nothing is
biting after fifteen minutes, he will put his fishing gear
away. His reason � 'there is nothing in the ocean
Though Leo was always present when his children
really needed him, it would be folly to surmise that the
children were always in total agreement with their
father. While most of the children tended to avoid con-
flicts with Leo, it is no secret that he and Jack have had
some pretty heated arguments. Sallie has an insight into
the disputes between her father and brother.
"They both have their own opinions, and they are
both as stubborn as they can be. Jack has a strong moral
sense of what is right and what is wrong � he's an
idealist in every respect. On the other hand Daddy is a
realist. He wants to get things done as expediently as
possible. He knows he is influential, so he wants to help
his children as much as he can � like any other father
totallv .
earned a college decree on his own men! I ach
capable ol being financially independeni I n
recalls, then fathei was nevei an overly generous per
with his children. Whal they needed, he
whal they wanted, they earned on then own. In the
backs of'their minds, the children all remembei on
symbol that was presenl to remind ihem how lortun;
they were. I hat was a picture ol a piect ol bread which
I eo had eul from a magazine. He had framed il and
placed it on the wall in the kitchen. It was ther
mind them to work for what they wanted and to be
thankful tor what they had
It is not likely thai the people who ha
heard ol I eo Jenkins would think ol the n
underdog s a mattei ol fact, most people might think
oi him as an out-and-out winner. Bui lack realizes
the success Ins fathei now enjoys did not come easily.
"Daddy was a nobody when he came to I
Carolina he says and his voice becomes suddenly
serious. "He was an outsider with a typical educator'?
background. But he wanted his school to serve people.
And so he took on the big dogs went alter things that
weren't necessarily written in his contract
won lack pauses, then lie gives I eo the highe
pliment a son can give his father.
"I don't want to be a chancelloi oi anything like
that he says. "I don't even want to be in educa-
tion.But I want to be somebody who wants to
something. I want to be an underdog like he's been an
underdog � I wanl to be like him
?Jn No timm Fm Sure He'U Be Like One Of Thm FamUy
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Encoder Inventor
Renaissance Man
rHF UM( AROI INI AN M ( SI 26. ls�xo 27
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B JON VI!HAS
Mart Wrurr
C harles Cain bears the mantle of genius with
the same affable humor that characterizes all of
his actions. Even when he is involved with the
most serious activities, that smile that at times
becomes a boyish grin is always present.
Besides being a genius (Cain will tell you that
it s hard to eat genius), he is an inventor, engineer
and president of the company that markets one of
his inventions. The Cain Encoder, publicized
recent!) along with its inventor in "Business
Week" and "Popular Science is developed and
marketed by the Cain Encoder Company that is
headquartered right here in Greenville.
1 he device can. when hooked into any of
several communications systems, read an electric
oi gas meter and report the reading and a number
o' other bits of information, including malfunc-
tion and tampering. T he device stands to save the
utilities companies a substantial amount of
money, that can be passed on to the consumer. It
will make time-of-day metering a possibility
without the purchase of new meters.
The relatively peaceful exterior gives no hint
that inside. Charles Cain is walking mayhem. No
machine is safe from his careful scrutiny, which
usuallv involves dismantling and study of the
works. To be sure, the machine goes back
together again, but oniv after its guts are examin-
ed and the principle of its function is understood.
Cain's car is the first hint that he is not the or-
dinary businessman he appears to be. It is a
Plymouth Valiant that looks like it was involved
in a hardware store holdup. Tools and gadgets of
everv description fill the back seat and trunk.
Cam is a private pilot and has been flying for
ovei 2o years. He owns a 1952 Cessna 170B. The
airplane reflects the personality of its owner in
much the same wav as the car does. Outside it
looks like a tal-dragger that has seen too much
hard service as an Alaskan bush plane, but inside
there is a small fortune in II R radio equipment.
The interior o the plane has been largely refur-
bished and resembles a modern, sophisticated air-
craft. Cain refers to himself as "Super Chicken"
when he talks about his Hying. Although he is an
expert pilot and IPR rated, he never flies in even
marginally bad weather. "There are old pilots,
but there are no old, bold pilots Charles Cain
expects to get verv old.
After any conversation with Charles Cain, it is
hard not to feel like Dr. Watson. Cain, like
Sherlock Holmes, operates on a plane somehow
separate from the one that ordinary men operate
on. His mind makes imaginative leaps that leave
the mortal behind in a cloud of confused wonder.
He is extraordinarily well-read for an English ma-
jor, let alone an engineei. His taste in music runs
to High Opera and his favorite album is "The
Greatest Hits of 1720" which includes "Pacobel's
Canon in D
He can quote Milton, Shakespeare and
Chaucer (in Middle English of course) as well as
read German, Russian and Latin (some French,
too, enough to translate French patent law.)
He is a fine mechanic and has done most of the
work of converting his Cessna to IFR himself. He
has singlehandedly kept any number of cars on
the road when they would otherwise have perish-
ed.
The Renaissance Man would certainly be
Charles Cain in this day and time. He is a sublime
blend of the artist and scientist as well as the
humanist. His gift is much more than the sum of
his talents. He is Plato's philosopher; he has seen
the sun and is come back to the cave to enlighten
the rest of us and yet has not lost any essence of
humanity.
Charles Cain is, besides being a Renaissance
Man, a truly unselfish friend to many students
and faculty members. He is generous with the lit-
tle time that is his own and is always ready to
share his wisdom and experience with his friends.
Cain's skill as an engineer has gotten him jobs
with such corporations as North American
Rockwell (working on the guided missile projects
of the sixties) and DuPont, which is how he ended
up here in Greenville, not exactly the Mecca of
the industrial world. While at DuPont, he
developed the Encoder and so just naturally head-
quartered his company here.
Charles Cain's wife is Myra Cain, the assistant
to the vice-chancellor for academic affairs and an
assistant professor of English here at ICE. They
have two children, Meg, who starts college at
Princeton this fall, and Glen, who is in the 6th
grade.
Cain earned his bachelor's degree at V'anderbilt
University and his master's degree at Auburn.
:r'
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Charles Cain, Inventor
Rock Fan Brings
Battle Ax To
Nugent Concert
11-Year-Old Boy Sues Creditor
1 lev e n - v e a r - o 1 d
Louis e! a o, who
makes 5 cents on everv
paper he delivers for
The Berkshire Eagle in
Adams, Mass had a
problem. One of his
cusl o m e r s. Cheryl
Bugbee, had moved to
Pittsfield. Mass
without paving S8.50
for seven weeks of
papers. Louis sued her
in Small Claims Ses-
sion. He won bv
default.
Other kids have
enough money to go to
McDonald's everv
night, and 1 didn't he
was quoted in a victory
statement.
But winning in court
is one thing; collecting
is another. Louis
waited and waited.
Nothing.
"I had to have a
show-clause hearing
he says, and earlier this
month he collected �
$8.50 plus S5.80 for his
court costs.
One good thing that
has come out of his
court experience and
the resulting publicity
about it: His customers
pay belter now. "I had
one that owed me $7
Eouis says, "and the
next day, after it was in
the paper, she paid
me
r rOffl I he bar nMI� ' �hsf ci
Charlotte police of-
ficer G.M. Law son
worked his first concert
at the Charlotte Col-
iseum last month and
confiscated his first
weapon at a concert �
a battle ax.
"It's one of those old
Roman-type things
with a sharp thing on
one side Eawson
said. "It'll split
somebody's head
open
Law son discovered
thhe silver-bladed ax
with an 18-inch handle
tucked in a teenager's
belt after a July 8 Ted
Nugent concert.
"1 was walking out
to get some air and ther
was a fight and one guy
said, 'He's trying to kill
me Eawson said. "I
saw this ax sticking out
of another kid's shirt
Eawson said he took
the ax but did not arrest
the youths, whose
names he wouldn't
reveal. "I didn't arrest
them because they were
pretty well drunk
Eawson said.
The youth told
Law son he was carry-
ing the ax for protec-
tion "because of the
Ted Nugent concert in
Florida where 20 per-
sons were injured in a
battle between eoncet-
goers and police.
Miami Herald rock
critic Bill Ashton said
Nugent's Saturday
night concert in
Hollywood. Fla. was
disrupted when about
250 people, angry over
the arrest of 15 concert-
goers who were drink-
ing or using drugs,
began fighting with
police.
About 50 Charlotte
police officers worked
tne show � tne normal
number for a concert at
the coliseum. About
8,000 people attended
the concert, police said.
Police turned awav
some poeple t h e
suspected being intox-
icated or using drugs
byt had no estimate of
the number. "They
were strung out on
marijuana, liquor and
what -ha v -you Sm.
H.E. Wilkins said.
The police arrested
five persons on charg-
ed ranging from posses-
sion of hashish to
disorderly conduct.
FALL
SEMESTER
1980
SUN.
MUG CLUB NIGHT
MON.
GAMMA DELTA IOTA
TUE.
LADIES NIGHT
WED.
GREEK NIGHT
THURS.
STUDENT NIGHT
FRI.
AFTERNOON
BLOW OUT
BEGINNING AT 3:30
FOR THE LADIES
WHILE THEY LAST
FREE
JOLLY ROGER
PENDANT
TO TAKE TO
ECU BALL GAMES
We never charge students a service charge for
checking. No matter how lowyour balance goes.
(Just as long as there is a balance.)
So come see us. We're handyto ECU. And
we've got special f reebies for students who open
accounts now.
Bank of North Carolina
Member FDIC
Locations:
10th and Hamilton - 4th and CotancheTelephone 758-5165.
America's Surfers:
Fiberglass Cowboys
B JON VI'HAS
Mall W rfcff
Now that summer is over there
are surfers here on campus, and
they are easy to pick out from the
crowd. It is not the dark tans or the
bleached out hair or the well-
developed pectorals that marks
them as a group apart. It is rather a
childlike lack oi concern that
characterizes their demeanor.
Surfers, like most athletes, are af-
flicted with a Peter Pan complex.
Athletics in general is a young man's
endeavor, and that is exactly true of
surfing. There is no such thing as an
old surfer. While some people surf
at the age of 40 and beyond, they
are not surfers. In fact, there are a
lot of people who surl who are not
surfers. One of the girls in "Big
Wednesday" (a film about surfing
which was shown on wampus this
summer) makes the comment,
"Back home being young was just
something that you did until vou
grew up. Here it's everything
It is true wherever surfers con-
gregate. The young guys are the in-
novators. They have the radical
moves that can cause a veritable
revolution in the surfing world.
"That is no country for Old Men
said Yeats of Byzantium, and the
same holds true tor the north shore
of Oahu (the Mecca of surfing) or
any other place where the break is
good and the sets come big and
long.
Surfers are not dumb or shallow.
A great number ol them are well-
read and can talk of subjects totally
unrelated to the waves or the shape
of their boards. Bui nothing elicits
the same response as a discussion of
the glass at the point or a goofy-toot
tube in a left break. I hcv can be ar-
tists, writers, carpenters or gar-
bagemen. It does not matter �
because what they are is surfers.
Although the activity is an ancient
one, it was not until the early '60s
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28
THF FASTAROl IN!N AUGUST 26 WHO

Patriotism Today
Is Nothing New
B .ION VI HAS
Sail Vni't
In these troubled
times o The Iranian
Situation and I h c
Afghanistan Situation
we can better examine
the role of the
American citizen today
and to compare it with
thai role in the past.
Patriots are
something America has
never lacked, yet the
definition of that term
has changed over the
years. 1 o one section of
the population the term
means military service,
and indeed main of out
great patriots have been
military m e n a n d
women. From the earl)
davs of this country,
America has kept a
large military machine
that has actively par-
ticipated m every major
conflict on this planet.
Since the time of
George Washington
and Francis Mat ion,
through IS. Granl
and Robert 1 . 1 ee,
through I c d d
Roosevelt and Sgt.
Alvin York and up to
udie Murphv and
Chesty Puller, the
miliiarv has produced
many famous patriots.
In addition to these
famous soldiers,
countless numbers of
Americans have served
theii country and their
own sense o! patriotism
by serving in the
military. If, in fact,
there is "no greater
love than to give up
youi lite for a friend
t h e n A m e r i c a h a s
millions of gieat
fl lends.
Milton reminds us
that " Ihev also serve
who only stand and
wait Other
Americans have proven
America's Surfers
Today's Cowboys
Continued From Page 27
that suiting became so romanticized
by the American public. The Beach
Boys are responsible to a great ex-
tent for bringing surfing to everv
merican shore from Hatteras to
Malibu, from Galveston to Atka.
I er since, the surfer has become a
.ort of cowboy, a symbol of in-
dependence and righteousness to the
ordinary folk that they refer to dis-
dainfullv as inlanders or rednecks.
1 he surfer rides the sea, for cen-
turies a svmbol of untamable fury.
1 he seeming ease with which a
surfer conquers the raw force of an
n wave makes him an object of
a we and admiration.
Surfers seem to taunt the Sand-
bound folk with their freedom.
1 heir lives are totally uncomplicated
b the evervdav worries that make
an inlander so uncomfortable.
W lien the surf is good, everything is
good. When the surf is not good.
simply pack up and move on to
where it is good. Inlanders cannot
migrate so easily. They have mor-
tgages and kids and a hundred
things thai keep them tied to land.
rhere has been an on-eoinu wat
between the sinters and ordinary
people for years. Fishing pier
owners, resort motel owners and
beach developers have tried to
legislate the surfers out of existence
with restrictions on where and how
close to the pieis they can surf and
where they can park The surfers
have come back everv time. 1 ike the
last breed of American hero, the
cowboy, they have prospered in the
face ot adversity. Ihev have manag-
ed to keep their lifestyle their own,
while the rest ot us tune changed,
grown up. In a societ that places a
premium on youth, the suiter is
perpetually young, a tact that we
find deplorable. 1 ike the How aid
families in Heinlein's books, surfers
have been persecuted foi our own
failings.
Not everv one should be a surfer. I
do not intend that when 1 praise
their lifeslyle so much. lust as not
everv one was meant to be a cowboy,
the pressures to remain young and
the actual physical strain arc pro-
bably too much tor most ot us to
make it. It takes a cei tain attitude to
spend an entire life in pursuit ol the
per tec t wave.
their patriotism
without any military
service or with service
in addition to military.
In the sixties and seven-
ties, in the aftermath of
the V i e t n a m war,
military service became
unpopular. Americans
had to use other means
io show their love of
country and the ideals
that America stands
tor. 1 o some, the spirit
thai m a d e the
American military the
best in the world
characterized these
other efforts. In the
Peace Corps the so-
called Military In-
dustrial Complex
Americans were mak-
ing the world better and
most importantly,
freer.
American patriots
come from everv con-
ceivable background,
from Cechoslavakian
immigrants to members
of the Fust Families of
Virginia. I 'bey are rich,
poor and middle class
and everv color and
size. Ihev are old men
and young women.
1 hey have supported
America everv where on
earth. Ihev have also
criticized their country
and its actions but that
criticism and the
freedom that allows it
have served to make the
count rv better and
stronger.
In the veais that
followed World War II
the image of the United
States abroad suffered
and it was not until
these past two vears
that that image was
poor enough to elicit a
reaction among the
citizens of the United
States. Now Charlie
Daniels sings patriotic
songs reminiscent of
the Hoagy Carmichael
and Johnny Mercer hits
of the forties. All over
the country, from rural
outposts like Greenville
to the Urban centers ot
leftist liberalism,
Americans are talking
tough, ready to fight
their way out of the
various predicaments
they find themselves in.
If patriotism is an ex-
treme love of country,
then the United States
has always had an
abundance of patriots
Even during the worst
of Vietnam and
Watergate, the two
greatest tests of
American patriotism,
Americans did not give
up on their coun-
try. Ihev m a y h a v e
despised their leaders
and the actions of their
government, but they
were still flag-waving
Americans and they
knew that their eountrv
was still the greatest
and freest country
available. The so call-
ed ' ' n e w
pat riot ism "elicited bv
the taking of American
hostages in Iran is not
new at all. It is the same
reaction that this coun
try had to the direct at-
tack on our citizens by
Japan, Germany and
even England. If indeed
we end up at war � an
abhorrent development
� over the hostages,
then the reaction of the
people will probablv be
the same as in those
past 11 mes w hen
America was attacked
bv a foreign power.
America's true patriots
have traditionally come
to the forefront when
the need arose. This
crisis is no exception
War cm peace, the real
lovers of truth, justice
and the American Way
will support their eoun-
trv .
All Gospel Juk Bv
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�S
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I HI ST CAROI INIAN
Al.(it SI 26. IVS0
29
ens At ECU:
A Party Maj
By I)A II) NOKKIS
East Carolina University offers its students
their choice of many fields of study: art, music,
drama, English, education, and others. But
perhaps the largest department at ECU is the
Department of Downtown and Partying. This
course of study is among the most grueling, ex-
hausting, expensive and time-consuming offered
al any university in the world. Some excerpts
from the introductory D&P textbook will give
you an idea of what the students in this depart-
ment have to go through.
I. Required Supplies
To stav in the Downtown and Parts depart-
ment, one must invest a great sum of money in
supplies. A refrigerator is necessary for storage of
study and research equipment and supplies such
as beer, wine and various mixers. A valid college
ID. card is needed to gain admission to the
classrooms downtown. Specific courses require
various supplies, which will be discussed later.
II. The Courses � Foundation
D&P majors must complete rigorous course re-
quirements. If you join this department, you
must successfully complete such tough courses as:
Beer Appreciation: This popular, but difficult
freshman course introduces the student to about
750 beers, which he must learn to identify, along
with 75 types of ale. Hangover remedies are also
discussed in detail.
Partving Survey: A basic introduction to col-
lege partving. Freshmen learn how to set up kegs,
make PJ, and build up the necessary stamina to
survive four (or more) years of constant partying.
Annoyance and Rudeness 1: (Replaces Hell-
Raising) The student learns how to give loud
Rebel yells at odd hours when neighbors have 8
am exams; how to wake up roommates; how to
throw up all over the bathroom so nobody can go
into it; and how to insult and or throw things at
people from cars.
Booe Survey: (prerequisite: Beer Apprecia-
tion) This survey continues the freshman's in-
troduction to alcohol, beginning with cheap wine
and covering rum, whiskey, gin, vodka and
others at the discretion of the instructor.
Booe History: This course covers the hisiorv
o alcoholic partying, beginning with mead and
continuing with ale, rum, rotgut whiskey and
bathtub gin. Special emphasis in the 1980 term is
on Medieval and Baroque tavern brawling and its
evolution into the American saloon fight.
Philosophy of Partying: An introduction and
inquiry into the intellectual motivations and
philosophical questions that trouble partiers.
Chugging: Beginning students learn skills and
methods of chugging. To pass successfully, the
student must chug a keg of beer in twelve seconds
or less.
III. The Courses � Major Departments
After successful completion of the foundation
courses, the student may apply for admission to
the upper school. He has his choice of several ma-
jors, including disco, barhopping, rednecking.
and hanging out. A few upper level courses will
be disc used here.
Disco Dancing I, II, and III: Students master
the skills of the bump, the hustle , etc. Instruc-
tional films such as "Saturday Night Fever" are
included.
The Poetry of Disco: Members of the English
faculty discuss and explore the themes of man's
loneliness and alienation in an industrial society;
mortality and insignificance in an infinite
universe; and the existentialist crisis, as treated in
such masterpieces as "Macho Man "Get Up
and Boogie and "Disco Duck
Cruising Around: This course covers sitting in
parking lots, outrunning police cars, and
shooting mailboxes and dogs, as well as basic-
mechanical skills, such as souping up engines.
Problems in Barhopping: This graduate course
includes a field trip to New York and Fos
Angeles, giving experience in partying situations
in other cities.
Introduction to Punk: This new course covers
punk fashions and music, as well as the lifestyle.
Required materials: leather jacket, safety pins,
punk buttons, and a diet of pizza and beer.
Students must be experienced in smashing disco
records.
Overall, the Downtown major suffers more
harships that any other student. The booze survey
class often costs $150 a month. The week long
parties required in Partying II leave the student
no time for his unimportant general college re-
quirements; often, they don't have enough time
to even get a good grade in library Science. All-
night beer socials ruin TV-watching, as well as
take their toll on the students' health. If vou want
to just have a good time and take crip courses
here at ECU, this department is not the one. Pick
something easy, like nuclear physics.
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30
( Ml IAS! AROI INI W
t (,1 v! 26 198(1
t
Reep Sees Mussolini's Death

i OV H
� - � ZICHERMAN
Kdward Reep concentrates on his work in his studio at his home. His
studio is crowded with his works of art and someniers of the last fort)
years, as well as a number of ongoing projects.
Violence
Fading From Films
B SUM R-U'HM-K
ii �� .i
We
n -1"
are siowiv
an era o
ap-piop stao -planet movie
violence and explicitness thai was in
its zenith around 1972. Before 2,
the camera, like a worried friend,
used to avert its gaze just before the
au ful thing happened.
In the old Ronald Colman version
rale ol fwo Cities, we watched
with a mixture of admiration (for
his heroism) and horror (at his fate)
while Sidnev. Carton's neck was fit-
ted into the grooved guillotine chop-
ping block.
I he camei a, how e er. was
alreadv scanning a peaceful eternity
in some painted clouds above the
guillotine at the moment the blade
ved dow n.
uvhat is certainh one ol the
violent wastes-of-time in re-
cent memory. Petet Benchley's I he
Island splattered onto the silvei
screen this summer. Its hack plot
about centuries-old pirates responsi-
ble for the disappearances in the
Bermuda 1 riangle is merelv an ex-
cuse for a bloodbath of un-
precedented carnage.
I he Island broughi back
memories ol the films ol the earlv
seventies; Polanski's Macbeth, Don
Siegel's Dim Harry, Peckinpah's
Straw Dogs and 1 he Wild Bunch.
Kubrick's C lockwork Orange, el
al.
Not all ol these movies I mention
are of equal importance. I think it I
had been able to do so without
disturbing the people around me, I
would have walked out o! I he
Island. I must admit that I enjoyed
Dirty Harry, but I am contused not
only with the uses to which it puts its
violence, but also with its idiotic
plot premise. I he movie is such a
ridiculous polemic for Neanderthal
law and order that I doubt even the
genius ot a Kubrick could make u
artistically acceptable.
so. no: all of the violence in
these movies is of the same order,
but all ot it is to a greater � rather
than to a lesser � degree unnerving,
some tor good reasons, some, as in
the case ot I he Island, tor bad.
However, it is only a little more
unnerving than the hysterical out-
bursts thai movies like I he Warriors
prompt from politicians and othei
opportunists who know that the
easiest wav lo attract attention is to
attack movie violence, as it that,
and not any number ot a thousand
other factors, were responsible tor
the admittedly dreadful state ot the
world
Among some movie viewers, not
necessarilv card-carrying critics or
professional movie viewers, a
favorite line ol reasoning is that
movie violence is evil because it in-
structs in the methods of evil, and.
what's worse, it is boring, although
it never seems to occur to them that
if something is really boring, then its
power to instruct � to seduce �
must be minimal.
rhrough the wizardry of the
special effects men. we see heads
opped ott. bullets passing through
mot jusl into) bodies, people burn-
ing themselves up. people getting
axed and slashed, and even, and this
is ver big now, people' getting
dismembered with iaei guns and
swords or eaten by zombies
I ven m the bad. last, hv poci itical
davs ot the Production Code, we
usually knew how things would turn
out generally. and it wasn't often
that we were surprised and
almost made ill �� by a shotgun go-
ing ott in someone's face, on-
screen.
A lot ot this, as in 1 he Island, is
just bad drama � oi jusl no drama
at all Sometimes you wonder � it
you can distance yourself from the
gore - how the tuck was rigged. All
ol this, over the long run. is
guaranteed. I think, to make us all a
little mote callous. I'm speaking
here oi movies that, tot me. could
not support the violence thev show
rhere ate some, however, that can,
but evervone has his own tolerance
level.
1 he violence in an earlier film like
Clockwork Orange is, bv com-
parison, practically poetic � not (in
spite ot everything you've read up to
nowas explicit as anything in a film
like 1 he Island. It is a horror show,
but cool, so removed from reality
that it would take someone who
really cherished his perversion to get
any vicarious pleasure from it.
Io isolate this violence is to ig-
nore everything else that is at work
in the movie which is nothing less
than the fate of mankind.
One of the reasons, I think, that
movies keep pressing the outer
limits of acceptability is that
although they are. on their visual
surface, realistic, they use up
realistic actions so quickly that the
actions become as unreal as the tot
mal gestures of a ritual.
People once were shocked when
gangsters in movies ot the thirties
shot people on the screen and the
victims doubled up, as if they had
suffered sudden heart attacks. Not
much blood, but death was ap-
parent.
We in the audience eventually see
the make-believe in the drama. 1 he
shootings had to become more and
more vivid to impress us. to excite
us and whether we like to believe
it or not � to give us pleasure. Now
that the explicitness has gone almost
as tar as it can go. as anyone who
has ever seen vour average garden
varietv horror film, like I he Iexas
C hainsaw Massacre, can tell you, it
may be that the margins ot pleasure
have been exceeded, but after seeing
and hearing the crowds' reaction to
Chainsaw Massacre in Mendenhall
Student Center right here on cam-
pus a tew weeks ago, I seriously
doubt it.
It may be about time, hopefully,
anyway, for movies to realize that
they aren't realistic. Ihey are, for
all the reality o their locales, and of
their actors and of then cir-
cumstances, only representations of
realitv and nothing more.
But showing us how a man looks
when his head is chopped ott. a
movie can capture our shocked at-
tention for a second or two. but it
has said very little about the nature
o man we didn't already know, and
absolutely nothing about the nature
ot the poor man who was the victim
� except that he died violently.
Continued From Page 25
Shortlv after this.
Keep met the woman
who would be his wife.
"We were married
with $13 to our
names Reep recalls
with a smile. "We got
married the day 1
graduated from officer
candidate school and
went ott to the Oark
mountains, where, in
the ice and snow, I fell
out troops at 5:30 a.m.
with icicles hanging
from my cap. I taught a
company how to blow
up and build bridges
and a lot of other
things that I wasn't too
expert in
Reep was transferred
from the ice o' the
Oarks to the warmth
of New Orleans, then
to Alaska and back to
Monterrey.
" There I was con-
tacted bv the secretary
of war with a telegram
asking me if I would
consider being a war ar-
tist overseas
Reep eagerly ac-
cepted the position and
became a part of a
corps ot 42 artists that
went throughout the
world foi the next tew
years, painting the Se-
cond World W ar.
"1 was thrown in
w ith some of the great
artists of that era:
Reginald Marsh.
rhomas Benton and
asuo Kunyoshi. nd
they scared me because
I was so young and in-
experienced
So. I got a call one
d a v 11 om Gen
I isenhowet 's adjutant.
I went to his head-
quarters, and he called
me into his ot fice, and
said, "Reep There
are five artists; you're a
Second 1 leutenant, and
I'm putting you in
charge o' these five ar-
tists And he said,
' I here are five divi-
sions going into Italy.
Pick a division, and
assign these other tour
men to a division. That
is all
'M was with him tor
possibly 40 seconds and
iiad to make the deci-
sion. I saw there were
tour infantry and one
armored division, so I
put myself down for
the armored one, jusl
to be significant
Reep said with a laugh.
"Soon after, we were
on our way to Italy, the
invasion of Salerno and
up Italy he added.
Reep feels that his
most amazing war ex-
perience came in Italy.
He and his sargeant
were (.hiving on a road
near Milano one day.
I hey had intended to
bypass the city, when
the sargeant suggested,
"Whai the hell. I ct's
go into Milano and
the quick turn Reep
made led down a path
that would bring him
one of his most vivid
memories.
"Halfway in we were
stopped by two par-
tisans with machine
guns. They were very
excited, shouting,
' A m e r i c a n i ,
American Ihev had
these big p a p et
American Hags, and
tney put one on each
fender. I hen thev
jumped on the lenders
and said. 'Do you want
to see Mussolini?'
"So I drove in to a
service station, where
they had Mussolini and
his girlfriend and 17
other people killed and
hanging up bv 'heir
feet Then thev were
cutting them down, and
people were lining up.
Women were taking
then heels ott and
beating Mussolini to a
pulp
At the end ot the
war. Reep returned to
the States as a captain
who had been given the
Bronze Star. More im-
portant to his profes-
sion, he had also been
awarded a Guggenheim
Fellowship, which lie
worked on for a cur
at let leaving the Armv.
Reep taught at the-
art school he had once
attended but quit after
tout veais and wen!
work in the film in-
dustry .
In our next issue on
August 28, id K
will tell about his years
us an wast m
Holly wood Don 7 miss
the next installment,
where he reminisces
about meeting Orson
II elles and I t
Astaire, anumu others
FLOYD G. ROBINSON
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Extended Fall Hours:
Tuesday August 26 9:00-6:00
Wednesday August 27 9:00-6:00
Thursday August 28 8:00-9:00
Friday August 29 8:00-6:00
Saturday August 30 9:00-6:00
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Hi.
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6. If

1 asi (
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be the
tO g
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Whilci
ali the






hi at the
had i
hson
l
ECU Artists Series
Highlights Montoya
For 1980-81 Season
THf EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 26, 1980
31
The staff of (he Fast Carolinian gratefully
acknowledges the valuable assistance and
cooperation of Mrs. Stephanie Hailey of
The Havelock Progress, in the prepara-
tion of this issue.
Juilliard String Quartet
The Julliard String Quartet, consisting of
Robert Mann, Samuel Rhodes, Karl Carlyss,
and Joel Krosnick will perform in the Hendrix
Theatre on January 22, 1981.
By DAVID NORR1S
The 1980-81 Artists
Series has been finaliz-
ed by the East Carolina
University Student
Union Artists Series
Committee. Season
tickets are now on sale
at a 33 percent discount
on single ticket prices.
The Artists Series Com-
mittee urges everyone
to purchase tickets now
as a limited number of
seats are available.
The first event of the
1980-81 series is the
Empire Brass Quintet.
A brass quintet of
serious musical ambi-
tion, Empire Brass won
the 1976 Naumburg
Chamber Music
Award. The quintet
features Rolf Smedvig,
trumpet; Charles A.
Lewis, Jr trumpet;
David Ohanian, French
horn; Normal Bolter,
trombone; and Samuel
Pilafian, tuba. They
are presently ariists-in-
residenee at Boston
University. They will
perform on September
18, 1980.
On October 16. 1980,
a fine duo, Charles
Bressler and Menahem
Pressler, combine voice
and piano virtuosity in-
to a dynamic perfor-
mance. Bressler. an
oratorio tenor, is par-
ticularly noted for the
scope of his repertoire.
H i s m a s t e r y o f
diverse and difficult
scores has made him
one of the vorld's
leading tenors. Like
Bressler, Pressler is
noted for his vast reper-
toire. He has perform-
ed with nearly every
major orchestra in the
western world. Each
Welcome Back Students
B DAVID NORMS
Welcome back to ECU; or, for those oi you
who are freshmen or transfer students, just plain
"welcome to ECU This article is mainly for
those oi you who are new victims � I mean,
students at East Carolina University, to help get
you introduced to life at college. Those of you
who are returning students may want to skip this
article, since if you aren't used to college life by
now, you might as well hang it up.
College is a great place for a young person to
mature and grow, since most young people don't
reach their full height until the age of twenty or
so. You will meet every imaginable type of person
here at ECU, as well as many types you probably
never imagined. You'll learn how to survive stan-
ding in endless lines and later how to avoid having
to stand in endless lines. Most important of all,
this place will give you a sense oi humor or drive
you crazy.
Most of you will soon become acquainted with
those peculiar institutions known as dormitories
and roommates. In vain attempt to make life run
more smoothly, the school has made a large
number of rules to go by. Like most rules, people
don't pay much attention to them. Just to help
you out, 1 have some rules of my own that can
give you an idea of what to expect in our
residence halls:
1. Student cars, if found by the police, will be
towed away.
2. Pet piranas are not allowed in fountains,
sinks, toilets, etc.
3. If you do not like your roommate, it is possi-
ble to change rooms. Do not kill your roommate
until you have permission from the housing of-
fice.
4. If you are locked out of your room, don't
break down the door. After three years in an
American high school, nobody should need a key,
anyway.
5. Remember that profanity on school property
is forbidden (1 didn't make this up; it's a real rule.
Like 1 said, people don't pay that much attention
to the rules.)
6. If you bring munchies into the dorm, either
bring enough for the moochers or get something
that .nobody else likes.
7. Students are permitted torearrange the beds,
chairs, etc in their rooms, but may not cut addi-
tional windows or doors into the walls.
Now that you know some of the rules, you
might as well learn some facts and statisticsabout
East Carolina University.
Enrollment: Around 12,(XX) students are enroll-
ed in ECU classes; of whom half actually attend
class.
Length of stay: Somehow, four years seems to
be the American idea of the length of time it takes
to get a college degree. In real life, though, unless
you know exactly what you want to major in
from the first day and stick carefully to your
course of study, it may take longer. Many people
stay here five years, and some take six or seven.
But then, some wise guys get out in three and a
half years. Others stay only a couple of weeks,
but they usually don't quite finish their course of
study in that time.
Brief history: Thomas Jefferson died over 80
years before the founding of East Carolina
University, and had almost nothing to do with it.
ECU miraculously escaped the wrath of Sher-
man's march to the Sea by cleverly hiding in
another state and century. The first buildings
were put up in 1907. Dozens of other buildings
and parking spaces were added as the college
grew. Today, ECU students can boast of having
the third largest university in North Carolina,
even though they were taught when little that
boasting is impolite.
Since you new folks are here reading this, we
can assume you survived the ordeal of packing,
despite the help of your family. Parents always
want to make sure their college-bound son or
daughter has everything they need to re-start
Earth civilization on another planet, much less
enough to fill up a dorm room. I never used most
of the things like daguerrotype cleaner or quinine
or extra Victrola needles that Mom talked me into
bringing, but you never know.
While packing, it s good to take advantage of
all the free stuff from home, like groceries,
toothpaste, soap, dishes, tape, string, thumbtacks
and all those other things that homes abound with
and arc necessary for maintaining a life at college.
For your convenience, the Student Government
Association rents refrigerators to students. For
your inconvenience, they don't deliver, so you
have to lug them back to your own room. The
refrigerators are a little small, but that's a bless-
ing since they have to be carried across the rugged
terrain of the mall or the Hill and then up varying
numbers of staits.
The big refrigerators are against the rules in the
dorms, because of cheap stairs and potential
blown fuses and hernias. You can sneak one in if
you like, but remember it's hard to hide a six-foot
high refrigerator in a dorm room, and that you'll
have to drag it back down the stairs within eight
months, or less it you flunk out. Besides, lots of
people I've known with those dinasaur sized
iceboxes keep only a head oi lettuce and a coke in
it. hardly, worth the effort oi having the thing in
the first place.
Sometimes there is a line at the refrigerator
place, but these are barely worth calling lines.
When you go through the heartbreak of drop-
add, then you will know what a line really is.
Drop-add is a biannual event (or is that semian-
nual? Twice a year is what I'm driving at.), at-
tended by all students who have to pick up or
drop a course. This is usually about half of the
student body. Lhey include lazy folks wno want
to drop everything except P.E. KXX) and vacation
until December and frantic students whose entire
schedules were obliterated somewhere along the
line.
Drop-add is really not as bad as people think,
though. It can be a good way to meet old friends,
since everybody ends up there sooner or later. Br-
ing some cookies or brownies and try to get stuck
in a line with somebody nice.
ATTENTION
ALL DANCE
downtown STUDENTS
eVe the college student
Headquarters
For All Dance Wear
The Classic
Capezio
e have a complete
selection of toe. tap,
ballet, and modern
dance shoes and
bodywear in a
spectrum of colors!
Capezio's been
dancing since 1887
We also have children dancewear
at our Pitt Plaza Store
There's a lot more to be said about drop-add,
but I'm saving it for a book.
After a grueling day or two in drop-add, you
might want to spend a quiet afternoon of relaxa-
tion by fighting your way through the mobs in the
bookstore to purchase your textbooks. To save
money, try to find used texts, which are half-
price. To really save, just don't buy the books at
all and hope that they really aren't that important
for passing the class. If you like this fall's book
rush, you'll love the mob that tries to sell their
books back in December.
As if you haven't stood in enough lines already,
you'll need to stand in another one it you want to
have a telephone in your room. This usually isn't
too bad a line, since they give you a phonebook
and you get a chance to meet lots of people in
line, who you can exchange brand-new phone
numbers with.
By now, it's probably time to get in line for
your dorm (I'm just kidding. They let you walk
on in.) Fixing a meal after such a tiring day is
really too much work. It's quite understandable
to say something like "Damn the expense - full
pizzas ahead
man is a major artist in
his own right; the two
together are beyond
compare.
The series' third at-
traction, Carlos Mon-
toya, is familiar to
many patrons. Though
Montoya is appearing
on the Artists series for
the first time, he was
one of the highlights of
the 1978 Mendenhall
Scries. Montoya thrill-
ed the audience with his
superb flamenco guitar
and charmed them with
his endearing personali-
tv. He will appear on
November 12, 1980 to
both excite and delight
his audience.
On January 22. 1981,
the renowned Juilliard
School of Music sends
its magnificent string
quartet to East
Carolina University.
The Juilliard String
Quartet sets a standard
oi excellence among
string ensembles. They
have played over 3,000
sold-out concerts, and
are widely acknowledg-
ed as "without peer in
the world
The final perfor-
mance oi the season is
pianist Charles Rosen.
His appearance is on
April 2. 198' Besides
being one of the coun-
try's foremost pianists,
Rosen is also an ardent
music historian.
He eschews personal
glorv to do justice and
render service to the
music itself. Rosen per-
forms the music oi the
old masters, the roman-
tic composers, and the
contemporary and
avant-garde creators.
Season tickets for all
these excellent per-
formers are priced at
$20.00 for the public,
$15.00 for ECU faculty
and staff, and $7.50 for
ECU students.
Opry
Seafood
Lovers
Fosdick's
"All You Can Eat"
Seafood Buffet
Every night from 5 till closlnc, we will feature
our fabulous new Seafood Juffet - Delicioua
Fried Shrimp, Golden Brown Oyatera, Flan,
Deviled Crab, Shrimp Creole, Fried Chicken,
Clam Chowder, Slaw, Huah Puppies and Your
Choice of Ice Tea or Coffee.
All You Can Eat
Only 6.99
Fosdick's
1890
Seafood
A Great Place for Seafood
Dinner Catering
Coming Soon:
Oyater Bar
Freah Seafood MM.
Hours:
Lunch
Sunday-Friday
11:30 A.M2:38 PM
Dinner
Sunday-Thursday
IMP.M.4.MP.M.
Friday and Saturday
5:00 PM10:30 P M
3US EraMStowt
Gr�i�vtl!�. N.C
Party Room Available Wall
Umlih th Caka lor Birth-
day Aaalvcraarlaa. air lor
Parttaa of 8 or more Call lor
Raaarvatlon. 7 56 21 1
AUGUST
27 - North Star - Ladies Free Men $2.00
28 - North Star - Ladies $1.00
29 - J. Murphy Martin Band
30 - J. Murphy Martin Band
SEPTEMBER
2 - Bill Lyerly Band
3 - Snuff - Ladies Free Men $2.00
4 - Ambush - Ladies $1.00
5 - Ambush
6 - Ambush
9 - Tennessee Hat Band
10 - Tennessee Hat Band - Ladies Free Men $2.00
11 - Tennessee Hat Band - Ladies $1.00
12 - Tennessee Hat Band
13 - Tennessee Hat Band
16 - Bill Lyerly Band
17 - Bill Lyerly Band - Ladies Free Men $2.00
18 - Bill Lyerly Band - Ladies $1.00
19 - Bill Lyerly Band
20 - Bill Lyerly Band
23 - Fargo
24 - Fargo - Ladies Free Men $2.00
25 - FargO - Ladies $1.00
26 - The Variation Band
27 - The Variation Band





32
1 Ml I AM r-R(M IM l,1 M 26, 1980
WE WELCOME
FEDERAL
FOOD
STAMPS
rrst
to dealer
restaurants
MONDAY THRU
SATURDAY
8 am-10 pm
OPEN SUNDAYS
9 am-9 Dm
WELCOME BACK
PIRATES!
BIG STAR EXTENDS
A PERSONAL
INVITATION TO YOU!
SHOP AND SAVE
r OUR CONVENIENT
LOCATION IN
PITT PLAZA
SHOPPING CENTER
GREENVILLE BOULEVARD
QUALITY CONTROLLED'
FRESHLY
GROUND
BEEF
3 LBS.
OR MORE
LB.
$1
38
MILLER
HIGH LIFE
BEER
CARTON OF SIX
,� 12 0Z CANS
OLDE TOWNE SLICED
"
BACON
1 LB.
PKG.
.98
6�&"Y
o i
BOLOGHA J
$1
PEPSI
MOUNTAIN DEW
)z. RETURNABLE
BOTTLE
fill Hi R
GWALTNEY SUCED
BOLOGNA
1 LB. 0-i 08
PKG.
SI.1
(LAND OFROStI
WAFER SUCED
LUNCH
MEATS
ALL VARIETIES
2 12- 3 A Q
oz. pkg. ,�0.
CELEBRITY N
BRAND
SLICED
COOKED
HAM
PAK
$i
45
12 oz.
pkg.
P&
38

FRESH
SNOW WHITE
MUSHROOMS
lb .99
JS
NABISCO ASSORTED '
SNACK 8 oz PKG on
CRACKERS -89
CfWaltneii
J Of SrtlTHFIUD J
TOP QUALITY MEAT
FRANKS 12 � 98

MINUTE MAID
ORANGE JUICE
HALF GALLON
CARTON
SI:
29
PINE STATE
ASSORTED FLAVORS
FRUIT DRINKS
.89

BOUNTY
PAPER
TOWELS
LARGE
ROLL
o
� :�
FOX
DELUXE
PIZZAS
SAUSAGE
CHEESE
HAMBURGER
PEPPERONI
79
EACH
TROPICANA
FRUIT
DRINKS
ORANGE GRAPE PUNCH
5
10 oz.
BOTTLES
$1!
00
CALIFORNIA
WHITE
GRAPES
LB.






Every
Tuesday
and Thursday
you can read the
most informative stories
about the news events of the
'of the day at ECU and in Greenville
the best sports coverage, and
interesting features about the people, places and
things surrounding you so can your parents.
For $25 your parents can get a one year mail
subscription to the East Carolinian.
Serving the campus community since 1925, the
East Carolinian provides valuable insights into
student life at East Carolina University for your
parents. Twice-weekly, we can tell your family
about the most current campus and local news.
Student free flicks, concerts and sports events are
all covered in the pages of the East Carolinian, as
well as state and local news that affects the lives
of ECU students.
Our experienced, award-winning news staff
can bring your parents the news wherever it is
happening in eastern North Carolina, plus the
most dynamic behind-the-scenes investigative
reporting. Our UPI wire instantly brings you the
hottest state and national news.
Our features section will bring them
fascinating and often humorous human interest
stories about the people of the university and the
surrounding area. It also covers the cultural
events that enrich student life, as well as presen-
ting interesting slices of area flavor.
Spanning the
entire spectrum of
ECLr,s athletic activity,
our well-trained staff
of enthusiastic sports
writers will bring your
family comprehensive coverage of
ECU 's exciting football schedule,
in addition to highlighting the rest of an
impressive sports program.
Our remarkable staff works around the clock
to produce the best possible newspaper, contain-
ing the most essential news, features and sports
of interest not only to you, but to your parents
and friends as well, wherever they may be. The
East Carolinian � let us inform them.
Your parents, friends, and relatives can
subscribe to the East Carolinian for one year by
sending a check for $25 to: George Hettich, Cir-
culation Dept The East Carolinian, Old South
Building, East Carolina University, Greenville,
N.C. 27834.
If you wish, you may subscribe for them by
mailing a check for $25 along with the coupon
below to the East Carolinian, or just drop by the
East Carolinian office.
i�iic �a0t (Carolinian
SUBSCRIPTION FORM
Name
Address
C'ilv
Slate
Zip
Telephone )
RATK: $25 per year.
I SUfi SaBt (Eamlf man
Vv
kA-





AM
kes,
I � 5
AY
1.49
.
I Ml I AMAROLINIAN
E
d i
OK
AUGUST 26. 1980
21
1979 Pirate Scenes
EASTERN N.Cs NO. 1 BEACH CLUB
WELCOMES BACK
ALLE.C.U. STUDENTS!
TUES.
WED.
Weekly Beginning September:
SIGMA PHI EPSILON
LADIES NIGHT
SIGMA NU 5050 NIGHT
.50 Admission and all canned beverages.50
THURS.OVER THE HUMP NIGHT
The Weekend Begins Here Don't Miss it
With John Moore 'The American Dream'
FRI. END OF THE WEEK PARTY
Free Admission - All Beverages.50
Also Collins Cooper and OldyGoldy Night
SAT. AFTER THE GAME PARTY
Relax and Enjoy After Latest Football Game
SUN. KAPPA ALPHA - NICKEL NITE !
See You There!
FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 752-9745
) A 1
H L HODGES
COMPANY
LOCATED AT 210 EAST FIFTH STREET
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
OFF ON SHOE'PURCHASE
KSviss
Coupon Good Until Sept 15. Must Present With ECU ID Cart.
ASAHI
HX. Hodges Co.
Bond's Sporting Goods
CoTJpW
Iretom
Adidas
SPERRY TOP SIDER
BOND'S
SPORTING GOODS
Located At 218 Arlington Blvd
Two Stores To Serve You
Welcome To Greenville

t mmttmmm





Title
The East Carolinian, August 26, 1980
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
August 26, 1980
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.70
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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