The East Carolinian, March 6, 1980






�toe lEaat (Haroltman
Vol. 54 Nojrf u 5
8 Pages
Thursday, March 6, 1980
(�reenville. N.C
Circulation 10.(MM)
Enrollment
Record Set
For Foreign
Languages
B ROBERT ALBANESE
AsMslanl News Kdilor
Required courses in foreign
language still elicit wailing and
gnashing of teeth at ECU, but
enrollment in language courses has
increased for the fifth straight year.
"We have had an average annual
increase in student enrollment of
15.5 percent for 1979-80 says Dr.
Marguerite Perry, chairman of the
Department of Foreign Languages
and I iteratures. "That's double last
year's increase. Majors are on the
upturn, too
This increase could indicate the
reversal of a trend which a presiden-
tial com mi si on has called
Scandalous Students across
America had developed an aversion
to the study of foreign language,
many considering it too hard or ir-
relevant to their educational goals.
This semester saw 34 students sign
up for Russian 1, which is an ECU
record. "Students will use Russian
as a door-opener for jobs in govern-
ment, business and science ex-
plains Dr. Maria Malby, ECU Rus-
sian professor.
'There's a lot of anti-Soviet sen-
timent in America today, which
makes a knowledge of Russian all
the more important. In order to
understand the enemy, we have to
know his language
"Foreign language is not only a
major � it's also a skill says Rob
Jernigan, a French major from
Ahoskie. "It's like being a diesel
mechanic. Some people know how
to take engines apart and put them
back together, and some know how
to speak foreign languages
What about those students who
say that knowledge of foreign
language is not important? "It's an
isolationist attitude said Dr.
Perry. "They are not studying to be
in touch with the world. To en-
courage the study of foreign
language in the university is in the
national interest. It is not only the
language that we study, but another
culture
Snow Jobs
Sally and George Brett (top)
give daughter Sarah a ride while
jogging during Sunday's
snowstorm. Dr. and Mrs.
Brewer (bottom) shovel snow
from the walkway leading to
their house, aided by Penelope
and Cleo, the Brewer's basset
hounds.
Photos by Richard Green
Weekend Snow
Brings ECU
To A Standstill
By LARRY ZICHKRMAN
Staff Writer
ECU students sloshed and waded
their way back to classes Wednesday
after a two-day vacation caused bv
the worst snowstorm to hit the
region in over 50 years.
The two-day respite from classes
marked the first time the university
has been closed because of weather
in 25 years, and the first time for the
school to be closed two consecutive
days, according to the ECU News
Bureau.
Warm temperatures and rain are
helping to melt away 16-22 inches of
snow that fell Saturday and Sunday,
but a cold front was expected to
move into the state Wednesday and
could turn the slush into ice.
It has not been decided whether
the missed days will be made up. A
spokesman for Dr. Robert Maier.
vice-chancellor for academic af-
fairs, said, he thinks the lost time
should not be made up during spr-
ing break, if at all.
A formal decision on the matter
will probably be made at. an ad-
ministration staff meeting on Tues-
day.
Mayo Allen, Greenville Public
Works director, said the city has
had every available unit working
around the clock to clear the snow.
Thirteen pieces of equipment and
about 30 employees with shovels
were working to clear the city of
snow.
He added that all roads
downtown and into Greenville were
cleared by 9 a.m. Tuesday, and that
crews are now working to clear
residential streets.
The N.C. Department of
Transportation utilized 36 pieces of
equipment and 87 employees
around the clock in Pitt County,
and by 3 p.m. Wednesday, the only
roads left uncleared were the coun-
ty's unpaved roads.
University Security Lt. Bill
Barnes said that there have not been
many problems due to the snow. He
said the biggest problem has been
snow removal, and added that there
were no vandalism or discipline pro-
blems like those during the last
snow.
Local police, fire and rescue ser-
vices were hampered bv the bad
weather, and were able to perform
their jobs only with the help oi area
four-wheel drive club and the
North Carolina National Guard.
Sgt. George Pleasants of the Na-
tional Guard's 514 Military Police
company said thai the guard was
mobilized at 11:30 Sunday night.
and assisted all law enforcement
agencies, fire departments, and
rescue squads that requested help.
He added that thev also helped
stranded motorists, physicians and
nurses who needed to get to or from
the hospital, and the Red C ross.
The guard operated four 2 : ton
trucks and ten V trucks from Sun-
day night until Wednesday after-
noon.
Greenville Fire and Rescue
recorded a large number of
emergency medical calls, and a luj
number of fire calls. 1 ire Chiei len-
ness Allen said the busiest night for
fires was Sundav. with three .alls.
He said that none of the hres w .
serious and credited the National
Guard's assistance in responding to
some calls.
Greenville Police Chief Glenn
Cannon said the city's problems
were severe. He said the cit was no;
equipped for heavy snows, both in
terms of equipment and personnel.
Pitt County Sheriff's Department
spokesmen noted the same situa-
tion. Both said the onlv va
most were able to handle an traffic
was with the assistance of the North
Carolina National Guard.
Pitt County Fire Marshall and
Civil Preparedness Coordma
Bobby Joyner said there were
relatively fes fire cutK, and thai fire
units, due to their size, weigl
ground clearance, had little trouble
getting around.
The Highway Patrol reporter
number of minor traffic accidents.
A spokesman said thev also relied
on high-clearance 4-wheel drive
trucks owned by patrolmen to get
around.
Relief is in sight, however.
Weather reports predict a general
warming trend for the next few
days. Combined with rain, this
should help area residents in their
battle against the white stuff.
ECU Student Center Suffers Water Damage
The roof of Mendenhall Student
Center is apparently not in much
better shape than that of Minges
Coliseum, where water was
"literally pouring" into the gym-
nasium and main handball courts
Wednesday, according to an ECU
employee who works in the leaky
tructure.
In Mendenhall Student Center,
similar leaks have been aggravated
by melting snow and drizzly
weather. Complaints about the
leakage in Mendenhall surfaced
after The East Carolinian reported
the water damage in Minges Col-
iseum on Feb. 28.
Although the leaks in Mendenhall
are not as severe as those in Minges,
the water is causing damage in
several areas.
The worst problem in Mendenhall
is in the Student Union office,
Room 233, where dripping water
has destroyed a section of the ceil-
ing, caused the wallpaper to peel,
and soaked into an approximately
20-foot-square area of the carpet.
In the Student Union Artist's of-
fice, Room 235, water has drained
down a wall and over an electrical
outlet, also damaging the ceiling
and carpet.
According to Rudolph Alex-
ander, director of the student
center, the university has contracted
an outside firm to repair the leaks,
but wet weather has delayed needed
repairs.
Alexander said the leaks have
been a problem for at least four
years, and that attempts by ECU
maintenance workers to correct the
situation have been unsuccessful.
"In all fairness, you have to give
them credit for trying, but they are
not experienced roofers Alex-
ander noted Wednesday.
Both Minges Coliseum and
Mendenhall Student Center were
designed by F. Carter Williams, a
Raleigh-based architectural firm,
but the construction work was done
by different contractors.
It is not clear at this time if the
leakage is the result of bad design,
faulty construction or other factors.
The individual at F. Carter
Williams who deals with such struc-
tural problems was not available
Wednesday for comment.
Minges Coliseum was completed
in 1967 and Mendenhall in 1976.
"It's a shame that a building only
5!2 years old is having its ceilings,
walls, carpets and wallpaper damag-
ed like this said Alexander, ad-
ding that it was an "eyesore and an
aggravation
In Minges, classes and activities
are continuing as normally as possi-
ble, despite Dr. Edgar Hooks' com-
ment that it was "raining" in the
gymnasium.
Hooks, chairman of the Health,
Physical Education, Recreation and
Safety Department, added that he
had also discovered new cracks in
the coliseum ceiling during the last
few days.
Alexander and Hooks both said
they have long been seeking action
on the problem. In an interview last
week, Vice Chancellor of Business
Affairs Cliff Moore said, "We've
done all we can, and we're still
working on getting the needed ap-
propriations. It's just that when one
avenue is closed, we have to go
through other channels to get it
solved
Jobs More Important Than Activism
By The Associated Press
Student activism may be on the
upsurge after renewed interest in the
military draft and worldwide unrest,
but it still falls short of the campus
activity that swept the nation 10
years ago.
"Students are beginning to feel
the itch, wanting to express
themselves in a way to have an in-
fluence toward redirecting society.
What it has needed to become more
broadly popular is an issue that
Inside Today
News & Observer BlastedPage 4
Dixie Dregs To
Appear SaturdayPage 5
Seniors Gray, Mayor
tiaisb Careers In StylePage 7
NCAA Playoff PairingsPage 8
makes activism apply to people of
student age said Jake Phelps, an
activist at Chapel Hill in the 1960s
and now director of the student
union at Duke University.
Phelps said President Carter pav-
ed the way for more student involve-
ment when he called for reinstate-
ment of military draft registration.
"He has guaranteed a decade of ac-
tivism Phelps said.
But the tone of the new fervor has
not taken form.
"It's hard to tell whether a real
trend has developed now says J.
Carlyle Sitterson, former University
of North Carolina chancellor. "A
lot of them are thinking things
over
Sitterson, now Kenan professor
of history at Chapel Hill, said that a
decade ago college students lived
with the assumption of an expan-
ding economy that would allow
them to take a couple of years off to
work for mankind
"Now, they are bound by the
perception of what they consider
limited economic growth and the
consequent necessity of finding their
place within the constrictions of that
� to put it in one word, jobs he
said.
Jobs also are on the minds of
students in today's economy-
conscious society.
"I'm sure they are concerned
about what is happening, but our
student body is extremely concerned
about the job market, getting an
education, finishing their degree
and moving into the world of
work said James B. Chavis, vice
chancellor for student affairs at
Pembroke State University.
The Duke Chronicle is one of a
number of campus newspapers that
are being inundated by letters on the
subject of draft.
"Some people want to go; some
people wouldn't go said Duke
junior John Tupple, 21, of Lex-
ington, Ky.
"If there is registration or a draft,
I think there is going to be organized
protest against it said Duke
psychology professor Norman Gut-
man.
John McDuffie, a Pembroke stu-
dent, says a lot of students would go
along with the draft "because it
would be law. But we wouldn't sup-
port it. We'd rather see a greater
consideration of energy than to go
to war for oil
In Chapel Hill, there is accep-
tance of the possible draft but little
ardor, Sitterson said. "It is more a
cautious and reluctant acceptance of
a necessary burden. Where it will go
from here, it is too soon to tell.
"The forces of time are going to
influence and develop student at-
titudes in this decade, just as they
did before
PfrrtOby KIP SLOAN
Student Union Office (Room 233)
Although university maintenance workers have tried several
times to repair the leaking in Mendenhall, water continues to
damage ceilings, waha and carpets. This photograph shows
the worst of the damage in the student center.

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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 6, 1980
Militants Resist Meeting
B 1 he Associated Press
The young militants
holding the American
hostages in Tehran
refused again today to
let the U.N. in-
vestigating commission
meet with their captives
even though Ayatollah
Ruhollah Khomeini
gave his implied ap-
proval to the meeting.
"Our position has
not changed. We will
not let the meeting take
place a spokesman
for the militants occu-
pying the U.S. Em-
bassy told a reporter by
telephone.
The spokesman said
Khomeini's agreement
to the meeting had not
been confirmed.
Foreign Minister
Sadegh Ghotbzadeh,
who favors the visit, ac-
cused "communists
and Zionists" of trying
to foil the commis-
sion's mission, an ap-
parent reference to lef-
tists among the captors.
The foreign minbister's
comment was in an in-
terview with the Tehran
newspaper Azadeghan.
Khomeini's son, Ah-
Announcements
Concert
I , .(till I'lf
i wcstci n )
v i� I He LOflccrl "ill

! � . J
I I
i ampu
ponstvi m i ��
Fall Housing
1 he n � � period loi returning
.liuKnK lo reserve Residence II.ill
Rms Ioi I .ill Scmcsici IW�. which
� i oikiimIK scheduled l�i Nlarcl "�
heen postponed iiniil March I" -I
I he v.iim lormai .i announced
will be lollowed Studenis
m- olhei lhan the ones in whn I
prcscntl. reside will be required lo pie
hen ll and clivitv ards
Twig
Theology
-
I � y H W . � research and
� . 1 hursd i r
M ' I
Fssay Contest
pleased
mmial Pau I
.� he contest is
I � � , should Ix
. lien in
tutse
, menda
to
t Kinn
award � " S5t)
. ,oui in
ul-
Benefit Dance
.
I he t nii.in.iii 1 niversalist fellowship
invites u lo attend the 'HmUlitit-
out i k� n I heologv � i ies i n March
M "Hislorv ' Honest Backward
I ook " Meetings art al 10 Wa m . 2nd
I � sii id n � ol 'he month n ihe
t ommunitv Room in ile hasement ol
Planters' National Bank. Washington
: hird Slreci
MC AT
� i� 1 (Medical i ollege d
mission l.i pad is have armed in
ihi resting t enter, ' tghl 105 lesl
dates lot ll�s" are Vprtl and (X-l ��
Headline lot ihe pril lesl is March
and tor Ihe October 4 test is Sept 5
ITme-lpC linic
I HI INOl c tub is sponsoring .1 tune
inic in Ihe power rechnologv lab
i l lanagan (look lot the Pirati
Ship) he I 5 � and includes
performance tune-up with the n"
lune up �:ope N u must supplv. youi
,wn riart Know make model, ind
engine sie to get parts Point and
plugs essential Rotot button .mJ
tnitoi cap optional Heir yo
vout v.r . youi � mileage, and ihe is
PI t lub In signing up iinl.iv I oi ,ip
- ill 752 �s ot sign up in
deparlmenl It
Proceeds � ' clp Pirate
Flections
Beginning ncxl lall semester, ihe Men's
Residence i otineil will change its name
u ihe t ollcge Hill Residence t ouncil
Ihis change will enable Met P oi
become a membci ol ihe governing
NJ i ihe hill Hie elections loi Ihe
I veculivc ouncil "1 Ihe t HKt �ill
lake place on Wednesday. Vpnl ��
Positions available include president,
.tec-president, sccrctan and ircasurei
Ihcse positions arc available lo any
resident ol the hiH Prospective can
didates should contact the Men's
K. iik ik c t ouncil
Rally
Iheie �ill be .1 Washington fot lesus
rails I ihI.iv. March 1 al the Rose High
School L'viiiii.isiiini in lirecnvtlle Ihis
IU is parl �i .i nation wide
Washington lot lesus movement which
. iniing day ol prayei in ilie na
lion's capital I he organization epe is
more lhan one millionhristians from
.ill ovei Vmcrica lo participate
Members ol .ill denominations arc in
i iied i" attend
mand, who in the past
has acted as a liaison
between the embassy
militants and his
father, was quoted as
saying he believed the
meeting would be
"useful
"It doesn't hurt
anybody and this was
part of their (the com-
mission's) work he
was quoted as saying in
an interview with the
official Pars news agen-
cy.
The five members of
the U.N. commission
met with Ghotbzadeh
to try to nail down ar-
rangements for the
meeting with t h e
hostages. They return-
ed to their hotel an
hour later, and a
spokesman said they
still expected to see the
Americans.
President
Abolhassan Bani-Sadr
told reporters Tuesday
night that Khomeini
had given him and the
Revolutionary Council,
which Bani-Sadr heads,
jurisdiction over the
matter of the proposed
meeting between the
U.N. group and the
captives. He said the
council decided the
meeting should take
place, and it would be
held.
But Khomeini, the
79-year-old religious
leader of Iran's revolu-
tionary regime, ap-
parently did not issue a
direct order to the
young militants to per-
mit the meeting on
Bani-Sadr's terms.
Wind Sculpted The Snow
.and buried many cars in while stuff
Register
h ispi
i
ship
(,BP
( rossroads
meet I '
Vlarcl I al '� :44
V1
Vote
lor the Mav I
v .
I absentee hallo
. oui
d S
Road Race
t-du

11
C ontest
D ii
vi �
i
V
VI
S i
� V nual ireenville Kmij
Race ri 000n ctei2n �)foot
racc �� enville is scheduled tot
iv. Vpnl rhe race is spon
vored hv Bond's Sporting ld Pro
ceeds will t� u ,ne I alc' Seal Society.
Merchandise awards ���M be sivcn to ihe
top finishers overall .mil to ihe op
age division 11 I
sni will receo
1 shirl I � lurthei
I
-��� � K � I Vlurray ii
reshmen who purchased y lass ol ll's;
I reshman Registers should come by Ihe
sy, office, room 228 Mendenhall. io
; , k up iheu books Deadline is Mai h
'I
sc;a
Iheie will be an st. V legislature
meeting tonight at 4 W in Room 221
Mendenhall VII members are ui
I
Notary
l notarv service lot I C I stud
available in ihe st, v olf.ee. room 229
nhall
Remember
We wish lo remind .til
students and facultv that we
will not accept am an
nouncements for ihe An-
nouncements column unless
thev are typed doublespace
and turned in before the
deadline, "so exceptions will
be made Ihe deadlines are
2:(X) p.m. Friday fot the
Tuesday edition and 2:(X)
p.m. luesdav for the lhurs-
day edition. We reserve the
right to edit tor breviu We
cannot guarantee that
everything turned in will ap-
pear in the paper, due to
space limitations, but we vvil
do our best
JOLLY
ROGER
THURS. - ECU NIGHT
FREE ADMISSION
and
SOCIAL HOUR
8:00 till 11:00
Friday Early Bird Specials
8:00- 11:00
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Magazines and
POSTER CONTEST
March 22,1980
2 Winners in Six Categories
GRAND PRIZE to
Best in Show Poster
The Poster Theme is -
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FRIDAY, MARCH 21st
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qUESTIONNAIRE
OFF CAMPUS STUDENT HOUSING
se�nIe!Siden?e Life Pro�� and Student Housing Task Force is
seeking information fro. ECU students who are living off campus
obfainS8w?aK CTCtTn lh9y T? have with fusing. The information
ootamed will be used as a basis for future planning activities.
Please return completed questionnaire to one of the following:
UJ box located in the Student Supply Store
(2) Room 201, Whichard Bldg
(3) Residence Hall Office or
(4) mail to: Pat Garton Belk Bldg
East Carolina University
Greenville, NC 27834
Return by: March 6, 1980
Please complete the following questions by either checking the
Blank or writing the answer you deem appropriate.
Classification:
freshman,
senior,
sophomore,
graduate
junior
Sex:
male,
female
Of the following aspects of off-campus housing, rate your degree
of concern by ranking each area on the following scale:
0 no concern, 1 � moderate concern, 2 great concern
cost
pest
vandalism
roommate
laundry
meals
noise
security counseling
other (please specify)
maintenance
transportation
access to campus
peer harassment
lack of privacy
In case of fire or disaster, do you know the safest way out of the
building ybu are living in: yes, no.
Should all students living on campus be allowed to have an automobile:
yes� no, don't know.
Do you feel there are sufficient avenues through which you may express
no.
your ideas regarding housing: yes,
What role should the University assume in off-campus housing?
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 6, 1980
Afghan Rebel Charges Neglect
I S L A,M A B A D ,
Pakistan (AP) � An
Afghan rebel leader ac-
cused the Western and
Moslem worlds of
"being unconcerned
spectators while our
people are floating in
their own blood
because of Russian
atrocities He denied
the rebels are receiving
aid from the United
States or China.
Professor Burhanud-
din Rabbani, head of a
coalition of five rebel
groups fighting the
communist government
in Afghanistan, told a
news conference here
Tuesday that hundreds
of his men had been
killed in the past four
days as Soviet
warplanes bombed
rebel strongholds in
eastern Afghan pro-
vinces near the
Pakistani border.
The rebels also
claimed to have in-
flicted heavy casualties
on Afghan army troops
during the fighting,
which Western
diplomats have said ap-
pears to be the start of
a major offensive
against the rebels by
Afghan and Soviet
troops.
Rabbani denied the
rebels were receiving
arms or other
assistance from the
United States, China or
any Moslem nation that
pledged support during
a foreign ministers con-
ference here in
January.
But the Soviet am-
bassador to Japan,
Dmitri Polyansky,
charged today that the
U.S. and Chinese
governments were
training "tens of
thousands of well-
trained guerrillas" and
in effect, waging war
on Afghanistan.
"The imperialists
and their accomplices
in Peking, disregarding
the protests of the
Afghan government,
are in reality waging
war against
Afghanistan without a
declaration of war he
said in a speech to
Japan's National Press
Club in Tokyo.
The Kremlin, which
sent an estimated
70,000 troops into
Afghanistan in late
December, has said it
will not withdraw from
the neighboring Central
Asian nation until what
it calls outside in-
terference stops.
In a disptach Tues-
day from Kabul, the of-
ficial Soviet news agen-
cy Tass acknowledged
"scattered actions by
gangs of mercenaries
were registered in some
provinces of
Afghanistan adjoining
the Pakistani border
It did not elaborate.
What are your reasons for living ofT-zampQs?
Special Examination
Scheduled For April
Duke Researchers Enter Chamber
DURHAM (AP) �
Last Tuesday, a
medical student, a
physician's associate
and a professional
diver entered a thick-
walled chamber at
Duke University for a
two-week stay.
Although they will be
far from the ocean, the
men will experience
pressure equal to that
1,500 feet below the
sea.
During their two-
week stay the men will
eat, sleep and perform
a series of tests, all in
the name of science.
Researchers at Duke's
F.G. Hall Environmen-
tal Laboratory will
study the men for pro-
blems that appear in
human beings at such
depths.
The experiment is
one of many ways the
laboratory's eight steel
pressure chambers are
being used to benefit
science, medicine and
the diving profession.
With an annual
budget of about $1.2
million, the Hall
Laboratory is con-
sidered to be one of the
busiest facilities of its
kind in the world. Thir-
ty different projects are
under way there, in-
cluding the underwater
pressure tests and
evaluations of
breathing devices for
U.S. Navy frogmen.
Dr. Peter B. Bennett,
the laboratory's direc-
tor and a diver, said
Duke is one of the
pioneers in the use of
high-pressure oxygen.
Patients from area
hospitals enter the
pressure chambers to
be treated for painful
jaw sores that develop
as a resul of some
kinds of radiation
therapy.
A special administra-
tion of the National
Teacher Examinations
is scheduled at ECU
and several other cam-
puses in the state on
April 19.
According to J. Ar-
thur Taylor, director of
standards and certifica-
tion for the N.C.
Department of Public
Instruction, the special
test date was set to give
teacher candidates a
last opportunity to
qualify for certification
under the present 950
score requirement.
Effective July I,
1980, teachers must
receive a NTE score of
970 before being issued
a certificate to teach in
North Carolina.
Further information
and registration
materials are available
from the ECU Testing
Center, 105 Speight
Building.
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March 21
The Dirt Band
"Ait American dream"
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urctrj iniiriil munif
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Rupert Holmes
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March 28
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, !�� �-�� ��'
Otye lEaat Carolinian
Serving the campus community for 54 years.
Marc Barneses� cam
Diane Henderson, Mmtm
Robert M. Swaim, amc uwitan Richard Green, ca&t&a
Chris Lichok, mm mmk Charles Chandler, �� ��
Terry Gray, v� e Debbie Hotaling, ��� eon�
SSfS I
THURSDAY, MARCH 6, 1980
PAGE 4
7Y�,s Newspaper's Opinion
N&O Feeds Rivalry
77i? News and Observer has
shown its colors (red, lily white, and
Carolina blue) in the editorial
"Keep UNC, State strong" (March
4). Backing former Gov. Terry San-
ford's statement to the Advisory
Budget Commission last week, the
N&O agrees that the UNC Board of
Governors should continue to keep
the "flagship" institutions above
the other schools in the UNC
system.
Sanford said, and the N&O
agrees, "There are those who would
try to bring N.C. State and Chapel
Hill down to the ordinary level of
the rest of the institutions. We
ought to be proud that some institu-
tions are rising above the average. I
would hope we would not try to
equalize everything
Granted, not everything can be
equalized, especially the unparallel-
ed superiority complex of these
flagship institutions. Why do these
two schools rise above the average?
Because most of the legislators are
alumni of the schools; so are the
Daniels family.
Chapel Hill and State are the ma-
jor doctorate-granting institutions
and deserve needed funding, but it
is doubtful that the entire UNC
system would drift into bland
mediocrity without them as the
Raleigh paper claims.
The N&O calls opposition to this
viewpoint "jealousy but it would
seem that the flagships are becom-
ing jealous of any school in the
system that is growing. ECU is a
handy example.
East Carolina: offers doctorates
in specialized areas; has one of the
only three accredited undergraduate
business schools and one of the only
two accredited graduate business
schools in the state (Chapel Hill,
too); has one of best art schools in
the nation; has the only drama com-
plex in the state; has a medical
growing school; and has an enroll-
ment approaching 14,000. The list
goes on.
Of course N.C. State should get
an expanded library facility if it
needs one, but the other UNC
schools need things too. ALL state
universities need more money, and
none of them (least of all the
"ordinary" ones) can stand a cut in
funds.
Of course the UNC Board of
Governors was not formed to create
a sameness over all institutions, but
it must advance all UNC schools.
There is little chance that attempts
to increase the level of education in
all schools (and God forbid if one
should approach flagship status)
"will only deprive the state of its
proud excellence in higher educa-
tion It will only offer North
Carolina students a better educa-
tion.
We feel The News and Observer is
backing a cause detrimental to the
good of the entire state and feeding
the already unnecessary rivalry in
the university system. There is an
old saying quite familiar to we or
dinary folks: Contrary to popular
belief, all knowledge does NOT
flow from Chapel Hill. Obviously.
We urge all students who feel
strongly about this issue to write to
their state representatives, or to the
editor of the N&O:
The News and Observer
P.O.Box 191
Raleigh, N.C. 27602
An interesting aside: It is
rumored that Terry Sanford plans
to ask that the state contribution to
N.C. students attending private
schools be doubled. Where will that
extra money come from?
C�APft
HILL
TH�& 60 MYAICH STEPSISTERS TO THE BALL
Pop's People
Mr
By LARRY POPELKA
"Hey kids, it's time for 'The Mr. Bill
Show
"Hoo-Hooo kiddies
"Today, Mr. Bill, we're going to inter-
view you for Pops' People
"Oh boy, are we going to have fun to-
day! I love interviews. Yah Who's going
to interview me, huh, Mr. Hands?"
"Here comes your interview now, Mr.
Bill. It's Reporter Sluggo
"Aw, he's no reporter, he's just mean to
me.
?�"Reporter Sluggo says he needs a
microphone
"Here's your microphone, Mr. Bill, but
be careful
SPLAT!
Oooooooooooooooooo
?
Fighting Sexism With Sexism
Certain fund raising events
deserve more than just a casual
mention in the Announcements col-
umn of this newspaper. Such an
event is the "Swing and Sway for
ERA" at the Elbo Room on March
24.
At first glance, the event seems to
be the run-of-the-mill variety, with
the crowd cheering for the Women's
Political Caucus, the group that will
get the proceeds from the night's
festivities.
A closer look reveals an unusual
twist. This group, which espouses a
pro-ERA stand, which is supports
women in politics and male political
candidates with similar beliefs, is
sponsoring a "Most Beautiful
Male" contest.
In short, this group which fights
sexism is using sexism against men
to carry on their cause.
Such demonstrations of tongue-
in-cheek humor dispel the widely
held notion that the women's move-
ment is absolutely void of any
humor. The stereotype of the
"typical" feminist or women's
rights activist is someone who never
smiles
This classic example of tongue-in-
cheek logic makes light of beauty
contests, the ultimate insult to
women of intelligence. The Miss
America contests, and their clones
for every age and status group, have
been degrading women for years.
This degradation has not reached
the male population yet, but if the
ERA supporters we mentioned
earlier have their way, it won't be
too long before some man takes the
walk down the runway to the strains
of a Bert Parks look-alike singing,
"There he is

Poor Mr. Bill. Nothing ever seems to go
right for him.
First he got electrocuted by his Christmas
tree lights. Then he was run over by a car.
Then he fell off the top of the Empire State
Building. Then when his mother talked him
into giving life one last chance and he
visited Psychiatrist Sluggo, Sluggo prescrib-
ed a lobotomy and chopped off half his
head.
And now, smashed by a microphone!
Life is rough. Especially for little clay
men.
In case you've never seen Mr. Bill during
his famous one-minute segment on
"Saturday Night Live" or never seen one of
his thousands of T-shirts with him scream-
ing "Ooooh Nooo" or never read his best-
selling book or never listened to his record,
it's time for an explanation.
Mr. Bill is a small red and white clay pup-
pet. Every week or two during the last half
hour of NBC's "Saturday Night Live" he
stars in "The Mr. Bill Show" with his. dog,
Spot.
The show usually begins with Mr. Bill
partaking in some seemingly harmless task,
such as going to the circus. But something
always goes wrong.
At the circus Mr. Bill meets Ringmaster
Sluggo, who, with the help of the ominous
Mr. Hands, ends up shooting Mr. Bill and
Spot out of a cannon, while Mr. Bill
screams, "Oooooooooo
So far Mr. Bill has been crushed, bent,
stapled, hit in the head with a baseball bat,
buried in a box of sand, smashed in a photo
album and ground up in a blender with a
chocolate milkshake.
Originally I wanted to interview Mr. Bill
to get a first-hand account of his ex-
periences. But Mr. Bill's not feeling too well
after his little encounter with Reporter
Sluggo's microphone, so I've asked Walter
Williams � the only person who knows Mr.
Bill personally � to tell us about Bill's life.
Mr. Bill was brought into the world six
years ago in a small New Orleans apart-
ment. Williams, who had dropped out of
the University of New Orleans (where he
studied accounting) to help some friends
make low-budget movies, recalls Mr. Bill's
birth vividly.
"One Sunday morning I was watching
Popeye cartoons he says. "And I noticed
the animation on the newer cartoons was
just terrible. The characters hardly moved
at all. And I was thinking, 'What's going to
happen next? Pretty soon we're going to see
people's hands moving the figures
"I just happened to have some Play-doh,
so I played around with it and made some
figures. And then I made a film with the
hands moving the characters. It was just a
joke
Mr. Bill was born.
"I chose the name Mr. Bill because I kind
of liked the way it sounded Williams
says. "And I invented Spot because in the
first film I didn't want anything bad to hap-
pen to Mr. Bill right at the beginning; it had
to happen to someone else first
In 1975 when "Saturday Night Live"
premiered and solicited home movies from
viewers, Williams sent in Mr. Bill's movie
and the network aired it.
At the young age of 2, Mr. Bill was a star.
And after several successful sequels Mr.
Bill has become a Saturday Night Live
regular, and Williams, at age 26, is now a
full-time writer for the show.
Much of Williams' time, though, is still
spent with Mr. Bill. A single episode can
take as long as six to eight weeks to pro-
duce. Mr. Bill has had to be transported
everywhere from skid row to mountaintops
just for the sake of getting his little head
bashed.
Then there's the problem of making up
Mr. Bill. This takes about two hours.
First Williams must cut out a Styrofoam
skeleton, then he shapes various colored
Play-doh ("I use Play-doh because I like
the smell says Williams) to fit over the
frame and glues the two together. Then he
uses pipe cleaners to hold Mr. Bill's legs and
arms together.
"I can't just use clay says Williams,
"because it breaks up too easy. Mr. Bill's
got to hold up for 18 to 24 hours of
shooting, and under those hot lights Play-
doh can really dry up
A new Mr. Bill is cloned to make each
new episode, and all the old Mr. Bills are
kept in a freezer in Williams' apartment in
case a stunt man is needed.
Whenever we do something particular!)
gruesome we use a stunt Bill William-
says. "A revoking door, tor example, can
really do a number on Plav-doh
When he's not getting squashed or
ground or bent out of shape. Mr. Bill stand-
about four to eight inches tall "depending
on the size of the set he working in and
he weighs one pound, "except when he eat-
too many snacks he gets up to 1 ; pounds
But whether he get- tlattened b an iron
or bent out of shape b a sledge hammer or
hung by his neck on a clothes line. Mr. Bill
is always a hit.
Then there are the thousands of Mr. Bill
T-shirts, mugs, cookies and other items on
the market � none of which have been
authorized by Williams or Mr. Bill, except
for one T-shirt.
"You know says Williams, "the. funny
thing about all this stuff being marketed is
that it says, 'Oooh Nooo, Mr. Bill Well.
Mr. Bill � or anyone else on the show �
never says, 'Oooh Nooo Sometimes Mr.
Bill says, Oooo' or 'Owww but he never
says, 'Oooh Nooo
"The problem is the people who do these
ripoffs have different interpretations of Mr.
Bill; they always miss the point. They take
one facet � Mr. Bill getting smashed �
and say, 'Wow, let's beat up Mr. Bill. 1 try
to make it more of an accidental thing. The
character is supposed to be a nice, gullible
person who people feel for
In a way, Williams says, Mr. Bill is just
like me and you � the little guy � con-
stantly getting stepped on by the Mr. Hand-
ses.
"Mr. Hands always tries to manipulate
things using Sluggo as an excuse Williams
says. "And Mr. Bill, who's always too
gullible, gets it. The worst that can happen
happens. 1 base it on things I've experienced
at times.
I'm not saying that 1 ever fell off the Em-
pire State Building. But my father died
when I was just a kid, and I've always been
a worrier. 1 just try to make jokes out of it.
Certain things scare me, and maybe they
should scare others too.
"Every day I've thought of killing Mr.
Bill Williams says. "I go looking for him.
but he's always hiding.
"I've thought of burying him alive, but
then he might always come back to life and
we'd be stuck with his reincarnation.
"There's no way out. Maybe one night
I'll just get up on the show and tell everyone
it's all been a big hoax and there's never
really been a Mr. Bill; it was all made up
Oooooooooooooo!
Power h The Name Of The Game, All Over The World
By CHARLES GRIFFIN
National News Bureau
Power is the name of the game.
But the game is understood and
played differently from one area of
the world to another. There is no
working democracy anywhere in the
Orient. It is highly unlikely that any
of us now alive will ever live to see
such a thing come about there.
There is some justification to the
claim "third world" countries make
about western imperialism hinder-
ing their orderly growth in the last
two centuries. The normal process
of change and societal growth was
broken by European and American
intervention in the established
societies of China, Japan, India,
Indo-China, and Turkey. Of course,
we literally destroyed all the
established American cultures ex-
isting prior to 1492; only traces re-
main of the Aztec, the Inca, and the
Iroquois.
We cannot restore what is lost.
But for the last fifty years we have
suffered increasingly painful pangs
of guilt that have blinded us to the
good we have done.
Once, it was fashionable to talk
of civilizing the heathen, and the
western world saw that task as its
appointed role in history. Although
the criteria were primarily religious,
the intent was sound. The dominant
society always imposes its mores
upon those it conquers. The con-
quered always infiltrate the con-
querers eventually through sex and
the absorption of ideas and
behavior, patterns that fit comfor-
tably in the conquered area's en-
vironment.
In the year 622 A.D. the religious-
ly fertile desert gave birth to a new
faith, Islam. It spread across the
Arabian deserts, the north of
Africa, the Caucasus mountains,
the Hindu Kush, the Indian subcon-
tinent. It jumped the Dardanelles
and the Strait of Gibraltar. It lapped
the shores of the Phillipines and the
banks of the Danube. And it crested
on the passes of the Pyrenees.
Islam was a chain reaction. It of-
fered a quick and violent means to
obtain power and promised heaven
as well as earthly rewards for being
rapacious. Petty kings succumbed
to hungry princes or cast their lot
with the new religion and each car-
ried the word to his neighbor on the
point of his sword.
In overrunning so great an area,
Islamic rulers found themselves the
possessers of great libraries,
kingdoms with long histories of
learning, civilizations that were old
when Moses was learning to write.
With so much to draw upon, Islamic
culture bloomed for a brief time.
But once the conquered areas
began to absorb and distort the con-
querers, divisions and demarcations
began that continue to this day.
Much is said in the news about the
Brotherhood of Islam, but the truth
is that they can't even get together
long enough to clear the Jews from
Palestine. The only thing they all
agree on is an old desert philosophy
� far older than Islam � and that
is, "Take a stranger for all he is
worth
A stranger may find protection in
the rigid law of hospitality with one
Arab, but that Arab will send one of
his tribe to his neighbor to warn of
the stranger's approach so that the
second Arab may profit where the
first one could not.
So here we are at the end of the
20th century A.D. (our time) and at
the beginning of the 15th century
A.H. (their time). In a power play as
old as time, an "Islamic Revolu-
tionary" has overthrown an existing
government of authoritative rule to
establish his own authoritative rule.
Playing upon natural resentment
toward outsiders and religious fer-
vor, he has led his nation to the
brink of war for a very simple
reason: the Ayatollah, Ruhollah
Khomeini, wants to get his hands on
the wealth and person of the former
Shah and his family. First, to enrich
himself or his associates; second, to
destroy any hope of a restoration of
the monarchy by killing the Shah
and his seed. Very traditional, don't
you know.
Khomeini knows the stakes of the
game he plays. It is absolute power.
It is life for him and his heirs as
soon as the last Pahlavi is dead. It is
wealth beyond a goatherder's
wildest dreams. The lives of a few
godless Americans matter little to
him. American actions in the recent
past cause him no discomfort. He
does not fear that he has grasped the
tiger by the tail. At worst he may
feel he has the tail of a worm in his
hand.
No, he does not understand
diplomacy. He has no patience for
it. He does not understand
democracy and would be horrified if
he did. It would be the last thing he
would want in Iran. He does unders-
tand power. He knows how to get it.
He knows how Jo keep it. And he
knows how to use it.
By comparison, we are as iambs
before the wolf. No one in
Washington seems to understand
Khomeini's form of power and no
one in authority in Washington
seems to understand American
power or how to use it.
Perhaps it is time that we began to
exploit our power. There is no lack
of exploitation in the Soviet Union.
Russian tanks make a parking lot of
Afghanistan, Russian arms hold all
of old Indo-China, and Russian
troops train Cubans to export
revolution to Africa, South
America, and Central America.
Meanwhile, we piss away time we
should be using to form an alliance
with China and we throw away old
alliances because they are too
repressive, not democratic enough
to suit us.
But what replaces a repressive
regime? Another repressive regime.
Maybe we should quit
pussyfooting around and take Iran
or any other area that has what wc
need while we have the power to do
it.
- ��
�� � m �
��v





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
Grammy Nominees To Appear
MARCH 6. 1980 Page 5
Dixie Dregs Produce New Sound
B RICHARD GREEN
The Dixie Dregs' concert at the
Attic on Tuesday, March 4, was
i ancelled because of the weather but
has been rescheduled for Saturday,
March 8. Tickets for the event were
14 94, but the price may go up
about 50 cents, according to lorn
f fames, manager of the Attic.
" eve been flooded with phone
calls about the concert said
fames, "and it seems 'ike a lot of
pic are planning to stay an extra
flight because their plans for break
have fallen through. "
Advanced tickets will not be sold,
the doors open at 8:30 p.m.
'You won't believe how good
this band is
So a friend told me about the Dix-
ie Dregs in the spring of 1977
(before Free fall was released). It
was the same old thing: How excited
can you get about a verbal descrip-
tion of a group'1 Words just can't
describe it. especially when you are
talking about the Dregs.
It was during the summer of '77
thai 1 firs! heard the Dregs at Folly
Beach. St in a little bar called
"The Dancing Bear" � almost as
obscure as the Dregs were back
then, li was all of eighty-five
degrees a! nine o'clock that night,
but no one seemed to mind the heat.
The lead-off band was The
Southern Aire Band, a group of
gus 1 went to high school with.
(Brad Henty, the lead guitarist, rein-
forced my first report of the Dregs.)
The crowd enjoyed the performance
bv the local boys, but it was evident
that everyone was there to hear the
Dregs.
I he crowd was tense with an-
ficipation as I settled down right up
front with some friends and some
brevvskies, ready to be blown away.
Brad came over and told us that
violinist Allen Sloan wouldn't be
there, and a second keyboardist
would take his place. We were
disappointed, but the performance
was excellent anyway.
It was evident that Sloan's
replacement came at the last minute
� he was reading the music, and
lead guitarist Steve Morse nodded
cues to him periodically. Morse
took many of Sloan's solos and
blew everyone away with a double-
dose of his phenomenal technique
and sound. Andy West smoked on
bass, Steve Davidowski was all over
the keyboards, and the whole thing
was paced by the endless enthusiasm
of drummer Rod Morganstein.
'Where the hell did these guys
come from? was all I could
manage.
Origins
The Dregs have an unusual origin
in that they were formed for college
credit at the University of Miami
School of Music. Boasting one of
the most innovative and effective
jazz curriculum, the UM staff dur-
ing the Dregs' education included
guitarist Pat Metheny, fusion drum-
mer Michael W'alden and Weather
Report bassist Jaco Pastorius.
Steve Morse and Andy West
played in an earlier conventional
rock band called Dixie Grit in
Augusta, Ga. Morse had been
thrown out of high school for refus-
ing to cut his hair, but he applied to
UM nevertheless. The music depart-
ment was so impressed with Steve's
guitar technique that his admission
was pushed through without a high
school diploma.
Violinist Sloan finished a stint
with the Miami Philharmonic at the
same time West was talked into
enrolling at UM with Morse. Short-
ly after Morse and West arrived,
they met Sloan and Morganstein,
added keyboardist Davidowski, and
formed the original Dixie Dregs.
For college credit, the Dregs pro-
duced and recorded The Great Spec-
tacular album, later privately issued
and now a collector's item. (This is
the album my friend was ranting
and raving about. WWWZ-FM in
Summerville, S.C was giving it
airplay at the time.)
The Dixie Dregs
Photo by RICHARD GREEN
Sieve Morse (foreground) and Allen Sloan of the Dixie Dregs play Jo a
packed house in C harleston, S.t in 1977. Tuesdays concert at the Attic
was cancelled because of the snow, but the event has been rescheduled
for Saturday, March 8. Doors open at 8:30.
After graduation, the quintet
moved back to Augusta and began
playing live dates. It wasn't long
before Capricorn Records heard
about the Dregs and signed them,
and the group moved to Atlanta. In
the spring of 1977 they released their
debut album, Free Faff, produced
by Stewart Levine. The Dregs were
on their way.
Growth and Recognition
Later in '77, keyboardist Mark
Parrish replaced Davidowski, and
the Dregs widened their fanatical
following playing more and more
dates. The momentum increased
with their second release in March
1978, What If, produced by Ken
Scott, noted for his work with Paul
McCartney, John McLaughlin,
Stanley Clarke and Supertramp.
The Dregs' fame skyrocketed. In
San Francisco they bedazzled the
editors of Guitar Player, Contem-
porary Keyboard and the Examiner.
A concert in Los Angeles elicited
praise from notables like Jean-Luc
Ponty, John McLaughlin and
Stanley Clarke. Then came an in-
vitation to appear at the historic
Montreux Jazz Festival in the sum-
mer of 1978.
Montreux went so well for the
Dixie Dregs that the highlights of
their performance comprise one side
of their third album, Night of the
Living Dregs. Ken Scon produced
the live side and took the band to
Chateau Recorders to complete the
studio half of the album.
According to Morse, Night of the
Living Dregs is "much more
mature, with even more superior
production. We like to keep things
changing, ever improving, and we
think Night is a very g0od represen-
tation.
"A lot of credit has to go to Ken
Scott. He doesn't tampei with the
music, but he tells us v. hat will
work, which is invaluable in arrang-
ing
As the studio side was compk
Mark Parrish was replaced on
keyboards bv Ke 1 avit, a Miami
native and also a I 1 alumnus. "He
was a member ol the ho!?, si ja
group at the university M
noted, "and ree's improvisational
ability made him a natural
The Dregs recenth signed rh
Regencv Arista Records and arc
currently recording theii
album in Atlanta. The Dregs also
received a Grammy nomination this
year for best rock instrumental
group.
Type of Music
To categorize the Dregs" music is
almost impossible. Rocl ai
"fusion" is the definition n
common!) used, but I won't
make an attempt.
"Fschewing vocals, the
combine equal parts ol ro.k. jaz,
country, and classical niihi to spin
a seamless web of sound with �
freshness and originality (I
Birnbaum, Down Beat.
"We rarek think of labels
Morse, "but if we did. it would
something like 'electric eh;
music' "
Categorizing their music is
last thing anyone could possiblv
want to do. jus! put on anv o tl
great albums, crank it up until the
windows rattle, and enjov vom-
Or even better, hang around ireen-
ville until Sunday and enjov a
"night of the living Dregs
"You won't believe how good
this band is
Bv BEAU HAYS
ssitanl Features Kditor
Interested students are invited to
send in their estimates o' the total
tmount of snow which hit the cam-
pus over the weekend. Extremely
masochistic persons can also submit
their entries for the amount of snow
East Carolina has received since
January 30.
The simple fact is no one knows
how much snow we have received in
the past 32 days, but the most con-
servative estimate is "a bunch
February was indeed a strange
month. The first day dawned with
snow on the ground and the final
day left us expecting more white
stuff. In between were two
snowstorms and an overextended
cold spell which was relieved by
three davs of nea � mmer condi-
tions.
The latest blizzard, although not
officially connected with February,
fits right in with the bizarre pattern
which could not be adjusted to.
I rum the early morning hours of
March 1 until some 48 hours later,
the entire state was inundated with
snow. The best estimate of snowfall
in the Greenville area is 18-22 in-
ches.
It started out looking like a sleet
storm, which would be inconvenient
but hardly dangerous. But the most
dire predictions of the weather pro-
gnosticates came true and heavier
snow began piling up everywhere.
By Saturday night, most people w ho
had driven to wherever they were
decided not to try driving back.
It actually snowed very little
Saturday night, but the situation
was quickly rectified Sunday as 40
mph winds blew mountains of snow
around the campus. The storm,
which many people had taken
casually Saturday, made walking
difficult and driving next to im-
possible. However, there were some
revelers out Sunday, sliding down
hills on cardboard, hubcaps, old
notebooks, and trays stolen from
Jones Cafeteria.
Even for these people, the thrill of
the snowstorm soon passed. People
realized that the fun of being out-
side was no match for the 20-degree-
below temperatures caused by the
winds whistling out of the north
Campus; Leaves Students Playi
Vandalism was also kept at a low
level as possible deviants became
convinced that dying of exposure
would be little reward for a few
broken windows.
Monday dawned bright and clear.
The people didn't hit the streets un-
til nearly noon (presumably, they
had been partying well into the night
celebrating the cancellation of Mon-
day's classes). Without the howling
winds and blinding snow, people
found it much easier to scoop up
snow and hurl it at anything they
could find.
5A few people went out to find their
cars, many of which were merely in-
distinguishable lumps of snow.
The Olympic sports of luge and
bobsledding were revitalized by
some of the more daring students.
Several bobsled courses, formed by
piling snow at strategic locations,
appeared near the tennis courts.
People on trays and cardboard
could be seen hurtling toward trees
and cars, only to swerve away at the
last possible minute.
Tuesday's recreation consisted
mainly of excavating cars from the
slushv oarkine lots and throwing
snowballs from dorm to dorm. On
the hill, any car passing by was an
easy target for about 5 million
snowballs.
Groups of ten and twenty could
be seen pushing stranded cars
toward the safe havens of the
streets. If some abandoned car hap-
pened to be in the way, it was usual-
ly picked up and thrust aside. No
damage to cars has been reported,
but some of the cars haven't been
located yet.
Working diligently through the
day, bulldozers and motor graters
managed to clear away enough of
the parking lots to facilitate having
classes Wednesday (much to the
chagrin of the student population).
But nothing could be done about the
hundreds of cars littering campus
roads.
With rain on Wednesday and
above-freezing temperatures for
several days, the only problem along
the roads is the large piles of snow
lining the roadside. Speculation e
ists that it may be well into I99
before this difficulty can be com
pletely alleviated.
The real success story oi the
storm has to be the four-wheel drive
vehicles. These hardy little
characters blazed around with
reckless abandon during even the
worst of the blizzard. Man) people
went around helping free stuck car-
See STORM Page 6. Col. I
New British Invasion Brings
On Innovative Musical Revh
Photo by RICHARD GREEN
Snow cancels classes
and students spend the day joy riding
By PAT MINGES
Staff Writer
Most Americans do not ap-
preciate the role that the black man
has played in the development of
American history in general and,
specifically, underestimate the
significance that black music has in
popular music.
A few people consider the black
man's contribution to be only in the
areas of disco, soul and pop,
thereby failing to give credit for
such glorious musical genres as jazz,
blues, funk and especially R&B.
Once even the term Rhythm and
Blues was considered to have
disagreeable connotations, and only
lately has it been recognized that
much of pop music has been in-
fluenced by R&B.
The British have always recogniz-
ed that the struggle against oppres-
sion has created certain existential
qualities within blacks which are
manifest in the form of powerful
and evocative music. The first
British invasion of the early 60s had
as its roots American blues and rock
and roll. Groups such as the Beatles,
the Stones, the Who, Led Zeppelin,
Eric Clapton, and John Mayall were
impressed with such black artists as
Huddie Ledbetter, Chuck Berry,
Willie Dixon, Little Richard and
Muddy Waters.
We are in the midst of a new
British invasion, and much of this
new music bears the influence of
black music, emerging from the new
world, the island sensation Reggae,
derived largely from American
R&B. Reggae groups like Bob
Marley and The Wallers, Burning
Spear, Jimmy Cliff, Byron Lee, and
Prince Buster have played impor-
tant roles in the development of the
styles of The Clash, The Police, The
Specials, Madness and the Jam.
These and other groups are greatly
indebted to Reggae for its powerful
presence, sparkling rhythmic exten-
sions, and socially conscious lyrics.
Quickly the term New Wave
comes to mind, but I have come to
believe this term is archaic � it has
been prostituted so much by recor-
ding personnel and radio per-
sonalities that seems to have lost its
validity. I prefer to call this new
music by the term New Rock, partly
because of the confusion concerning
what New Wave is, and because
distinctions can be made between
the two genres.
This new music has its roots in the
desires of the common man, striving
for powerful simplicity and a return
to the basic ideas about men and
music and their ecological relation-
ship with society.
The Police and the Clash are the
two most prominent British new
rock groups, and both are an eclec-
tic blend of new wave and Reggae
that has catapulted both groups to
the forefront of the international
music scene. The Police were the
first to bring Reggae to popularity
in the new wave scene with the
release of the popular single
"Roxanne
But it was actually the Clash who
were the first in new rock to utilize
reggae on their first album in 1977.
Some have suggested, however, that
this "razor cut" or "white" reggae
is somehow a perversion of what is
considered a uniquely black or third
world phenomenon and is the pro-
fiteering of an art form.
The British recording company
2-Tone Records was founded by the
group The Specials and is home tor
them and their alter-egos Madness.
Both groups feature the unique off-
beat sounds of "ska one of the
predecessors of Jamaican reggae.
that is dominated by a sort of inside
out beat and bizarre horn ar
rangements. The Specials and
Madness have just released new
albums that celebrate the lifestyle of
the "rude-boys" and exhibit in-
creasing concern for the welfare of
the common man.
The Specials have been receiv ing a
strong, positive response from
critics in the United States, and their
first album is currently in the top
fifty selling albums of this nation,
and the top twenty in the U.K. The
album has a lean, spare sound that
is reminiscent of The Clash's first
album, was produced by Elvis
Costello, and is a superb endeavor.
It features commendable efforts
concerning racial equality and the
need for contraception.
The album by Madness, though
containing a few nice cuts such as
"My Girl" and "Mummy's Boy
is not altogether that great an
album, so don't write any bad
checks to buy it.
Two females, Marianne Faithfull,
and Chryssie Hynde (of the
Pretenders) have proven that new
rock is indeed for justice and equali-
ty, even in regards to sex, as oppos-
ed to more traditional rock. Fach
have released excellent new albums
that are being well received by both
critics and consumers alike,
establishing a strong role for women
in rock during the 80s. This pair arc
weaving musical careers
See NEW Page 6, C ol. 5





v , - - - � &
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 6, 1980
New British Performers
l Set Future Music Pattern
Continued from Page 5
out of exceptional secured a group and a
talent and worldly-wise recording contract with
lyrical strength, instead Sires records, and has
of promotional hype set out to conquer the
like that of pop harlot world. She is well on
Deborah Harry of her way, for the fans
Blondie. and critics are raving
Marianne Faithful about Chryssie's hav-
has proven to be ing "more to offer
somewhat of an enigma emotionally and
to me, for although her musically (and sexual-
album is receiving ly) than any of her
much critical acclaim, competition" (Robert
when I saw her on Christgau, Village
"Saturday Night Voice).
Live she was perfect- The Pretenders are
ly atrocious. Marianne one of the more pro-
has been around for mising groups to
quite a good while, was emerge from the new
formerly Mick Jagger's rock scene, powered by
girlfriend, and has Chryssie's dynamic
The Specials
somewhat of a troubled
past. Though her new
album, Broken
English, is a success,
Marianne's claim to
fame may be the fact
that Jagger's "Wild
Horses" was written
with her in mind.
Chryssie Hynde left
the United States to
pursue a career of rock
in the British Isles,
voice and terse lyrics
with brilliant support
from lead guitarist
James Honeyman
Scott. The Pretenders
are definitely con-
tenders.
The Who and the Sex
Pistols had perhaps the
definitive roles in the
formation of this new
British Invation, and a
group that shows a
strong influence of
both groups is a little-
known group called the
Jam. Their similarity to
the Who was first
noticed with their first
recorded effort entitled
All Mod Cons, which
was a minor success.
Their latest release is
Selling Sons, currently
in the top twenty in Bri-
tain. 1 am really im-
pressed with this
album, for it is une-
qualled in its sheer
power and lyrical
strength (even by the
Clash), and you hae
never heard the single
"Heat Wave" until you
have heard it by the
Jam.
Setting Sons is
among the most gut-
wrenching rock that
has ever been recorded,
and the Jam should
take their place along
side The Clash as the
clarions for a new age
in rock music. You may
have some difficulty
getting to buy or even
part of the new British invasion
Storm Problems Still Plague ECU
Continued from Page 5
and taking victims of
the storm to their
destinations. Others
simply rode up and
down the deserted
highways, enjoying the
fact that they were the
only ones capable of
locomotion.
Freshmen were vic-
timized by the storm
more than most other
students. The freshman
parking lots were
covered by about three
feet of snow until
Wednesday afternoon,
when bulldozers went
to work clearing the
lots.
Provided a freshman
could get his car out
after the snow was
cleared, he would have
trouble parking it. Not
mud indefinitely, ing their tires in the re-
freshmen looked for maining snow as they
other locations. But the leave town
campus security opera- According to the
tions had returned to most accurate weather
normal by Wednesday forecasters, the
night, and the spectre crocuses, winter saves
of tickets and the like
hung over each
freshman car not still
sitting in the mire.
With spring break
has come for the last
time. A few people
went out to find their
cars, many of which
were merely in-
distinguishable lumps
of snow.
wanting to subject their beginning this
vehicles to the possibili- weekend, most students
ty of being lodged in will be joyfully spinn-
her biggest for last. The
little crocus plants have
begun springing up
through the snow,
assuring North Caroli-
nians that the
overabundant snow
from the winter of 1980

t Prohibition is oxer .

Mr. Jack Daniels is coming
Ki il?r ! I H
IMt )K!ANf
For more Information contact:
Peace Corps Coordinator
Science Education Department
East Carolina University
Greenville, NC 27834
(919) 757-6586
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one. We are just begin
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JNCH
140
2:30
I'Hl t S1 . XROl 1 N
Sports
M K( H 6. 1980 I' 11 .
Seniors Maynor, Gray Finish In Style
ByH HI FSCHAND1 IK
Sp��rts ililor
1 nun have been cold and sinus
ing on the outside but inside ol
1 nges I oliscum Saturday aftei
were really scorching.
1 he hoi shooting and steady pia
wo senioi I asl Carolina basket
ball stats enabled the Pirates to pull
a vH- 86 win ovei Wisconsin
Milwaukee.
1 he dynamic duo forward
Herb Gray .n. guard George
Maynor, joined three other Pirate
seniors, Herb Krusen, kvle Powers
I rank Hobson, in the playing
� final collegiate basketball
s 1 ul it after the game, the
me "went out in style
Gray and May nor.
�. the top scoi ei s foi
II all season, combined for a
56 points in leading the
1 victory. In a game that
oughout, this twosome
the dil ference.
Maynoi especially seemed to dig
Icep when it looked as though he
out on a losing note. He-
played as though lie were determin
ed not to i.o so, scoring 12 points in
the second period, and an
astonishing 11 in the five-minute
overtime period en route to a
30 point (career high), nine re-
bound, and four assist perfor
mance.
"I kept looking at the scoreboard
the last two minutes of regulation
claimed the 6-3 Raeford native.
'ear the end, 1 gave it everything
that I possibly could
s tor his ottensive dominance in
the overtime period (scored 11 ol
ECU's 17 points). Maynor said he
nisi had to have the ball. "I kept
moving and getting the ball he
claimed. "I had that feeling
I he second half explosion came
alter a poor 3-of-10 shooting per-
formance in the opening halt. "I
was forcing shots in the lust halt
Maynoi explained. "Also, I jusl
wasn't getting my man in the ait like
1 should
For Ciiay. it was his most gratify-
ing hour. The 6-8 Seat Pleasant,
Md. native scored 26 points, one
below his careei high, pulled down a
eateet high 19 rebounds and block-
ed two shots.
"I'd have to say this is my best
game ever said Gray. "I can truly
say that I and the team went out in
style
s he sat in the lockei room
following the contest, Gray's mind
centered on memories of his tour
years as a collegiate player with the
Pirates.
"I kinda feel like reminiscing a
little bit he said. "You know,
there have been some good tunes
here along w ith the bad
Gray was obviously referring to
the two seasons the Pirates foiled
under controversial coach Larry
Gillman, a term that was culminated
when Gillman resigned List season
nist before the Pirate basketball
program was placed on probation
"Heck Gray continued, "1
really enjoyed my freshman year
undei (Dave) Patton. We had a
great win over William and Mary
that year. My sophomore year 1
remember how well we played when
we went out to Indiana.
"As for my junior year, I can't
say tot) much
It was during his junior year that
Gray left the Pirate squad due to
run-ins with Gillman.
"This season Gray claimed,
"has been my most satisfying.
We're 16-11, a winning record. I'm
glad we got to accomplish that
For another Pirate senior statter.
Herb Krusen. Saturday was satistv
ing from a team standpoint but not
from a personal one as he finished
with a sub par 4 of-12 shooting per-
formance.
"It's been a great vear said
Krusen, "and it ended well today. I
didn't shoot as well as usual but
Herb and George reallv picked up
the slack
for ECU coach Dave Odom, the
loss o the five seniors means that he
will have to hit the recruiting road
hard this year.
"They'll really leave void he-
said. "The thing is, though, that
people naturally realie how much
we'll miss Herb Krusen, Herb dray
and George Maynor but we'll miss
Kyle Powers and Frank Hobson
aw fully bad also
"Kyle has come so tat and is our
most complete player. I can play
him anywhere. And frank Hobson
was a real lifesaver today. He came
in late in the game in Mike Gibson's
place and just played super
Though Odom must worry about
replacing the fivesome, he ean o so
feeling, like Gray said, that they
"went out in style
George Maynor was 8-for-8 from FT line Saturday.
Maynor Scores 30
Pirates Down UWM
96-86 In OT Thriller
Hhoto by KIP SLOAN
Herb "Scooter" Gray slams one home.
By CHARLES CHANDLER
sports Y �1it�r
Seniors Herb Gray and George
Maynor combined for 56 points to
lead Fast Carolina to a 96-86 over-
time victory over stubborn
Wisconsin-Mil aukee Saturday
afternoon.
Gray and Maynor were two o
five Pirate seniors playing the last
games of their collegiete careers and
went out on a winning note as ECU
finished its season at 16-11, the
school's first winning mark since
1975.
The game was fast-paced and
close all the way as neither team led
by more than five points during
regulation play. The game was tight
enough, in fact, that most o the
1,800 fans in attendance stayed until
the end despite a severe winter
storm.
"This was a very enjoyable
game said ECU head coach Dave
Odom. "We played with real en-
thusiasm, something we've been
lacking for a while now. I'm sure
the fans realized this and enjoyed it
also
The first half saw the lead change
hands numerous times as the largest
advantage either team held was a
mere four points.
UWM led at the intermission by
one, 43-42, behind Dave Weber's 14
points and the only 43.9 per cent
shooting o' the Pirates.
The second half remained as tight
as the first, thanks to the timely
shooting of Maynor. I he 6-3
Raeford native had one spell in the
second period where he scored eight
consecutive I c I buckets.
Maynor's scoring kept the Pirates
in the lead throughout the second
period until the six-minute mark
when a bucket by Hob Mood put
UWM up 70-69.
From this point on the two clubs
exchanged buckets�and the lead. It
appealed that the team that had the
ball last would win.
Following two tree throws by
Flood at the 1:18 mark that tied the-
game at 79, the Pirates called
timeout to set up a possible winning
bucket, remaining.
ECU then held for one shot and
watched a possible regulation vic-
tory fall to the wayside when I'ony
Byles' 1-looter fell short.
The overtime period was another
chapter in the "Maynor story
1 he ECU guard totally dominated
the extra period, scoring 11 of his
team's 17 points, the result of which
was the 96-86 win.
"1 just kept moving and getting
the ball Maynor said of his play in
the Ol . "1 had that feeling
"That feeling" enabled Maynor
to close out his ECU career with a
career-high 30 points, 23 of which
came during the second half and
overtime period. The Pirate star
also dished off four assist
The 6-8 Gray also went out on a
record-setting note, tallying 26
points, one below his personal high,
and a career-high 19 rebounds.
"This is a great way to end up my
career at East Carolina Gray said.
"I'd have tit call this mv greatest
game evei
It tool
senioi stai - could offei
the scrappy Milw
I M was
that eclipsed the
Bob I d allied 22
20 and Chris Lewis 20 I
pulled down 11 reb
team's season tit
I hough I M �
9-1" mark. (dom
"1 can't explaii
saiu. i ney sno
today. I think they
team
For Odom the gai e
close his first sea
coach, a position
unenviable when
"I ast summer. 1 nevei
we'd win these 1
"But everyone has
coaches, players, everybex
game marks a bes
end
WISCONSIN-Mil W VLKFI S
I ewis 9 2-3 20, 1 lood S 3 22
Tatge 4 4-7 12, Cullei
Weber 9 2 2 20, Barnes I 2 2
Jones 3 0-0 6. Rossei 10-0 2
36 14-22 86
FAST CAROI l p
Hobson 2 1-3 5, Powt s -
Grav 10 6-12 26. Maynor 118-8 3
Krusen 4 0-0 8, Md aurin 0
Byles 4 1-1 9, I nderwood 2 2
Gibson 2 0-0 4. Totals 39 18 ?
Halt time UWM 43. ECl -
Fouled out - None Iota:
UWM 21. ECU 17. Iechi
None. - 1,800.
NCAA Tourney Is Wide-Open Affair
See NCAA pairings on page eight.
The NCAA pairings are all set.
All the speculation is over. Well,
almost.
The speculation now centers
around which of any number of
teams could win the coveted na-
tional title.
The entire Associated Press Top
Ten. along with several members of
the second ten, have a shot at the
championship. Gone are the days
when one team, namely UCLA, was
a clearcut favorite going into the
tournament.
Strange enough, the number one
�team in the country, DePaul, is not
really considered the pre-tourney
favorite. This makes it two years
consecutively that number one wa;
not favored. If you recall, last
season top-ranked Indiana State
was given little chance by the
"experts
So if it's not DePaul, who is the
favorite this time around? Is it Ken-
tucky, Louisville, LSU, Indiana,
Maryland, Oregan State, Syracuse,
Ohio State?
Yep, that's who it is. It could be
any of those learns, plus a few-
others, depending on who's looking
at it and HOW they look at it.
The forementioned teams are
joined by Notre Dame, North
Carolina, Duke, and Georgetown as
clubs given a significant chance to
end up on top.
With 48 teams included in the
tourney this year, there is a unique
situation as the entire top twenty is
included for the first time in history.
Therefore, the four regionals are
blanced-and packed.
The East may be the easiest of the
four as only four ranked teams are
included (Syracuse, Maryland.
Georgetown and Iona) and only two
(Syracuse and Maryland) are in the
top ten.
If things go on schedule, Syracuse
and Maryland should meet in the
East finals. Maryland would rate
the favorite.
In the Midwest Regional, things
are much tougher. Number two
Louisville and number three LSU
join ninth-ranked Notre Dame,
15th-ranked North Carolina and
16th-ranked Missouri to form a
most imposing group.
The finals shou'a, of course,
feature Louisville and LSU. The
winner of that game would be well
on the way to a possible national ti-
tle. LSU is the pick here.
In the Mideast one finds number
four Kentucky, number seven In-
diana, 13th-rankedSt. John's, 14th-
ranked Duke and number 20 Pur-
due. The finals should feature In-
diana and Kentucky, though Duke
has a shot should the Blue Devils
continue playing as spirited as they
did in the Atlantic Coast Con-
ference tournament.
The national finals are located in
Indianapolis, Indiana this season.
All things point to Indiana's
Hoosiers edging out Kentucky and
therefore going "home" as a
member of the Final Four.
The West Region is loaded as
usual. Top-ranked DePaul heads
the entries. Competiton for the
Blue Demons will come from fifth-
ranked Oregan State, lOth-ranked
Ohio State, 12th-ranked Brigham
Young, number 17 Weber State and
number 18 Arizona State.
DePaul is the favorite with the
bookies but not here. Ohio State
has one of the most imposing
lineups in the country and should
sweep to a Wesl title, edging, believe
it or not, Clemson in the regional
finals. The Figers should surprise
many people, including Oregan
State, before falling to the
Buckeyes.
So that's a Final Four of eighth-
ranked Maryland, third-ranked
LSU. number seven Indiana and
number 10 Ohio State.
From there anything could hap-
pen.
But, what the heck. Maryland
over LSU and Indiana over Ohio
State.
In the final game, the Hoosiers
must be favored because of
geographical reasons. Just as N.C.
State enjoyed a geographical advan-
tage in their 1974 national tite
(tourney was in Greensboro), so
should Indiana here.
Why Indiana? The Hoosiers have
it all. First there are two legitimate
All-America candidates on board in
forward Mike Woodson and
freshman guard Isiah Thomas.
The team could not function suc-
cessfully without the two. oodson
went down with an injury earlier
this season when the Hoosiers were
ranked number one. While he was
out, the team fell out of the rank-
ings. His return a few weeks ago
propelled Indiana back among the
nation's elite.
The 6-1 Thomas is the ultimate
point guard. He is probably the best
at his position to come along since
Phil Ford.
So look for the Hoosiers to finish
on top. Keep in mind, though, that
the tourney is so balanced thai
anyone can be upset at any time.
The key to the NCAA tourney,
though, is as much slaying healthy
as it is playing well. An injury to In
diana or any of the other contenders
could eliminate their chances.
I





. VI "

i� THE EAST CAROLINIAN MARCH 6. 1980 mammmaammmmmmmamammmmmmmmmmmmmmhmammmmmmmm
Grapplers Finish Third CJa$sjffigd-
M JL FOR RENT tf����i'�'�-� .���� d�: j�
By EDDIE
WILLIAMS
Staff Writer
The East Carolina
wrestling team went in-
to the NCAA Division I
Eastern Regional Tour-
nament with a number
of its wrestlers nursing
aches and pains. The
Bucs came out, though,
inflicting a lot of pain
onto the other teams in
the tournament.
ECU finished third
in the 16-team tourna-
ment with 58 points.
Only Slippery Rock
(68'2 points) and
Virginia Tech 61 Vi)
outdistanced the
Pirates.
The Bucs also placed
two individual wrestlers
into the NCAA Divi-
sion 1 National Tourna-
ment, to be held at
Oregon. They are
Butch Revils (177
pounds) and D.T.
Joyner (heavyweight).
"We really did
well said a satisfied
ECU head coach Ed
Steers. "In the finals,
Butch decisioned Bod
Reisch of Virginia
Tech, 5-3. D.T. Joyner
pinned Bill Pfeffer of
Virginia Tech at the
V.20 mark
Frank Schaede (150)
and Jay Dever (190)
reached the finals in
their respective weight
classes, but both came
up short. Schaede lost
5-3 to Anthony Surage
of Rutgers and Dever
was defeated 18-6 by
Mark Miller of Virginia
Tech.
"Schaede wrestled a
super tournament
Steers said. "He came
very, very close to win-
ning. We're proud of
the fact that Frank
broke the twenty win
mark for the first time
in his senior year
Steers was also im-
pressed with Dever who
pinned his first three
opponents to gain en-
trance into the finals
before losing.
But the story this
year has been the duo
of Revils and Joyner.
li Revils was on crut-
ches the Tuesday
before the tourna-
ment Steers said. "It
took a lot of courage
on his part to come
through
Joyner has been
fighting a strep throat
the last couple of
weeks, according to
Steers.
"It gets better, then
worse he said. "We
were concerned about
his conditioning
In reference to the
Nationals, which will
be held at Oregon State
from March 13-15,
Steers said, "We're go-
ing in with the attitude
that Revils and Joyner
can be all-American
"D.T. can go with
them all Steers said
flatly.
Concerning Revils,
Steers remarked, "I'd
feel a lot more positive
about him, but his
ankle still hurts
Quakers Win,
Make NCAA
By BARRY WILNER
AP Sports Writer
The University of
Pennsylvania became
the last team into the
NCAA tournament and
Pepperdine became the
first team out of the
National Invitation
Tournament. And
tonight, the postseason
action begins in
earnest.
Penn edged
Princeton 50-49 on
James Salters' bucket
with 10 seconds left to
win a playoff for the
Ivy League title at
Easton, Pa. The
Quakers, who made it
to the Final Four last
year but lost their other
four starters from that
team to graduation,
thus completed the
NCAA tourney field.
Penn travels to West
Lafayette, Ind on
Thursday to play
Washington State in
the Mideast Regional.
The NIT opened with
Michael Wiley connec-
ting for 31 points in
leading Long Beach
State to a 104-87 rout
of Pepperdine. All five
Long Beach starters hit
for double figures.
The NIT continues
tonight with eight first-
round games. St.
Peter's visits Connec-
ticut; West Texas State
is at Illinois State;
Lafayette travels to
Virginia; Loyola,
Chicago is at Illinois;
Penn State takes on the
University of Alabama
in a game at Birm-
ingham, Ala St.
Joseph's, Pa visits
Texas; Murray State
goes to Jacksonville
and Bolwing Green is at
Minnesota.
There are six more
NIT openers Thursday
and one more on Fri-
day.
Other NCAA tour-
nament sites Thursday
include Greensboro,
N.C Lincoln, Neb
and Ogden, Utah. On
Friday, opening round
contests will take place
at Providence, R.I
Bowling Green, Ky
Denton, Texas and
Tempe, Ariz.
Salters is the lone
starter left from Penn's
surprising finalists.
"I was in that
rhythm said the cap-
tain of the 16-11
Quakers. "Last year we
had something to pro-
ve; we knew how good
we were. This year we
don't know how good
we are ourselves
"I was really proud
the way the kids hung
in said Penn Coach
Bob Weinhauer. "With
one senior guard � and
we lost three possible
starters to injuries �
they just kept hanging
in all year
Salters led Penn with
15 points
1980 NCAA Playoff Pairings
(Latest A P Rankings in Parenthesis)
EAST RECilONAl S
Villanova
Marquctlc
Syracuse 6
Iowa
Va. Commonwealth
N.C. Stale
lona (t)
Holy Crow
Georgetown (II)
Tennessee
Furman
Maryland fit)
FEMALE ROOMMATE:
te share ttatf ret a utilities �m
two bedroom apartment �ree
blacks Irani campus CH
NMM.
ROOMMATE WANTED: to Share
two bedroom apartment at Vitiate
Green. Call 757400 before S 08
p.m. or 7�a-44St. Ash lor Brenoa.
SPACIOUS ROOM: for female
non-smeher. Oeiet home across
from Jarvts. Sfe mo. 75J-SSW
FEMALE ROOMMATE: needed
to share heo bedroom trailer. Mall
rent and utilities. CaH 7S-J3i.
NEED FEMALE ROOMMATE:
to share three bedroom apartment
at Easthrook Apartments. So
month plus one-third utilities. For
summer and fall. Call Rhona at
mvm.
FOR RCNT
spacious house I'
US per month
7SP-1SM.
FOR
FOR SALE: bass ewttar and amp.
Case, strap and cord inclwded.
Can Keith at 7� 7t7V after 5:M.
17) Suick Cenfwnan, AC, AM
FM. SMC or best offer. 7SI toll
PERSONAL
Sloe REWARD: for information
leadinp to the return of Rosie:
female eetd cocker spaniel, mon-
ths old. All calls kept confidential.
rail
HORSEBACK RIDING: Day or
Niejht. individual or groups Tri-
County Stables Grimesland. Call
7S3-t�3.
TYPING done: Term papers.
resumes. Thesis,
Reason. C
rsm.
HELP WANTED: L'�. ltd
tath street, needs iu�luntfr
maid. Call f- ap�"
TAKE A BREAK: beach it atte
Kin Grf Motel or Sand Pebble
MO&4 in North Mv Geach La
spring brea rates start t SU-
Call otl !?� ini �� reservation
�REWARDS for ny information
leadinp to the return of a white
mM necklace with sapphire lost m
or around Chapter X on Thursday.
Feb. IV Great Sentimental Value.
Substantial Reward! Please call
7St 420,7W JMI 7S� JIM
REST PRICES: paid for class
rings, �. and sterling. Men s
medium class ring SSi S7�. Sterl
ing fork SU. Call Jotw alter J 00
7S2��I3
MIDWEST REGIOS
Each of
mtftisaxl.
romrs it roKjuirpd to b roMdWy avilebU for sate at
price in each A4P Star. e�cpt a ipecitiealfy noted
or
Akorn St.
S Alabama
ISU (3)
Missouri (16)
San Jose St.
Notre Dame (9)
Texas A&M
Bradley
N Carolina 115)
Kansas Stale
Arkansas
I ouKville (2)
MIDEAST REGION
FIorKia St
Toledo
Kentucky (4)
Washington St.
Pennsylvania
Duke 114)
I Purdue (20)
LaSatte
l�
Va. Tech
West Kentucky
Indiana (7)
WEST REGION
UCLA
Old Dominion
DePaul (I)
Arizona State. (IX
Loyola-Mary mount
Ohio State (10)
Clemson
Utah St
Briaham Young (12)
Weber Slate (17)
Lamar
Oretan State (5)
HAIR DESIGNS
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You know you've always wanted to fly!
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Call or write for free brochure.
If You Can't Go To
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Call SCISSORSM1TH
758-7570
for info on how to
plan your tan
103 Eastbrook Drive
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT MARCH S, AAP IN GREENVILLE
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Title
The East Carolinian, March 6, 1980
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 06, 1980
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.45
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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