The East Carolinian, February 26, 1980






�he lEast (Uaroltmatt
Vol. 54 No.r"4 3
10 Pages
Tuesday, February 26, 1980
Greenville. VC
Circulation 10.000
Festival Is
A Success
By ARAH VENABLE
Staff Writer
Black History month was
celebrated Saturday, Feb. 23, at the
Greenville City Carver Branch
I ibrary. The Black Arts Festival,
which wa open to the public, was
called a success by Mrs. Wilamay
Ciibbs, librarian and planner of the
event.
The morning segment was plann-
ed for children's entertainment. It
consisted of films, a dramatic rendi-
tion of "The Creation" by Sheila
Harrel, negro folksongs and black
folktales by Joe Stines, the
children's librarian at Sheppard
Memorial Library. ECU Art In-
structor Clarence Morgan and his
wife featured a black art exhibit
consisting of charcoal etchings,
paintings, and a slide presentation.
The afternoon portion of the
festival was geared for adult
enlightenment, beginning with a
dramatic performance of "The
Creation" and "Noah's Ark" by
Mr. Edward Love.
A history of the black man was
given through a sermon by Ken
Hammond, program director at
Mendenhall Student Center. He
talked of the parallel between the
black man's struggle and the bon-
dage of Israel when Moses pleaded
"let my people go Emphasis was
placed on the role of the black
church in the black community.
Mrs. JoAnna Tyson recited
poetry selections by Paul Lawrence.
The film, "A Black Experience
then presented the folklore of black
man from slavery to the present.
The program ended with music by
The Wilson Singers � Onession
Brooks, Barbara Rodgcrs and Helen
Peterson.
I
Photo hv CHAP GURLEY
Temperatures Soared
to record highs this weekend
Student Consumer
Card Little-Used
By WAYNE TALTON
Staff Writer
Have you used your NSCC lately?
The National Student Consumer Card issued to all
ECU students offers many items and services from
several Greenville merchants, but most businesses are
dissatisfied with past response from students.
The card offers discounts from the twelve following
merchants: The United Figure Salon, The Tree House
Restaurant, Mike's Bike Shop, The Pierced Ear, Glen-
da's Beauty Salon and Boutique, Pitt Motor Parts,
Greenville Quick Copy Service, Phidippides, Cleaner
World A-l Quality Cleaning Center, the Mushroom, C.
Herber Forbes, and the Olde London Inn.
Most of these businesses were dissatisfied with the
response they have received. Only three of the 12 mer-
chants were happy with the support from ECU students.
They include the Tree House Restaurant, Pitt Motor
Parts, and Cleaner World A-l Quality Cleaning Center.
The Tree House Restaurant has entertainment four
times a week and the bearer of the NSCC receives a free
beverage with the purchase of a salad.
When contacted by The East Carolinian, the manager
of the Tree House said he has had a good response.
especially from female students.
Pitt Motor Parts offers a 10-25 percent discount on
popular brands of auto parts such as niters and igni-
tions. The owner of Pitt Motor Parts said he was
satisfied with the response, saying that main more
students used the card than he expected.
The Cleaner World A-1 Quality Cleaning Center,
which offers a 10 percent discount on drv cleaning and
the first 12 minutes of drying time free with iuo wash
loads, has also had a good response from students usine
the NSCC.
The response of NSCC cardholders is onl avei
for Greenville Quick Copy Service. Phidippides and C.
Herber Forbes. Greenville Quick Copy Service otters a
10 percent discount on all copy services to students with
a card. The management said the response vas average
at the beginning of the year but has decreased.
He added that many times students have to be
reminded if they even have a card.
See CARD Pane 3. Col. 1
Police Offer Warnings
By MARIANNE HARBISON
Staff Writer
In light of the capture of two
"Kissing Bandits" by the Greenville
City Police Department on Feb. 13,
Assistant Director of Security Fran-
cis Eddings and Greenville City
Police Chief E.G. Canon had some
tips to offer students, on how to
recognize "rip-off" artists.
Eddings noted that in order to be
on the alert for these types of
criminals, one should be aware of
their different methods of opera-
tion.
"These people might approach
you as a magazine salesman work-
ing through college; a housewares
Student Involvement On Rise
By TERRY GRAY
News Editor
Ranita McGee is an ECU senior
majoring in health education. For
the past few weeks, she has been
working with faculty members and
administrators in helping plan cam-
pus health services for the years to
come.
Cornell Allen is a psychology ma-
jor who helps evaluate suggestions
about ECU's academic planning.
Gary Blevins is a junior business
major. Like Ranita and Cornell, he
is also lending a hand in shaping the
future policies and programs at East
Carolina University. He recently
finished working with a committee
'hat examined how Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center operates and how its
services might be improved.
In fact, there are scores of ECU
students whose voices are being
heard by the people who are looking
into the school's functioning during
the next decade.
According to Dorothy Homer,
the student government associa-
tion's secretary of academic affairs,
almost 125 undergraduates are cur-
rently involved with the planning
process at ECU.
Their presence in this process is
intended to ensure that students �
the group most likely to be affected
by changes � will be represented in
the opinion-gathering phase of plan-
ning.
"I volunteered because I was in-
terested in involvement, but also
because the faculty can't really see
always what the students want and
need said Gary Blevins Monday.
Blevins was one of two students on
the Mendenhall Student Center
committee. The other members were
drawn from the ECU faculty.
Ms. Homer says she spends about
25 hours a month in her SGA job,
acting as a liason between the
numerous committees and the
students who are interested in serv-
ing on them.
"There has never been an
overabundance of people who want
to sign up Horner said, "but most
of the problem is in making people
aware. Once they understand what
it's all about, they get interested
Comments trom at least four of
those students seem to bear out
Homer's remarks. Cornell Allen,
the psychology major, said that
"besides being important in itself,
the work is helping me better
understand the decision-making
process. And it will be interesting to
come back in a few years and see
how my opinion has affected the
university
Ranita McGee: "I was the only
student on my committee, but I was
treated as an equal. My opinion was
as important as the others, and I en-
joyed working with the other peo-
ple
Gary Blevins made similar corn-
See Blevins Page 3, Col. 1
salesman; a Bible salesman; or a
cosmetics salesman Eddings said.
After deciding upon their ap-
proach, the rip-off artists must then
establish "contact" with one who
can put the "salesman" inside the
dorm or apartment complex. Accor-
ding to Eddings, "Maybe the rip-off
artist found a girl in a bar
downtown and became friendly with
her; letting her know he was work-
ing his way through school,selling
cosmetics and he needed X number
of sales to win a scholarship.
Perhaps she would agree to take him
into the dorm to solicit sales This
girl would be used by the artist as a
"contact" to the dorm students.
Eddings commented that the ar-
tist would use the individual to get
into the dorm where he would have
a captive audience to listen to his
speech.
Eddings also stated that quite fre-
quently the "salesman" will by-pass
the rules and regulations and not get
permission from Dean of Women or
Campus Security to solicit on cam-
pus.
After having obtained his captive
audience, the "salesman" will
knock on the door, and begin giving
his sales pitch. According to Ed-
dings, "He's going to ask for a
check for part of the amount off pur-
chase.
"Sometimes he'll tell you to leave
the 'Pay to the order of blank emp-
ty because he has a stamp with the
company's name on it and he'll
stamp it in the blank later. That's
where he's going to write in his own
name and find some store thai wl
cash it without any I.D Eddings
said.
"In most of these cases he add-
ed, "the merchandise is never seen
or received. The salesman did not
See WARNING Page 3. Cat. I
Interpreters Give
Show At Hendrix
Appeals Board Decision Unchallenged
Ruling Called 'DangerousPrecedent9
By DEBBIE HOTALING
Assistant News Editor
The stage is set and the audience
is waiting for a quiet evening of
music and entertainment.
There is a difference between
most musical programs and the one
being given in the Hendrix Theater
on Thursday evening, however. This
program is being given by East
Carolina interpreters for the deaf.
The "signing" group is called
Fantasy and includes: Jim Haslup,
Bob Coltrane, Shannon Gilley,
out and see what the program is all
about. I really think they would
learn to appreciate sign language
from another point of view Ernest
said.
The ECU Sign Language Club
and Fantasy will perform at 7:30
p.m. on Feb. 28 t the Hendrix
Theater. Tickets will be S2 for
adults and S.50 for children and can
be purchased in 114 A Brewster or
from any club member.
Profits will go into the club's fun-
ding to help sponsor other club ac-
tivities.
Mike ernest, and Kathy Beethan.
The program will also include sign- QtoHli1P CTYiltK
ed songs and skits performed by stu- OnVffCWi i"�J
Photo by CHAP GURLEY
Lynn Bell (Left) At SGA Meeting
Reservations Slated Soon

Students who plan to return to
East Carolina University Fall
Semester 1980 and who wish to be
guaranteed residence hall housing
are required to reserve rooms during
the week of March 3-7. Prior to
reserving a room, a student must
make an advance room payment of
$60.
These payments, which must be
accompanied by housing
applications-contracts, will be ac-
cepted in � the Cashier's Office,
Room 105 Spilman Building, begin-
ning February 28. Applications-
contracts may be obtained from the
residence hall offices as of February
25.
Room reservations are to be made
in the respective residence hall of-
fices according to the following
schedule (Exceptions: Assignments
for Fleming Hall will be made in the
office of Jarvis HalJ.)
Monday, March 3 and Tuesday,
March 4: Students who wish to
return to the same rooms they
presently occupy must reserve such
rooms.
Wednesday, March 5 through Fri-
day, March 7: All other returning
students will be permitted to reserve
rooms on a first-come, first-serve
basis.

Lynn Bell warned the student
government legislature Monday that
last week's Appeals Board ruling on
an SGA bill that sought to change
an election law could set a
"dangerous precedent" for future
legislation.
Bell, chairman of the Rules and
Judiciary Committee, introduced a
bill on Jan. 28 which would have
taken away the SGA President's
power to appoint the elections com-
mittee chairman. The change was
ruled unconstitutional by the Ap-
peals Board on the grounds that it
violated a constitutional article for-
bidding the passage of laws affec-
ting an incumbent president, except
as directed by an established judicial
body.
SGA President Brett Melvin
vetoed the bill and opened the floor
up to its discussion, but the
legislators had no questions.
Melvin said afterward that he was
"surprised" that the matter went
unchallenged.
In other comments before the
group, Melvin proposed that there
be a $2 increase in student fees to
cover transit costs, and a $1 increase
in fees to help cover operating costs
of the Student Government Associa-
tion. As a means of cutting student
fee expenditures, Melvin also pro-
posed doing away with the legal
fund in favor of a less costly legal
referral service.
The savings in legal fees and the
$3 total increase in student fees
would give the legislature an addi-
tional $12,000-14,000 to work with,
Melvin said.
The legislature approved a $917
funding request from the Student
Planners Association. The money is
intended to pay for the expenses of
an upcoming professional planning
conference which the group wants
to attend. Steve Nelson spoke on
behalf of the organization and add-
ed that much of the money will be
recycled into ECU services that the
grodfc needs.
After several rounds of debate,
the legislature also approved a $365
appropriation to the ECU chapter
of Pi Omega Pi to help finance their
alumni newsletter. Some legislators
questioned the bill, saying that stu-
dent funds should not be used to
pay for such limited causes. Others
argued that Pi Omega Pi was a
highly respected sorority and that
the university has a valid interest in
keeping ties to its alumni.
The Model Organization of
American States also won their bid
for a $350 appropriation to defray
the costs of attending a conference
with similar groups. A political
science club, the Model OAS
simulates international diplomacy
and policy of the nations in the ac-
tion OAS and submits their resolu-
tions to the parent organization for
consideration.
SGA Vice President Charlie Sher-
Sec SGA Page 3, Col. 1
dent interpreters.
In the past, and in some places
even now, sign language was looked
down upon and regarded as inap-
propriate for the general public's
observation. A job as an interpreter
was not considered decent work.
"Interpreters were supposed to
fade into the background and
refrain from drawing attention to
themselves. It's more respectable
for interpreters to display their skills
now explained Mike Ernest,
director of the program for hearing-
impaired students.
Thursday evening's performance
by the signing group, Fantasy, will
not be their first. The group has
been performing together for about
a year. Their first performance was
given in New Bern for the state con-
vention of the North Carolina
Association of the Deaf.
They have also performed at
Duke University, Atlantic Christian
College, Winston-Salem Deaf
Center, Asheville (Western North
Carolina Association of the Deaf),
and the South Carolina Association
of the Deaf.
"It's unique that we have inter-
preters working together here at
ECU, Ernest commented. "Most
interpreters work independently.
It's very unusual that so many good
interpreters come together and work
together like this.
New musical-interpreting groups
are springing up across the nation
and the popularity of signing is
growing. "Students should come
Sign Language
Offerings
In the pre-registration list includ-
ed in last Thursday's The East
Carolinian, the summer courses for
Sign Language were not published.
The beginning classes for sign
language will be listed under SLAP
3001 at the following times, 8-9
a.m M-F; 9:40-11:10 a.m M-F;
11:20-12:50 a.m M-F; 2:40-4.10
p.m M-F.
The intermediate sign language
classes will be listed under SLAP
3002 and will be offered at 1-2:30
p.m M-F; and 2:40-4:10 p.m
M-F.
Any interested students should go
by Brewster A 114 and ask for Mike
Ernest, director of the program for
hearing impaired students.
Inside Today
New Poli-Sci MinorPage 2
Oscar Nominations
AnnouncedPage $
New Wave Band
Plays Auk?Pan 5
1 My Pirates TWri
In Mate TonrncyPage t
CWttMW'WLiWUi





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 26, 1980
Announcements
Alpha Sigma Phi
The Mpha Sigma Phi fraternity wil.
hold its second annual pre-Spnng
Break bash on Monday night. March 3
at the -iiic dnnssion by ticket �ill be
M and thete will be VII) draft beer all
night Mso, ihere will be free pinball
and free toosball for everyone bikini
coniect will be held �nh SMI lo the win
ner and a S2 gill certificate from the
Happs Place lor second prize To the
most represented organization, a tree
keg will be awarded Plus, a band will
he plasmg so come down to the Mtic
on Mondas night and blow it out'
BKA
The banking and linance fraternity will
meet Wednesday, feh T at ' 00 in
room 221 Mendenhall tluesi speaker
will he Mi lerrj Powell ot first State
Bank A slide presentation, put
together h IBM and dealing with c
peered changes in hanking and finance
in the Inline, will he shown Interested
pcis.his are welcome
Physics Tutors
I he ("enter lor Student Opportunities
t. Mil in ihe School ol Medicine Cttl
icntlv has opening, foi phyMCs unois
"i on nuisi have at academic record of
high performance in ihe subject area
s, rm may earn an income at standard
campus tales i oniact Or Bndwell.
fi Vkhichard nius ni can 757-6122
,v nis ,H an inlei s K'VS
Judge Candidates
I he Nonh Carolina ("ivtl liberties
l mon chapter in Greenville will spon
an introductory forum of sun
didates seeking ihe Democratic
nomination foi ihe Dtstricl c omi
ijtcship currently hclJ b the
Honorable Norris Reed ot Ne� Bern
Reed will retire m Scptembei
Ml candidates foi ihe udgeship
have accepted ihe invitation to attend
trn forum, whwh will be held al Ihe
1 hodisi Student i enter. 5M I 1 itth
Si ,ii s im p m on luesday, I eh 26
public is invited
SNEHA
Greek Sing
The Student National (nvironmental
Health Association will meet on Thurs-
day. Keb 2H at 5:00 p m in the In
vironmcntal Health lab Ml members
and interested students art welcome
Contest
The Most Beautiful Man on Campus
will be selected at a Disco party at the
Tlbow Room on Monday. March 24.
Applications are now being accepted.
C all Treddv Jacobson. W(XW Radio
Station. 758-1171
Counseling
Planning
! ndevided on a major? meeting foi
. l! in a m.uor 01 minor
an .ni Regional Planning will be
lay Kh 26 ai 7 JO p m. in
209. Brewstet Planning faculty
hers and ihe President ol the Slu
Planning Vssocialion will he pre
answer tpjestions regarding the
planning curriculum and career oppor
cs ni sin and regional planning
.more .inJ uinioi level students
I , planning eer are urged
to attend additional information may
��- William
v Hankins oi Mulaiu Wubnch al
- m .� isji.s nend
Radio Staff
v n working oi
� v ho station Sews and
lit should s.ill Mel
-4- � come to :he
I' ursday night al 6 �
,nei �'
The ECU Department of Counselor
education is offering free peer counsel
ing to all students These services will
be provided bv masters degree can-
didates as pan ol then career prepara-
non 1 hev can provide assistance in
such areas as academis. vocational and
problem cenleie-d oriental ion. but are
essentially independent ol the Counsel-
ing I enter I eel tree 10 drop b Room
lit) Speight Irom �i M lo 5:00
wcekdavs
Phi Sigma Tau
Phi Sigma Ian. ihe Phtlosophv Honor
Society, is holding a paper reading
Ihursdav. I el 28, 7 00 p m at 40V N
Biltmorc lames 1 erov Smith will pre
sent. "A Question of Intention His
papet concerns the topic ol aitistie in
lention, having significance in all
aesthetic orientations Ml disciplines
are encouraged to attend
Rho Epsilon
I here w ill he a Rho I psilon meeting on
Ihursdav. I eh 28, al '00 P � in
Raw I I'D The spring banquet and ihe
symposium planned tot pnl If. will be
discussed Ihe symposium will be
designed u benefit people seeking a
careei in real estate Ml members and
interested per. mis should attend
Jazz Educators
Ihe 111 chapter oi ihe National
Association ol Jau I ducators will meet
on I uesdav. 1 eh 26 al -� it) p m in ihe
concert studio ol V I Ftetchei Musk
C enter Ml interested persons are in
v ited to .mend
Essay Contest
The Department ol English is pleased
to announce ll ' fifth annual Paul 1 ari
Memorial I ssay i ontesl I he contest is
open 10 all undergraduates enrolled hi
I nglish sourses 1 nines should be
essays ol literary criticism, nol research
papers, and should have been written in
partial fulfillment ol an 1 nglish course
unce Apt il ol last yeai Ml essays must
K accompanied bv the recommenda
lion Ol the isnirucior tor whom Ihev
were written and must be' submitted hs
March 21, 1980 rhe writer of l new inn
mg essav will receive an award ol ISO
.inJ othei recognilM n VV youi in
structor for complete Jei.nK
Alpha Xi Delta presents the s)th An-
nual All Sing, in Wright Auditorium,
Tuesday, Feb. 28 at 7:00 p.m There is
no admission charge, so come see the
fraternities and sororities perform
BSPA
The Black Students' Psychological
Association will meet Thursday, Feb.
28 at 6:00 p.m. in the Psi ("hi t ibrary
on second floor Speight. All members
are urged to attend. Any interested per-
sons arc welcome.
MCAT
The new MCAT (Medical College Ad
mission Test) packets have arrived in
the Testing Center, Speight 'M)5 Test
dates lor 1980 arc April 26 and Oct. �
Deadline for the April 26 lest is March
28. and for the October 4 test is Sept 5
Road Race
Now is the time to start getting rcadv
for ihe Second Annual drecnville Road
Race This 10.000 irictcr (6 miles) fool
race through Greenville is scheduled lor
Saturday, pril 5 The race is spon
sored by Bond's Sporting Goods Pro
eeeds will go to the Taster Seal Socielv
Merchandise awards will be given to Ihe
top finishers overall and to the top
finishers in each age division The first
sOO to enter will receive a com
memoralive race T shirt lor furlhei
information, call the Taster Seals Socie
iv al 758-3230 or Ken P. Murray at
-Sh sa-s
Holy Communion
There will be a service of Holy Commu-
nion of ihe I piseopal Campus
fellowship al 6:00 p.m Wednesday,
feb 27. at the Methodist Studenl
C enter, 501 E. Fifth St. Supper will be
served at 5:30. These services arc open
to all students on campus. The Rev. Bill
Hadden will celebrate the service
IVCF
The Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship
meets every other Wednesday night in
the Methodist Student Center. On Feb.
27, at 730. there will be a special
speaker loin us for lun in fellowship.
Bible study, prayer and praise in sing
ing. IVCF also has small Bible study
groups which meet weekly al different
times I vcrvonc is welcome (The
Methodisi Student Center is on I ilth
Si. across from Garretl Dorm.)
Snowshoe Ski
Ihe Snowshoe Ski Group will have an
important mccling Teh 26 al 4:00 p.m
in Room 108 Memorial Gym There
will nol be a bus going, so travel plans
must be arranged. Some still need
transportation Everyone should attend
this meeting Please be prompt.
Ripple Raiders
Ihe Ripple Raiders are having a Guys
and Gals Bikini C ontesl on luesday
Feb. 26 al the I Ibo Room starling al
8:30. I irsi prize is $M) hose wishing
lo enter should cither eall Kay or Teresa
at 752 W8J ot sign up al the door I ues
dav mehl
ECU Holds Second
Library Competition
A total of $150 in The three prizes-
prizes will be awarded first, $75; second, $50;
to winners in the se- and third, $25
cond annual ECU Stu-
dent Library Competi-
tion.
The competition,
sponsored by the
Friends of the ECU
Library, is open to full-
time graduate or
undergraduate
students, whose per-
sonal libraries will be
evaluated on the basis
of quality.
be awarded during Na-
tional Library Week,
April 13-19. Formal
presentation will be
made on April 16 in
ECU's Joyner Library.
Eligible for the com-
petition are libraries of
all types: collections
centered on one sub-
ject, collections of
works of a single
author or a few special
authors, or general col-
lections. Entire student
libraries may be entered
or a minimum of 15
books from a personal '�"��'��? e.or .h"
the public
Poli-Sci Offers
New Minor
The department of political science depart'
political science is now men commented.
offering a minor in "e v,ould like
public administration. students to learn more
Because a rapidly about our program and
growing number of wh
employment oppor
library.
The deadline for sub-
mitting entries is March
1, 1980.
Entries will be judg-
ed by a panel consisting
of a board member
from the Friends of the
Library, an ECU facul-
ty member and a
library services faculty
member.
department faculty
believes that comple-
tion of the new pro-
gram will greatly
enhance job oppor-
tunities tor students
majoring in political
science and a anet ot
related fields.
Dr. Tinsley Yar
borough, head ot the
a really good program,
and with p r e -
registration going on
this week, now
good time n introduce
it
A n interest
students -should contact
Dr Young-dahl S
(Brewstei -120)
Mr. Herbert k (
(Brewstet -127)
department ol
science
Handicap
Ihe Office ol Handicap Student Ser
vices otters free registration services
and information regarding special
testing and learning for handicap
students for assistance or informa-
tion, come lo W hichard 211, or call
757 6�W nl no answer, call 7S7 6772 I
Russian
Russian anyone? Russian 101 will he
offered MVN T WM Fall Semester Rus
sian I neraiure (translated) will be
taught MWI 12ot! Interested students
contact Or Malbv. office hours
2:10-3:00 MWI
Twig
I he vav C ampus Outreach is a biblical
research fellowship ihal believes ihe
Word ol C.iHl is the Vv ill ot (vd
nvone who loves God and desires an
accurate knowledge ol (.od's Word
warmly invited to attend ihe nevi l"�ig
fellowship which is being held on
Ihinsdav. Fee 28, a) voo p m in
loom 24" Mendenhall
ECGC
I he I asi c arotina t .av i ommunit) �ill
feature a speaker on I uesdav, I eh 2h
at 5 � P ni al NIH Nmih Si . the
Newman House Bung yOUl favorite
hev e- aae
Kissing Contest
Ihe kappa Sigma Pledges are having a
kissing contest al ihe Tlbo Room on
Ihursdav. I eh 2H trom MXI1 � p m
live lucky guvs will be rated bs live
beautiful gnls I ust prize is a sase ol
youi favorite beverage
Remember
We wish to remind all
students and faculty that we
will not accept any an-
nouncements for the An-
nouncements column unless
they are typed doublespace
and turned in before the
deadline. No exceptions will
be made The deadlines are
2:00 p.m. Friday for the
luesday edition and 2:00
p.m. luesday for the Thurs-
day edition We reserve the
right to edit tot brevity. We
cannot guarantee that
everything turned in will ap-
pear m the paper, due to
space limitations, but we will
do our best.
REMEMBER TO VOTE FOR YOUR OUTSTANDING
PROFESSORS
From Monday, Feb. 25, until Friday, Feb. 29, ECU students will have the op
Dortunity to vote for the outstanding teachers they have had for at least one
Undergraduate course for credit during the fall or spring semesters of the
1979-80 school year.
The computer processed voting card can be obtained from the student's
faculty advisor. The student may vote for up to three undergraduate teachers
and is to assign to each nominated teacher a rating of lO(highest), 8, or 6,
depending on the intensity of the nomination. The falculty member's four die
code number, as given in the Feb.21 issue of The East Carolinian, should be us
ed instead of the faculty member's name. The voting card should be deposited
in the voting box in the Registrar's Office in the Whichard Building, 8 a.m. 5
p.m during Feb. 25-29.
Students should bear in mind that the vote is for teachers whom they feel are
outstanding. It is not a vote to find the most popular teacher or a vote to in
dicate course preference. The best teachers are not necessarily the most
popular and conversly, the most popular teachers are not necessarily the best
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SGA Legislators Hear Towing Report
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 26, 1980
Continued from Page 1
rod reported that
another wrecker ser-
vice, Hastings Ford,
has joined three other
wrecker services that
have agreed to lower
their off-campus tow-
ing rates for university-
registered vehicles.
Like the others,
Hastings Ford will
charge $15 to tow stu-
dent vehicles that are
ticketed off campus
before 6:00 p.m. and
$20 thereafter.
Sherrod also said
that he would be work-
ing to get approval of a
no-tow policy on cam-
pus. This could be
achieved through the
use of wheel locks in-
stead of tow-trucks,
Sherrod explained. He
added that he will con-
tact administrators on
campuses that use the
system to get an idea of
how effective it is. .
In other business,
Steve O'Geary was
sworn in as a new Day
Student Represen-
tative. It was also an-
nounced that there is an
opening for a Fletcher
Dorm representative.
Greek News
Card Use Is Disappointing To Businesses
Continued from Page 1
A one-dollar dis-
count on athletic shoes
and a free can of tennis
balls with racket string-
ing are offered by
Phidippides. They have
an average response of
one or two students a
week.
C. Herber Forbes of-
fers a 10 percent dis-
count on full-price mer-
chandise. The manage-
ment was satisfied with
response, but they said
response would be bet-
ter if more students
knew about the NSCC
The remaining six
businesses said they
were not pleased with
the respone they have
received. The owner of
Glenda's Beauty-Salon
and Boutique stated
that they "have not
received good response
because the cards were
poorly distributed.
The manager of
Mike's Bike Shop also
Blevins Helps Plan
Continued from Page 1
meitts, and Patrice Smith, another
volunteer who has not yet begun her
committee work, said that she was
"enthusiastic" about getting
started.
Student opinion has not always
been so highly valued at East
Carolina University.
Dr. Henry Ferreil, vice chancellor
for institutional advancement and
planning with 18 years of experience
at ECU, said Monday that this type
of involvement is something new for
the university.
Ferreil commended the students
who are doing committee work, and
noted that Chancellor Brewer "was
very specific about having student
representation" in planning.
The current drive to examine all
aspects of university life was begun
by Chancellor Brewer shortly after
being appointed ECU chancellor.
Dorothy Horner said she still had
several committee and task force
seats to fill, and invited interested
students to come by her office at 224
Mendenhall to apply.
"We try to put students on a com-
mittee that they will enjoy or get the
most benefit out of. It is especially
good when a student can relate his
committee work to his studies
Horner said.
said that half of the
students did not receive
cards. He added that
students did not know
about the NSCC.
The owner of the
Mushroom said only
about two or three
students have used the
card, and she added
that she gained ab-
solutely nothing from
it. Operators of the
Olde London Inn, The
Pierced Ear, and the
United Figure Salon
also claimed poor
responses.
The National Stu-
dent Consumer Card
offers the holder dis-
counts from Greenville
businesses. ECU
students can pick one
up at the SGA office in
Mendenhall Student
Center. All Greenville
merchants listed on the
card stated they would
welcome more support.
Warnings Given
Continued from Page 1
represent a legitimate company
The "salesman" usually will
work in an area, such as Greenville,
for two to three weeks, leave and
pick up his solicitation somewhere
else, like Chapel Hill, commented
Eddings.
Referring to how one can be so
easily taken in by such artists, Ed-
dings noted that most of these types
of criminals have a very glib tongue.
They are quick to defend their posi-
tions as salesmen, and people just
get "suckered in" by their apparent
knowledge of the material.
To spot the rip-off artist quickly.
To Students
Eddings suggests asking to see an
ECU Security Office permit to
solicit on campus. If the salesman
does not have such a permit, tell him
you are not interested and call the
police after the salesman has left.
Greenville City Police Chief E.G.
Cannon also suggested that the
customer ask the salesman to see a
permit to solicit in the city of Green-
ville. Cannon stated, "This permit
has my signature on it and the
photograph of the salesman. If the
salesman does not have this permit,
then send him away and call the
police immediately. They will come
and investigate the person in ques-
tion
i WHILE
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By
RICK1 GL1ARM1S
Greek Correspondent
The Alpha Phis
honored their outstan-
ding seniors at their
Forget-Me-Not Ball
this past weekend. Lin-
da Greatorex, 1979-80
president, was
presented with the
"Best to Wear
Bordeaux" and the
Leadership Award.
Geri Keel was
honored with the Best
Supporting Sister
Award by her fellow
sisters and with the
Sister of the Year
Award by the pledges.
The Scholarship
Award for the highest
grade point average
was presented to
Dorene Rountree. The
Andrea Norris Activity
Award was presented
to Joanna Best for her
participation in sorori-
ty and campus ac-
tivities.
Eddie Walters was
honored with the
Bordeaux Beau Award
for the most outstan-
ding brother. Joe
Hallow was made an
Honorary Big Brother
for his help and sup-
port of the Alpha Phis.
Congratulations to
Burley Day and Martha
Clark, the winners of
the First Annual Alpha
Phi Shag Contest.
Thank-yous are extend-
ed to all the par-
ticipants, judges and
supporters.
The Sigmas were
visited by Ruth Mc-
Creery, national of-
ficer, this past
weekend. During the
visit, Ruth met with the
sisters and held
workshops. Also dur-
ing the weekend,
several girls were in-
itiated. Congratula-
tions and best wishes to
the new Sigma Sigma
Sigma sisters.
Sigmas would like to
extend a special thanks
to Sandy Burke, rush
chairman, for all her
hard work and for the
wonderful job she is
doing this semester.
The Chi Omegas in-
ducted seven new
pledges this past week.
They would like to
welcome Lorraine
Bradley, GeorgeAnna
Chambers, Nancy
Hughes, Rosemary
Knapp, Dee Dee Ward,
Lisa Ward, and Laura
Woodard. Congratula-
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Sigma Tau Gamma is
proud to announce the
addition of two new
pledges to the spring
pledge class. They
would like to thank alt
of the Sig-Tau Crew for
coming over Sunday
afternoon for the yard
party.
The Pi Kaps
celebrated their
Founder's Day on Feb.
16. They had a good
turnout with several
alumni in attendance.
The Pi Kaps would
like to congratulate
their new officers:
Bruce Mullis, archon;
Alan Britt, treasurer;
Randy Langley,
secretary; Chuck
Milian, historian; Jeff
Kearns, rush chairman;
Doug Marlow,
chaplain; Mike Sheaf-
fer, warden; and Bruce
Hayden, social chair-
man.
Sigma Phi Epsilon
announces the official
opening of the Sig Ep
beach!
This past weekend,
the Phi Taus held their
annual Little Sister
Champagne Breakfast
at the Pipeline
Restaurant. After the
breakfast, the brothers
and little sisters relum-
ed to the house for a
keg party.
This coming
weekend, the Phi Taus
will be holding their
Parents Weekend and
Formal at the Green-
ville Country Club. The
festivities will begin at
5:30 with a cocktail
party at the house.
Dinner will be served
at the club, and follow-
ing the meal, the Phi
Taus and their parents
will be entertained by
the band "Sunny
Skies
The Phi taus are also
participating in the
Miller Pick Up and are
presently in first place.
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The East Carolinian
Serving the campus community for 54 years.
Marc Barnes, &�
Diane Henderson, rimm rti
Robert M. Swaim, mh�vmmm� Richard Green, cmm
Chris Lichok, �.� .�,�� Charles Chandler, �� �.
Terry Gray, � mm Karen Wendt, �iw &
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 26. 1980
PAGE 4
This Newspaper's Opinion
Let Our People Go
The confusion over the Iran situa-
tion is much worse than the incident
of the kidnapping of Americans
themselves. The Iranians alternately
support and oppose the release, say-
ing at one time that they would
release the hostages if the Shah's
alleged wrongs against his coun-
trymen were investigated. Then, the
militants say that nothing short of
the Shah's actual return (and almost
certain execution) will cause the
hostages to be freed.
The newly-elected president of
Iran, Abolhassan Bani-Sadr, has
spoken for the ailing Ayatollah,
saying in agreement with the
militants that the election of the new
Iranian parliament will almost cer-
tainly delay the return of the
hostages.
The new parliament, said Bani-
Sadr, will have to decide when and
if the hostages will be released.
Every spokesman in Iran,
whether it be the militants at the em-
bassy, or the Ayatollah, or the
foreign minister, or any one of a
host of others, every one of these
people has a hard time deciding
what the policy will be.
One day, there is hope that the
hostages will be released within the
next week or so; in the next breath,
we hear another report from Iran
which says that the Americans
won't come home until the Shah is
brought back to Iran. Bani-Sadr is
all at once critical and full of praise
during the whole situation.
The fact of the matter, no matter
what any number of militants or
others might say, is that the
Americans should be freed now,
and that it is virtually impossible for
us to return the Shah to Iran. To do
so would almost certainly result in
his death, and nothing, save the
triumphs of a howling mob, would
be served by this.
It is against the morals of the
United States to send a man into an
almost certain death. If a fair trial
could be guaranteed to him, it might
well be a different story.
An almost forgotten group in the
entire debacle has been the
hostages' families. These few have
stood by with patience ever since the
taking of the embassy. They,
especially, are the ones who are the
most hurt by the conflicting reports
that come out of the country.
The Americans should be return-
ed home, and the Iranian govern-
ment should, as President Carter
hinted a long time ago, pay for the
entire affair. They should not be let
off the hook with a slap of the wrist.
To do this, or worse yet, to
apologize to the Iranians for the
alleged activities of the Shah should
not be done.
The taking of an embassy and the
subsequent imprisonment of its per-
sonnel is a flagrant violation of in-
ternational law and should not be
tolerated.
We feel that our President should
demand the release of the hostages
now, and we also feel that he should
use any sanctions that are necessary
to insure this. Each day that goes by
is but one more day of possible
lasting emotional harm to the
hostages.
Iran, let our people go!
Saved By The Bell � Again
The editorial writer went to his
tiny office and sat down. After
lighting up a cigarette and putting it
out again, he thought and he
thought and he thought. Nothing
would come to him. He could not
think of a good, exciting topic, and
deadline was fast approaching. He
pounded his head, and hit his
typewriter in frustration. Woe
descended upon him, and he was
sore afraid.
With fear and trepidation, he ap-
proaches the sacred oracle of higher
learning. He bows quickly as he
walks into the small room, and the
room has the eerie air of the land of
Oz, with some machine-like noise
running, and little pale blue lights
glowing. This is the place called the
Typesetter's Room, and the oracle
of wisdom is the Typesetter herself.
"Sit down the Great Oracle in-
tones. "What's the matter?"
"What on earth can I write my
editorial about tonight?" the still
fearful writer says, fumbling for a
cigarette.
"Boy, are you in trouble. Of
course, you could write one on Bill
Loeb, and the Manchester Union-
Leader � you know, the guy that
was on 460 Minutes' last night. Or,
you could write one on the
Ayatollah, or on the Olympics, or
on the weather
"Are we in favor of the weather
or against it?" asks the writer.
"Don't be silly the Typesetter
says. "Or, you you could write
one on how hard it is to write
editorials. You know, that might
not be a half bad idea
A light comes on above the
writer's head.
Saved by the bell again.
HOW WOULD YOU ATE
THE NSW P�C6ISTItTlON
SVS7CM ON A $CAL�
Of 1 TO TO 9
W�tl NUM.
c m
o" .rohshh
gox?o:o o o:o
Toroooo,a
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3
Pop's People
Holiday Held To Herald Hams
By LARRY POPELKA
I have a hard time getting excited about
holidays. To tell the truth, after 21 years of
coloring Easter eggs, shooting off fireworks
and carving jack-olanterns, I've gotten
bored.
Why do we always have to celebrate the
same stupid holidays every year? Columbus
may have sailed the ocean blue in fourteen
hundred ninety-two, but who really cares in
nineteen hundred eighty?
If our holidays are going to be mean-
ingful, we should be constantly adopting
new ones to replace those that have gotten
outdated or boring.
A favorite replacement of mine is Na-
tional Pig Day.
Pig Day was established eight years ago
by sisters Ellen Stanley and Mary Lynne
Rave of Lubbock, Texas, and Jacksonville,
N.C respectively.
According to Ellen, Pig Day, which is
celebrated on March 1, is "our own special
holiday for pigs
"When we were girls, we read stories
such as E.B. White's 'Charlotte's Web
telling of the joys of raising a pig says
Ellen. "We both agreed that piglets were
just about the most adorable animals alive!
We didn't live on a farm and we were
unable to ever own a pig, so we started giv-
ing each other little figurines of pigs for bir-
thday and Christmas gifts
But pigs never seemed to tie in very well
with the Christmas theme, so in 1972 the
sisters set aside their own day, especially for
pigs.
To celebrate their holiday, the sisters
send each other boxes of food to "pig out"
on. They also have neighborhood parties in
which friends exchange pig presents, such
as piggy banks and pictures of pigs.
Their children, who have also adopted a
passion for pigs, take pig-shaped cookies to
school.
Part of the purpose of Pig Day, say the
sisters, is to improve the pig's poor public
image.
"Pigs are not dirty, smelly creatures who
wallow in mud says Ellen. "When they
used to live outside, they would occasional-
ly take a mud pack to cool off because pigs
have no sweat glands. But today's pigs now
live in clean, environmentally controlled
'pig parlors
Since the pig � particularly its meat �
plays such a vital role in our daily lives (a
much more vita role than St. Patrick ever
did), Mary Lynne and Ellen suggest
everyone organize their own Pig Dav
celebration. J
And so, to help you celebrate National
Pig Day at your school, I've spent the past
week digging up information about pigs.
The following items are some of the more
important things you need to know.
�Pigs don't pig out. Unlike horses, dogs
and other farm animals, pigs know when to
quit eating. A dog, for example, if left on
his own, will eat too much and bloat up and
die. Pigs, however, know when they've had
enough and never overeat.
They also chew their food thoroughly
(unlike dogs which gulp their food).
Nor are pigs finicky � like cats � about
how their meals are prepared, which is why
farmers used to feed them garbage, slop
and other such foul matter.
�Pigs make better lovers. Hogs are loyal
to their mates. Unlike other animals, male
pigs don't fashion themselves as porky ver-
sions of Richard Gere. Rather, they prefer a
quiet sex life with only one sow.
Since many boars are castrated at birth
and there is a distinct shortage of fully-
equipped males, this creates quite a ruckus
in the pig pen.
Some hog farmers claim that jealous
sows push and bump male pigs who attempt
to make love to their mates.
The loyalty with which pigs preserve but
one lover makes breeding especially
troublesome for farmers. So does the fact
that some pigs are homosexual and refuse
to fraternize with any pigs of the opposite
sex.
�Pigoholics. A few years ago researchers
at the University of Missouri-Columbia
studied pigs' drinking habits and found that
pigs � like humans � drink for social
reasons.
The researchers took seven pigs and
determined their social pecking order. Then
they let the pigs drink as many screwdrivers
as they wanted. (Screwdrivers, it had been
determined, were the pigs' favorite
cocktails.)
According to the researchers, at first the
top pig drank heavily and lost his status
Meanwhile, the number three pig which
drank very little, became the new top pig
However, once the number one pie
sobered up, he redeemed his social standing
and never got drunk again.
The heaviest drinker overall was the pig
ranked sixth in the social pecking order
The researchers concluded this was because
he is frustrated about his position and has
resorted to drinking
But the number seven : .
drunk. "Number seven knows V
has accepted that the researchers in-
cluded.
�Pig Stars. The most famou � i
(Miss Piggy doesn't count) ,
fel, who co-starred on I
1968 and 1969. Arnold won the Pei
Animal Television Star ol the Year A
for opening doorv sucl
wearing sun glasses
For his work rnold ;
and drew the attention ol
gradeschoolers w ho wrote him k
vowing never to eat pork d .m
Once EvaGabor, Am
peeved at the attention
was quoted as complamir.
if I'd powdered my nose I en :he pie
ready, we began shooting In a
most humiliatine to share b
Pig
�Singing Swine. I he gafl
is Uncle Heavy's Pork.hop Reue, a iroup
which includes three pig hodo dogtricts,
such as pushing babv buggies, roW out
carpets and playing on a eea.
The group, which ha red on the
Johnny Carson Show and been featured in
Life magazine, includes a singing swine
named Oink. Oink grunts aK ne
of "Popeye the Sailor Manand 'Home
on the Range
�Hog Rustling. When the British col-
onists settled in Jamestown in 160 ;he
brought several pigs with them fot food,
some of which escaped and were killed and
eaten by Indians.
According to hog historians, the Indians
developed such a taste for pork :va:
began "hog rustling" the swine from set-
tlers.
The settlers, in return, chose to confine
their herds to a plot of land off the c
called Hog Island. They also used -hog
rustling" as an excuse for takinc over In-
dian territory.
�Pig Wars. In the fall of 1T0. several
tribes in New Guinea went to war over the
killing of pigs. One tribe that lost several
pigs took out their vengeance hv killing
members of the offending tribe. Eventual!)
the war escalated to the point where 10,000
natives from 29 tribes were battling oi
few pigs.
After two months Indonesian authorities
arranged a truce among the tribal chiefs.
But according to a Reuters report the chiefs
warned that "if any more of their hiehlv
prized pigs were slaughtered, thev would at
tack the police
Happy Pig Day!
Boycott Of Olympics Is Called Because of Soviet Threat
By CHARLES GRIFFIN �
National News Bureau
The furor over the Moscow
Olympic Games leaves the world
sorely divided. The President and
many other Americans feel we
should not go to Moscow as long as
the Soviets are holding Afghanistan.
Allied governments around the
world are expressing similar sen-
timents.
But the International Olympic
Committee (IOC) is firmly against
canceling the games or moving the
site. And the IOC member for each
nation � including the U.S. � is
firmly against such action. They
have to be. They are honor-bound
to ignore any pressure of any sort to
change, harm or stop the games.
IOC members are chosen for life
and they are carefully screened.
They are not chosen as represen-
delegates to their countries to guide
the Olympic movement within their
countries.
Each Olympic
country must be
I
in a
of
representatives of the governing
bodies of each sport represented in
the games. Each of these sports
must have an international federa-
tion with representatives from ach
country's sport federation or gover-
ning body.
And every member is sworn to
abide by the rules of the IOC. They
must be totally independent and.
autonomous and resist commercial,
religious or political influence.
They cannot do other than say no
to the President � their first duty is
to the games, not to their countries.
Reality is another matter.
Western nations and non-
communist nations do not generally
attempt any sort of control over
their sports to the degree that com-
munist nations do.
If the games were being held in
America and the Soviets wanted to
io th?ir dispJeaiire o sn sc-
tion of ours by boycotting the
games, you can be sure that the
committees under their control
would immediately kowtow and
withdraw their support for the
The very idea of amateur com-
petition is alien to the communist
nations. Where we have a clear
demarcation between professional
and amateur athletics � profes-
sionals get paid, amateurs don't �
the communist countries operate on
a non-profit basis and have no clear
demarcation.
The rules of the IOC state that
each athlete must have a basic oc-
cupation designed to ensure his pre-
sent and future livelihood that he
does not receive and never has
received any enumeration for par-
ticipation in sport.
Of course, many athletes have
devoted their school years and the
period just after college to attaining
mastery of some sport, winning a
medal in the Olympics, and living
off commercials thereafter. But they
were teaming something else while
i sstsee! snd sfey hsd u spon
themselves afterward or depend on
public or paternal help to continue
training.
The same is not true in the USSR.
There an athlete k completely sup-
ported by the state as long as he or
she can compete and win. They live
and eat better than the general
populace. They receive allowances
for luxury items when.on tour in
foreign areas. They become coaches
of their sport if they retire
honorably. Their bodies are ex-
primental playgrounds for Soviet
scientists searching for ways to build
better Russians through better
chemistry.
In international events, Eastern
European and Soviet jduges have
visibly favored athletes from their
own countries when getting a gold
medal becomes a point of interna-
tional prestige.
To the Soviets, there is a great
deal of national prestige in being the
best athletes in a given field, or in
winning more gold than any other
team. We do the same thing, but we
don't put our hearts and souls into it
� and we don't retire k�w�
coaches and athletes to the north
slope of Alaska.
My point, at long last, is that the
Soviets see the games as a means to
show political superiority. If our
government is to attempt 9
demonstration against Soviet ag-
gression short of going to war,
boycotting the Moscow games or,
the winter games as well. We can-
not, in good conscience, accept the
Soviets as equals if they continue to
act like sharks in a feeding frenzy.
We must use every economic,
better, drawing participants away
from the games to another site is the
very best means at hand to humiliate
them.
We must recognize that the IOC
cannot go along with the boycott or
a change in location. Undoubtedly
there will be an Olympiad in
Moscow, but the only participants
should be Soviet client states and the
IOC.
America should sponsor an alter-
nate Olympiad without IOC sanc-
tion using every incentive to lure
other nations to attend. A neutral
skc snouia oe chosen, perhaps in
Egypt. The rules of the IOC should
be rigidly adhered to even though
the members of the IOC now living
aseept any of the records
r
We must do this thing knowing
full well that the Olympic eames
may never be the same. We should
have denied Soviet teams entrv to
political or emotional resource we
1 iQVcot0humniate and ensure the
ubR. Our government should ac-
tively seek to undermine and destroy
the Soviet government
Boycotting the games, refusing
and withdrawing economic support
from the IOC and the commit
accepting the Moscow Olympiad is
akin to the rich kid on the block net
ling mad and taking his ball awav
making ,t impossible for others .0
Piay. But it is a move that must �
done and it should be just the fir
step m a new aggressive policv to
progress, vely destroy hc
USSkMnamac diarchy of ,he
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I he Oscars
Academy Award Nominations Announced
Scheider of ' Ml ha( la'
nominati it tot ! s ctor
B HDH I MOM s
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'ali ' wot k and others eoi
indulgent. Rov Seheidei was nominal
��civ paralled i i lite
(Hhers named toi he I letoi I) j
"Ktamei s Kramei laek 1 emu
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among the nominee
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" I he Rose lustin Henrv. "Kramei s K- m
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Moi � Streep was eonsidered hv man .
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memhei s nominate onl lot hesi
mnotmce its choice tor hest
' March 15 I suallv the
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Kiamei ' has alreadv collected the lion's
X iden . iwards iolden (ilobes. New
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1 ' 'ill return a mcee lot the 52nd
! � Xngeles Musicentet pi
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BeatlesReunion
Popular Myth
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Rob Fosse. lu,t la" Director
ilm nominated for
Hest Picture
Campus Views
Vary On Draft
I he Romantics
eu If ave hit in Greenville
The Romantics
Group Debuts
In Greenville

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However, th�
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�. v'
THl tASTC AROIINIAN
hfcBRl ART 2. IWO
New Wave Debuts In Greenville
Romantics At The Attic
Music For A While1
plays Hendrix Theater March 3
'Music For A While'
Presents Chaucer
A reproduced segment of
Chaucer's world will appear on the
Hendrix Stage on March 3, when
the Student Union Artist Series and
Musk For A While present "La
Fontaine Amoureuse"the Loving
Fountain).
The presentation was written by
Guillaume de Machaut, who lived
during the period of Chaucer and
Petrach.
The group will perform in
authentically-styled 14th century
costumes and will play most of the
music on the instruments that the
music was written for. Also on
display before the performance and
during the intt mission will be in-
struments from the period such as a
sackbut, recorders, a tambor, a viel,
a rebec and a Turkish Kemence.
Within the performance are
Chaucer's music and verse, a court-
ly feast, his amourous cor-
respondence with Peronne, his
awareness of the capriciusness of
fate, his failure in love, the horror
of the plague of 1343, and his turn-
ing to the 'other' lady 'Virgin
Mary
The group maintains historical
accuracy, but also insists on the
freedom to keep the music alive.
Music For A While has been call-
ed one of "the most distinguished
purveyors of the repertory
The group is also part of the
Artists-in-residence Program at
Saint Lawrence College.
Continued From Page 5
yelled at intermission, "Bring on the
punk-rockers
A ell. the Ron antics nit tne stage
in a flash of color and bravado,
resplendant in the shiny, red leather
pants and bearing witness to the fact
that they were far removed from
their setting. The boyish lead
guitarist and the drummer wore
their slim ties, characteristic of new
wave dress. The lead singer resembl-
ed Franki Valli with an overdose of
speed, and the bass player was a
blond bombshell who seemed very
impressed with himself.
The Romantics were perhaps the
most famous group to appear at the
Attic because, to the best of
knowledge, no other group has ever
had an album that ranks as high as
The Romantics. The group's first
album ranked within the top one-
hundred in the Billboard charts and
placed 44th in their first week on
Rolling Stone's chart. Only last
week the group headlined the Valen-
tine's Day concert at The Bottom
Line, one of New York's most
famous night spots.
The boys attacked their in-
struments and the wall of sound that
resulted was overwhelming � they
were so loud that my ears almost
started bleeding. The group's music
was really pretty good, but as loud
as it was, the instruments jsut blend-
ed together into one tremendous
rock noise. They were so loud that
the crowd was forced to respond.
The sheer volume was enough to
shake you so hard it looked like you
were dancing There was no need
lOt li io Oc tiMlt iOui.
The music was good at times, but
it was much more fun to watch the
Romantics antics onstage. The lead
singer acted like it was his last con-
cert, and the frenzied look on his
face was a bit psychotic, but it was
all just food fun. The lead guitarist
played just inches from the crowd,
and drove those close to him into a
pogo-jumping panic. Jimmy was
having the best time of all. His fran-
tic screeching and frenetic playing
was perhaps the highlight of the
night. The bass player just looked
bored.
The crowd had a relatively good
time, but it seemed that they jsut
didn't know how to react to this
alien brand of music. They rocked
pretty well, but they just didn't want
to relinquish their inhibitions and
engage in inspired decadence. It
could have been a riot, but instead it
was just a remarkably good time.
Well, next time we will know what
to expect.
So, the new wave made its first
assault on Greenville, and the even-
ing was a magnificent success. For a
relatively small admission price, we
experienced one of the most profes-
sional shows 1 have seen at the Attic
and certainly had the most fun at
the nightclub in a while. My only this rocking eve My compliments to
reservation was the decibel level of Tom Haines and the Attic for a job
the group and the crowd's inability well done, and wc ill be looking
to break down and really appreciate forward to next time.
Poetry Contest
In Springtime
International
Publications announc-
ed that it will sponsor a
National College
Poetry Contest this spr-
ing.
The poems will be
printed in the 10th edi-
tion of the American
Collegiate Poetry An-
thology.
Cash prizes will be
awarded in the top five
places with the first
place winner receiving
$100.
Some of the Contest
rules are as follows:
Any student is eligi-
ble to submit his verse.
All entries must be
original and unpublish-
ed.
All Entires must be
typed, double-spaced ,
on one side of the paper
only. Each poem must
be on a separate sheet
and must bear, in the
upper left-hand corner,
the NAME and AD-
DRESS of the student
and the COLLEGE at-
tended. Name and ad-
dress are also required.
There are no restric-
tions on form or theme.
Length of the poems is
limited . 14 lines.
Each poem must have a
separate title.
The judges decision
will be final.
Entrants should keep
a copy of all entries as
they cannot be return-
ed. Prize winners and
all authors published
will be notified im-
mediatly after the
deadline. IP. will re-
tain first publication
Hunts for accepted
poems. Foreign
language poems are
welcomed.
There is an initial one
dollar registration fee
for the first cntr and a
fee of fifty cents Foi
each additional poem,
with a ten-poem limit.
All entry fees must
be paid with cash,
check or money order
to:
International
Publications
P.O. Box -U92"
I os Angeles
9X)44
Brewer Presents Introduction
Symphony Enjoyed By Many
Bv STEPHANIE
K. TINGLER
Slaff V rilcr
The East Carolina
School of Music "is the
finest in the
Southeast Chancellor
Brewer commented in
his introductory
remarks to the ECU
Symphony Orchestra
concert. The Sym-
phony adequately
represented that state-
ment in its performance
of Saturday, Feb. 16.
The Symphony open-
ed its program with two
pieces especially ar-
ranged by conductor
Robert Hause. The
Toccata in G Major by
Bach is lovely, but it
seemed a bit rushed, ex-
citing, but a little
pushy.
The obvious gem of
the eveningwas the se-
cond Hause arrange-
ment of the program,
Brahms' Intermezzo in
A Major. Originally for
piano, Mr. Hause's or-
chestration is not short
of ingeniously perfect.
The melody itself is
transfixing, but the
symphony's presenta-
tion was lovely and sur-
prisingly sensitive. It is
often unbelievable that
a group so large can
sound like the outpour-
ing of one spirit.
The Concerto for
Harp'and Orchestra, by
G. F. Handel, was a
landmark perfor-
mance. Not only is
Paula Scarangella a
fine harpist, but tftfe
symphony can adapt
well to "mere accom-
paniment The An-
dante allegro which was
chosen for the program
was a lively addition
for the evening's
presentation. Miss
Scarangella is destined
for further study in
Philadelphia.
The Hungarian
Dances 5 and 6 were
further proof that
Saturday's program
was meant for the
public favorites. A
common tune to the
Saturday c
diets, number 5 Was a
pleasant surprise judg-
ing from the gasps in
the audience. However,
both dances were
Minor. Pirated by the
rock music industry
several years ago, it
further popularized the
infamous tune which
by now must be playing
to Beethoven through
those great headphones
in the sky. Hause and
his obviously en-
thusiastic group were
all fire and passion.
y put the cherry
oh'a delightful treat.
The lilting melodies of
the now immoralized
motion picture can still
sent the most unap-
preciative listener into
the skies above
Tatooine or the cor-
ridors of the Death
Star.
Anyone who ap-
preciates a symphony
can doubly appreciate
the efforts of musicians
striving to master an
ancient craft. A sym-
hony can say things
relate. If you missed
the East Carolina Sym-
phony this time, you
still have a few more
chances. But you'll
probably never hear a
more moving, original
premiering arrange-
ment of a timeless
Brahms Intermezzo or
a more boisterous
Beethoven's Fifth.
The East Carolina
Opera Theater will be
presenting their spring
production beginning
Feb. 22.
SPRING BREAK
MONEY
Paying Cash
for
GOLD and SILVER
MIXED MEDIA
ABORTION
The decision may well be d ificult . .
but the abortion itself doesihave to be.
We do our best to make it easy for yox.
Free Pregnancy Test
JTmry Barijr Pregnancy Test
The Fleming Center
Friendly . . . Personal . . . Professional Care
at a reasonable cost
plagued by intonation
Reunion Hoax Discussed SS vr
Continued From Page 5
rison, the whimsical guitarist known
for his ties to the Hare Krishna
movement, would more than likely
favor the idea. Ringo Starr, the
likeable drummer, would also sup-
port a Beatles reunion.
No one knows what exactly to ex-
pect if a Beatles reunion actually
takes place, but most groups break-
ing up and re-forming have been
disappointments. Such examples
would include Crosby, Stills and
Nash, the Moody Blues, the Byrds,
the Animals and the Allman
Brothers Band. The group Faces
aggggggggggggm
also had a small reunion that was
not in the same vein as their earlier
popularity. Some groups who got
back together after splits have been
successful, most notably the Bee
Gees, but these didn't enjoy the im-
mense popularity that the aforemen-
tioned groups did at the time of
their breakup.
Could four almost middle-aged
men rival the accomplishments of
their exuberant youth? The Beatles
once sang, "Wait till I come back by
your side Perhaps that is all the
public demanding a reunion can do.
places. This did not
seem to dilute the en-
joyment of those pre-
sent.
As soon as the first
bar of the next piece
was sounding, an ap-
preciative sigh was
heard in response. Foot
tapping was nearly
audible, and an all-time
favorite was again get-
ting its due. The sym-
phony shone in
Beethoven's opening
movement of the Sym-
phony No. 5 in C
STEEPLECHASE
MONSAT.
11:00- 2:00
CAFETERIA
PITT PLAZA
CLOSED SUNDAY
4:30- 8:00

TUE.26Febl980
$1.14 Franks&Beans
$1.49 BBQ Meat Loaf
WED. 27 Feb. 1980
$1.14 Chili&Macaroni
$1.49Pork&Dressina
THUR.28Febl980
$1.14 Baked Lasagna
$1.49 Pork Chow Mein
FRI. 29 Feb. 1980
$1.14 Franks&Saurkrout
$.49 Turkey & Dressing
$2.50 Fried Trout&Hush Puppies
Cole Slaw,FF Potatos, Coffee or Tea
SAT. 1 Mar. 1980
$1.14 Turkey Casserole
$1.49 Smothered Liver&Mushroom Gravy
MON. 3 Mar. 1980
$1.14 Creole Spaghetti
$1.49 Pork&Dressing
TUE. 4 Mar. 1980
$1.14 Chili&Macaroni
$1 49 Chicken Chow Mein
The end
off the
Brown
mBa9
Blues
Starting March 3,1980
the beginning of an exciting new era in mid-
day dining.
Dimino's introduces a tasty alternative piz-
za for lunch. Great when your too busy to get
away because Domino's will deliver it to you,
hot and delicious, within 30 minutes.
So break up the routine have a pizza for
lunch!
Our drivers do not carry more than10.00.
We reserve the right to limit our delivery area.
FREE PEPSI OFFER STILL GOOD!
4 cups for large pizza
2 cups for small pizza
OH
o a
�Copyright 1978
Off any pizza
at Domino's Pizza
during the day shift only
11.00-4.00 Mon -Sun
i coupon per pizza
Expires 3-17-80
Fast, Free Delivery
1201 Charlc Blvd.
Phone 758-6660
HOURS:
11:00am- 1:00am Sun. - Thurs.
ii:O0to-2:OftlmFriSat.
���

:�:
ipvto
mm
&Ss
i





Special Sixties Double Feature
THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEBRUARY 26. 1980
Carnal Knowledge' Will Play
"Carnal
Knowledge" and
"Getting Straight
two movies about life,
sex, and college, will be
featured Wednesday
night in a Student
Union Film Committee
double feature beginn-
ing at 7 p.m. in
roommates who have
different perspectives
on the meaning and
performance of sex.
Jonathan prefers to be
loved while Sandy
would rather be loving.
Candice Bergen plays
the woman who is in
love with Jonathan
'Getting Straight' Stars Elliot Gould
and Candice Bergen
Students Fill
Out Survey
Mendenhall Student while Sandy is in love
Center's Hendrix with her.
"I can't tell you that.
I'm just following
orders
No, these were not
the words of a
demented scientisi in
the latest horror flick.
1 hese are the words of
Dr. John Ebbs, a pro-
fessor of English, and
the campus represen-
tativc for Na-
onal International
Fellowships and
Scholarships.
bbs was attempting
explain why only
freshmen and seniors
are being asked to par-
apte in a global
awareness survey
sponsered by the
Educational testing
Service in Princeton,
vi.
1 he survey deter-
mines 'how much col-
e students know
about world affairs
said I bbs. It also tests
their abilities in foreign
languages and their
perception and con-
ns about world af-
rs.
On Tuesday night, 20
students (ten seniors
and ten freshmen) will
have taken the test.
However, Ebbs is not
allowed to see the com-
pleted surveys because
they are sealed in
envelopes upon com-
pletion. " I never get to
see what they say
said Ebbs.
East Carolina is one
of 185 public and com-
munity colleges and
universities around the
nation that will par-
ticipate in the survey.
According to Ebbs;
most of the students
were amazed to find
out what they did and
did not know about the
world.
"I'd like all the
students to take this
thing said Ebbs.
Ebbs was not sure
what the results of the
survey would be used
for, but he thought it
would be for educa-
tional purposes, and
perhaps as a study of
the effects of media on
college students.
Twenty people from
each class were con-
tacted for the survey,
although some did not
respond.
Theater.
"Carnal
Knowledge" follows
two men from their
beginnings as sexually-
inexperienced college
students to their lives as
sexually-bewildered
adults. It creates a pic-
ture of the twisted em-
phasis on sex in
American life.
Jonathan (Jack
Nicholson) and Sandy
(Art Garfunkel) are
This trio lasts for a
time, but the pictures
moves forward to the
adult lives of Jonathan
and Sandy. Here we
find that, for reasons
given us a beautifully
performed film, achiev-
ing special miracles
with Candice Bergen
The screenplay was
written by Jules Fief-
fer, a celebrated car-
toonist who, in addi-
tion to being syndicated
nationally, often has
work displayed in
Playboy and Time. His
characters are given in-
creasing depth through
his consistent use of
monologue and
dialogue.
"Feiffer has grown
starring Elliot Gould anti-hero
and Candice Bergen. Director Richard
"Getting Straight" is Rush pushes "Getting
the story of Harry Straight" through its
Bailey (Gould), a Viet- controversial plot with
nam veteran who
returns, to college to get
a master's in education.
But he has returned on-
ly to be caught up in a
student revolt.
Bailey doesn't side
with the dissident
students, but he
vehemently opposes the
administration's policy
for keeping the campus
under control. At one
a deft touch. However,
he may be accused of
forgetting about Can-
dice Bergen � she is
not developed into
more than a shallow,
sex object when her
character could be
greatly enriched.
"Directed with great
skill by Richard Rush
said Charles Champ of
the Los Angeles Times.
"Elliot Gould is a most
ingratiating screen per-
sonality
not clearly explained, away from his roots as point he screams at the
they are leading
frustrating sex-lives.
Director Mike
Nichols makes his point
with comedy and artful
use of the characters'
situation. L ife
magazine said, "He has
a cartoonist, wrote
Newsweek shortly after
"Carnal Knowledge"
was released, "to write
characters instead of
caricatures
The second features
is "Getting Straight
president, "You can't
hold back the hands on
the clock! They'll rip
your arms off
Judith Crist of New
York magazine called
Gould "perfection in
his embodiment of the
Visitation Tightens
On Some Campuses
While we at ECU are
busy debating, filling
out questionnaires, and
forming task forces to
discuss the expansion
of visitation policies, at
least two other cam-
puses have cut
drastically their present
visitation policies.
On Feb. 12 officials
of the University of Pit-
tsburgh einstated
dorm visiting hour
regulations. Prior to
this reinstatement, all-
night visitation on
weekends was allowed
for both sexes. The new
rules prohibit non-
reisdent visitation after
2:00 am.
About ten years ago,
Pift abandoned their
visitation regulations,
but the murder of a co-
ed in January 1979
caused the rules to be
re-examined.
According to Mary
Ann Aug, director of
the Pitt news depart-
ment, the murder of the
co-ed "clearly piqued
our concern for safe-
ty
This is the first time
since 1971 that Pitt has
not followed the
policy of in loco paren-
tis, "in parent's
place
"The university
wants to make no
moral judgements
said Aug, "but we do
need a program that
allows i s to sweep the
dorms, and allows the
students to know that
whoever is there
belongs there
Kent State Universtiy
was another campus
that has dropped its
"liberal" dorm
policies.
According to Kent
officials, security was
also a reason for the
change in policy.
However, Kent
students are mainly
concerned with the lack
of student input into
the new policy.
Kent Interhall Coun-
cil (KIC) President
Harold Robinson ex-
plained, "You come to
a university to become
an adult. How can vou
become an adult if you
have restrictions?
"Year by year, the
policy has gotten more
restrictive He says
the issue is "whether or
not students have some
input into the policy
changes that are taking
place
Kent also developed
a policy about a year
ago which kept dorms
locked at all times and
forced student to carry
dorm keys with them.
So far the system
seems to have worked
out well.
Ann-Margaret and Jack Nicholson
in a scene from "Carnal Knowledge'
HEAPING �i�v
PORTIONS. price
Break the junk food routine and get a good, hot meal with
vegetables.
WEDNESDAY FEATURE
Feb. 27 ONLY$ 1.69
SALMON CROQUETTES
with Hot Slaw and choice of potato
Spring
Elections Chairperson
ATTIC
N.C. No. 3
Tues.
Cripple Creek
( Phoenix Room )
Nightclub
Wed.
Bull
Thurs.
Sutlers
Gold
Sat.
Sugar
THURSDAY FEATURE
Feb. 28 ONLY$ .69
STUFFED GREEN PEPPER
with your choice of two vegetables
Come home to eat at S&S � we're located in the
Carolina East Mall in Greenville, at the intersection of
West Haven Road (U.S. 264 Bypass) and Hwy. 11 Plenty
of free parking too.
Carolina East Mall
Serving continuously daily
from 11 a.m. till 8 p.m.
(8:30 Friday & Saturday)
Filing for all persons interested
in this position is Feb. 25-Mar. 3.
Full-time students apply in SGA Office.
(228 Mendenhall)
OVERTON'S
SUPERMARKET
located on 3rd and Jarvis St.

Peking Palace
Restaurant
0' GrMnvilte
Greenville Square Shopping Center
:or The Celebration Of Chinese New Year, We Are Of-
enng These Specials February 1 Through February 29,
1980
Luncheon Specials
Monday Through Friday
i,264 By Pass.�Greenville
PLUS ALL THE SALAD
YOU CAN EAT
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
�Sunday Buffet
�We Specialize In Szechuan And
landrtan Style Dishes
10�o Discount Coupon 10
10 Discount, With This Coupon On
IUJI Or More Purchase, With The Ex-
ceptton Of Luncheon Dishes, Family Din- I
ner Selections And Buffet. J
i
tmmvXT69
A Special
RIBEYE
FOR 2
a 3
25
99
10 Discount Coupon 10
Dinner include steak, . potato,
toast A all th salad you can eat.
Coupon expires 4-30-80
LUNCH SPECIALS
Everyday from 11-4
Ribeye 2.99
Chop Steak 1.99
Steak Sandwich 2.29
Parkay AAargerine
one pound pack
Duke's Mayonnaise
quart jar
Hi-Dri Paper Towels
Del Monte Catsup
quart bottle
Morton Frozen Pot Pies
Chicken, Beef, Turkey
8 oz. package
Garner's Grape Jelly
2 lb.jar
Grade A Whole Fryers
2$1.00
88'
28'
98"
4Vlb.
Overtons
includes potato. Toast,
SALAD BAR.
ALL YOU CAN EAT
A
n






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
BRl Rt 26. 1980 Page 8
Lady Pirates Crush Duke, Finish 3rd
Photo by KIP SLOAN
kathv Rilev Fires
By JIMMY DuPREE
Assistant Sports Kditnr
Ralc'gh � The Lady Pirates of
East Carolina claimed third place in
the NCAIAW Tournament Satur-
day with a 99-65 consolation game
romp over Duke, after falling 81-70
to eventual champion N.C. State in
the semifinals.
The Pirates allowed the Blue
Devils to tie the score only once and
never trailed as they claimed their
21st victory of the year against 10
defeats.
Senior Rosie Thompson fired in
seven consecutive points, as East
Carolina expanded the lead to 21-11
with only nine minutes expired. The
Blounts Creek native was forced to
the bench in the latter stages of the
opening half and also the second,
but nonetheless led all scorers in the
contest with 23 points on 10 of 17
tries from the field.
Junior speedster l.ydia Rountree
netted 15 of her 21 points of the
niuht in the first half, but sat out
part of the second after injuring her
right knee just over two minutes in-
to the half. Rountree netted only
four points after returning to the
lineup with a bandaged knee.
Juniors Kathy Riley, Marcia
Ciirven and Heidi Owen added 10
points. Owen, a defensive standout
throughout the season, had her best
offensive performance of the year
connecting on three of four from
the field and a perfect four of four
from the free-throw line. Girven
was the top rebounder of the night
with 10.
Junior point guard Laurie Sikes
knocked in three 20-footers in the
opening 2:30 of the contest to give.
ECU a 10-4 advantage. Although'
remaining scoreless the rest of the
night, Sikes handed out 12 assists to
bring her nationally ranked total to
228 on the year.
After trailing 50-38 at the half,
things only got worse for the Blue
Devil squad which upset the Pirates
76-75 in the first NCAIAW contest
of the season. ECU forged to a
64-44 margin with 16:00 to play, on-
ly to have Duke's Lisa Warren cut
the lead back to 18.
' It was smooth sailing down the
stretch as the reserves maintained
the advantage, although falling one
point shy of hitting the century
mark for the second time of the
season.
"They wanted to beat Duke
tonight lor several reasons said
coach Cathy Andruzzi. "They had
been beaten on the road in their first
conference game of the season and
they felt we should have won. We
respect Duke, but we were the
stronger team.
"If this is to be the last game of
the season, and 1 certainly hope it is
not, we can can go out with style
The Pirate women dropped a
heart breaking 81-70 decision to
N.C. State in Friday's semifinal ac-
tion. Riley posted the high game
total of the tournament with 31
points on 14 of 24 from the field and
three of three from the line.
The Wolfpack utilized a balanced
offensive attack to burst to a 28-16
lead with 5:24 till halftime, and sus-
tained the margin to the buzzer.
Rountree and Ciirven connected
on jumpers and Rilev added four
points as the I adv Pirates made
their first second-half run at N.C
State, cutting to42-34 with 16:31 on
the clock.
i The Wolfpack resorted to their
height advantage to widen the lead
again to 15 with 11:43 to be played,
repeatedly lobbing inside to 6-2 Ml
American Genia Beaslev and 6-5
June Dob v.
With iust under eight minutes re-
maining in the contest. Beaslev hit
her final bucket to give State 63-49
edge, but the relentless Pirates
weren't readv to surrender.
Rilev hit a pair ol field goals and
a free throw and Sikes added
another of her patented 20-footers
to cut to within nine of the regular
season Wolfpack.
State reserve Beth I iclden
preserved the 11 point victorv with a
field with :18 on the Jock and
another high-archer as the final
horn sounded.
"I think thev were up tor this
game more than we were said
veteran State coach kav Now "I
thought Genia played a little loo
loose this game. She sagged too
much defensivelj a! times
1 ast C arolfna no awaits a com-
mittee decision on M W r
at-large berths which �
he made this weekend. N.C Sta
automatically advances, ha
crushed North C arolina in the fit
ai the Raleigh Civicenter to cl
their tilth consecutive
State Genia Beaste
tournament MVP,
Mi-Tournament team, rcan
ngie Vrm '
Rogers, I C I 's Katl R
North C arolinas Ben - Mc
rounded out the all-tourne
ECU Attempts To
Stop Losing Skein
B) CHARLES CHANDLER
sports r dilor
I he I ast Carolina basketball
team hosts Campbell College
Wednesday night in hopes of ending
a three-game losing streak, all com-
ing on the road.
"Thev weie three er tough
losses commented ECU coach
Dave (Join of the defeats at the
hands oi Mar viand. UNC-
W ilmington and old Dominion. "1
hope we can bounce back and win
our last two games
The Pirates, 14-11, host
W isconsin-Milwaukee Saturday
afternoon in their last game of the
season.
The two contests represent the
last rimes that Pirate seniors Herb
Krusen, Kyle Powers, Herb Gray,
George Maynor and frank Hobson
will plav in ECU's Minges Col-
iseum.
Odom says special plans have
been made for the two games. "We
have dedicated this entire week to
our seniors he said. "I've talked
to each oi' them indiv idually and feel
they'll be really hyped up.
"I plan on started the five o
them both games Odom con-
tinued. "Hopefully, thev'11 give us
some good leadership and the
underclassmen will follow
following a tough loss to
nationally-ranked Maryland, the
Pirates looked emotionally "out of
it" at times in losses to UNC-W and
ODU. Odom said senior en-
thusiasm should help prevent this
from happening this week.
�Enthusiasm is something we've
talked about a lot claimed Odom.
"We need to try and generate more
excitement. With all they've been
through the last few years, 1 know
our seniors will generate some this
Photo by CHAP GURlEY
ECU guard Tony Byles lays one in
.
Campbell, 14-10, presents the
Pirates with an opponent similar to
UNC-Wilmington said Odom.
"They will really be up for us he
noted. "We will probably be their
biggest game o' the year. They'll
come in here will all their guns
ready
Since the Camels will be fired up,
Odom says the enthusiasm he wants
so badly will be essential. "We have
to be just as ready for them as they
are for us
Campbell is led by an experienced
backcourt and a 6-11 center.
Senior guards Darrell Mauldin
and Fred Whitfield average 14.8 and
16.1 points per game, respestively.
Mauldin led the nation in free throw
percentage last season.
I he big man is sophomore center
Tony Britto, who averages 12 points
and 8.4 rebounds.
Sophomore forward Ron Curtis
(8.1 ppg and 7.5 rpg) is termed by
Odom as the Camels' "best overall"
player. "He can do it all said the
first-year Pirate coach.
The Pirates are led by guard
George Maynor's 16.6 average.
Herb Krusen averages 13.4 while
Herb Gray tallies 11.7 points per
contest.
The game marks the twentieth
meeting between the two schools.
ECU leads the series 11-9, but this is
the first meeting between the two
since 1947, roughly ten years before
most of the players in this game
were born.
The Camels were the first college
team that East Carolina ever played,
making this contest a trivial one.
The matchup with Wisconsin-
Milwaukee was moved from Friday
at 7:30 p.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday due
to the ACC Tournament, being
played on both nights
6-8 Pirate Mike Gibson (52) rejects opponents' shot
Wild And Crazy ACC Tournament Expected
The following is a satirical look at
how the ACC tournament should
Would) turn out.
It's ACC tournament :ime again
and as the saying goes, "This shapes
up as the greatest one ever
No doubt, this season's tourney is
the most wide-open in league
history. Any one of six teams, all of
which have been ranked for most of
the season, could come away the
winner.
N.C. State, Virginia, North
Carolina, Maryland, Clemson or
Duke all have an excellent chance to
be the team cutting down the nets at
11:00 Saturday night.
How should it all turn out? Let's
take it game-by-game until we have
a winner.
The tourney opener (Thursday 1
p.m.) pits second-seeded and
nationally-ranked UNC versus
seventh-seeded Wake Forest. First
of all, don't count the Deacons out.
The game should begin for the
Heels much like their last one
against Duke ended. North
Carolina will literally dominate
play, jumping to a commanding
first half lead.
Senior Tar Heels Mike O'Koren
and Rich Yonaker get so excited
that they literally run in circles
around the Greensboro Coliseum
playing surface. This upsets Wake
coach Carl Tacy so that he gets head
spins and must be taken via stret-
cher to the locker room. UNC leads
at the half 48-26.
The hotdogging by O'Koren and
Yonaker so infuriates Tacy that he
inserts Frank Johnson into the
Wake lineup in the second half, kill-
ing all chances for the senior guard
to return and play next season.
With Johnson, Wake makes a
truly remarkable comeback as UNC
coach Dean Smith benches both
Yonaker and O'Koren.
With the game tied 90-90 Wake
has the ball at its own end with four
seconds left on the clock. A
desperation pass by the Deacons hits
the Coliseum scoreboard and
Charles
Chandler
bounds into the Tar Heel basket,
killing the Wake rally and giving
Carolina a 92-90 win.
The 3:00 contest features
Maryland and Georgia Tech. Tech
gets the opening tap and holds the
ball until the last few seconds, when
a last second shot by Lenny Horton
misses. The halftime score is 0-0.
The Terps get the ball at the
beginning of the second half and
score quickly as Albert King ignites
the crowd with a 360 degree dunk.
Maryland leads 2-0.
Tech decides to hold for a tie.
With two seconds left Horton drives
and misses a wide-open layup as
Maryland comes away with a thrill-
ing 2-0 decision.
The 7 p.m. game matches Duke
and N.C. State. The Blue Devils
start out like the Dukes of old, surg-
ing to a 22-6 lead behind the scoring
and rebounding of Gene Banks and
Mike Gminski.
All the momentum is in Duke's
favor until the Pack's Hawkeye
Whitney drives through the middle
of the Devil zone. Gminski prepares
to block his tenth shot of the game
when he suddenly sneezes. W hitney
slams the shot home and connects
on a free throw for a three-point
play.
State now has momentum and
catches up. Duke is still in it until
late in the second half when Devil
forward Kenny Dennard is knocked
senseless by a flying elbow from the
Pack's Chuck Nevitt. State wins
82-75 and Nevitt gets the Holly
Farms Chicken Award.
The final first round game pits
Clemson against Virginia. Cavalier
center Ralph Sampson nearly kills
his team's chances when he collects
his third foul after playing only 45
seconds. Clemson takes advantage
of this and leads at the half 42-25.
Sampson returns in the second
half to cheers of "Ralph who?"
from Tiger fans. Sampson answers
them with a 30-point, 20-rebound
and 12-blocked shot second half
performance as Virginia rallies for a
75-70 victory.
The UNC-NCSU second round
game is a real classic. The teams
literally trade buckets the entire first
half and are tied 40-40 at intermis-
sion.
Carolina scores quickly in the se-
cond half and . following a State
miss, has the ball and a 42-40 lead
with 19 minutes remaining. Dean
Smith calls for four corners at this
time.
After watching this nonsense for
ten minutes. State coach Norm
Sloan, who is headed to Florida next
season, yells to Smith "Listen you
idiot, this is my last tournament. If
you keep this up, I'll go down look-
ing like a fool
Smith replies, "Yeah, I know
Nothing changes as the Heels gain a
42-40 win.
The Maryland-Virginia matchup
is a dunking spectacular. Virginia's
�ampson and Maryland's King and
Buck Williams literally set the
crowd afire.
The second half is all Maryland as
the quick Terrapin guards literally
steal the game from the slower
backcourtmen of the Cavaliers.
Virginia coach Terry Holland is
ejected from the game when he
curses at Terrapin guard Reggie
Jackson.
"I don't care Holland says
after the game. "Nobody calls my
players a bunch of slow, no-playing
white boys
The championship game between
North Carolina and Mai viand s
tight and exciting. Terrapin
Williams and Tar Heel 1 Wood
play superb!).
The game ends in the fifth o
time when, with no time remaining
and the score tied 124-124.
Maryland coach lefty Dricsseil is
called for a techimcal I V N
James Worthy enters the game, c
and all, and sinks the winning free
throw.
Later in the evening. Driesseil is
rumoured to be on the phone long
distance to California. Reliable
sources sav he is talking with ev
l CLA Bruin coaching legend lohn
Wooden.
"John, I'll be damned sav
Lefty. "I guess ihere reallv is no
such thing as a'LCI of the East
It's got me worried, too. I think m
hairline is reeeeding
ttricsseU
1






THF EAST CAROLINIAN H BJU M � �, !? 9
Softball Entries Requested
IM Roundball Playoffs Begin
(ieorge Maynor on the move
Photo by CHAP GURLEY
Atkins Resi

f
UNAKI ES
( II M)1 IK
1. 11 r I� I �111 � r
c arolina
spoils In-
Dire c t o 1
ias i esign
1 the
o enter
had serv-
sports
: t o i at
ked in
ation
while
a i
He i a 1972
or of
trk, Md.
he will join The
Meredith-Webb Prin-
ting Co. of Burlington,
N.C. He will serve as a
salesman.
Yesterday Atkins
said that he had already
been signed two ac-
counts and would begin
work on them im-
mediateh after leaving
ECU.
He also mentioned
that Meredith-Webb
a as interested in im-
proving sports-related
accounts, such as sear-
books and game pro-
grams. This is where
Atkins comes in.
Cain. "He will be dif-
ficult to replace, but we
certainly wish him and
his family the best in
the future
Several names have
been mentioned as
possible replacements
for Atkins, including
the man Atkins replac-
ed. Ken Smith.
Also linked with the
job is UNC-W SID
John Justice along with
Durham Morning
Herald staffer and
ECU graduate John
Evans.
Bv
R1CKI GLIARMIS
Intramural C orrespondeni
The Intramural
Basketball season is
coming to a climax this
week with the divi-
sional playoffs being
played in Memorial
Gym and Minges Col-
iseum.
Fraternity playoffs
begin Wednesday, In-
dependent men on Fri-
day and Residence Hall
men playoffs also on
Friday.
Sorority and
Residence Hall women
are set to begin play on
Friday, with the In-
dependent opening
round on Friday, as
well.
The quarterfinals of
the Independent and
Residence Hall men
and Fraternities will be
played Sunday. The
quarterfinals of all
women's divisions will
also be played on Sun-
day. All divisional
finals will be played
Monday, March 2.
Softball
Get your teams
together early to see
what your players look
like. The pre-season
softball tournament
will include 64 men
teams and 16 women's
teams.
Entries are accepted
on a first come, first
serve basis, and a five
dollar entry fee per
team will be required to
cover the cost of balls
and umpires.
Play begins on
Thursday, March 20
and continues through
Sunday, March 23.
ASA rules with In-
tramural modifications
will be used. Sign up
now in Room 204
Memorial Gym.
Sports Club
Three new sports
clubs are being organiz-
ed for participation
during the 1980-81
school year. The new
clubs will be Weight
Lifting, Women's Soc-
cer, and Physical
Fitness. The Sports
Clubs have been a suc-
cessful facet of In-
tramurals, especially
with the addition of
these three new clubs.
Roller Hockey
Roller Hockey
playoffs began Mon-
day, Feb. 25 with tour-
nament competition
continuing throughout
the week. All this ac-
tion can be seen bet-
ween 3:30 p.m. and
6:30 p.m. at Twin
Rinks.
Swim Meet
Don't forget the In-
tramural Swim Meet
being held todas at
Minges Pool. The meet
will begin at 6 p.m.
with entries being ac-
cepted until 5:30 today
You still have a little
time left, so hurry on
out to Minges tor the
Swim Meet!
IM council
The next Intramural
Council meeting has
been scheduled tor
March 6 at 4 p.m. in
104 Memorial Ct ru
pressed a
ange" as
for leaving
n iust time
o on to
else he
enjoyed m
b si an op-
;ame along
id to jump
ins to serv e
1I Nil) until
10 Afterwards
"1 wasn't necessarily
hired as a specialist in
that area he said,
"but they have told me
that I'll be used a lot
�here
The search for a suc-
cessor for Atkins will
begin immediately says
ICC Athletic Director
Bill Cain.
We recognize the
dedication with which
Walt Atkins served
East Carolina said
NEW YORK
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PHILADELPHIA TRIP
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- V
1 �
10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 26, 1980
Banquet Set
Members of East
Carolina's 1979 foot-
ball team will be
honored at the school's
annual football ban-
quet, March 5 at the
American Legion Hall
in Greenville.
The Pirates, 7-3-1
last fall, led the na-
tion's colleges in
rushing at 368.5 yards
per game, and finished
second in total offense
at 475.3 yards. Also,
the 34.5 points scored
per game made the
Pirates third in the
NCAA in that
category.
Among the junior
honorees are all-
America guard Wayne
Inman and halfback
Anthony Collins, the
No. 16 rusher in the
country with 1,130
yards. Linebacker Mike
Brewington, the top
tackier for the second
straight year, and cor-
nerback Charlie Carter,
will be among the
seniors honored.
In addition to the
seniors who will receive
special recognition, all
1 e 11 e r m e n will be
recognized, and special
awards will be made to
numerous players.
ACC Tourney
Predictions
CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
NORTH CAROLINA
Heiden In Limelight
JIMMY DuPREE
Asst. Sports Editor
DUKE
DAVE ODOM
ECU Head Basketball Coach
DUKE
JIM WOODS
"Voice of the Pirates"
MARYLAND
ART CHANSKY
Durham Morning Herald Sports Editor
NORTH CAROLINA
A.J. CARR
News and Observer Staffer
N.C. STATE
RICH BRENNER
WRAL-TV Sportscaster
NORTH CAROLINA
WOODY PEELE
Daily Reflector Sports Editor
NORTH CAROLINA
By DANNY CUFFE
Staff Wriler
East Carolina's men
won their second
straight Seahawk In-
vitational swim meet at
Wilmington Saturday,
and the Pirate women
placed second.
ECU's men, led by
double winners Bill
Fehling (50 and 100
free), were on top from
the first day and rolled
up 565 points to
William and Mary's
342 and host UNC-
Wilmington's 332.
After getting off to a
slow start, the Lady
Pirates, led by Tammy
Putnam's wins in the
100, 200, and 400 In-
dividual Medleys, mov-
ed from fourth place to
second with 448 points.
Virginia Tech's women
placed first with 584.5
points.
The Pirate tankers
also received stong per-
formances from Ted
and Doug Nieman who
won the 500 freestyle
and the 400 individual
medley. Cindy Sailor
By WILLGRIMSLEY
AP Special Correspondent
A last reflection on
the XIII Winter Olym-
pic Games � a fort-
night that began with
confusion and frustra-
tion and ended on a
note of elation and
triumph:
The incongruity of
the Games' No.l hero,
Eric Heiden, a garland
of five gold medals
around his neck, hailed
as the greatest Winter
Games' performer of
all time:
"I don't like to be in
the limelight he says.
"I was happier when I
was just a plain person
� just me
Adds his mother,
Nancy: "It galls us all
that people assume
we've raised our
children with the sole
thought of winning
gold medals Do we
really want to idolize
won the 50 butterfly. peopIe that one.
The Pirates also ex- dimensional? Our
celled in the relays. The chiidren are not im-
men won the 400 ed b the word
S2,lZind.5f.?X) 'Olympics' or by
themselves
noto DyKIH bLUAN
Marcia Girven goes for two
ECU Swimmers
Capture Tourney
800 free relays. The
ECU women placed
first in the 800 free
relay.
ECU coach Ray
Scharf was "pleased
with the teams perfor-
mances, especially the
women, who defeated
Old Dominion and
William and Mary
Scharf added that
"the men's win was ex-
pected due to the lack
of competition.
However, it was.a real
accomplishment for the
girls to beat Old Domi-
nion, who are in Divi-
sion I, and William and
Mary, who finished 6th
nationally in Division
II
The next event for
the men's team, who
are classified Division
is the Eastern
Rcgionals in Morgan-
town, West Virginia on
March 5-8.
DELBERI
McCLINTON
He sings with the sensibility of a
man who has already witnessed
more than he cares to tell
The Rolling Stone
OPTICIANS
option
aooaation
of amenca
CONTACT LENSES
Soflens
Bausch & Lomb
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s129
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Guaranteed Fitting or Your Money Refunded
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GREENVILLE, N.C.
HYSICIANS QUADRANGLE
BUILDING A
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ADJACENT TO EAST
CAftOUMA EYE CUNtC
"VBtf
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OFFICE HOURS
9 A.M5:30 P.M.
MON.TUES.THURS.FRI.
9 A.M. -1P.M.
WEDNESDAY
10 Discount To E.C.U.
Students On Glasses.
r
9
If this be true, why
sacrifice the years of
dedication and training
to become an Olympic
star? Why hire a New
York lawyer-agent to
reap the commercial
benefits?
Heiden's five golds
represent a remarkable,
perhaps an un-
touchable feat but on a
per capita basis it fails
to outshine the four
medals picked by Han-
ni and Andreas Wenzel
from the wee prin-
cipality of Liechtens-
tein.
Hanni won two golds
and a silver, and
brother Andreas a
silver in Alpine skiing.
Heiden represents a
rich, powerful nation
of 230 million people.
You can cram the
populace of Liechtens-
tein, which is 16 miles
long and eight miles
wide, inside Madison
Square Garden.
Disappointment has
no boundaries. The big
television eye reached
across the ocean to spy
on Russians, watching
the USA-USSR ice
hockey game from out-
side Moscow store win-
dows.
When Mike Eru-
zione, the U.S. captain
from Boston Universi-
ty, sneaked in the winn-
ing goal for the 4-3
American victory,
Soviet spectators walk-
ed away in disbelief and
disgust.
What is the Russian
equivalent of the
Yankee "raspberry?"
Said Tass, the of-
ficial Soviet news agen-
cy: "Perhaps we have
stayed with the same
team too long. We
should use younger
men
It is the inbred fault
of a state-governed
society. It happened to
the USSR track and
field team in the
mid-1960s. An
overhaul took place.
We can expect the same
in Russian hockey.
The most exciting
race of the Games was
staged in semi-privacy
on Mount Van
Hoevenberg � the 15
kilometer (around 10
miles) cross-country
won by Thomas
Wassberg of Sweden
over Finland's bearded
giant, Juha Mieto.
Wassburg won by the
length of a finger, a
margin it would have
been impossible to
decipher a few years
ago before modern
electronics could
measure time to the,
100th of a second.
Our gold medal of
extraordinary merit
goes to Arturo Kinch of
Costa Rica, who was
his team's onlv com-
petitor, doubling also
as flag-bearer, trainer,
counselor and national
delegate.
Largely overlooked
in the awe over Eric
Heiden's five medals,
the giant-killing heroics
of the U.S. ice hockey
kids and the climactic
glamour of the figure-
skating finals were the
gold medal victories of
Ingcmar Stcnmark of
Sweden and Annemarie
Procll Moser o
Austria.
Classified
PERSONAL
SUNSHINE STUDIOS offering
the following classes: Ballet. Jan.
Belly Dance. Yoga and Disco. For
more information call 7S6 7235
TYPING for students and pro
lessors available, call 752 749?
after 6:00 p m
i REWARD � S300 in NYSE (blue
chips) certificates Leading to the
arrest and conviction of those per
son(s responsible for the thieft
and vandalism of a 1948 Chevy
Van on January 30, 1980 at 1 30
a.m. SlOO bonus to the person(s)
who brings vandalism before the
appropriate committee
S100 REWARD: for information
leading to the return of Rosie
female gold cocker spaniel. 6 mon
Riggan Shoe Repair
across St. from
Blount Harvey
Downtown
111 W.4thSt.
Parking in front and Rear
Distributed
By
Taylor
Beverage Co,
Gofdsboro
IMPORTED
fit)
Heineken
HOLLAND BEER
i THE 1 IMPORTED BEER IN AMERICA
ths old All calls krpt confidential
752 0256
BEST PRICES paid for class
rings gold and sterling Men s
medium class ring S55 S70 Stir!
mg fork sia Call John after 3 00
757 6013
FOR SALE
FOR SALE Scuba complete out
fit. tank two regulators. Guages
wet suit 756 8793 evenings
FOR RENT
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed
to share half rent and utilities on
two bedroom apartment three
blocks from campus Call
758 3076
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed
to sri.iri- larq Iao ttdroom
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FEMALE ROOMMATE n, . ci, o
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756 33� .ilttr 3 DC p m
MALE WOOMVATF nOid to
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Title
The East Carolinian, February 26, 1980
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 26, 1980
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.43
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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