The East Carolinian, January 22, 1980






�te �aat daroiinian
luesday, Januan 22. 1X0
M�h Union
President To
inish Term
(.r tni� (
( 'fi ulalion Ml IHHI
"Wl HOI (,
rmei Stnden
oi
K ! a erN
I nioi
uui I think she'll do .
hei past ex
N!l ' n new duties will m
numerous boards
Homecoming Si
M d ; Board. '
liai wc
Mil
SGA Treasurer
Keeps Position
ImS ;l�� ih special election I
"I't be called to Till the treasurer's final exa
KC m thc Sdent Unernm Iron, ca
MHKon "�" hccn filed I , holidays
deesion from the S(,
declaring Rick I owe climbl, Wh�
main in the position u he
w ithdra
. .

ese is a
Vs pi
Is II H
I 'HO
M denhall
VN are
'7 qusnon a�" aftci lime
'ihdrew from school during I ,hjs
;�cs,cr1cxai,1Ls: ' ' hi ilk finished out
treasurei I ov lied at I Cl
foi "he Spring seme tei

lueui at
Karen Mt- aw horn
i he s( i A constitution s
person except , ;lk.
' asl arolina I nivei sitv wli
SUCCCs -� a;
rk shall �
ol treasure!
blem
I f easurei
In a
ne reru
i �
nistiii
V, I
ympic
Hopeful
Is Victim
Drug Use At ECU
Still Continues
Bv HI BBIf Hoi l
Vssistani , �. :
"I ' ;�
more
criminal p
pull v
commeni ma -
ing ph
rhis attitud
polii

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heroi
.� the spii
Vlai ijuana use
.on the rise at I C I
studi :

But �
i- aine, i Ml ,rt
Mso, all arc relai
without much efI rt
I he junior poli-s.
Trip Around World Discussed
-
i �
Bv IhRRt C.RW
Mall Writer
�r then second session
tei Monday, the Stu-
I egislature heard an appeal
be to observe a total eclipse of the ed tops in Frankfurt, Hong Kong
sun in Hyderabad, India on Feb. 16. and Honolulu.
9S0,
1)T I lo.vd Mathias explained thai
funding for the trip is
According to the group's pro-
posal, the plan to stop in Frankfurt
on Feb. 1-3 to visit science classes in
m members ol the Science coming from the National Science German schools. After the solar II
nlub foi monev to help
a research trip around the
rid
ience Educationlub ask
I egi lature to approve a one
nine appropriation ol $3,190 foi an
upcoming research trip to West Ger-
many, India, Hong Kong and
1 oundation. I he 1 oundation eon
irmed approval ol a $32,670 grant
eclipse expedition in India, they
plan to stop in Hong Kong on Feb.
o the group in a Jan. 9 letter, 20-22 to visit science classes there.
Mathias said
Mathias added that the trip is
"the best opportunity I've seen in 20
years tor the students
1 rom Feb. 22-24. they will stop over
in Hawaii and visit the Honolulu Carolina I n
been turned over to the ppropi
lions Committee o the Studt
1 egislature for further studx 1 he
science club group is seh
'eave Jan. 31
ic legislators also heard SG
Vice-president Charles Sherrod sa
that he and Grad Dickerson wil
working to gel the administratioi
approve a Fall break for 1 asi
Astronomical (bservator
I he National Science Foundation
iversitv studei
Hawaii. Eleven students and two group wanted the extra money wa
to enable 'hem to do additional
studs and research on their sehedul-
Mathias said thai the reason the ii onl covers transportation
: i (lessors are involved in the ex
lition, whose main purpose will
and expenses while the group is in
India.
I he request for the money has
Dickerson is president ot the Men's
Residence Council.
In other business, legisla
voted to approve a $130 expense ac
count for SGA Presidem Brett
See TRIPS, page 2. col. 4
business
an
w as mi' o
C i 01 I
som s4
Sp
ts a hit bu
one dollai I
populai di
around ean I
year, .o.
w ide use. It
di ug because it's �
giv es one a a of p
See DRl (,s, page 5. col. 1
i h
'r
N c
ECU Housing Analyzed
Bv 1
l I (
VKI NNf HARRISON
VfHN I (lilur
differeni
: �' � � ailable to
Inside I oda
I wjm h.
Hjpii
Pmn in
i'Jt. in
students. I o provide a personal in
ighi into these differeni living
situations, several students were in
ter viewed, giving tfieir opinions and
presenting the pros and cons ol each
situation
I he students interviewed com
mented on then views of cost,
space, privacy and social activity.
Tracy Hembree ol Greenville,
S.C lived at a number of different
locations during her four years at
E( I Miss Hembree first lived in
Jams. In Sigma Sorority, Village
Green Apts Eastbrook Apts
Greene Dorm 2nd floor. Greene
Dorm 10th floor, and finally in a
private sublet house, from these
housing experiences. Miss Hembree
was able to give her opinions about
each with certain justifications
Comparing the two dorms, lams
and Greene, Miss Hembree prefei
redneene. "Greene has its advan
'ages in size and convenience. I he
bathrooms were located in a central
place on the floor in Greene, which
was much more convenient than
those in Jams Miss Hembree
went on to say that the water in Jar-
vis was hooked up in such a way as
to allow only hot water to flow
through the pipes in the showers
when the toilet is flushed.
Other advantages m dorm life in-
clude the people living there and the
s�cial life. "I think thai every
freshman should get to live in a
dorm because dorm life prepares
you to deal with all kinds of people
and all kinds o situations. Dorm
living also tends to get the student
more involved in what is going on
on campus Miss Hembree stated.
When confronted with the pro
blem oi space. Miss Hembree also
preferred Greene to Jar vis because
"Greene has so much more shelf
and closet space, it's just incom-
parable to Jarvis
What is the advantage o living in
Jarvis? "Jarvis is closer to the
center ol campus than the newer
dormitories. Also, you're able to
move the furniture around to your
own preferences, and in Greene the
furniture is permanently fixed to the
room
Miss Hembree described the
situation in the Tri-Sigma sorority
house: "They're not as crowded or
as expensive as most people think
The most advantageous factor of
living in the sorority house, other
Nee HOI SING, page 2, col. 1
t
m


m
�Jg i
' 9 '
�fe�:f ,
I
. M. .li
&m i 5sS?
fi�
m
i
wTTzb
The housing alternatives
dorms are cheaper





t
TUt EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 22.1980
? -
Trips Discussed
Greek News
I
M e 1 v i n' s trip to
Washington scheduled
for Jan. 28. Melvin said
he will be going with
several other SGA
presidents in the UNC
system to speak with an
HEW official about the
pending court case
HEW has brought
against the UNC
system for failing to
abide by federal
desegregation
guidelines.
Melvin justified the
trip by saying that the
students in North
Carolina will be given a
chance to have their
opinions heard through
the SGA presidents
who will attend the au-
dience.
The legislature also
agreed to a proposal
that $520 in
unrecovered emergency
loans to students be
written off and replac-
ed with money from the
general funds. It was
also suggested and ap-
proved that these bad
loans be paid off on a
term-to-term basis
rather than have them
add up over the years.
The $520 in bad
loans had accrued since
1975, according to
Speaker Mike Adkins.
By R1CKIGLIARMIS
(ireek Correspondent
Housing Analysis
Voting
.Absentee Ballots Available
Student Notary Public
Gives Voting Hints
Just because students are awa
from home doesn't mean they must
give up the right to vote. ECU
students that wish to vote in the
Ma 6 partisan primary election in
North Carolina should thus begin
writing to their respective election
hoards requesting applications for
absentee ballots.
I he local board will verify that
the student is registered and will
then send the application. I he stu-
dent must then complete the form,
and the election board will send the
absentee ballot.
Charlie Sherrod, vice president of
the SGA, recently became a Notary
Public and can now assist students
completing itic ulVv�lav� b��A �c-
"1 cannot emphasize the point
enough that it is important to
always maintain a good voting
record even if you are awa in col-
lege. Each student can do this by
just writing their local election
board for an application to get an
absentee ballot. It will onlv cost 15
cents and an envelope. If a student
can't afford that, then come by
SGA and we will furnish a stamp
and an envelope. Of course, getting
the ballot notarized will be free to
all students Sherrod stated.
In order to receive Sherrod's
assistance, the student should go to
his office. 229 Mendenhall, with the
absentee ballot. As a Notary, Sher-
rod will ask the student for iden-
tification. Upon presenting the iden-
tification, the student must then
mark the ballots in the presence of
the Notary. The Notary will then
fold the ballots and place them in
the container envelope and seal it.
Alter these steps have been com-
pleted, the affadavit must be signed.
The Notary will notarize the al
fn'cliwVt Ccnvclope). Cr.c it is
noia?:0, the attaUavIl should �:
mailed or delivered sealed. If the
envelope is opened, the ballot will
be promptly rejected.
Sherrod added "It seems like a
complicated process, but I can
assure all students that it is not. My
office will assist each student so that
voting absentee will be painless and
easy
than the social factor,
is living space, accor-
ding to Miss Hembree.
"In a dorm, you just
have the one room, and
that's where you do
everything, whereas in
a sorority house, there
are a variety o dif-
ferent rooms � like a
social room, a den, the
kitchen � where one
can choose where to be
rather than having no
choice at all
Regarding so ial ac-
tivity. Miss Hembree
stated that "there was
always somebody who
wanted to do what you
wanted to do in the
sorority house. There
was always something
going on, somewhere to
go and something to
do The biggest disad-
vantage and the reason
why she moved out of
the sororitv was exactly
that; there was so much
to do that it was dif-
ficult to find time to do
what had to be done.
Miss Hembree said she
felt she didn't apply
herself to her
schoo 1 w ork as
vigorously as she
should have, because of
the activities involved
at the sorority.
Another disadvan-
tage, according to Miss
Hembree, was the lack
o' privacy in the sorori-
ty. "I needed a place
where I could go and be
alone if I wasn't feeling
well, or if 1 just didn't
feel like being around a
lot of people, and in the
house, there was always
a lot o( people there
Hembree said.
Miss Hembree was
very insistent that the
cost of living in the
sorority and in the
dorm was comparable.
"Both places were
about the same cost
said Miss Hembree.
Advertising Director of
The East Carolinian,
Robert M. Swaim,
agreed with Miss Hem-
bree and stated that
"living in an apartment
is much more expensive
than dorm life. If you
think about it, just
moving into an apart-
ment requires
somewhere around
$500.00, and then every
mo n t h you ha ve
outrageous utility and
phone bills
Swaim also com-
mented that he liked
living in an apartment
because there was more
privacy, and it was
more comfortable. The
only disadvantage
Swaim cited was that
"you really don feel
like you're a part of
East Carolina Universi-
ty � vou don't reallv
feel like a student
anymore
Another student.
Susan Reis, lived in two
locations, Fletcher
Dorm and also on
Fourth Street in a boar-
ding house. Of the two
locations, Miss Reis
preferred the dorm
"because it's just more
convenient than a boar-
ding house She also
said she thought the
cost of living in the
boarding house and the
dorm were comparable,
the privacy of the dorm
was more available,
and the space in the
boarding house was
much more abundant
than in the dorm.
Debbie Hotaling, a
senior from Sanford,
N.C related her view-
point saying, "I advise
everyone to live in a
See Housing, page 3
This is a big week for
Greeks, especially the
fraternities. It's the big
Spring Rush week for
most fraternities, and
seeing all the banners
and advertisements
around campus is
enough to prove that!
The Phi kappa I au's
rush began Mondav
night and will continue
through Wednesday,
when the fraternity
holds a big beer blast at
8 p.m. at the house.
The Sigma Phi I p-
silon's schedule began
last night with a keg
party luesdav and
Wednesday night's
rush will also consist o
keg parties with formal
rush scheduled foi
Thursday and Friday
nights.
Kappa Sigma's rush
will last until Wednes-
day. Tonight's partv is
a chicken pickin while
a beer blast will be the
highlight ol Wednes-
day's partv.
Sigma Nu's rush is
all week; I ambda C hi's
on Monday, Wednes-
day and Friday; Beta's
rush is being held Sun-
day through rhursday;
and Delta Sigma Pin's
from Mondav until
Wednesday.
The rush parties are
for anyone interested in
fraternities. It vou are
interested in joining a
fraternity, make your
way to all the fraternity
houses at East
Carolina, and make
choice that is right for
vou!
Some sororities are
also participating in
rush. Don't neglect the
invitations and banners
you see around vour
classrooms and dorms
Follow up on them and
find out how much tun
Greek life reallv is.
I he Alpha Phis
would hke to welcome
ev eryone back to
school and wish them
good hick in the new
semester. ongratula
lions are extended
the ten new girls wl
were initiated into (I
Alpha Phi
last ednesd
I he s
their annual I all 1'
formal last wee I
the Ramada Inn
with dinner �.
tainmeni from 1
Degrees S
pledges from
semester were I
and recogi
their achieven
Sharon Sink ��
ed Best 1
pledges a
Casey the Be i S
ward.
I he s
with rush tl
hope it �'
and succe
rhe Sigma PI
silon's
mgratulate t it
and Chuck 1 ei' .
g r a d i
Decen I t
Don't foi i
vou havt
houi
ou may I
and friend
checkine ii
THE COMPLETE
STUDENT
ASST. VAR.$.99 f QMf
PIZZA. .�r ITUE - ' ' 1 t&
ALL YOU CAN EAT
SPECIALS
hat s the easiest way to complete you-
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By making one convenient trip to you
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cost cutter prices. No matter what your
plans, complete them with one easy tnp
ito your Kroger Sav-on.
REFRESHING
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&
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1
Make a
March of Dimes
�)
March of Dimes Vii ABUm m
YOUR SUPER EFFORT TO PREVENT
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l
WITH FRIES & COLESLAW
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CHICKEN
WITH GARLIC BREAD
ITALIAN
SEA
WITH FRIES A COLE SLAW
ONLY
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Magazines and
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�.
CLIFF'S
Seafood House and Oyster Bar
�Wir���i .N C n�. Grwrv.ne Norm Craim.
ALL YOU
Records and
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CAN EAT $2.95! mv$M
99
6 12oz.
BEER
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188
COLONY WINE
Chablis, Burgundy
& Rhine
BARBARA DEE
Assorted
Cookies

Priced
From
32-Oz.
Bag
169
MON D A Y-TH U RSD AY
TROUT, CRAB CAKES
and FLOUNDER. $3.25.
CLIFF'S SUPER
SPECIAL
WEDNESDAY
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2 Golden Fried Crab Cokes
French Fries, Slaw, and
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fCS IT TO
AM Brands
Motor
SOLD
1
Little Debbie Snack Cakes & Archway Cookies REG or dip
Chips, Snacks & Bagged Nuts country oven
POUCH PAC� � -jjaw -
Sauces & Gravy Mixes gS tFmWI
PfPPCRlOGC (ARMS � I P4
Bagged Cookies & Snacks
ilUMIAlililYEfl I OFF MANUFACTURER S
MSUUUI lUl1 SUGGESTED RETA.l
ADVERTISED ITfM POLICY
I I Each of thaaa advartlaad Mama it raqulrad lo bo raadlly avaitobta for
I Mkt In aach Krogar Sav-on Stora aicapt aa apaclflcaNy notad in this
LI ad N wa do run out of an advartlaad Mam, wa wlH oftar you your choice
o�acon�parablanOm.whavallabla.faflacitnflthaaamaaav�n9aof�
II ralnchack which wlH antttla you to purchaaa tha advartlaad Ham at tha
11 advartlaad prica within 30 daya
Potato
Chips
8-Oz. Twin Pack
59
Copyright 1980
Krogar Sav-on
Quantity Right Raaarvad
Nona aotd to Daalara or Whotaaalara
on
FOOD, DRUG, GEN
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NONE SOLD
TO
DEALERS
OPEN 7 AM TO MIDNIGHT
OPEN SuNO'
SAM TO 9 P M
600 Greenville Blvd. Greenville
Phone 756-7031
jf
i





Buc Wins
A nnouncements
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 22, 1980
By TERRY GRAY
Staff Writer
On the basis of its photographic
quality, layout design and overall
concept, the 1979 edition of the
Buccaneer received a First Class
Award from the Associated Col-
legiate Press, Senior Editor Craig
Sahli announced Monday.
The First Class Award is the best
showing for the publication since
1970, when the Buccaneer won the
Associated Collegiate Press's
highest honor of Ail-American. The
Buc received Second Class awards in
1975 and 1976.
"Considering the low level of
support we got last year, we're very
pleased with this recognition said
Sahli. "After two successive failures
to get a yearbook out in '77 and '78,
there was very little moral support
for us
The Associated Collegiate Press
reviews college yearbooks from
around the nation on the basis of
photographic quality, accuracy and
objectivity in writing, cover and in-
terior design, extent of campus
coverage, and overall concept.
Although the Buccaneer must pay
to be reviewed, Sahli believes it's
well worth the price.
"The critique points out not only
the strengths of the book, but its
weaknesses as well. Being judged
every year gives the staff an idea of
how the next issue mav be improv-
ed Sahli said.
One of the strengths of the 1979
edition was its chronological
magazine format, according to the
critique written by its reviewer. In
terms of quality and content of
writing, the reviewer said there was
room for improvement.
"We are going to concentrate
more in that area this year said
Sahli. "We've hired an extra staff
writer, and we're trying to be more
specific in terms of names, places,
dates and events so that the average
university student will be able to
relate to next year's book more than
he could with last year's
Sahli added that work on the 1980
edition of the Buc is proceeding
ahead of schedule. The first
deadline will be in mid-February,
when approximately one-third of
the 352 planned pages will go to the
printer, he said.
Speaking of the new book's
cover, Sahli added that "it's going
to be nice � just as attractive as last
year's, but it's going to reflect the
theme of the book better than last
year's cover
The theme of the 1980 Buccaneer
will be "The New Decade Sahli
noted.
Of the 7,000 copies of the 1979
Buc, about 1,000 remain to be
claimed by students, according to
Sahli. The yearbooks, which are
free to ECU students, may be pick-
ed up at the Buccaneer office or The
East Carolinian offices. Both of-
fices are located in the Publications
Building across from Joyner
Library.
Ski Refunds
The Christmas Sncm shoe Ski group ill
meet in Room 108 Memorial Gym on
Thursday. Jan. 31 at J:J0 p m. for
deposit refunds
Day Rep Openings
There are three SC1A day representative
openings available. Screenings for these
openings will be held Monday, Jan. 28.
at 4:15 p.m. Applications arc being
taken in the SGA office in 2.W
Mcndenhalt.
Sleazy Dance Contest
The Ripple Raiders arc having a slcay
dance contest at the Elbo Room
tonight. Those wishing to enter need
only to come tonight and bring a record
ol the song to which you wish to dance,
hirst prize is a keg party, second and
third prizes will also be given. The con-
test will be judged by P: il Arlington.
Tnglish professor; Nancy Mize; Bob
fox, from the Intramural sports
department; Earl White, fiddle player;
and the Sunshine dance teacher.
Circle K Club
To all those interested in helping others
and obtaining self-gratification, there is
a co-ed club on campus called Circle K
which is interested in helping others.
Service projects are held such as rock a-
thon for muscular dystrophy, working
with undcrpnwledged children and
various projects at nursing homes. Not
oat) do wc have service projects but we
also have hind-raisers; bake sales for
instance Alter all the work is done,
everyone gets together and relaxes at a
nans lor the workers. If this sounds
like vour type of social outlet, just
come to Mendenhall on a Tuesday
night, 7 to 8 p.m in room 221 and see
what Circle K is all about.
Memorial Gym room 104. Plans will be
discussed for the upcoming match with
UNC Wilmington. Anyone interested
in joining the Racquetball Club is en-
couraged to attend.
Kappa Smoker
Kappa Alpha Psi announces its formal
spring smoker. All young men in-
terested should meet at the coffee house
in Mendenhall at f� p.m. on Thursday.
Jan. 24. Come and sec what Kappa
Alpha Psi is all about.
Women's Rugby
The ECU Women's Rugby Club will
have its first practice Wednesday, Jan.
23 beginning at 4:30 p.m. in the Allied
Health field. Anyone interested in lear-
ning how to play rugby is encouraged to
come out or to call 758 8482.
Writers
Anyone inlerestei' in reforming the
Writer's Guild should med Wedncsdav
Jan. JO at 5.30 p.m. in room 207.
Austin, or contact Jerrv I ail al
752-4V42.
LSAT
The I aw School Admission Test will be
offered at ECU on Saturday. April i.
Registration deadline is Eebruary II,
I"M0. Application blanks (which must
be completed and mailed to ETS) mav
be obtained from the ECU Testing
Center. Room 105 Speight Huilding.
Faculty-Staff Night
Every Monday from 5:O0 p.m. until
8:00 p.m. is Faculty Staff night at the
Mendenhall Bowling Center. Any ECU
faculty or staff member with proper
identification may howl two games and
get a third game I REE Relax after
work and lake advantage of the savings
at Mendenhall.
Moonlight Bowling
Massage
Rugby
ECGC
On Tuesday, Jan. 22, al 5:00 the East
Carolina Gay Community will feature
Brother Cosmos, who will speak on gay
retreats and ministry. The meeting will
be held at the Newman House. 608 E.
Ninth Street. Bring your favorite
beverage and SI 00 for food.
There will be an organizational meeting
Jan. 22 at 7:30 p.m. in room 104
Memorial Gym for the Rugby Club.
New members arc welcome and urged
to attend.
Physics
The society of physics students will
hold a meeting on Tuesday, Jan. 22, at
7:30 p.m. in E-303 of the Physics
Building. All members should plan to
attend since plans will be made concer-
ning the forthcoming trip to the Shar-
ron Harris Nuclear Power Plant in
Raleigh.
BKA
The Banking and Finance fraternity
will hold its January meeting Wed. the
23rd, at 3:00 p.m. in room 221
Mendenhall. Guest speaker will be Mr.
Burke Barbee of Wachovia. The com-
ing field trip to Planter's National Bank
headquarters will be discussed. All in-
terested pcrsonx arc invited to attend.
"Moonlight Bowling" is hack al
Mendenhall Student Center. Bowl in
the moonlight plus gel a chance to win a
FREE GAME of howling Every Sun
day from 5:00 p m. until 700 p.m
WRC � MRC
The weekend of January 12. WRC and
MRC went on a skiing trip to
Massanullcn Village near Harrison
burg, Virginia. WRC President
Stephanie Ganus, WRC Vice President
Gail Watson. MRC President Grads
Dickerson and MRC Vice President
David Murray traveled to Mars Hill
College this past weekend for the
NCARR Executive meeting.
Do sou have a tired, stiff neck? Ciaylan
Host, a physical therapy student, is
now conducting research which in-
volves a MASSAGE to the upper hack
and neck If sou suffer from a light
neck, call Ciaylan al 756-277
Episcopal Worship
An Episcopal service ol Holy C ommu-
mon will he cetehraied Wednesday
evening. Jan 22. in the chapel ol the
Methodist Student Center (5lh SIreel
across from Carrel I Dorm). The service
will he at 6:110 pin with the I piscopal
Chaplain, the Rev Bill Hadden.
sclehrating. Supper will he served at
5 30 p in A Bible study at 7t� p m .
led by the chaplain, will be held ji the
home of Eleanor C olcman. 1003 I
I ilth Street, across Irom the mam gale
SAC
The ECU Sociology Anthropolo�:
Club will present a speaker. Or Susan
Hofacre. on Wedncsdav. Jan 23, in
Brewsier W2 at 7.30 p.m She ,�,�
speak on "How Women Arc Port raxed
in the Mass Media AH members and
interested persons arc urged to attend
as this is the first meeting of the new
semester.
Allied Health
rK Allied Health ITufi ii� dnns
sion lest will fx- ollcred at 111 on
Saturday. March 8 Application Wan
arc atailahlc at the Testing Center.
Speight Building. Kihhii H5. Kigiiln
lion deadline is I cbriurv 9
GMAT
The Graduate Management fliaai inn
lest will he olfercd al IC t on .�Ui
day. Marsh 15 Anplisaiion Wank- arc
available al I he lo.nn Center rviii
Building. Room t)S Regi.ir.olon
deadline is I ennuis 22
Fellowship
Racquetball Club
ECU Racquetball Club will have a
meeting Tuesday. Jan 22, at 5 p.m. in
Housing Analysis
dorm for a full year so
you can meet other
people, establish new
relationships.
Counsellors are readily-
available. Being away
,r .a home and parents
requires many kinds of
learning other than
academic Stating her
position on financial
differences between
dorm and apartment
living. Miss Hotaling
commented that
"unless you are really
financially prepared to
handle the burdens of
off campus livine,
STAY IN THE
DORM
Miss HouIiimsharxdL.
rter opinions about off-
campus financing with
Terry Gray, a senior
from Hatteras, N.C. In
his situation (lives in a
rented trailer), Gray
said, "Utilities are run-
ning almost as much as
the rent � $120 for
utilities is a fair
estimate, and we pay
$155 per month for
rent Gray added that
this financial situation
was indeed going to
pressure him and his
roommate into finding
other living ar-
rangements SOril.
Considering all com-
ments made, it is
logically assumed that,
in general, the dorms
are the most
economical choice for
students, with sorority
and fraternity houses
second, and boarding
houses ranking a close
third. Apartment life,
financially, is the most
expensive for the stu-
dent.
In regard to conve-
nience, the dorms are
the closest to campus,
generally, and usually
WQvide acdQyfate ar7
up to date information
about social events on
campus.
Privacy is a subject
of personal preference
and requires an
assumption and defini-
tion of what is private
by the individual. In
general, the apartment
affords the student
maximum privacy.
In considering the
space element, the
apartment or boarding
house would be the
logical choice if space is
a primary factor in
choosing a new
residence.
Considering the
social element, the
fraternity or sorority
choice offers the stu-
dent a variety of ac-
tivities. This element of
social activity would
also be up to individual
preference � the per-
son concerned will get
involved in whatever he
or she is really in-
terested.
Having looked into
some personal views of
the housing oppor-
tunities avajJablti to the
tc V 51 uacms, perriaps
a more advantageous
alternative exists. For
more information, call
the Housing Office
about dorms; Ricki
Gliarmis about sorority
or fraternity life; and
you're on your own
concerning apartments
and boarding houses.
,�'
Do you have questions without
answers, about who you are and where
you're going? Come hear and hearken
to Biblical truths that will give you the
answers you are searching for. Enjoy
fellowship and fun with Rock Church
Student Fellowship on Wednesdays at 7
p.m. in 221 Mendenhall. Everyone is
welcome.
Alpha Sigma Phi
Alpha Sigma Phi, the newest fraternity
on campus, invites all interested men to
come out for the following rush parties
this week:
Aycock Basement � Tuesday 8:00
p.m.
King's Row Party House � Wednes-
day 8:00 p.m.
Spring Skiing
Spring Snowshoe Ski Group will meet
at 4:00 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 31 for
the first ski orientation period.
Icposits will not be accepted after this
dale. The final payment is due on Feb.
7
UFDC
The University Folk and Country
Dance club would like to invite all who
are interested in folk and country danc-
ing to attend meetings of the UFDC.
The meetings are every Wednesday
night from seven to nine p.m. in
Brewster D 109. If you're interested,
come on over or call 752-0826.
Billiards League
Sign up today for the MSC handicap
billiards league at the Mendenhall
Billiards Center. A league is a treat way
to meet with other for weekly competi-
tion plus get a discount on the price of
play. Also, trophies are awarded for
various achievements. The organiza-
meeting will be held at the
i Center on Monday, Jan. 28 at
I p.m.
Bowling League
�3� some friends together and sign up
for a bowling league at Mendenhall.
Two men and two women will nuke up
each mixed-doubles team for a Monday
and a Tuesday night league. Sign up for
the league of your choice at the main
bulletin board on the ground floor of
MSC. The organizational meeting for
both leagues will be held on Monday,
Jan. 28 al 7:00 p.m. at the Bowling
Center.
ECU PIRATE
JEANS
by RUMBLE SEATS
campus division
SOCIETY FOR THE
ADVANCEMENT
OF MANAGEMENT
IBM Guest Speaker
ALL interested persons
urged to attend
Thur. Jan.24 4:00
Room 221
Mendenhall
Wed. Niteat
Allan Hand�lmn
piays me
BEATLES
no charge
Hip pocket emblem
$16.99
Exclusively at
J.D.DAWSON CO.
Greenville
(J)KT HOUSE
Elizabeth St.
i a & a
m �
Top Sirloin Choice USDA
CUT DAILY
$3.99
Including Texas Toast, Baited
Potato, Plus FREE All you can
Eat Salad Bar
Banquet Room Available for
meetings or parties.
For Reservations call 756-2633.
Bus
BONANZA
520 W. Greenville Blvd.
264 Bypass
Fire
Station
WOMEN. YOU'RE EQUAL
IN THE AIR FORCE.
Women start out on the same looting as men in Air Force
ROTC Women wear the same insignia and hold the same
cadet positions in AFROTC. ust as they do later on as Air
Force officers
And the same AFROTC scholarship can be yours as a
woman. If you qualify, you can have your tuition, book costs
and lab fees paid by the Air Force, and receive $100 a month
for other expenses It helps free you to concentrate on your
education And that's important
As an Air Fores officer, youll be expected to use your tram
ng and education, and be a leader managing people and
complex systems You'll be handed executive responsibility
starting with your first job.
It's a great way to be equal, and a great way to serve your
country Check into the AFROTC program at your campus
Be sure to ask about AFROTC scholarships � you may be
helping yourself earn an exciting new Hfesryle
TJUTt IXBTHaS
CELEBRA TE THE NE W
DECADE
with the
PHI KAPPA TAUS
Start Mon. Jan.2 fst. at 8:00 and go
until!
Mixers and Women on Tues. the 22nd.
and on
Wed. the 23rd. a Big Beer Blast I
Come on over and Party I
0KT RUSH
i
Gateway io a groat way ol l�f�.
Contact: MojorBilly D.Tudor CaptianBarton J.Moyer
Second FloorWright Annex 757-6597 757-6598





Qttje �a�t Carolinian
Serving the campus community for 54 years.
Diane Henderson, Managing �
Richard Green, cw a
Anita Lancaster, product� Manager
Marianne Harbison, v &���
Marc Barnes, nui rai'
Robert M. Swaim, d.w ow
Steve O'Geary, busi wonor
Charles Chandler, spom Ed�or
KAREN WENDT, Features Editor
TUESDAY. JANUARY 22 180
PAGE 4
This Newspaper's Opinion
ECU Quagmire
It's time our friends in the Ad-
ministration answer a few questions
about why the construction of the
parking lots has not progressed any
farther than it has. After all, it's not
too much to ask that a parking lot,
ostensibly for day students, be
finished between midsummer and
the end of January.
The claim has been made that the
lots are not completed because of
bad weather. Even so, the weather
has made for a strange and wonder-
ful phenomenon. The weather on
one side of Mendenhall (the student
side) was too inclement to finish the
paving. But, lo and behold, just 150
yards away, the sun came out over
the staff parking lot behind the
alumni building. The construction
company was fortunate to have
found such good weather, and they
finished the staff parking lot in
record time.
A student dropped by the ottice
this morning to report that he had
to be on the campus before eight in
the morning to make it to his nine
o'clock class on time. Yesterday
morning, he had the misfortune of
running late, and at 8:30 there were
only four spaces left in the day stu-
dent lot at the bottom of College
Hill. Moreover, as he was driving
through the lot in search of a space,
he found that at least six cars with
staff stickers were parked in the lot.
Students who live in Umstead and
Slay Dorms are forced by necessity
to park some distance away,
because of the shortage of spaces in
those areas. Often, they must com-
pete with day students for parking
spaces. Add to this the current shor-
tage of day students spaces and it is
easy to see how the problem
snowballs.
We need only ask ourselves what
opens when a student parks his
r in a staff parking space. It
,ually ends up with the student ow-
g the Security Office some money.
il it happens with frequency, it ends
up with the student paying a towing
service some money. What would
happen if a departmental chairman
was faced with the possibility ot
paying parking tickets and towing
fees9 It is clear to us that something
needs to be done as soon as possi-
ble.
Several things need to be done.
�The paving needs to be speeded
up. The university administration
should request that the construction
company, beset as it is by bad
weather, use more equipment and
manpower on the days that the
work can be done.
�A list of priorities must be made,
and the paving of student facilities
must come first.
�A better solution must be found
to the problems surrounding park-
ing at Slay and Umstead Dorms. In-
convenience to students who pay the
same rates for parking as other
students having better facilities, the
saving of time by these students,
and improved security for female
residents are all reasons parking in
this area should be upgraded.
�The Student Government
Association should lead the fight
for better parking. They are our
representatives, and it is their
responsibility to fight for the
welfare of their constituency.
�Parking sticker prices should
come down for those students who
are forced to park in distant or in-
convenient places on campus. The
students who purchase these lower
priced tickets should be limited to
the areas they buy tickets for.
Many students have made
sacrifices to come to college. But
not being able to find a parking
space is a burden we can do
without.
Think Reality
We knew it would end as soon as
we left school at the end of last
semester. Christmas, like all vaca-
tions and other brief respites, ends
much too soon.
We often wonder why we do the
things we do, with the tightening of
the job market and the fear of war
being ever-present. Sometimes we
feel that we would be better off get-
ting on an early plane to Arizona
and working in a diner for a few
years to return to college some-
day, maybe after marriage and a
few'kids come our way.
But don't sell your education
short The problems in the economy
and the world should be the reason
for staying, not leaving. Here are
just a few examples:
�College costs are getting higher
every year. If you stay and work it
out maybe it will take an extra
semester or two � it will not cost
you as much now as it will later on.
, �The problems the world faces
now aren't going to be solved by a
short order cook in Arizona. The
economy, inflation and world
hunger � not to mention the
nuclear question and ethical pro-
blems of genetic engineering � need
college-trained minds to deal with
them.
�You probably are set up right
now to get the most our of your col-
lege education. Most of us do not
have families to support or mor-
tgage payments to meet, as we
might later on.
VMOVO, it took
700 YFAfcSTO &uilO
THE OOLOGY CKTHeDMU
CERTAIN PARKING LOT
I CvJOlO Of.

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TBBffi �
Letters To The Editor
Mann
The following is an open letier sent to this
column bv Drake Mann, SGA attorney-
general. The original was sent to SGA
Treasurer Ricky Lowe.
Dear Mr. Lowe,
On January 16, 1980, I received a writ-
ten request from you to interpret the SGA
constitution on the question of your
eligibility for the office of SGA
Treasurer.
With this letter I am replying to that re-
The matter involves your withdrawal
from school at the end of Fall semester
1979 In an article and editorial in the
January 15th issue of The East Carolinian
a position was argued that upon your
withdrawal from school you ceased to be
a full-time student, therefore failed to
fulfill one of the requirements for
eligibility for the office of Treasurer.
� Restricted to this point of v,ew'
regardless of whatever activity you have
been engaged in since, i.e. registering and
becoming a full-time student again this
semester, the office of Treasurer became
vacant. The constitution states that conse-
quently, there is to be an election to fill
that vacancy within three weeks of its oc-
currence.
After carefully researching this matter 1
found myself confronted with a number
"gray areas" where being
"technically" correct was nearly impossi-
ble. For example, the SGA constitution
states "No person except a full-time stu-
dent at East Carolina University who has
successfullv completed 48 semester hours
of work shall be eligible for the Oftice of
(Treasurer) Now does the phrase
"shall be eligible for" mean eligibility to
applv for the position or eligible to hold
it? this distinction, although seemingly
worthless, is of great importance. Also, 1
learned that over the Christmas break
there were NO full-time students. Fall
semester had ended and no students are
considered registered for Spring semester
until registration day � even if tees have
been paid. Therefore, all Student Govern-
ment Association positions including
mine, theoretically became vacant when
we lost our full-time status. In a strict,
technical sense, this is correct. However,
it is quite ridiculous.
Your withdrawal form is dated
December 11 (the last day of classw), and
you registered on January 10. Had you
withdrawn mid-semester or even late
semester, the situation would be different.
You did not, however. You missed NO
time from your treasurership and were
not negligent in any duties pursuant to
that position. Common sense finds the en-
tire confusion profoundly silly.
If I were to determine that you are in-
eligible to be Treasurer, an election would
have to be held to fill that office. Such an
election would cost students hundreds of
dollars in student fees. In addition, the
regular Spring elections are less than two
months away and the office will have to
be filled again. Sideline facts such as these
cannot be ignored in deciding such
delicate issues.
Judicial structures everywhere are
designed to interpret and apply the law in
such a manner as to allow for the
peculiarities of the situation and to allow
for level-headed thinking. This is the case
with you.
The full-time student requirement is in
the constitution simply to insure that no
non-students or even part-time students
hold such a responsible position.
Therefore, since you registered as a full-
time student this semester, I do not
believe that you are ineligible for the of-
fice of Treasurer, even though ou were
withdrawn from school over the
Christmas break.
I believe mv decision, however con-
troversial, was made with cleat,
reasonable thinking, and I will gladh
stand behind it.
Also, 1 am submitting a copy of this let-
ter to the Letters section of The East
Carolinian in order to make my decidion
public.
Respectfully yours,
Drake Mann,
Attorney General, SGA
Paper Is Looking Up
�If you play your cards right, it
can be a lot of fun and a learning ex-
perience both in and out of the
classroom. In addition to your
classwork, you will learn how to get
along with people. You will find
that you have interpersonal rela-
tionships that you might not have
had if you had not gone to college.
You may find that you will have in-
terpersonal relationships that you
don't particularly want, but that's
part of the whole picture. You will
find you have new likes and dislikes,
especially in terms of what you like
to see and do.
To the Editor:
The East Carolinian is looking up! The
January 15th issue was one of the finest I
have read in some years. You are to be
commended for the attractive lay out, the
choice of news reported, the writing, the
features.
I especially liked your story on the late
Dr. Oral E. Parks. When a professor of
his stature dies the loss is shared by the en-
tire campus community, not just by those
who knew him personally. Too frequently
in the past there has been little mention in
the student paper of the passing of some
revered and respected faculty members.
Your story showing warm and sensitive
aspects of the man as expressed by his col-
leagues and students is a reflection of a
healthy new attitude in your paper.
The expanded coverage of world news,
the reviews, the features such as "Pauling
Fights Cancer the reprints of
Washington Merry-Go-Round and
editorials from other newspapers should
be appreciated by all students, especially
those who do not subscribe to a daily
paper.
A few years ago the ad on the back page
asking students to have copies of the
paper sent home to Mom and Dad would
have been a real joke. At that time the
paper was little more than a porno and
gripe sheet full of misspellings and gram-
matical errors which would have caused
parents serious concern about the kind of
institution their children were attending.
I find it very encouraging to see the
paper coming of age. I used to cringe
when I thought of our paper being
distributed to the merchants and
townspeople of Greenville and to other
campuses. But the paper of January 15th
would make any student or faculty
member feel proud to be a part of East
Carolina University.
Beatrice Chauncey
Professor of Music
Letters To The Editor
The East Carolinian welcomes let-
ters expressing all points of view.
Mail or drop them by our office in
the Old South Building, across from
the library.
Letters to the editor must include
the name, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s) and
must be typed, double spaced, or
neatly printed. Letters should be
limited to three typewritten, double-
spaced pages. All letters are subject
to editing for brevity, obcenity and
libel.
Personal attacks will not be per-
mitted. Names of authors will be
withheld only when inclusion of the
name will cause the author embar-
rassment or ridicule, such as letters
concerning homosexuality, drug
abuse, etc. Sames will be withheld
onlv on the authors request.
David Armstrong
!
At ECU you can sample art,
music, drama, films, sports, danc-
ing, barhopping, gourmet food,
backgammon, cultural activities,
and dinner theaters, or you can just
sit quietly in your room and con-
template your navel.
Out in the real world, many of
these things are not feasible,
another reason to stay in school and
tough it out.
The time to get started during the
semester is now � at the beginning.
Those who made exceptionally poor
grades last semester now have a
chance to do better, but start now
� not two weeks after mid-terms. If
you don't, you may end up on
academic probation and sitting in
summer school trying to bring your
grades back up again.
Think about it.
Noise Is A Nuisance To All Of Us
The stereo in the apartment downstairs
pounds out a steady 130-thumps-a-minute
disco beat, while overhead a jet plane
roars, preparing to land. Just then, the
refrigerator kicks in with a loud electronic
hum. The traffic outside has been a cons-
tant drone since seven this morning and
will continue apace until midnight. You
could say this is a noisy neighborhood.
Unfortunately, it's not uniquely so.
Most of us live in an environment
polluted by noise � unwanted sounds
that have long been accepted as the in-
evitable price of progress. And most of us
figure that, annoying though they may be,
the noises around us don't do much harm.
Both of those assumptions are being ac-
tively challenged. Recent studies confirm
what some folks have long known: cons-
tant high-level noise can cause both
physical and psychological harm What's
more, people in a growing number of
places are doing more than holding their
hands over their ears and hoping it will go
away. They're passing noise control
legislation, winning lawsuits, creating
quiet zones in their towns, even using
finely-tuned sound to heal disease.
Damage to industrial workers from ear-
splitting noise was documented as early as
1830 in England, and a landmark study in
New York City in 1938 underscored the
hazards of noise pollution. But it wasn't
until 1972, when Congress passed the
Noise Control Act, that noise was
recognized as a national problem in the
United States.
The law was enacted after scientists
discovered that high levels of noise � 75
to 90 decibels � can cause high blood
pressure, make muscles tighten up, induce
rapid breathing and a stepped-up heart-
beat and trigger subtle changes in the
brain's chemistry � even in sleep. Com-
mon consequences for victims of noise
pollution include irritability, insomnia
and depression � and sometimes con-
siderably more serious problems.
A 1978 study by researchers at UCLA
showed that mortality rates for people
who live next to busy Los Angeles Inter-
national Airport � where they were
routinely exposed to 90 decibels or more
of noise � were significantly higher than
the death rates for people living in a
quieter neighborhood three miles away. A
highly mechanized American kitchen may
be noisier still. With a dishwasher and
garbage disposal unit, an exhaust fan and
a radio going all at once, noise levels can
shoot as high as 100 decibels.
"Calling noise a nuisance is like calling
smog an inconvenience says Dr.
William Stout, the U.S. Surgeon General.
"Noise can be considered a hazard to the
health of people every where
i





Drug Availability Is High
THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 22. 1980
can buy a gram for
$100. The only reason
it's not used as much as
pot is simply because of
economics. It's called
the 'rich man's dope
a senior accounting ma-
jor said.
As with cocaine, a
junior business major
said, "MDA is snorted
usually, and costs ap-
proximately $35 a
gram Mescaline,
which is found in a
powder form and is
most commonly
chocolate or stawberry
flarored, usually costs
$35 a gram.
Some of the most
popular drugs with
students besides pot
and alcohol are those
found in pill form.
Besides the fact that
many students take
speed in order to help
them "make it through
exams, "valium and
qualudes (a depressant)
are also taken for a
high. It seems to be
common practice in
larger cities for people
to try to forge prescrip-
tions in order to obtain
drugs "over the
counter But here in
Greenville, the average
student doesn't go to
such extremes.
One Greenville phar-
macist (name withheld)
said, "The people who
are going to abuse
drugs on campus are
not illegally
sophisticated. I've been
in Greenville for almost
seven years, and I've
never been personally
aware of this forgery-
type thing happening.
Among the profes-
sionals, stealing
prescription blanks is
very popular, but I
haven't seen a lot of
this. I couldn't per-
sonally attest to it
This pharmacist also
emphasized the fact
that the usage of a drug
over an extended
period of time can have
bad effects on the drug
user.
Many students worry
abvout seeking help
because they don't
want to admit the pro-
blem, or they don't
want anyone else to
discover their problem.
Mary Smith, counselor
and director at the Real
Crisis Center said,
"One of the major pro-
blems we deal with here
is drugs. Alcohol is one
of the most abused, but
tranquilizers and bar-
bituates are used a lot
too. I don't believe that
the term "peer
pressure" correctly
describes the reasoning
of some students who
end up taking drugs.
It's more because of
boredom or because
everybody else is doing
it on the weekends to
party. Most drugs are
fairly easy to get. Last
year, PCP, an animal
tranquilizer, was a
heavy overdose pro-
blem. No one has ever
come in and said, "1
have a problem with
pot smoking or with co-
caine
Pitt County has a
Drug and Alcohol
Treatment Center.
Students who have a
serious problem are
referred to the center
by REAL. "We don't
give treatment at
REAL. Our job is to
determine the severity
of the problem and to
refer the person, if
treatment is necessary,
to the Treatment
Center Smith added.
We get many calls
that are speed-related.
I'd say about 10 per-
cent of all contacts are
drug or alcohol related.
Fortunately, we're see-
ing an increase of fami-
ly involvement in the
problem as far as seek-
ing help for the person,
and they can see how
they can help the per-
son in the family with
the problem.
"The biggest pro-
blem we see is prolong-
ed use of drugs � tak-
ing several different
kinds of drugs at one
time. This includes tak-
ing pills while drinking
liquor, also. To be
quite honest, people
who do that are ig-
norant of the effects
Despite the fact that
drug usage is prevelant
on campus, it is illegal.
A campus police
spokesman com-
mented, "We don't try
to hassle the students
who smoke pot. We
would rather become
concerned
ith the-
dealers. We do,
however, receive a lot
of complaints from
non-smoking students
about those who smoke
pot in the dorms
Marijuana, along
with oil, gasoline, and
food, has suffered
from the crunch of in-
flation. One marketing
major gave these
figures: "In 1975, you
could buy a half key
(kilo) of pot for
$140-$160. Now it's
WECU
Staff Meeting
Thurs. Night at 6:00
2nd floor of Old Joyner
Librery
ALL INTERESTED PEOPLE
ARE
INVITEDTOATTENDU!
OPTICIANS
ue
over $400. There's no
such thing as a nickel
bag anymore ($5 for a
quarter ounce), or a
dime bag either (half
ounce). The whole
market is so unstable,
and the price will go up
whenever there's a big
crackdown
From talking with
different sources on
campus, it is evident
that there is no specific
type of drug user. The
images brought to mind
in the 60s and early 70s
with long hair and fad-
ed blue jeans no longer
exist. Society is now
dealing with the conser-
vative business major
or down-to-earth poli-
sci major when it ad-
dresses drug usage. One
must wonder, just how
long it will be before
cocaine and speed will
be just as commonplace
swjelLDOtorjjeer
ATHLETIC SURVEY
The task force on Intercollegiate Athletics is seeking to
determine what opinions exist about the intercollegiate pro-
gram at East Carolina University. Your opinion willbe useful
in our work for the Long-range Planning Commission. With
this in mind, please complete the statement below:
In my opinion, the contribution that athletics make at ECU
would best be described as (circle one):
a. Excellent b. Above Average c. Average
d. Below Average e. Poor
1 am
Student Faculty Administrator Alumni Other
I answered this way because
Return this form to:
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TASK FORCE SURVEY
ATHLETIC DEPARTMENT
MINGES COLISEUM
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE, N.C. 27834
Students may use campus mail
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J
il






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
JAM AR 22. I9K0
Pate 6
Bartending Work
Is Truly Draining
By KAREN WENDT
Features Editor
Have you ever opened 400 beers
in one night?
Very few of you have, but if you
work behind a bar, 400 beers is a
conservative estimate of the number
one person will open on a busy
night.
Never having opened that many
beers myself, I asked Tom Haines,
manager of the Attic, if I could
work behind the bar on a typical
Saturday. Who would turn down a
bartender offering to work for free?
Not Tom.
Not many people showed until the
band was ready to play, and
business behind the bar was only
moderate.
Once the band began to play it
became imDOssible to hear behind
the bar. This did not seem to bother
any of the regulars working at the
bar. They have either developed ex-
cellent hearing, or they have learned
to read lips mouthing the names of
all the beer they sell. However,
Miller and Michelob are difficult to
distinguish, for a novice.
For about the first ten minutes of
the first set there was little or no
business. Everyone was too involved
with the band, but it wasn't long
before the onslaught began.
1 had been taking notes steadily
before the mad rush, but the next
time I took notes was about 1:15
a.m. It was non-stop.
At the break between sets the
crowd grew unbelievably. There was
constant movement behind a bar
with people practically running over
each other trying to get a combina-
A normal Greenville Scene
rain on the horizon
tion of foreign beer ana good oP all-
American suds. Then you have to
ring it up on the register. Many
times all four of us were at the
register at the same time, and confu-
sion was inevitable. But everyone
kept smiling. It's the only way to
make money.
As an employee of a place like the
Attic, the only hours available to
work are 8:00 p.m. to 1:30 a.m. �
unless there is a happy hour. That's
barely 40 hours a week. The people
who work at the bars make almost
half of their money in tips, so smil-
ing is a necessity.
One of the other employees said
that having girls working at the bar
increased lips.
I could believe it. Of all the peo-
ple who left tips that night only one
was a girl � she had left a nickel.
The rest were guys, but the crowd
was primarily maie.
The Attic has a standard policy
that is apparently accepted by all �
if a person did not pick up their
change, it went into the tip jar. The
jars were full in a very short time.
It is also Attic policy that when
the band stops playing for the night,
no more beer is served. The others
at the bar knew there would be at
least one encore, so beer was sold
until the end of the first encore.
The customers, around the bar
didn't much care for that, though
no one was abusive. We explained
that no more beer could be served
unless the band began playing
again. It seemed as if everyone knew
that, and a roaring applause promp-
ted a second encore.
The policy is the only way to deal
with N.C. consumption laws.
It is a rule that is enforced, too.
One employee who stayed around to
watch the cleanup procedures had a
beer in -her hand at one "thirty, and
the manager simply came up behind
her, said "one more sip" and she
See BAR, page 8, col. 1
Student Union Theatre Arts
featured an excellent actor last night
Mark Twain
Recreation of Writer
Successful by Actor
By MARC BARNES
Senior Editor
WECU Plans Format
By KAREN WENDT
Features Editor
WECU-FM Station Manager
John Jeter has very definite ideas on
what will be played on the station.
The main group of people we
are programming for is the
students Jeter said.
He plans to play primarily rock
and jazz, with a lot of album rock
mixed in.
"We will not repeat music every
three hours said Jeter. He ex-
plained that most stations have a
steady stream of music which is
repeated every three hours
throughout the day.
"On Saturday afternoon we will
have the Metropolitan Opera, live
from the Met said Jeter. He add-
ed that there would be more
classical music on Sundays, 12-6
p.m but there are no definite
plans.
There will also be a variety of
special programming on the
weekends.
Occasionally there will be a jazz
program to run steadily for two to
three hours without a break.
The station does not have to con-
tend with the scheduling of commer-
cials because, with the special
license, WECU is not allowed to
have paying commercials. The only
breaks in the programming will be
public service announcements and
news broadcasts.
The public service an-
nouncements are expected to take
up two or three minutes each hour.
Interspersed in the programming
will be what Jeter termed, "live
PSA from cards" which will detail
meetings and similar campus func-
tions. According to Jeter, it will be a
service similar to the one served by
77? East Carolinian announcement
column
Most of the albums that will be
played on the station will come from
record stores in the area. However,
they may run into some unexpected
problems.
"The oil situation has caused a
shortage of vinyl said Jeter. He
claims that this has caused in a
reluctance in the record industry to
allow their albums to be distributed
by the record stores.
He says this is not the way things
should be.
"The college radio stations are
the ones who break the music. The
commercial stations won't touch it
if it's not proven
See WECU, page 9, col. 1
John Chappel successfully recreated the role of
American humorist Mark Twain last night in a perfor-
mance in Hendrix Theater.
Chappel, who is a theologian turned actor by way of
Southern Pines and Wake Forest University, skillfully
blended comic timing, makeup, and an incredible stage
presence into a performance that was unforgettable.
The actor first started imitating Twain about ten
years ago, getting much of his material from the Hal
Holbrook performance called "Mark Twain Tonight
"I was interested in how Twain discussed issues of
what concerned him � that's how I came to do the
show Chappel said.
Researching Twain's writings for materials, and
listening to a phonograph record of another Twain im-
itator, Chappel also turned to a print of a one of a kind
motion picture of Twain himself. The print had been
supplied by a museum in Hannibal, Missouri which
specialized in Twain artifacts. Even though the movie
was silent, Chappel was able to observe Twain's
movements and mannerisms.
"The timing itself is in the material, though said
Chappel. "Part of the humor is in letting the audience
do the laughing for you
Chappel himself, without makeup, looks like he
might be in his late thirties. In character, he looks and
moves, and in short becomes the elderly American
author. How does it feel, then, to leap over forty years
in your life in just over three hours?
"Well, I have been doing this since 1V6S. and t'sgc
ting easier Chappel aid with a laugh.
Amazingly, Chappel has never taken a class npr fe�
sional acting.
"T learned mostly b doing Chappel
ed time in summer theater, dinner theater, ai
door dramas like "The I ost Colony" at Mar
his credits included pans in series like "The Rock!
Files" and special productions like "The Tria
Harey Oswald Recent film appearances hae inc tid-
ed "Nickelodeon "The Other Side of M
a role in the currently-showing film "10
One of the more unusual things that has happ.
Chappel is that one night at Chow an College in Mur-
freesboro, a hurricane as headed through tour-
same time he was telling his ghost stor. which m
have added to the effect. The image of 1100 B
imprisoned by tradition on the one hand and
Almighty in the guise o a hurricane on the othei
have been something to see.
Other times. Chappel has put on his makeup or. stage
or on an airplane � which Chappel said tended to gc
on the stewardesses' nerves a little bit. "This va- b
during the time o all the airplane hijackings Chappc
remarked.
For the convenience of those who couldn't make it to
the performance, we hae taken the liberty ot tak
See TWAIN, page 9. col. 1
Humorous Profiles On Profs
By LINDA J.ALLRED
We all know why professors turn
prematurely gray, become indif-
ferent and turn to the bottle: It's the
ty and undifferentiated paranoia,
turn to the bottle,And, on occasion,
add a few gray halirs of their own?
What factors tre at work which
turn enthusiastic, interested, First-
week freshmen into hardened, dull-
students. But has anyone stopped to eyed creatures whose only concern is
wonder why students become indif-
ferent, develope free-floating anxie-
to grab that diploma and run? The
obvious answer is the professors.
The following are a few examples
of those professors who turn the
"educational experience" into an
exercise in preservation of sanity:
THE SOMINEX: This guy comes
to class with his lectures carefully
written down and reads them, ver-
batim. His glance never leaves the
paper. He is responsible for training
ed by abrupt awakening induce
psychotic behavior in experimental
animals. Of course, he knows this,
just trying to confirm that the same
phenomenon can be observed in
higher-order primates!
THE DGRESSOR: Watch out
for this one�he seems innocuous,
but the long-range effect can be ex-
tremely troublesome. He outlines
the course work at the beginning of
the semester, but somehow he never
manages to complete the subject
this prof lulls you
because he's a nice guy. he an ea-
grader, so the A ou got in his class
will help to offset all the Ps j
because you don't hae
background for the rest of
courses.
THE INTELLECTVAL SOB
This guy can permanentlv de-tro
our self-worth, creating class c
neurosis even in the most stable
students. He spends the entire first
lecture telling the class that the are
so stupid that they will neer be able
to understand him or the course
material, and that he doesn't want
anyone wasting class time bv asking
dumb questions, so all questions
should be addressed to him after
thousands of students in the art of tn �n then pcc cZTlZTx Wf , a(T
falling asleep in class. (One enter- tQ Sleep, ttien teStS J he
falling asleep in class. (One enter-
prising student is selling tapes of JLfr effort h7 ft Cfif-
these lectures as a replacement for I13 CJJLl US u Ui
sleeping pills; however, preliminary riprt cf? '
research is beginning to show poten-
tial permanent neuropsychic
damage from long-term use, so the
tapes may be taken off the market.)
THE SOMINEX-PLUS: Iden-
tical to The Sominex, but with an
extra-added ingredient� this prof
lulls you into sleep, then tests his ef
immediately turns into The Ghosi
(below). For any student unluck
enough to catch up with him. the
response to any question is, "If
you're so dumb that vou have to ask
that question, you couldn't possibl
understand the answer He is an
impossible grader, and he claims
that the abundance of D's and F's in
Perhaps
there are still places to escape
mLc K lc?urc b?ins ?n the
right track, but he wanders off into his classes is proof that the students
discussion of current events, really are stupid,
movies, tales of his college days, THE GHOST: Try findimt this
feet by a sudden shout, dropping a and what his three-year-old said at one outside the cUssromn Y�
book or slamming a door. He takes breakfast that morning. He is amus- won't. Sometimes he dot esZ
great delight in observing the ensu- ing and likeable. Unfortunately, he show up for class and hisustratcd
teaches very little, and you will find TA has to give a totally unprepared
that next semester all of the infor- lecture. He posts office hours
mat ion you never covered in his faithfully, but if he's there at all
class is essential background for (and it's a big if), he's in a meeting
every course you will take from now -
on in that subject. However, KM,Kssai&. P��r t, c�l. 4
ing confusion as students work fran
tically to re-orient themselves and
return their pulse rates to normal.
This guy is particularly dangerous.
Studies have shown that repeated
exposure to short-term sleep follow-

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New Album Releases: Utopia
THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 22. 1980
By PAT MINGES
Utopia � Adventures in Utopia
Larry Dowty, manager of the Record Bar,
related an interesting story to me about this
album which rvealed the cult status that Todd
Rundgren and Utopia have even in Greenville.
The first day he had the album, he opened his
store and there was a small group of fans waiting
to get this album. They were obviously a
dedicated group, but Larry said he didn't really
know if the album was worth the wait. For them 1
am sure it was, but I don't know if 1 would have
waited too long for Utopia's latest endeavor.
However, 1 have waited my entire life for one
song on this album entitled "You make me
crazy" � it is that good. The song is a perfect
blend of new wave (a la Talking Heads or the
Cars), and the pop stylism that has made Todd
Rundgren "a wizard, a true star for so many
years. This song could be a great-selling single.
The sad thing about the entire album is that while
it has such potential for becoming a classic
album, recognizing the future in new wave, it set-
tles for some pretty mediocre, pure pop.
Adventures in Utopia is really an enigma, for it
has absolutely sparkling moments, yet at the same
time lags into pure FM formula "Adult Contem-
porary" music on some cuts. The songs rangs
from the brilliance of the aforementioned cut,
'The very last time and Last of the new wave
riders to the not-so-hot "Second Nature" and
Harry Nilson-like "Love alone "Rock love"
seems to be more like disco affection.
The performances on Adventures in Utopia are
absolutely dynamic because Utopia is a group
that takes their instruments to the very fringes of
applicability. The group sets new standards of ex-
cellence in the rock field. Rundgren's guitar work
is superb, and Roger Powell's work on the syn-
thesizers almost redefines their role in instrumen-
tation of rock and pop music. The rhythm section
sometimes lets one down, as it gets stuck in a
purely commercial vein, but more often if pro-
vides sheer dynamic strength. John Wilcos is the
journeyman on drums, and Kasim Sulton pro-
ides the bottom and fills in on backing vocals for
Todd, who is as remarkable as ever on lead
vocals.
This album reminds me of an old poem about a
little girl with a curl on her forehead, "when she
was good, she was awfully good, and when she
was bad she was horrid I would like to say that
it is the first great album of the eighties, and Todd
certainly had it within his grasp. Instead, the
group released an album of excellent quality, yet
it isn't the classic that it could be. Mayb � 1 lust
dont understand the relationship Todd has with
his music, what appears to be "pure pop for now
people" (Nick Lowe) may be just the musical
outlet that Rundgren is seeking. Truly Todd is no
newcomer to commercial music.
In conclusion, Adventures In Utopia is an ex-
cellent album and perhaps an album that sets the
tone for the eighties. It certainly is a very pro-
gressive album musically, the compositions may
fluctuate in strength, but there are no doubts
about the level of performances. They are
dynamic. But Todd and Utopia seemed content to
settle for a fortress of musical strength surround-
ed by a moat of commerciality. Hopefully it is
just the calm before the storm.
Teddy Pendergrass � Teddy � Live
From Coast to Coast
I sometimes feel a bit unqualified to review
black music, because 1 do not have the history of
acquaintance that 1 have with rock music. What I
lack in knowledge, I attempt to remedy with
desire. Teddy Pendergrass is somebody I did not
really knokw much about until this album, a live
concert recorded in Philly and L.A and at first I
didn't know what to think. So I will not think,
just feel.
Side one left me somewhat lacking. I began to
wonder, "What is the big deal. This guy ain't so
hot The first two songs had nice horn ar-
rangements, and never have I heard a synthesizer
used in soul music the way the Teddy Bears did,
but it was not exactly super star material. The
medley of tunes from his Harold Melvin and the
Blue Notes days did nothing at all for me, and I
was prepared to pan the album.
The music on Side Two made me a believer.
Teddy is a great performer, and beneath his
tremendous sex appeal lies a dynamite individual.
"When Somebody Loves You Back" is a
beautiful song. Teddy's voice excels, and the str-
ing and horn arrangements are the perfect com-
pliment to his voice. I have seen audience par-
ticipation songs before, but I never saw anyone
invite people up to sing solo verses from the song.
Here is a man who knows where his strength
comes from � the love of his fans is evident, and
few stars have such a love for their supporters. It
is an anomaly in these days of rock self-worship.
Side Three could be referred to as his bedroom
suite, if you will pardon the pun. The songs are a
progression of tunes from "Come Go With Me"
to "Do Me dealing with a love affair held in the
intimacies of one's bedroom. Teddy's sex appeal
is accentuated in this set, and his gentle, sensuous
croon is his claim to fame. The girls go wild.
The final side is an interesting new concept, for
it is a pairing of a radio interview from WDAS-
FM in Philadelphia surrounded by new studio
music from Teddy. The interview reveals where
Teddy comes from, his approach to music, and
where he is going. The new music serves to prove
the things Teddy proposes in his interview, his
background in Philadelphia soul, and his future
in progressive soul. It is some of Teddy's best
material, providing more musical substance to an
already good album. This is one loveable Teddy
Bear.
Ian McLagan � Troublemaker
Ian McLagan is a veteran keyboard performer
who has been in the middle of the British rock
movement since the mid-sixties. McLagan began
with Small Faces, one of the founding groups
(along with the Who) of the London Mod move-
ment. He played with them until they broke,
when Steve Marriot left (to form Humble Pie) in
1969. McLagan remained with the group as they
added Ron Wood and Rod Stewart to form
Faces. Faces was relatively successful until Rod
Stewart left in 1975 to pursue a solo career as did
Ron Wood, who joined the Rolling Stones in
1976. Ian McLagan has since played with the
Stones on their last American tour and with the
Who on their European tour, immediately after
the death of Keith Moon.
In the fine British tradition (Rod Stewart, Pete
Townshend, John Entwistle, Ron Wood, Bill
Wyman), McLagan has released his first
endeavor since the demise of Faces, entitled
Troublemaker. Also in the fine British tradition
(stiff upper lip, you know), it is an excellent
album, featuring guest artists Ron Wood, Keith
Richards, Jim Keltmer, Ringo Starr, Stanley
Clarke, Bobby Keys, and Zigaboo Modeliste.
(Namedropper!) McLagan is simply smashing as
he turns in jolly good performances on
keyboards, guitars, and rough and ready vocals.
As you would expect when you get this many
British rockers together, they are gonna throw
some Reggae (Third World blues) at you. The
most potent moments of the album are when
McLagan, Richards, Clarke, and Keltner get
together for some shantytown breakdown
(Aargh-aargh?). Other tunes remind one of Nils
Lofgren (a D.C. boy) and other (the Stones), but
nary a one is a bad song. The album features
British rock guitars (more in control), sparkling
keyboards, and wailing horns surrounding plea-
sant melodies, nice hooks, and husky vocals.
"Mystifies Me" could easily be a hit single, and
the album burst into the Billboard charts at a big
179 in its first week. It's a lot better than that!
Bob Welch � The Other One
I have never really cared for this Californian
cum laude, except when he was with Fleetwood
Mac during their peak days in the early seventies.
His first solo album was nice, with the strings and
all, but these proceeding two albums were not
that impressive. It has been such a good week for
music that I hate to say anything bad about this
album. It is okay, I guess. It is not a bad album.
If you want to talk about bad albums, we could
surely do a lot about that, not musically but
production-wise. Conglomerates have bought out
the recording companies, and with super mass
production the quality of recordings is atrocious
(scratches, pops, skips, etc.). The prices are
outrageous, and many corporations are limiting
returns from the retailers. It is a tragic situation
because the industries are cutting their own
throats, and who is having to pay the price? The
small people like record store owners and us poor
people who enjoy listening to new music. Blame
he corporations.
Albums courtesy of Record Bar, Pitt Plaza and
Carolina East Mall.
See NEW ALBUMS, page S. coi. i
Pickings are getting scarce
but the squirrels seem well fed
4

��
The
Mushroom
'Good Things for
Gentle People"
318 Evans Mall
Pitta inn
AMERICAS FAVORITE PIZZA

PIZZA BUFFET
ALL THE PIZZA AND
SALAD YOU CAN EAT
Mon. -Fri. 11:30-2:00
Mon. �P Tues. 6:00 8:001
758-6366 Evening buffet 82.79
Hwjr SB4 �yi�i
til
.vllle , K. C.
� �
PS! WE GOOFED
Being new in the keg beer
business, we were improperly
equipped. However, we now
have tubs to hold your keg.
We also have all the other
necessary equipment for you,
so
ATTENTION PARTY
GIVERS
Overton's is now offering a wide selection of draught
beer in half barrels and pony barrels
Buy your draught beer at Overton's low, low prices
instead of convenience store prices
half barrels $39.99

pony barrels $23.99
QUANTITY DISCOUNTS AVAILABLE
Overton s
Suprr ma? k't, ln
OVERTON'S SUPERMARKET
located on the corner of 3rd
and Jarvis, just 2 blocks from
ECU campus
GRADE A Whole Fryers .45 -lb.
OVERTON'S Finest Ground Beef
3 lb. package or more $1.09-lb.
Soft n Pretty Toilet Tissue
4 roll package .78
Peter Pan Peanut Butter
creamy or crunchy 18oz. jar .98
Star Kist Tuna
6oz. can .78
STOKLEY TRUCKLOAD SALE:
Cream style yellow corn, whole kernal
golden corn, cut green beans, french
green beans, cut beets, sliced beets,
whole beets
303 cans 3-$1.00
case of 24 cans $7.88
COCA COLA
1 ooz. carton of 8 - $1.38(plus deposit)
OVENGOLD 24oz. loaf bread.
Hot Dog and Hamburger Buns, or
Brown n Serve Rolls 288
OVERTON'S
ECU PIRATE COUPON
10 discount on all
food orders over $10.00
expires Jan. 29,1980.
NAME,
I.D. mmm
Amt. of Purchase.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 22, 1980
Professors Show True Form
There's still hope
spring will be here soon
Bar Is Fun
continued from page 6
took one and handed him the bottle.
He threw it away.
After the second encore, I didn't
think anyone would leave. For
about the first 15 minutes, it ap-
peared that no one had moved from
where they were standing, but the
place was finally empty.
1 was empty � physically drain-
ed. 1 spent five hours on my feet,
opening beers, running from
counter to counter, and working a
cash register. I had a blister on my
right index finger from opening
beers and pushing buttons.
It was fun, but 1 haven't figured
continued from page 6
or on the phone. Don't try calling
him at home�the number is
unlisted.
THE SHOWMAN: Ringling
Brothers circus is not as entertaining
ias this guy. He rehearses his lectures
Jin front of a mirror, dramatically il-
lustrates his points with impres-
'sionations and elaborate drawings,
and manages to exhaust the entire
class with his abundant energy. He
also has an enormous ego which
needs constant feeding, so the only
way to get an A is to convince him
that you think he's the greatest in-
structor since Socrates.
THE EXHIBITIONIST: A varia-
tion of the showman, The Exhibi-
tionist delights in shocking his trap-
ped audience with obscene language
and dirty jokes. His specific target is
young women, so he is rarely found
in disciplines which are still primari-
ly male.
THE GREAT MAN: As a
published and acknowledged leader
in his field, this guy's reputation has
impressed everyone (including him).
Like The Showman, his ego must be
fed, so count on having to spend
most of your time doing just that.
Since he uses lecture periods to crow
about his accomplishments, you
won't learn much; however, he has
a reputation to protect, so his
grading system is apt to be lenient if
you're willing to play along with his
game. The cardinal rule is never to
disagree with him.
THE TIMID RABBIT: To look
task, he is a tyranical grader. THE TEA CJW�;Wil�Cf
THE GARDENER: His only pur- defines the verb teach as 10
pose in life is to "weed-out" cause to know a subject. This is
students who don't belong in his The Teacher s primary goal. He (or
discipline (although by what reason she) is in the classroom by choice,
and criteria, he is never specific). To He is human (and admits it), and he
do this, he Rives tests and exams is genuinely concerned
out why. Part of the reason was that
1 didn't think I would be doing it
again.
1 wasn't supposed to get paid, but
after everyone Jeft, I was told to
stick around because I was to be in-
cluded on the tips. Then the
manager said that since they had
been so busy and I had worked so
hard that he was going to pay me. A
good night.
I told him jokingly that I might
just apply for a regular job.
As 1 was leaving he told me that if � expression of sheer terror on
I was serious, they would be glad to would think this guy
have me. I would only have to work
occasionally on weekends, since I
work during the week
I'll think about it.
New Albums
continued from page 7
Ahmad Jamal
dene tic Walk
This is the first
outstanding jazz album
of the year, and if this
album is indicative of
the material that will be
released this year, it
will be a banner year.
A.Ymad Jamal is m.
subcrb piamsl and
ccmiposer and this
album features a
plethora of remarkable
musicians performing
superbe material. The
fact that the album
sometimes succumbs to
the commercial urge
does not detract from
its stature as a jazz
medium.
The tone of the
album is a relaxed,
club-type atmosphere
that is indicative of the
long stint that Ahmad
Jamal spent in the lofts
and clubs in the Big
Apple. Jamal is well-
versed in the various
keyboard instruments
as he moves from
acoustic to electric
piano twitn ease and
uses excellent taste in
choosing which instru-
ment goes best with
each composition.
Once again, the com-
positions on this album
are as fine as any 1 have
heard recently in the
commercial jazz
medium, and Jamal's
utilization of string and
horn arrangements
reveal that he has an ex-
cellent arranger in
Richard Evans.
The title cut is the
finest on the album,
having an almost
unearthly appeal to it in
the way Evans weaves
texture upon texture of
was a lone mouse in a room filled
with hungry cats. His voice quavers
as he speaks, and his hands tremble
as he constantly shuffles his lecture
notes. He checks frequently to be
certain his fly is closed, and occa-
sionally glances over his shoulder
(to be certain the blackboard isn't
about to jump him.) A raised hand
drives him into such heart-rendering
stammers that, out of pity, his
students quickly stop trying to ask
questions in class.
THE CONSCRIPTEE: This guy
tells the class first thing that he hates
teaching undergraduate courses, but
that the university requires it, so
he's trying to make the most of a
bad situation. He reminds you con-
are wasting his
. 11 ii mi �
gives
which require a photographic
memory for details and trivia. His
lectures are complex and highly
technical.
THE PERFECTIONIST: Most
frequently found in creative
disciplines, this prof gives two
grades�A and F. "Either you do it
perfectly, or you don't do it at all"
is his motto. Since he doesn't like to
give F's, he requires that each
assignment be redone until it is
perfect. Perfection being defined
only in terms of what pleases him,
his courses rapidly develop into ex-
ercises in imitation.
THE EX-MARINE DRILL
SARGEANT: This guy runs his
classroom like boot camp. The
assignment load for his course is
more than all your other courses
combined, and to make certain you
do the work, he gives frequent
unannounced quizzes and drills you
individually in class. If a student
answers incorrectly, he faces public
chatisement. Although such
repeated demoralizations are known
to contribute to the development of
psychological problems, no one
dares to confront this prof with the
facts.
THE BIGOT: This one is the
worst. Whether his prejudice is
racial, sexual, religious, regional, or
whatever, he will attack his target
unrelentingly, sometimes only by in-
nuendo and insinuation, but often
more directly. Since his basic thesis
is that certain people are for some
reason inferior, he proves his point
by making the course impossible for
them. If you accuse him of pre-
judice, he'll only respond that
you're paranoid, so don't waste
your breath�you just might begin
to believe him.
In all fairness, it must be noted
that these species are becoming ex-
ceedingly rare. They wore different
guises, but they shared a common
denominator�total lack of concern
for the quality of teaching and the
learning process. Before you
stereotype a prof into one of these
categories, look for that common
factor. Chances are you won't find
it. A new species has emerged and is
students. (Don't be alarmed if you
find some vestiges of the above
categories in him; after all, old
customs take time to disappear com-
pletely.) You (the student) must
keep two things in mind when deal-
ing with The Teacher. He is not
perfect, and he is not a magician.
Because he is human, he will make
mistakes, but this does not mean
you can't learn from him. In addi
tion, he can't impart knowledge by
the stroke of a magic and.
Teaching is a process, not an action,
and learning is going to involve
work on your part, too. Give this
guy a chance, and you just may find
yourself in the midst of a truh
rewarding experience.
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- m





L�AKv�OG At6Ksr CoccTGr the ffco lM! V
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Bi D)vip A)oju
JANUARY 22. 1980
MOVJiOG JHt' ST�C0
ACROSS f�- fcOQtf '
VOfet A�ft0 4TTHf
A)EI6H60RS 00 THl
Gar THAT
rl
Television Is Safe
If Watched Well
How long has it been since your feet were wet outside?
Twain Revisited
ABORTIONS UPTO
12IH WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
$175 00 "all inclusive"
preqnancy test b.rth coo
trol. and Drocile proqnan
cv counseling For further
information call 83? 0535
i toll free nu m oer
800 221 2568 Between 9
A v 5 p v weekdays
Raleigh Women's
Health Organization
917 West Morgan St
Raleigh. N C 27403
continued from page 6
down some of Twain's
sayings, as said by
Chappel:
�1 vsas born honest,
but it didn't last.
�(1 traveled out west
and became ) a
newspaper reporter. 1
couldn't find honest
work.
�A Congressman is
the only man 1 know o'
who can raise ten thou-
and dollars to put on
an agricultural fair to
show forty dollars
worth o punkins that
grew in his own
brother-in-law's
garden.
�Clothes make the
man. Naked men have
no influence.
�1 have a scheme of
life. I only smoke one
cigar. At a time. I don't
smoke any cigars at all.
When I'm asleep.
�Always obey your
parents. When they are
present.
�Be careful about ly-
ing. Or you will get
caught.
�I don't remember
the first lie I ever told. I
do remember the first
truth.
�In a democracy the
people are the country.
The government is a
servant, and an indif-
ferent one at that.
�Lies cannot be
struck from the face of
the earth as long as
Congress is in session.
And perhaps the best
one:
If you can't make the
age of seventy by tak-
ing a comfortable road,
don't go!
WECU Plans
continued from page 6
'They're more concerned with
aking profits now he said, refer-
ng to the record companies.
Some record companies have
een very good to the station. CBS
ecords has cooperated with the
tation, a fact Jeter attributes to
eir broad range of interests.
In news broadcasting, the ten-
tive plans include ten minutes of
news each hour. The majority of
hat news will be local and campus,
but it will include some state and na-
ional news.
"It won't be a typical news for-
mat said Jeter. It will include
news which is unusual, along with
special features such as Zodiac
News and Earth News.
The station will also subscribe to
the UPI news wire.
They will also be part of the UBS
network, which gives early warning
emergency signals. The signal has to
be run from two tapes to form "that
annoying noise according to
Jeter. In that way the regular tones
in a song will not trip the system.
The station expects to have 30-40
disc jockeys, though there is no pay
involved in the jobs, except for the
executive.
Jeter expects to be on the air in
March, and people are more than
readv.
By LOUISE COOK
Associated Press Writer
True or false? Watching television is harmful
to your eyes.
The answer, says the American Optometric
Association, is false, despite the popular belief
that long hours in front of the TV set will damage
your vision.
The association is quick to add a warning,
however. It says television is safe only if it is pro-
perly installed and viewed. It also says that too
much concentration on the screen can lead to
temporary fatigue.
In an effort to help people learn how to watch
television safely, the association has prepared a
guide, "To View or Not to View It is available
at no charge. Send a stamped, self-addressed
envelope to Communications Division, American
Optometric Association, 245 North Lindbergh
Blvd St. Louis, Mo 66141.
Here are some of the highlights, in question-
and-answer form:
Q. Is it safe for children to sit only two or three
feet from the screen?
A. It is not likely to do any permanent harm,
but it is not recommended � for children or
adults. A tendency to sit too close io the TV may
be a sign of nearsightedness or myopia. As a
general rule, television should be viewed from a
distance equal to at least five times the width of
the screen. If your screen is fifteen inches wide,
you should sit 75 inches or just over six feet away
from the set. The picture will be clearer and any
lines in the screen will be less apparent. You also
should try to place your set at eye level. Looking
up or down at the screen can cause strain.
Q. What about watching television in a dark
room?
A. It's not a good idea. When the room is total-
ly dark, the contrast between the screen and the
surrounding area is too great for comfortable and
efficient vision. Very bright lighting also is bad; it
tends to reduce the contrast on the screen and
"wash out" the picture. Soft, overall lighting is
best. Avoid placing lights where they will produce
a glare or reflection on the screen.
Q. Is it all right to wear sunglasses while wat-
ching television?
A. No. Sunglasses may block out too much
light. If you wear them when you don't need
them, you may have trouble adjusting to normal
light without the glasses. If the television seems to
bright, despite tuning, you may have a vision pro-
blem
Q. Are there any special rules for color televi-
sion?
A. Not really. Since the reception of color pic-
tures is more complex, however, it is especially
important to have the antenna properly adjusted.
Walls near the set should be neutral or pastel in
color and stronglv colored lights should be avoid-
ed.
A feeling of eye strain while you are watching
television could be an indication of trouble and
you should get a checkup.
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By
Taylor
Beverage Co.
Goldsboro
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11S30





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
ECU Defeats
Winless Bucs
Bv CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
East Carolina jumped to a quick
28-9 lead in the first 11 minutes and
cruised to an easy 90-67 win over
hapless Baptist College last night in
Minges Coliseum
Winless Baptist, now 0-13 and
losers of 27 in a row dating back to
last season, connected on only two
field goals in the first ten minutes of
ihe first half to put itself in a hole
that became too deep to climb out
of.
Leading the way in the Pirate vic-
tory was guard George Maynor,
who had his best night of the season
in scoring 24 points, grabbing five
rebounds, dishing off three assists in
addition to stealing the ball twice.
"George had his best game of the
year on defense said a relaxed
Pirate coach Dave Odom after the
game, "which allowed him to have a
great offensive night
Maynor, who connected on seven
of eight from the field in the second,
was The main reason the Buccaneers
committed an astonishing 26 tur-
novers during the game. "I'm very
proud of our defense and George in
particular Odom commented.
"He was long overdue for a com-
plete night like this
Despite the 23-point loss Baptist
coach David Reese felt his club
came out of the game a lot better off
than he had expected. "Coach
Odom was really nice to us
tonight he said. "He's a class guy
and his team displays that
Reese looked back on this
season's earlier 99-77 loss to the
Pirates, now 10-7, and claimed that
the results were probably better this
time than last. "1 think they were
even better to us here than when
they played us at our place
Despite Reese's comments, he
had to be pleased with his team's
performance as the Bucs battled
back from the early deficit to cut the
lead to 12 at half time, 46-34.
The ECU lead was cut even more
in the second half to seven on
several occasions, the last time at
the 13:42 mark at 58-51.
It was then that Maynor took
over, scoring 12 points in seven
minutes and sealing the Pirate vic-
tory.
The game was dotted with spec-
tacular plays, including a driving
behind-the-head dunk in the first
half by ECU forward Herb Gray.
"This was a very pleasing ex-
perience for me said Odom. "I
didn't go into this game blood thirs-
ty. 1 just wanted us to play as well as
we could for the entire game. I'm
very pleased as this was the best
we've played all year for 40
minutes
In addition to Maynor, other
Pirates scoring in double figures
were Herb Krusen with 14, Bryant
Wiggins with 12 and Herb Gray 10.
Gray scored his 10 points and
pulled down a game-high eight re-
bounds in only 18 minutes of play
For the Bucs the leading scorer
was Eric Tennille with 19 followed
by Eddie Talley with 14.
For the game the Pirates shot 57.9
percent from the field while the
Bucs shot a respectable 54 percent.
A key for the Pirates was the fact
that they got off 76 shots compared
to just 50 for the Bucs and outre-
bounded the visitors 38-24.
The Pirates now head into the
thick part of their schedule, with
games against Detroit, South
Carolina, Illinois State and
Maryland upcoming, not to men-
tion two games against a very tough
Lady Pirates
Fall To ODU
ECU Guard George Maynor
scored 24 in Monday win
UNC-Wilmington squad.
"I told everybody that this is
where we coaches begin earning our
pay and the guys begin earning their
scholarships Odom said. "There
are no guaranteed wins from here
on out for us. As a matter of fact,
we'll probably be the underdog in
most cases from now on
As for Saturday's home matchup
against UNC-W, Odom said the
game presented a "gigantic
challenge" for the Pirates. "It's
such a big game for us Odom said
with authority. "If we play well we
can win. I just hope there's a big
crowd because we'll really need it.
"That game could very well be
the best game in North Carolina
that'll be played Saturday
By JIMMY DuPREE
Assistant Sports Kditor
NORFOLK, Va. � East Carolina
visited the land of the giants Mon-
day and although they took a few
whacks at the great redwoods of Old
Dominion, they still came out on the
short end of a 112-77 final.
Monarch center Inge Nissen
dumped in follow shot after follow
shot, netting a crushing 37 points on
the night. The 6-5 Nissen, who was
celebrating her 25th birthday, also
grabbed 10 rebounds, but it was 6-8
post Anne Donovan crashed the
boards for 26 while scratching 21
points.
East Carolina came out cold in
the first half, allowing ODU to
quickly establish a 16-0 lead with
less than five minutes elapsed. The
Lady Pirates fought back behind the
14 point effort of Lydia Rountree
and trimmed the margin to 50-34 at
the half.
The second half for ECU turned
out to be the "Laurie Sikes Show
as the 5-6 point guard from Mariet-
ta, Georgia, sizzled the nets for 18
points, hitting from 20-28 feet on
her nine field goals. Sikes also con-
tributed 10 assists.
All-American Nancy Lieberman
had what many of the season-high
3,207 at ODU Field House con-
sidered to be an 'off night, scoring
14 points, grabbing 13 rebounds and
dishing off 15 assistants.
The story of the game waas the
difference in height, as the national-
ly second-ranked Monarchs chaired
the boards with 76, while the Pirates
only managed 32.
"We didn't think we could play
man-to-man against them said
ECU's Cathy Andruzzi, "but in the
end we found that we had to. We
knew we had to take our offense
Andruzzi
Sikes
outside and Laurie Sikes and Lydia
Rountree had great games for us.
"We felt it wasn't Lieberman we
had to stop, but those big girls in-
side. They're great post players.
Our break worked against them.
We see now how well it can work "
East Carolina, now 14-4, host
Florida Sate Thursday, while the
16-1 Monarchs travel to St. Joseph
Thursdav.
Brewington, Revils Gain National Publicity
NOTES AND COMMENTS:
A COUPLE OF Pirates from dif-
ferent sports have been sighted in
national publications. Butch Revils,
a 177-pound wrestler is ranked sixth
in the country in his weight class ac-
cording to Mat News, the collegiate
wrestlers' bible.
Linebacker Mike Brewington of
the Pirate football squad is said to
have all the tools for a pro with his
speedy 6-3, 230-pound frame. This
is backed up strongly by his being
picked as the number two middle
linebacker prospect in the nation for
the upcoming National Football
League draft by College and Pro
Football Newsweekly.
Brewington is ranked just behind
All-American Dennis Johnson of
Southern California and well ahead
of Michigan A-A Ron Simpkins.
SPEAKING OF Ail-Americans, a
true A-A was in Greenville yester-
day in the person of Charlie "Choo
Choo" Justice. The ex-UNC star
running back and practically a living
legend took time out to visit ECU
Athletic Director Bill Cain,
Chancellor Thomas Brewer and
several other members of the Pirate
athletic community.
When visiting the office of ECU
Sports Information Director Walt
Atkins, which is located high above
Ficklen Stadium in the upper areas
of the press box, Justice quipped,
"Heck, this stadium don't look so
bad from up here
"With a little work he con-
tinued with a smile, "it would like
Charles Chandler
almost as good as the one at Chapel
Hill.
RETURNING TO GREEN-
VILLE and ECU next Monday will
be ex-Pirate defensive end Zack
Valentine. Valentine, now a
linebacker on the world champion
Pittsburgh Steelers, says he wants to
get back in school and finish his
degree.
Valentine and the Steelers won an
unprecedented fourth Super Bowl
title Sunday with rheir hard-fought
31-19 victory over Los Angeles.
Valentine played stricly on the
special teams but did get in on a
number of tackles.
Following the game Valentine was
able to play the hot dog's role a bit
as he passed across television
screens all over the world in the Pitt
dressing room after the game. When
the CBS-TV cameras zoomed in,
Valentine merely smiled and went
on his merry way.
ANYONE INTERESTED in try-
ing out for the women's tennis team
is invited to a meeting on Tuesday,
Jan. 29 at 4:30 p.m. on the Minges
Coliseum tennis courts, ECU coach
Barbara Olschner announced yester-
day.
AN ALL-DECADE team made
up of NFL superstars was named
last month in the latest issue of Col-
lege and Pro Football Newsweekly.
Included on the team were six
members of the Pittsburgh Steeler
club that won Sunday's Super Bowl.
Wide receiver Lynn Swann,
fullback Franco Harris, defensive
end L.C. Greenwood, defensive
tackle Joe Greene, linebacker Jack
Ham and Head Coach Chuck Noll
were all named. In addition, former
Steeler Andy Russell was named to
the outside linebacker position op-
posite Ham. Also. Harris was
bestowed the super honor of being
named Player of the Decade, thanks
to his eight-year total of 8,563
yards. This total does not include
his more than 1,000 yards gained in
post-season plav.
ALSO INCLUDED in College
and Pro Football Newsweekly s All-
Decade issue was a list of the twenty
top college teams over the past ten
years, based on the teams winning
percentage. Alabama topped the list
with a 103-16-1 slate.
Left off the list in an apparent
overlook was the ECU Pirates.
ECU's 73-37-1 record actually ranks
as the 18th best mark in the country
among Division 1 schools.
Emory Names
Two To Staff
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
New East Carolina head football
coach Ed Emory completed the hir-
ing of his staff yesterday when he
signed Steve Schnall and Tommy
Bowden to contracts as Pirate
assistants.
Schnall, 35, who had been the
defensive secondary coach for the
past three years at William and
Mary, will coach ECU's offensive
backs.
Schnall previously coached in the
college ranks at Lafayette and
Widener. Previously, he served as
head coach at Indian Hills High
School in Oakland, N.J. He is a
1965 graduate of Springfield Col-
lege, where he majored in physical
education. Schnall earned his
Frank Orgel
masters degree in educational ad-
ministration at Connecticut in 1966.
Bowden, 25, is the son of Florida
State head coach Bobby Bowden.
The younger Bowden starred at
West Virginia and in 1975 played in
the Peach Bowl. He graduated in
1976 as a physical education major.
Bowden served as a part-time
assistant at West Virginia as a
secondary coach for one year
following his father to FSU, where
he has coached the past two seasons.
This past season the Seminoles
finished the regular season with an
11-0 mark before losing in the
Orange Bowl to Oklahoma.
Bowden will serve as defensive
secondary coach under Emory.
Emory, a former Georgia Tech
and Clemson assistant, had
previously named to his staff Frank
Orgel as defensive coordinator and
Wright Anderson as offensive coor-
dinator.
Both Anderson and Orgel served
at one time or another under former
ECU head man Pat Dye. Orgel
worked for Dye during the Georgia
native's full six year tenure in
Greenville. Anderson was with the
Pirates during Dye's first two
seasons and was instrumental in in-
stalling the wishbone attack.
Also on the offensive staff with
Anderson and Schnall is Jim
Gudger and long-time Pirate aide
Henry Trevathan.
Defensive coaches other than
Orgel and Bowden are Bob Sanders
and Jim Holland
Won't Return
Miles Quits
Clarence Miles
leaving Pirate fold
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
Sophomore swingman Clarence
Miles quit the East Carolina basket-
ball team and withdrew from school
to evaluate his future plans, Pirate
coach Dave Odom announced Mon-
day.
"Anytime there's a new situa-
tion said the first-year ECU
coach, "someone has got to be un-
comfortable. I had a short meeting
with Clarence, and he relayed to me
that he just needed time off to take a
close look at things
Miles was contacted at his home
in Burlington yesterday, and he said
he had no plans at the moment ex-
cept that he would not return to
East Carolina.
"What I'm doing now is looking
for another school to attend Miles
said. "I've talked to several schools
but am not close to a final decision
yet
Miles said that he left the Pirate
squad for a variety of personal
reasons. "One of the main things
that bothered me was my playing
time he said. "I just wasn't get-
ting enough. I fed with a little more
1 could become a much better
player
Miles said he had nothing against
Odom personally but mentioned
that their basketball philosophies
differed. "Coach Odom is doing m
great job at East Carolina said the
6-5 Miles. "He has things really
organized and looking so much bet-
ter than last season.
"He just likes a different style of
basketball than I do. It's not that
he's hard to play for or anything.
It's just that I'm better off
somewhere where I would fit in
more
The ex-Burlington Cummings
High star also said that the pre-
season departure of 6-11 center Al
Tyson from the Pirate squad in-
fluenced his decision.
"That had a lot to do with it
Miles said. "Al and I got to know
each other real well at all-star games
after our senior seasons in high
school. He was really the reason
that 1 came to ECU
When Tyson left, so did part of
Miles. "I felt kind of left out in the
cold Miles claimed. "Everyone
still treated me okay. It just wasn't
the same without Al, though
Tyson has since enrolled at
Virginia Commonwealth. Would
Miles consider making a similar
move? "1 doubt they know I'm
available yet. Even if they do, I'm
considering several schools at the
moment.
Miles played in 11 of ECU's v
16 games, starting three times. He
was averaging 3.7 points and 2.4 re-
bounds per game. As a freshman
last season he averaged 4.7 points
and 1.2 pulls, starting eight of the 25
- that he played.
I
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 22, 1980
11
Riley Enjoys Pressure
By JIMMY DuPREE
Assistant Sports Kditor
NORFOLK, Va. �
Facing such opponents
as 6-8 Anne Donovan,
6 5 Inge Nissan of Old
Dominion and 6-5 June
Doby and 6-2 Genia
Beasley of N.C. State,
one would expect com-
paratively demure
Kathy Riley of East
Carolina's Lady Pirates
to be hesitant about
taking the court, but
this 5-9, 150 pounder
thrives on the pressure.
"When teams are
really clogging the mid-
dle, then I have to
shoot well from out-
side said Riley, a
lunior who came to
ECU via Middle Ten-
nessee State University.
"I think my shooting
from outside is more
important to the team
than what 1 can do in-
side
Prior to the Lady
Bucs matchup with
defending AIAW na-
tional champion Old
Dominion, Riley stated
that in order to beat the
taller Monarchs,
ECU'S outside game
would have to be at its
best.
"Laurie (Sikes),
Lydia (Rountree) and I
have to be hitting out-
side to beat them. 1
mean, we have GOT to
be on. We're not going
to be able to drive on
them or work the ball
inside much.
"I'd be surprised if
we can get the ball in-
side to Rosie
(Thompson) very
often. Lydia and I drive
a lot too, but we're go-
ing to have to have a
great fast break
Riley came to East
Carolina after two suc-
cessful years at Middle
Tennessee (also a four-
year institution) and a
high school career dur-
ing which she netted
all-state AAA honors
as well as being named
most valuable player.
Her performance in the
Junior Olympics
brought her All-
American accolades
from that group.
Riley admits that her
32 point performance
in the 71-68 victory
over North Carolina
was probably the
team's best to date, but
conceeds "we still have
a lot of room to im-
prove.
Riley is confident in
her abilities, admitting
that she has taken
desirable qualities from
a variety of players she
has seen through the
years.
"I think I do a lot o.
things well says the
Nashville, Tenn
native. "I can shoot in-
side and outside � I
have good speed and
strength. I like to think
I do many things
reasonably well, rather
than one thing very
well
Indeed Riley has pro-
Kathy Riley
ven herself as a round-
ed athlete, averaging
17.7 points and 5.3 re-
bounds per outing, as
well as dishing off 46
assists on the season for
second place honors in
that category.
"Kathy Riley means
a great deal to our ball
club says ECU coach
Cathy Andruzzi.
"She's a gutsy player
who doesn't know how-
to quit. She works well
in our offensive
scheme
Riley is truly a stu-
dent of the game; she
can be found at Minges
Coliseum anytime of
the day or night that
the coaches or janitors
will let her in. She
hopes to continue into
the women's profes-
sional ranks, but her
three knee operations
could cut that goal out
from under her.
With East Carolina
riding their best season
in recent years, forward
Kathy Riley is a
building block which
the Lady Pirates rely on
to supply power and
scoring, but also the in-
spiration which is
necessary for success.
The American
Cancer Society
thanks you.
Their families
thank you.
American Cancer Society
2,000,000 people fighting cancer. I

ARMY-NAVY STORE
Backpacks, B 15, Bomber
Field, Deck, Flight, Snorkel



AMAZING BLOUSE SALE
Special Group Blouses $20.00
all others Vi off
also
Blazers,Skirts,Dresses, Pants, Jeans
V� Off
Jackets, Peacoats, Parkas,
Shoes, Combat Boots, Plus.
IS01 S. Evans Street
Leather Belts
$6 to $19
Leather Handbags
$10 to $25
Shoes Repaired to Look
Like New.
CMTAIN
THIN
Riggan Shoe Repair
Leather Shop
USE. 4th St.
(across from the Attic)
111 West 4th St.
Downtown Greenville
758 0204
Parking in Front
and Rear.
The Minority Arts Film Series Committee presents
Electronics Cited
The Future Of Football
PASADENA, Calif.
(AP)�The country has
dropped back to earth,
clawing its way out of
the hysteria, ra-ma-
and heady wine
marks the annual
S ipei Bowl tootball
game.
The pomp, pagean-
try and paralysis of
SupeT Bowl Sunday�is
it really, as they say,
America's greatest one-
sports spectacular"
'Strictly bush, ar-
chaic, not in tune with
the technological age
ffs Bob Kap, a
56-year-old
-planted Yugosla-
Yet, he sees foot-
mushrooming into
a multi-billion-dollar
extravaganza that will
give the sport global
appeal.
Soccer, he insists, is
decadent as a spectator
attraction�"dry. dull
and
unintelligent"�where-
as American football is
"human drama, tac-
tical, fast-paced and re-
quiring the ultimate
challenge of the mind
and body
But the game, he
says, must move into
the technological age.
"Look at those silly-
chains on two sticks
which are moved after
every first down he
says' "They've haven't
changed since
Princeton was playing
Rutgers nearly 100
years ago.
"And those
goalposts sticking up in
the air, just like they've
been for decades. A
15-yard kick counts the
same as one from 50
yards and it's one point
whether you boot the
ball over the middle or
bounce it inside one of
the poles
Kap is a round,
puckish little man who
migrated to this coun-
try 25 years ago, joined
Dallas millionaire
Lamar Hunt as general
manager of the
Dynamos hockey team
and in recent years has
been active in working
with soccer style
kickers in the NFL.
"They laughed at me
when I predicted the
conventional place-
kicker would be
passe he sys. "Now
there are only two or
three around
A painter who often
illustrates his ideas with
murals, Kap says dom-
ed stadiums soon will
become as obsolete as
the straightaway
kickers and millions of
fans will have their
football transmitted to
them electronically in
three-dimens;onal
holographs.
He foresees the day
that the game will be
played in a glistening
palace with 10 million
cardsize screens replac-
ing live spectators, with
the fans, in the comfort
of their living rooms,
through futuristic elec-
tronics having the feel-
ing of being on the
scene.
Electronic sensors,
almost invisible in size,
will be attached to each
of the players' hands
and rsewn into the ar-
tificial surface to pin-
point the progess of
play.
Footballs will change
color as they change
hands. The field will
light up and change col-
or ' from red to green,
for instance�to follow
the progress of the ball.
A signatory ball,
with an electronic sen-
sor, will record the pro-
gress to the 100th of a
an inch. The ball will
change color when
fumbled and recovered.
A player's headgear
will explode into blink-
ing lights when there is
a rules infraction.
Ridiculous0 Silly0
Something out of the
Wizard of Oz� Don't
try to sell that to Bob
Kap.
Kap said modern
technology would make
his idea simple.
"Why should the fan
go through all the trou-
ble of having to park
his car, queue up for
food and fight the
crowds when he can get
the same sensation at
home he says.
"We have developed
means for a viewer to
talk back to a TV set.
Third dimension is now
a reality. You will feel
that you can almost
reach out and touch the
players. And the spec-
tators' presence will be
felt at the field through
the small screens.
"When something
good happens, the
screens turn into a
bright glow. When the
fans are unhappy, they
will have a dull, gray
look. The players will
know it. They also will
hear the sounds
Kap said the moder-
nistic game also could
be a financial bonanza
for the NFL.
"Imagine 10 million
people buying season
tickets for $200 he
says. "That's $2
billion. This would be
multiplied many times
over. The NFL could
have its own network.
"That's the Super
Bowl XXXV in year
2000
EDUCATIONAL
CENTER
TEST PREPARATION
SPECIALISTS SINCE 1938
Visit Our Canters
And See For Yourself
Why We Make The Difference
Call Days, Eves & Weekends
For classes in your area, call
919 4898720
Suite 102
Crost Bldg.
2634 Chapel Hill Blvd.
N.OrW�?
Outside NY State ONLY
CALL TOLL FREE
. 800-223-1782
J
Ledoma S. Wright
Cutturxl Center
Jan. 24 8pm
The
Forgotten
American
CBS news produced this documentary about those for-
gotten Americans who have become aliens in their native
land�the American Indians By being alienated in this way.
the American Indian has faced factors of hopelessness and
despair minimal food and housing, inadequate educational
facilities, and limited employment opportunity. More damag-
ing is their loss of identity and self-respect as individuals and
as members of a vanishing and irreplaceable American
culture
The following films complete the Minority Arts Films Series this
semester Check the ENTERTAINMENT each month for details
THE UNQUIET DEATH OF
JULIUS ANO ETHEL ROSENiURG F������v 1
' " THE BUS March 25
ROBERTA FLACK April 1 5
HARLEM RENAISSANCE
JAZZ IS OUR RELIGION May 1
- NOTICE -
TOALL
JUNIORS & SENIORS
ATTENTION: COLLEGE RING PRICE
INCREASE EFFECTIVE ON I 2680
KAPPA
SIGMA
Presents
THE FIRST ANNMJ Al
MISS EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
PAGEANT
Feb. 5th 7:00 p.m.
Wright And.
For information
or applications
Phone 7SS-SS43
If you are thinking about buying a college ring,
we urge you to place your order before January 26,1980.
Our ring manufacturer, Artcarved, has given
us special advanced notice that prices will increase
significantly on both men's and women's gold rings, due to)
the rapidly escalating world gold price.
NOW is the time to order. Prices will increase
anywhere from $25 to $40 for women and$30to$95
for men, depending on style. As your bookstore, we
wanted you to know about this while you could still
benefit- and save. Order Today!
Joseph O. Clark
Manager
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
WRIGHf BUILDING
tt
I
�-�- � Z-i 'sjmf-im
W VVS M "W?Zffl-
�ri.��mma
eff "





12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 22, 1980
Dormitory Competition Initiated
Classified
By RICKI GLIARMIS
Intramural Correspondent
The Intramural-
Recreation Sports
Department has added
a new dimension to its
program. Beginning
this semester, competi-
tion and tournaments
within the residence
halls will be initiated.
This program will be
ihe combined respon-
sibility of the In-
tramural personnel and
the residence hall ad-
ministrators. All out-
door recreational areas
will be available to the
dorms for softball, ten-
nis, volleyball, badmin-
ton, basketball, ar-
chery, and horseshoes.
Swimming pools and
indoor facilities will
also be available for the
students and may be
reserved on a first
come, first serve basis
during available hours.
Other activities in the
planning stages are rac-
quetball tournaments,
pinball competition
and weekly exercise ses-
sions, to name a few.
Sports Medicine
Update
The Intramural
Department is for-
tunate and pleased to
have the following new
trainers on the sports
medicine staff: Jim
Rich, J.R. Titsworth,
and Frank Taltusko.
Rich has several
years of teaching and
athletic training ex-
perience, and he is
beginning his first
semester at East
Carolina. J.R. and
Frank are both
undergraduate students
concentrating in sports
medicine.
With six people now
available in the sports
medicine department,
coverage of activities
will be. expanded,
allowing for optimal
pre-play and injury
care. Remember, train-
ing room hours are
2-3:45 p.m Monday
� Thursday.
Team Handball
Everyone should go
out and enjoy East
Carolina Team Hand-
ball as the ECu team
battles Appalachian
State University, Satur-
day, Feb. 2, at 10:00
a.m. and 8:00 p.m. in
Memorial Gym, and
Sunday, Feb. 3 at 1
p.m. in Memorial
Gym.
East Carolina Rugby
Since its beginning in
1976, the East Carolina
rugby team has grown
to be a major sports
club team. The game
consists of two 40
minute halves with play
stopping only for in-
juries and a five minute
half time. There are 15
men on each side and
two injury substitutes
allowed in each game.
The game could be
described as a cross bet-
ween soccer and foot-
ball. At every match
there are both A and B
matches, which means
everyone plays.
In the past, the East
Carolina Rugby Club
has traveled to the
Bahamas and Florida.
This spring, the club
has an excellent chance
to compete for the
Eastern Collegiate
Championship.
Women's Rugby
The ECU Women's
Rugby team is starting
practice for the Spring
season and is interested
in recruiting new
members. No special
skills are required.
Rugby players come in
all sizes, shapes and
abilities. Students, staff
and faculty are
welcome. They will be
practicing at the Allied
Health fields
Wednesdays and
Thursdays.
Even if you're uncer-
tain about whether or
not you want to play,
or if you're just
curious, please come
out. Rugby is a great
way to get exercise,
meet people, have fun
and release your
frustrations.
For more informa-
tion, call 758-8482.
Intramural Staff
Expands
The Intramural
Department is pleased
to announce the addi-
tion of Duane Grooms
to the recreational
staff. Duane will be
working as a recreation
intern with the depart-
ment and will function
in the same capacity as
the graduate student
assistants.
Tube Basketball
Tube basketball is an
exciting water sport
sponsored by the In-
tramural Department.
The game will be
played with three men
and three women, the
object of the game be-
ing to pass the ball
while sitting in the
tubes and attempting to
work the ball down the
pool and into the goal.
Team members must
remain inside the inner
tubes at all times. If
this sounds interesting
to you, get some
friends and come on
over to the Intramural
department to sign up.
What's Happening
Co-Rec Roller
Hockey is being played
Monday � Thursday,
4-6 p.m at Twin
Rinks. Basketball, with
a total number of 167
teams, is played daily,
3:45-10 p.m in
Memorial Gym. Games
are also scheduled in
Minges, 7:45-11 p.m
whenever possible. Free
play will resume in
these facilities at the
conclusion of the in-
tramural basketball
season.
women for your Co-
Rec Bowling team.
Don't let it slip by!
Racquetball Doubles
competition is also
right around the cor-
ner. Entry deadline is
Thursday, Jan. 31. Call
the IM office for more
information.
Arm Wrestling
Women's arm wrestl-
ing is quite a sight. If
you'd like to watch,
drop by the lobby o
Memorial Gym during
the evenings and watch
the strength techniques
of both men and
women.
You have until
February 7 to round up
two men and two
ysz-
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students For more .ntor nation
call 752 m� and ask to' Brenda
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Lady Pirates Down Apps
Bv JIMMY DuPREE
Assistant Sports Editor
Fast Carolina's Lady
Pirates rallied behind
forwards Kathy Riley
and Rosie Thompson
and guard I ydia Roun-
tree to post their first
NC MAW Division 1
victory of the season,
70-53 over Appalachian
State.
Riley led all scorers
in the contest with 19,
followed by Rountree
with 18 and Thompson
with 16 points and nine
rebounds. Junior
center Marcia Girven
ecA Ve Pirates with
rebounds.
Riley, who sprained
her ankle en route to
Minges Coliseum for
the Saturday game, net-
ted 14 points in the first
half as ECU built to a
42-24 edge with 2:33
before intermission.
ASU's Tiana McEntire
hit a pair of field goals
to the the margin to
45-28 at the half.
East Carolina led by
17 with less than three
minutes elapsed in the
second half, but McEn-
tire hot hand along
with a Pirate drought
allowed the Moun-
taineers to pull within
striking distance at
50-4V wUh 2ia re-
maining.
East Carolina silenc
ed the comeback effort
as ASU turned the ball
over to the Lady Bucs
on five successive trips
down the floor. The
Mountaineers were
plagued by turnovers
thoughout the evening,
recording 36 on the
night.
"We're disappointed
because we played so
well against Carolina
Wednesday com-
mented ECU coach
Cathy Andruzzi. "We
want to play that well
all the time. We missed
a lot of the shots we
should have made.
"UycJia had a great
game for us�she kept
us in the game in the se-
cond half
Laurie Sikes, a
junior from Marietta,
Ga dished out a game-
high 13 assists while
quarterbacking the
ECU fast break with
looping passes.
The win evens the
Lady Pirates'
NCA1AW record at
1-1, including an early
loss to Duke at
Cameron Indoor
Stadium.
ASU (53)
Horton 1 0-0 2,
Weast 3 1-2 7, Higgen-
botham 1 2-2 16. Fousi
2 2-2 6, Loy 0 0-0 0,
Hampton 1 1-2 3,
Cameron 1 1-3 3,
McEntire 6 2-4 14, Lar-
rimore 0 0-1 0, Hiltz 1
0-0 2, Smith 0 0-1 0.
Totals 22 9-17 53.
ECU (70)
Thompson 7 2-4 16,
Riley 7 5-9 19, Girven 2
0-1 4, Rountree 9 0-1
18, Sikes 1 3-4 5, Owen
1 2-4 4, Barnes 0 0-1 0,
Moodv 0 1-3 1, Hooks
0 1-21, Denkler02-22.
Totals 27 16-31 70.
Halftime: ECU 45,
ASU 28. Eouled out:
McEntire. Total fouls:
ECU 17, ASU 26.
Te�ttn icais:
A-300.
FREE
EAR PIERCING
$2.00 Off
Reg. Price of any
Ear Piercing
Earrings
Your Diamond
Earring Store
THE
PIERCED EAR
Pitt Plaza
Offer Good Thru
2280
The Judaic Collection
of the
North Carolina
Museum of Art
Feb.1-28
Antique - Comtemporarypieces
Including textiles, bronzes, brasses,
and silver.
� Feb. 5
7pm- bagels and lo
7:30 pin- (lecture)
Dr. Abraham knof
(Major Contributor and Curator of collection
Multipurpose Km.
Mendenhall Student (enter
Student Union Art Exhibition Committee

Hut
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Making our pizza by hand really
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2601 E. 10th Street 305 Greenville Boulevard
752-4445
L
752-4320
One coupon per party per visit at participating Pizza Hut � restaurant Offer good on regular menu
only, throui
Feb. 3,1980.
Cash redemption value l20f. �1980. pj, HutP,
prtrea �
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i
i
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"�





Gymnasts
Derailed
C HAND&�HARLES
Sports Editor
A couple of "trouble
Npots" derailed the
Easl Carolina gym-
nastics team Friday as
it fell to Georgia Col-
lege 115.5-109.4 in
lmges Coliseum.
"We had some trou-
ble spots on the bar and
balance beam said
ECU coach Jon Rose.
"If we had cleaned up,
we probably would
have won
The Pirates were not
without outstanding in-
dividual performances,
though, as Cindy
Rogers. Elizabeth
Jackson and Susan
McKnight all had good
evenings.
In the floor exercises,
Rogers placed second
with an 8.0 mark.
Mcknight and Jackson
finished third and
fourth with 7.85 and
7.65 scores, respective-
ly
On the balance beam
the Pirates could do no
better than Rogers'
fourth place mark of
6.65. Jackson was the
only other ECU per-
former to place at 6.55.
McKnight was the
sole Pirate to place on
the uneven bars with a
6.55 score.
Kim Lowe tied for
third in the vaulting
competition with a 7.6
mark.
"I'm still looking for
a team score of 118
Rose said. "If we can
get that, we'll be tough
to beat
ECU, 2-5 on the
season, hosts Western
Carolina and
Longwood College in
Minges Friday at 7
p.m and Rose says he
is confident about the
outcome. "If we per-
form to our potential
we should be able to
handle them he said.
"A key for us though
is attendance Rose
continued. "We had
300 people at our last
home match and that
really helped. I hope
the crowd will be even
better this time
The Sharp-Shooter
THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 22, 1980 13
ORANGE JULIUS
Carolina East Mall
2 for 1 Sale
On Reg. Price
Hot Dog with coupon
offer expires
Jan. 31,1980 We sell Oscar Meyer Hot Dogs
ECU's Herb Knisen (R) Fires Shot At Surprised George Maynor (L)

NBA Standings
Philadel
Boston
New
Washing
New
At lanla
San
Houston
Indiana
CI e s e I a n
Detroit
Eastern Conference
Atlantic Division
W L Pel. OB
Phia 35 II .761
34 12 .739 I
York 22 27 449 14-
ton 20 25 .444 14
Jersey 9 29 .396 17
Central Division
28 21 .571
Antonio 25 24 .510 3
23 24 .489 4
22 25 .468 5
J 21 28 .429 7
13 35 .271 14'
Western Conference
Midwest Division
Kansas Cily 30 21
Milwaukee 27 23
Chicago 6 3)
Denver 17 34
Utah 15 35
Pacific Division
Seattle J6 ,3
Los Angeles 34 15
Phoenix 32 17
San Diego 27 25
Portland 24 27
Golden State 15 33
Late game not included
.588
540
.340
333
.300
.735
694
653
.519
.471
312
2
12
13
14
2
4
10
13
20
Hurry, we cant
start without you
Monday's
New York at I on Angeles, (n)
Tuesday's
Houston at Boston
Washington at Cleveland
San Diego at San Antonio
Detroit at Chicago
Atlanta al Kansas City
Milwaukee at Utah
Came
G a m c s
Wednesday's
Seattle at Atlanta
Boston at Detroit
San Diego at Houston
San Antonio at Indiana
Cleveland at New Jersey
Philadelphia at Denver
New York al Phoenix
Milwaukee at Golden Stale
Games
Now is the time to get involved. The Student Union will be
accepting applications for the following positions on the
following dates.
Student Union President Nov. 2fVJan 16
Student Union Committee Chairperson Jan I8-Feb I
Student Union Committee Members Feb.4-Feb. 18
The Student Union is responsible for sponsoring social
recreational. Tine arts, visual arts and cultural presentations '
tor you, the entire University community. There are many
events going on, and lots of places to go .
come on, join in 3ES
m
HELP US
STRIKE OUT
BIRTH DEFECTSl
MARCH
OF DIMES
Freshman gymnast Lisa Redfern
THIS SPACE C-GNTn,rjrE0
BY THE PUBLISHER
r
1
1
1
!
I
I
I
I
I
ECU, buy a single
hamburger at regular price J
get another for I
SPORTSWORLD
COLLEGE NIGHT
Tuesday Night
6:30-10:00
Bring I. D. and
Get In For Only $1.25
mm
i;rti:�
11
plus tax'
I
Cheese and tomato extra
Offer expires Jan. 31, 19801
Good at participating Wendy's
in Raleigh, Durham, Wilmington,
Goldsboro, Greenville and Jacksonville
RUSH
Sigma Phi
Epsilon
8:30 p.m.
: Monday
�JTuesday
�Wednesday
i 505 C. 5th. Street
Beer Served
Call for a ride 752-2941
The Marathon Restaurant says
"Welcome Back Students"
To Show Our Appreciation
To Our Old and New Customers,
All Soft Drinks are
Vz Price This Month,
Come In and Try Our
Delicious Steak Sandwiches.
Marathon Restaurant
560 Evans St.
GOLD BEADS
3 mm
4 mm
5 mm
7 mm
75C each-14 karat
$1.64 each-14 karat
$2.76 each-14 karat
$3.95 each-14 karat
Many sizes and colored beads also
available.
Chain sold by inch.
J.D. DAWSONCO.
2818 E. 10th St.
Greenville, NX.
71 -252-1600





14 THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 22. 1980
ECU Grapplers
' Steer' Ahead
By ED WILLIAMS
Staff Writer
When you think of the word "steers what
comes to mind? The "steering" of a car,
perhaps? Or maybe something that guides or
directs0
To the East Carolina wrestling team, "Steers"
means first-year head coach Ed Steers, and he is
the one who "guides and directs" the wrestlers.
In the past two years, the ECU wrestling squad
had won a total o' only four dual matches. This
year alone they are 2-1 in these matches, as well as
having two highly-ranked individuals in Butch
Revils and D.T. Joyner. Steers' guidance and
direction is a main reason for the eomback of the
Pirate grapplers.
Steers wrestled in high school at Silver Springs,
Maryland, then moved to the Citadel for college
competition. While there he was a three-time
Southern Conference wrestling champion and
was undefeated in dual matches.
from there he moved on to become an assistant
head coach at William and Mary from 1968 to
1970. "Then 1 went into the Army for two
wars Steers said, "where I was all-Army
wrestling coach
After he was discharged from the Army in
1972, Steers went back to William and Mary,
where he became head coach in 1973, replacing
Dick Besnier, who had resigned.
In 1979. the head wrestling coach position
became open at ECU. Steers applied and got the
job.
Steers said he feels that he wanted to coach at
ECU because he could "accomplish more in my
life at East Carolina 'han at William and Mary.
"1 felt like we had gotten as high as we could at
William and Mary he continued. "I always saw
an attitude that East Carolina wanted to grow
and improve in everything that they're doing. I
warned a situation where I could grow and reach
for excellence. 1 was reaching for it at William
and Mary, but I feel that I have a better chance
here
Steers commented that his high school coach
helped to orient him towards sports, academics,
and personal-life goals. He feels that he is "at a
better position to do thai sort of thing here than I
was at William and Marv
In reference to the differences in the two
schools' wrestling programs. Steers said,
" 1 here's much more of a rebuilding process to be
done here than I had at William and Mary.
"The last two years have been really rough for
the (ECU) wrestling program he said. "We're
looking towards improving that. We've got to
rebuild with what we've got and get a continuous
strong recruiting process to build it (the wrestl-
ing program) back up to where it was and
hopefully higher
Steers said recruiting was "a little tough
because I didn't get the job until June, but we
managed to bring in a couple of good kids
Steers specifically mentioned John Brennan
and Grey Sours as making significant contribu-
tions in their first year on the Pirate squad.
One of the first things that needed to be done to
begin rebuilding the Pirates was to set a number
of goals, according to Steers.
"We wanted to have a good show in the Wilkes
Open, which is the Rose Bowl of wrestling. And
we wanted just to win as many of the duals as
possible. We want to win the Eastern Regionals,
and, realistically, 1 feel we can have a few people
go to the Nationals
If two wrestlers individually place in the Na-
tionals, then the team could possibly end up in the
top 25 in Division I of the NCAA, according to
Steers.
Steers admitted to placing his goals a little
higher than he can realistically get, but that the
team is "right on schedule" in attaining them this
year.
To help the team reach those lofty goals, Steers
does one particular thing a little differently than
other wrestling coaches.
"We have two practices in the afternoon he
said. "They're duplications of each other.
They're around two hours long. And our guys
can come to one or the other, which helps you get
a quicker, harder workout and helps me give each
individual a lot more attention. Also, this leaves
the opening for a highly-inspired person to come
to two
Steers turned his attention to the team by say-
ing, "I'm really pleased with the effort the guys
are giving now. I wish there was a way to give
them all the credit that they deserve because
they're really working hard.
"The nucleus of our team has been involved
with this sport and working hard ever since like
the twenty-ninth of August. And there's about
eight guys that didn't get hardly any Christmas
break. They went straight on through. They've
been working really riaret ami tnrsrtrrer Thetr gut.
They deserve a lot of credit
But then again, so does Coach Ed Steers.
SPECIAL SEMESTER MEMBERSHIPS
are available Now for Spring Semester
and can save you money
think about it
These special semester memberships
are $10.00
and will be available TuesWed.and Thurs.
From 1:00p.m. until 4:00p.m.
and Nightly from 8:00p.m. until 9:00 p.m.
thru Jan. 31st
We encourage you to take advantage of this
special offer. - It only happens
once a semester.
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TONIGHT
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Title
The East Carolinian, January 22, 1980
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 22, 1980
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.32
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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