The East Carolinian, January 17, 1980






�lje iJzust GLataliman
Vol. 54 No
3"K
12 Pages
Thursday, January 17, 1980
(Greenville, N.C.
Circulation 10,000
WECU-FM Gets FCC License
John Jeter, station manager of WECU
Photo b Kip Sloan
By ROBERT M.SWAIM
WECU General Manager John
Jeter announced yesterday that the
long awaited WECU-FM broadcast
license has been issued by the
Federal Communications Commis-
sion in Washington, D.C.
Jeter said that on Mondav he
telephoned the office of Con-
gressman Walter Jones, who was
asked to intervene on behalf of
WECU several months ago, to in-
quire about he progress of the
license application.
Then on Tuesday Jeter received a
call from Congressman Jones office
informing him that the license had
been granted that day. Jeter was
told that the license would be mailed
"in a couple of days
"It's definitely been approved
and granted said Jeter. "It is due
in the mail any day now
According to Jeter, the Media
Board will meet today to release the
WECU budget which has been
frozen pending approval of the
license application.
Jeter's efforts to obtain an FM
license for WECU took a year and a
half of research and long unexplain-
ed delays.
The original license application
was filed on June 6, 1978. In May of
1979 an amendment to that applica-
tion was filed in ordc to allow the
station to increase power.
Jeter said that the first step in get-
ting the station ready for broad-
casting is getting new equipment.
The ECU purchasing office is ex-
pected to begin accepting bids on
the equipment very soon, Jeter said.
The estimated cost of the equipment
is $27,000.
An additional $3,000 will be spent
on renovating and refurnishing the
studios, including the control room,
news room and production room,
according to Jeter.
Before the WECU tower can be
placed on top of Tyler dorm the
original architects of the dorm will
have to be consulted and will have
to confirm that placement of the
tower on the dorm would be safe.
Jeter said this was being done at the
insistance of the administration.
The purchase, installation and
testing of the new equipment will
take about two months.
"The station should be on the air
by the third week of March said
Jeter.
Once the station is on the air it
will broadcast album rock and ja7
on an 80-20 ratio.
News, including local reporting.
United Press International, and
possibly network news will be
broadcast everv hour.
SGA Plans To
Meet With HEW
Bv TERRY CRAY
staff Wriler
Student government association
presidents from universities across
North Carolina will meet with HEW
officials soon to discuss the
egregation case now pending
tinst the UNC system, said N.C.
Stale Universit) SGA President
I.I). Hayworth Wednesday.
The SGA presidents have suc-
ceeded in setting up a Jan. 30 au-
dience -vith Jeff Champagne, direc-
tor of HEW's Office of Civil Rights
after eight months of lobbying
through the UNC Association of
Student Governments (UNCASG)
and North Carolina congressmen,
said Hayworth.
Hayworth cited a "lack of stu-
dent input into a case which will af-
fect students' lives" as the purpose
of the meeting.
The court battle began in early
1979 when the UNC system refused
to meet federal guidelines to further
desegregation in some of its univer-
sities. Although the number of
black students enrolled in the
system's M predominantly white in-
stitutions more than doubled bet-
ween 1973 and 1978, Washington
officials charged that North
Carolina had not done enough to
desegregate.
Former HEW Secretary Joseph
Califano said the system was still
"fundamentally segregated citing
figures which showed that less than
seven percent of the students atten-
ding the predominantly white
schools were black and less than 10
percent of the students attending the
system's five predominantly black
schools were white.
Hayworth charged that the
federal government "has overstep-
ped its boundaries" and has been
"downright arrogant" in its
response to the requests of the
students to have their opinions
heard in an official setting.
Hayworth said that he has led the
effort to set up the meeting, adding
that the former SGA president at
N.C. State first wrote to HEW
about the matter last spring.
"They declined to hear us, and
they later told people from Pem-
broke State (Lumberton) that they
had been forbidden to discuss the
case
The 16-campus UNC system
stands to lose some of the $89
million in federal funds it receives
annually if the matter is not settled
to the satisfaction of HEW. Federal
money accounts for about one-
seventh of the $634 million the col-
leges spent in 1978, but state of-
ficials fear also that the controversy
will portray North Carolina as
obstinate and segregationalist.
Specifically, the UNC system
refused to honor HEW's suggestion
that similar programs at neighbor-
ing campuses in the state be
eliminated to increase desegrega-
tion.
"I'm not a states-righter or a
George Wallacite or a racist, but I
think that both black and white
students in North Carolina are con-
cerned about what is happening here
and want to preserve their right to
choose schools Hayworth said.
Hayworth added that he and
others have had three meetings with
UNC President William Friday, and
that the UNC administration has
been "most helpful But he
that the SGA presidents are
"mouthpieces" for the
ministrators, noting that
students have ideas of their
about the dispute.
Of the five predominantly black
schools in the system, only three
See HEW Page 2, Col. 5
ECU Student
Dies
in Traffic Mishap
An ECU student, Edgar Jones,
21, died due to injuries resulting
from a car crash at 11:50 p.m
December 31. Jones was the son of
Mr. and Mrs. J.R. Jones of
Washington, North Carolina.
According to Highway Patrol
Trooper R.G. Mills, Jones was
driving an estimated
speed of 70 to 80 miles per hour
when he ran off the right side of the
road on a curve. Trooper Mills also
stated that the car was apparently
out of control when it overturned
and struck a tree, the impact cutting
the vehicle in half. Also according
to Mills, Jones was heading north
returning to Washington from a
party in Greenville. "Apparently,
he was going from one party to
another, and trying to make it to the
second one before midnight
Trooper Mills stated.
Edgar Jones lived in a house on
Fourth Street with six other
students. One of his roommates,
Thomas McCarley, offered com-
ment about Jones. "He was a real
fine fellow kind of quiet, but he
didn't party a lot. He liked to stay in
his room and study or read his
books, but he was a real fine
fellow Mike Farmer, another
roommate, said, "He was a very
unique fellow; he cared a lot about
other people
Jones was an English major at
ECU and a very good student. A
friend and graduate student, Tim
Wright, said, "He was an excellent
student. We traded books and
albums a lot. He liked contem-
porary novels. He liked to talk
about what he'd read. He was a real
laid back fellow, never got mad. It
took a while for it to hit me, you
know. It's his absence that I
notice
said
not
ad-
the
own
Klan Leader Arrested
For Cross Burning
Reception To Be Held
By DEBORAH HOTALING
Assistant News Editor
A reception for the North
Carolina Student Legislature will be
held Jan. 24 at 7:00 p.m. in the
Multipurpose Room, Mendenhall.
East Carolina delegation
chairperson Anne Northington in-
vites all interested students to the
reception. "The Poli-Sci depart-
ment, faculty and the city council
are also invited. We would like to
see faster communication with the
deans and city council. That's why
we are urging all interested persons
to come
The reception will include the Stu-
dent Legislature compendium which
is put out every year as a way of in-
forming students as to how other
students are speaking out on the
issues. One of the issues to be
debated is whether or not the North
Carolina school system should be
allowed to cut its own budget.
Northington explains the reason
for the compendium being included
in the reception. "Each school gets
so many compendiums. We decided
it would be better to give our com-
pendium in person. Each school
delegation has been invited from
across the state, and we're hoping
for a good turn-out
The East Carolina delegation to
the North Carolina Student
Legislature will be traveling to
Greensboro College this weekend
for debate on several resolutions.
These resolutions include: 1)
Budgetary limitations in regard to
the UNC school system; 2)Rights of
Iranian students to the freedom of
peaceful protests while residing in
the Unite J States; 3)Resolution call-
ing for ratification of SALT II; 4)
Resolution for increasing the use of
nuclear power as a safe and reliable
energy resource; 5) Resolution to
raise the marriage license fee to fund
a spouse-abuse, center; and
6)Resolution to provide funding for
UNC system professors to attend
professional meetings.
Inside Today
Puffed Wheat
CigarettesUp 3
Rebel announces
Art show winnersPage 6
Lady Pirates
Defeat UNCPage 10
A Look At "RadarPage 10
J
LINCOLNTON, N.C. (AP) �
Virgil Griffin, grand dragon of the
North Carolina Knights of the Ku
Klux Klan, was arrested Tuesday
night in connection with a cross bur-
ning in Lincoln County.
Griffin, 35, was charged with
reckless driving and aiding and abet-
ting a cross burning. He was releas-
ed shortly after the incident under
$5,000 bond.
Lincoln County Detective L.C.
Underwood said an off-duty prison
guard was on his way home when he
saw two men run to a car after set-
ting fire to a cross on the lawn of
William and Diane Ingle, near
Boger City.
Underwood said the guard
recognized one of the men as Mark
Jeffrey Sherer, a man who served
time in prison for armed robbery.
The guard followed the two men
and radioed a local REACT
emergency team for help. The
REACT team in turn notified both
Lincolnton city police and Lincoln
County officers who took Griffin
and Sherer into custody about five
miles from the cross burning.
Underwood said Griffin was driv-
ing the car.
He said officers confiscated two
.44-caliber pistols, a sawed-off
shotgun and a .22-caliber automatic
rifle. Underwood said all the
weapons were loaded and there were
boxes of ammunition in the car.
Underwood said Sherer, 19, is
charged with burning a cross and
possession of a firearm by a felon.
The detective said Sherer could
receive one to five years in prison
for cross burning if convicted.
Sherer is in the Lincoln County
jail under $6,500 bond.
Underwood said Sherer currently
is on parole for a Dec. 15, 1977,
conviction in Mecklenburg Superior
Court for armed robbery.
Both men were to make an initial
appearance in court today.
CORRECTION
In the interview with Iranian
students, it has come to our atten-
tion that one comment was deleted.
It was printed that the United States
had attacked Oman, but the person
interviewed actually said that there
was a United States military base
established in Oman to control the
Persian Gulf.
Unexpected warm weather brings students to the maH.
t
4






THE EAST CAROL INIAN
JANUARY 17, 1980
Announcements
Ski Snowshoe
Spring Break March 4 14
Options Son si edit
I redit I'lOl 101)0 PHVI II0
Includes: Slopcsidc aetomodalions
lilt tickets, lessons, and equipment
(. im Pa according to package
(. Ofltacl Mis lo Sauiuletv n
Memorial (.ain, Kooni 205, ot cal
'57 NIOt)
SI! Kntertainer
I he student I nion is now accepting ap
ideations foi Major Attractions
.hairperson and ntertainci chairnci
ns nitcrcslcd pei sons should pick
ip applications in the Student t nion
Room ;u. Mcndcnhall Stu
km i cntei ppheations musi he puk
,i up hs I iid.i. Ian is. iso
Major Attractions
Studenl I nion Maioi Mtraetions
i ommiltce will meet ruesday, Ian
J 00 p in ni Room 2M ol
Mcndcnhall student C entci Ml
Bed ' ' attend
Poetrv
1 he last Carolina Poetrj I orum smII
hold a rcgulai woikshop and meeting
on Ihursdav. Ian I at H IN) p in in
Room 24K McndcnhaH I he puhlu. is
otdialK un itcd
Ski
ECGC
i in luesdas. I.in 22. at 5:00 p.m the
l .isi Carolina Cias lommunily ssill
leature a jtuci spcaket al win I Ninth
street (the Ncuman House) Brothci
i ovinos Mill xptik on e.i retreats and
Ming week ilte
ia will I 1.1 a hinlul.is pans flu-
I ('(I
MSI
I lie North C arolma si udenl
laturc will meet tonight al 7 no
� m al NK ndenhatl in Room 221
- lo he discussed ssill he iliis nion
I c and the legislative reception lo
he held Jan 2' ll members should al
Organizations
ll organizations Mhich haven'l tilled
.nit a registration form should go b the
i the nee v haneelloi 's lot stu
denl affairs m 2'U Whichard The
(ration i foi the organizations
director) I1 � �; organizations which
Jo noi �. i ui he able
,ampu .irid will not he in the
alt tiloe
a rat ion
lortit . d ill i- Ian 2 It iltc
deadln ihe information
in the organi al ri
Kamih Child Assoc.
�ill meet
lai
l Room
v
people
10 .Hlcnd
Brotherhood Weed
n! iik will he observed in
I avetleville, I eb 10 I lvwi I he
I as cites die Human Relations dvisor
mission .mJ Department will
ire a special program on Sunday.
1 eb 10. I "WO � m in the
loi luin. on the campus
� I iv el lei die Stale I nivcrsilv
Guest speakei will he Ihe Honorable
Wallace I) Muhammad. I eadei o) the
World I i

have done
d ol human
v 11'l I Inez
I :
VI
: loens, essay - and
Aha! Bi
ski Massannulien, lanuarv 25 I lie
price is S44 25 with youl own equip
inent Without soui .ssn equipment n
is Sf2 2' I he equipment is 4 pel dav,
Ihe llll is ).l(s pel d.is and Ss al nielli
Room lent is S2n lot two nights I here
's a mandaioiv meeting in Memorial
livnion lucsdav, I.in 22 at 4 p in lot
those who plan lo go i .ill "2 '2X lot
tnlot mation
Art Business
"Interview rechntques, Resume
Writing and Portfolio Preseniation" is
the look ol ihe third Business ol n
Seminal ol the IV7S so school ycai
I lie seminal will he conducted b 1i
I nines lames, direct Ol ol the It I
P icement Office, and Mrs Dot Naltci
held, . ni theommumcation rts
Dcparimcni ol the School ol n. on
the evening ol fucsday, Ian 22. at 7
p m in Ihe lenkins udlloi nun il
students preparing lo siitei ihe proles
sional job maikei in the ncai future
should lake advat tagt ol ihis I Kl I
seminal sponsored hi the I t I Punt
l i iHip
RAPE SEMINAR
seminai on "How l oon ici a
Kapist designed loi law enforcement
olficers, emergency room nurses,
medical personnel and others will he
sponsored Ian 21 22 hs the last
i arohna I niversit) police department.
ni the puhlu tnteresi
"less crimes have motivated the
merican puhlu lo wanl to .ismsi and
�opei.lie with iass enforcement ol
ficers more ' he crimes of rape
and sexual assault ihe setninai spon
s.Ms s.l.J
I aw en I officers are
tremendously frustrated in mans
aspects ol ihis type ol crime (often)
it becomes ihe responsibility of the law
enforcement officet nol .nils to solve
� . . Ii k Is prepare ihe
ise lot court lhev added
l)i los s stu.iu. n.iiioualls known
authoritv in the field and loundei and
directot ol ihe Rape risis Education
and Research Centet and Sexual
ssauli Ireaimenienter, will conduct
ihe seminai Sessions will he from
a m to 4 so p m in the Willis Bide .
f-irsl and Reade Streets, Greenville
I urthet informalion mas he obtained
Irom I rancis bdd lit Police
Department, 757-6l5t. oi through ihe
PIN i Police Inlormai s �ork) by
calling the I 1 police department
I J , initial
open i all law ei
i pre
PHI ALPHA THETA
On Ihursdav, Ian 17, there will be a
meeting ol Phi Alpha Thcia History
Honor Sosieis at 7:30 p.m. in the
Manuscript Collection located in
loynei I iht.uv. Room li Featured at
this meeting will he a slide presentation
inscii hv Mr Donald I ennon. Dues lot
ol the I C I Manuscript t olleclion,
concerning the nature ol archival and
manuscript preservation Ml members
arc teqtnieil to attend. Ihis presema
lion is open 10 the pttblis Ml sistlors
are welcome lo attend.
RUGBY
Ruehv practice has now slatted lot all
interested persons al 4 00 p m lues
through I Inns "here will he an
organizational meeting Ian. 22 at 7 to
p in . Room (U Memorial Gym New
members are welcome
PAIN RELIEF
Do sou want teliet ol pain? Ihe
Department ol Physical lherapv.
School ol Mlied Health and Social Pro.
fessions, is testiiiting volunteers lo pat
tisipate in a research project, lot lur
thei information on hoss you s.in he a
subject lo relieve pain, conlacl the
Departmenl of Physical lherapv "s
sestet.ns or Paul 1uipln al hM
PHYSICS
will
Ihe Society ol Physics Studenl
hold a meeting on ruesday, Ian 22. a
7 JO p in m I �ol of the Physic-
Building Ml members should plan ti
attend since plans svill he made concet
nine Ihe forthcoming trip lo the shar
ton Harris nuclear power plant.
PAPER MAKING
Ihe Student Union Ml I xhibinon
Committee is sponsoring a paper mak
ing workshop to he held on campus
Ian i and again on Ian IX from one
to lout p ni II interested, students
should sign up in ihe Programs Office,
Mcndcnhall Registration tee is one
dollar, tills, cents
BILLIARDS
Sign up todav lot the MSt handicap
hilliatds league al Mcndcnhall billiards
ccntci (ici a discount n ihe ptisc ot
plav I opines arc awarded lor various
achievements Ihe organizational
meeting will he held al Ihe Hilliatds
C enler on Ian 2S al fvOO p m
GAMMA BETA PHI
(lamina Beta Phi will meet Ihursdav.
I.in 17, al 7 00 p m in Room 244.
Mcndcnhall
Models Needed
Models are needed lot figure drawing
classes lot Ihe spring semester, f acitltv
members who should he contacted hv
applicants are: C larence Morgan,
lenkins 215a; Wesley C i.iwles. lenkins
1340; Iran Cioidls. lenkins 1307; Ras
hlmore, lenkins 215; and George
I).inheres, Jenkins 12.1 Students should
he apptosed hv anv of these stall
members
POETRY
NTE
1 he Nal una fcachet I - an i
iS 11 i ssiii be given ai the 1
i entei Saturday. I eb lh
Scores from ihe examinations are us
cd hs states tot teachei certification, by
school systems foi selection and iden
lificalton of leadership qualities and hv
olleges and universities as part of then
graduation requirements
Bulletins describing registration pro
cedures and enclosing regisira
forms are available Horn the It I
resting Center, 10? Speight Building.
III. Greenville. N i 27834
Persons wishin) I i
� Jan 23
TYPIST
Means
lo lh
puhlu is tm
attend
� � 6 M'plv
in the Bik �, Publtca
tions Center, M w from one lo three
No experience necessary
'Not too
long ago
I was
speechless.
Now
I'm teaching
Ben
how to talk:
i onaId Stevenson
Don Stevenson
had cancer of the larynx
voice box). He's now
cured and talking aain.
And helping other
people who had the
same cancer learn how
to talk again.
Cancer of the
larynx is one of the
most treatable cancers.
If discovered in time,
9 out of 10 patients are
curable. Of these, two-
thirds learn to speak
again, thanks to a
rehabilitation program
of the AX.S. Early
detection and prompt
treatment can save your
life and your voice.
plaza
cinema P2'3
PITT-PLAZA SHOPPING CENTER
Held Over
5th Fun Week
STEVE
MARTIN
ihe jerk
Fvnshows
3:00-5:00-7:00-9:00
have been active in the
efforts of the UN-
CASG to be heard in
Washington, said
Hayworth. "But we're
trying to keep them fur-
ther informed he
said.
The court fight pro-
mises to be drawn out
and expensive, with
teams of lawyers from
UNC, HEW and the
Justice Department
contesting the case.
As of Oct. 23, 1979,
North Carolina had
already paid out
$381,284 to a
Washington law firm,
and in a recent inter-
view, ECU Chancellor
Thomas Brewer
predicted that the case
could drag on for three
years and cost the
state's taxpayers as
much as $1.3 million in
legal fees.
Jennifer Salinger, an
East Carolina Universi-
ty graduate who is now
the assistant to the
secretary of education
at HEW, was in-
strumental in arranging
the meeting, according
to Hayworth.
New Kennedy Study
RALEIGH, N.C.
(AP) � A Research
Triangle Park scientist
says a computer
simulation he con-
ducted shows Sen. Ed-
ward M. Kennedy's car
was traveling faster
the car at various
speeds, taking into ac-
count such factors as
the type of car, the
angle of inclination of
the bridge, the height
of the wooden curb, the
distance the car travel-
than he reported when ed and the approximate
it ran off the Chappa- position in which it
quiddick Island bridge
in 1969.
Raymond McHenry,
a specialist in the
analysis of automobile
accidents, said Tuesday
he performed the
simulation last month
at the request of
Reader's Digest
magazine.
His study placed the
speed of Kennedy's car
at between 30 miles per
hour and 38 miles per
hour. Kennedy testified
during an inquest into
the death of Mary Jo
Kopechne, who drown-
ed in the accident, that
he was going about 20
mph.
McHenry said he
simulated the path of
came to rest under
water.
"Since there is no
reason for him to have
been watching his
speedometer, I can't
realy comment on
whether there was any
deliberate attempt to
underestimate the
speed McHeim said.
"I'm sure the reason
for the interest in this is
political, but I have
tried to avoid getting
into the political
aspects
Kennedy's campaign
manager, Stephen
Smith, disputed the
study Monday, citing
Kenned testimony,
Massachusetts Motoi
Vehicle registrv inspec
tor's determination
that the vehicle speed
was 20 mph to 22 mph.
acceptance of Ken
nedy's testimonj b the
inquest judge and
private studv sup;
ting Kennedy'
testimony.
THURSDAY NITE JAN. 17
a t
It l I'octts fi'tuni meets Ian I" jl S
pm in Mcndenhall 211 flic puhlu
.itul interested parties are welcome
Please attend!
FELLOWSHIP
IV you ' ise questions without answers
about stu� you are and where you're
going, about life uJ.is and situations
sse face? tome lien .nul barken 10
Htblis.il iitiths ih.it will eise sun the
answers sim need I mos fellowship
and fun with Knsk t lunch Studenl
fellowship on Wednesday sal " iki r m
221 Mcndenhall Kveryone is
SK.N LANGUAGE
fhe 1 C I s . � I ,r auatclub ssill have
ihe in -i meel . 1480 I hursdas.
Ian I al JOp tin in Brewstet H ;iu
fl - t .ill pi �ns interested
deal awareness, n in
it pi � nji (hen sign language skills h
.iss.v - deaf studenls and sign
language students )�'� thi not need
be abk to sign lo oin the Sign
Ig I ' � , . lies planned tor
the Spnne sfmcstei include tirsi ol
the se.r parts on Ian 18; participation
m Speech .md Hearing Symposium
tleh 24 21. performance hs Sign
t .menage Musual Interpretation
C'loup. jnia-a. . .
Maior prsijeets of the slub will in
elude IVaf wafenc5x Week al 1(1
and a t icUf trip lo GaMaudei (
(Washington; D.C.) In Apnl rhe club
meets every other rhursday in Brewstet
H risi Ml students, faculty. and
Greenville residents are united
OPENINGS
1 ss.i j.is iudeni representative (obsare
open Vpplicaticms are being taken in
the SCiA office in Mcndenhall until
. i 2 Screenings ssill be done on
Monday, lanuary 2s al foul fifteen
p in
I1
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I
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ORANGE JULIUS
Carolina East Mall
2 For 1 Sale
On any reg. price
Julius Drink with
this coupon
Offer expires Jan.31,1980
We sell Oscar Mayer Hot Dogs
Allan Handelman's
T.V. Show
will be taped
Mark Dillard from Atlantic,
Atco, and Virgin Records as
well as other very interesting
people and YOU are invited to
discuss MUSIC of the '80's.
THE COMPLETE
STUDENT
ALL YOU CAN EAT
SPECIALS
4 oo a oo pm
SALAD�50� EXTRA
ASST. VAR.
PIZZA
ONLY
$
1
99
TUE.
WITH FRIES & COLESLAW
FRIED
CHICKEN
WITH GARLIC BREAD
ITALIAN
ONLY
$199
1
WED.
ONLY
WITH FRIES i OLE SLAW
FRIED
FISH.
ONLY
$199
1
FRI.
Magazines and
Paperback Books
752-7649
STARTS FRIDAY
TTS NOT THE SIZE
THAT COUNTS"
What you
think its
about
its
about!

American Cancer Society
UPOQOOO pnfkt lighting cancer
�SSCXK01SK �MSfMHHCOOS
FUN SHOWS
Motif ri: 7:05 and 9:00 p.m
Sal-Sun: 3:15- 7:05 - 9:00 p.m
0�f
M � R
SUGG
Hf TAIL
Records and
Tapes
gsSsfsi
Up
To
8
rwha s the easiest way to complete pour
plans�no matter what youe pa c'
By making one convenient trip tc �
Kroger Sav-on where you II ' z
everything from apple cider to ?ra"s stor
radios to footballs and more a a
cost cutter prices No matte' mrhel �-
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REFRESHING
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$
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1?$388
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& Rhine
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From
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Each
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Little Debbie Snack Cakes & Archway Cookii
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COUCH P�C�
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ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Each of thM �dvftiMd Items Is required to be readily available for
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Smoke It
Or Eat It?
B JOHN C. EAGAN
�.s�K'iated Press Writer
SAN FRANCISCO
(AP) � A new non-
tobacco cigarette made
of puffed wheat, cocoa
bean husks, citrus and
molasses went on the
market this week with
the blessings of a
medical expert who
as it could help curb
heart disease.
"There are 50
million smokers in this
country, and we can
certainly help a lot of,
them quit or greatly
reduce their consump-
tion of cigarettes said
I ee I Donna, board
c hair m an of the
manufacturer. Interna-
tional Brands Inc. of
suburban I os Altos.
The nes smokes �
claimed to be the first
ma-marketed, mass-
pr oduced non-tobacco
cigarettes � do not
carry the familiar
surgeon general's
health warning because
they contain no tobac-
co. Nor are they subject
to the heavy tax levied
against tobacco pro-
ducts.
Danna discussed the
firm's new product,
called "Free at a
news conference Tues-
day. He was accom-
panied by Dr. Donald
C. Harrison, the chief
of cardiology at Stan-
ford University School
of Medicine who is a
consultant to Interna-
tional Brands.
"I'm against smok-
ing in its fullest ex-
tent said Harrison,
"but 1 have patients
who won't quit
Harrison said that
nicotine-laced tobacco
causes cardiovascular
diseases that kill about
2U0.000 people a year.
He said about 20
million Americans suf-
fer from cardiovascular
disease.
"Ninety percent of
the smokers want to
quit, but only 20 per-
cent do � about the
same percentages as for
heroin addiction
Harrison said.
The new cigarettes
still have about 3 to 4
milligrams of tar,
about the same as low-
tar tobacco cigarettes,
Harrison said. That
means that they still
pose a cancer threat.
"Free" cigarettes,
which come in regular
or menthols, "don't
have a great deal of
taste Harrison said.
He explained that he
doesn't smoke, but that
was the opinion of the
people he knows who
tried them.
The East Carolinian
s. �. -v iht i jiiipus t ummtinily
far $4 iturv
. �r I undi and l"Kuf�in dur
� . '�� ii nil mm vew ��i 'v� Jrdncid�v
��- amawmt.
I -�� 1 j ' irolinun u ihr oMiaal nep�vn
I �r 4-n,u I unami. otrteA oprnlrd.
and puMuhrd � and b nr �'ud"i� o� Ka�l
( afJirw t nivr"i'v-
Suhtcnplion Hairs
I5 v-ark
UOyowh
�� i � U� j��ua- p�id ai Gwuuilc. N-C.
�� Eal Cmitmmn Mxn ut located m (be
oath Hu'lding m thr rampus Ed .
relrehonr. 757-bi6b. b it7. bi09
"Free" cigarettes are
the result of seven years
of research costing
more than $3 million,
Donna said. The pro-
duct has been test-
marketed during the
past two years in a
number of cities, but
this week they are being
mass-marketed in Nor-
thern California and
will be distributed "as
quickly as possible"
across the nation and in
perhaps 70 other na-
tions, he said.
The no-nicotine
cigarettes will be com-
petitively priced with
tobacco cigarettes,
about 75 cents a
package, Donna said.
The company's Los
Standardized Tests
Are Questioned
THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 17, 1980
CHRISTOPHER
CONNELL
Associated Press Writer
WASHINGTON
(AP) � The school sent
home the first danger
signals when the child
was in the third grade:
he had not scored well
on standardized tests
and might be steered
down a remedial track.
His mother refused
to believe what she
heard.
"I thought
something was
haywire. This was a kid
who had designed
year medical student at
the University of
California at Irvine.
His mother, Shirley
Mount Hufstedler,
stayed on the fast
track, too. Last month,
after 18 years as a local,
state and federal judge,
she became the nation's
first secretary of educa-
tion.
This small, forceful
woman, daughter of a
school teacher and a
building contractor,
brought from the bench
a deep concern about
After her son's ex-
perience, one of the
things she discovered
"going on" was a lot of
tracking � putting
She said she did not
mean to criticize the
schools "nor to say
tests don't have their
use. They do. But they
youngsters into slots by also have been seriously
their early test scores.
"Kids ended up with
labels that were in
many respects almost
as destructive as tattoo-
ing numbers on
prisoners said Mrs.
Hufstedler, who was
active in both local
school affairs and on
state education com-
mittees. "Kids became
how people and institu- prisoners of labels and
Altos plant is capable wnole 8arnes and could
of producing about 100 work three-dimensional
million cigarettes a
month, but the early-
production is expected
to be 30 million to 40
million, he said.
Donna said the com-
pany has made no
scientific study to
determine if anything
in the new cigarette
might have unsuspected
harmful effects on
humans. But he
pointed out that two
major ingredients, puf-
fed wheat and cocoa
bean hulls, are current-
ly being used in some
tobacco cigarettes.
prec.iooler she
recalled.
"I took him to a
specialist in educational
psychology, who said
he was a very, very
bright, very creative
kid, and then I went
back to the school and
said, 'O.K what's go-
ing on?
The public school in
Los Angeles' Eagle
Rock section backed
off, and Steven
Hufstedler was kept on
the fast track. Today,
at age 26, he is a third-
tions treat children.
She told senators at
her confirmation hear-
ing that one of her top
priorities in the new $14
billion Department of
Education would be to
weigh every federal
people no longer think
about them to find out
what they really can
do
She calls it "a per-
sonal bias: I have never
had much use for true-
false tests, nor for
policy for its impact on multiple-choice tests
individual children. "I recognize they are
"We have not been a easy ways mechanically
child-caring society, to grade large numbers
really. We pay a lot of of papers. In many
lip service to being respects, they test the
child-caring, but to my ability of the people to
take true-false tests.
mind w: have not con-
spicuously
demonstrated a com-
mitment to children
the 54-year-old Cabinet
officer said in an inter-
view last week.
But for the imaginative
person, these tests are
very difficult to take,
unless one is simply
asking for rote infor-
mation.

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judgement, intuition,
creativity, imagina-
tion
"1 dare say if you
gave these tests to some
people who became the
leaders of our country
who didn't look at the
world in the way that
the testers do, these
gifted people would
flunk she said.
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HELP
The East Carolinian needs YOU
We are currently in need of good writers, reporters, and
editorial commentators. We currently have an assistant desk
editor position open (in the Features Dept.), and ail sections
are desperately in need of writers.
If you think you can help us out, or if you wouldlike to get
into the journalistic field on the university level, or if you want
to work within one of the best extra-curricular activities at East
Carolina, come see us.
Here are the people to talk with:
For Questions About
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Features
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Contact
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�tie lEaat Carolinian
Serving the campus community for 54 years.
Marc Barnes, semor Editor
Diane Henderson, Managing Editor
Richard Green, copy mw
Anita Lancaster, production Manager
Marianne Harbison, �� &�
ROBERT M. SWAIM, Director of Advertising
Steve O'Geary, �� Manager
Charles Chandler, sports a�
KAREN WENDT, Features Editor
THURSDAY. JANUARY 17, 1980
PAGE 4
This Newspaper's Opinion
WECU Signs On
There comes a time in every
man's life when he hears a call to ac-
tion, a call that tells him that
something needs to be changed. We
believe John Jeter, the determined
and perseverant station manager at
WECU heard such a call several
vears ago.
Jeter decided that what ECU
needed was a high quality FM radio
station � not a mere carrier current
system like other second rate
systems throughout the country �
but a real voice of the students that
would carry the music the students
wanted to hear instead of the simple
bubble gum which characterizes' the
airwaves in this area.
Once Jeter started on this quest,
he began to solicit support from
other individuals and groups in
university community. The student
newspaper helped some by lending
financial and editorial support at
times when the entire project looked
hopeless.
Jeter came up against some of the
most powerful opposition any stu-
dent leader has ever seen when try-
ing to complete his application for
the FCC license. His application
came up at a time when the entire
administration was being changed.
A new chancellor came to power
and a new Media Board came into
existence. This costed Jeter time �
time that could have been used to
gather information for the FCC.
At the same time, other media
under the jurisdiction of the Media
Board were having difficulties. A
yearbook was cancelled last year,
the administration thought it best to
divide up the money between the
media and various other campus
groups. A shortage of money this
year has caused Jeter � and the rest
of the media � to cut back on his
budget to find money to hel the
Media Board survive its financial
woes.
Also, a reported shortage of FM
frequencies throughout North
Carolina threw another wrench in
the works. Rumors abounded in
Washington and elsewhere that the
powerful National Public Radio
network was considering a move in
court to refuse FM frequencies to
student owned and operated radio
stations. Simply put, Jeter now has
to fight Washington on two fronts;
first, on the FCC front, where the
federal agency is dragging its heels,
and on the National Public Radio
front, where a powerful national
radio network is trying to keep him
from getting his frequency request
approved.
Jeter, more determined than ever,
now has his voice in the halls of
Congress. A phone call to Con-
gressman Walter Jones finally set
the rusted wheels of federal
bureaucracy to turning. A strongly
worded letter from Jones to the
FCC is apparently what convinced
the agency to grant the request.
So now, with the acquisition of
the license, and the bidding process
on the transmitter begun, it looks
like WECU-FM will finally hit the
airwaves sometime during March.
We hope the station is a big success,
and we hope it doesn't fall prey to
apathy, now that it is almost here.
So, we extend to John Jeter the
best of wishes for a job well done.
We know as well as he did for
awhile there, it didn't look possible.
We are all better for the knowledge
that one person took on what seem-
ed like the whole world � and won.
Bad News
Now, for the bad news.
Even in the light of Jeter's
achievements, we believe that one
thing must be clear: the fact that it
was STUDENT (in capital letters)
fees that paid for the construction
of the radio station. We paid for it,
through the Media Board, and we
should have the final say in all deci-
sions regarding station operation.
We paid for it, so it logically
follows that the station shouldn't
fall within the realm of faculty and
staff in terms of content or control.
Despite what anyone says, it is ours,
and we should fight any effort by
any individual who is not a student
to take it away from us.
Pop 9s People
Ads Are An Art Form
vaulters and hurdlers advertising everything
from candy bars to beer.
And remember Schlitz, the gusto that no
one dared to take away? Schlitz is now plug-
ging itself as the official beer of the Olym-
pics. Drink up, you jocks.
� The Liberated Look. Women have
paper? That we spent our time listening to gra(iuated from cleaning ovens, wiping up
finicky cats talk about their food? That we spiijs an(j washing soiled shirts. Now they're
I've often wondered what explorers 2000
years from now would think if our entire
civilization were wiped out in a nuclear war
and the only thing that survived were a few
television commercials.
What could they think? That in our day
we amused ourselves by squeezing toilet
all had little men on barges floating in our
toilet bowls?
When it comes to fine art no one ever
thinks of those obnoxious 30-second blurbs
on the tube between "Charlie's Angels"
and "Mork and Mindy No one except
J.W. Anderson.
Nine years ago Anderson, a 20-year
veteran of the TV commercial biz, founded
the U.S. Television Commercials Festival �
now recognized as the Academy Awards of
TV commercials � to honor these fine
works of American art.
This year he and about 100 other advertis-
ing managers, directors and producers judg-
ed more than 1,100 commercials to select
winners in 69 categories. Awards were
presented recently at a special banquet in
Chicago.
McDonald's led the way with five winn-
ing 1979 commercials, including one called
"Morning Glory which was voted co-
commercial of the year. The NBC "Proud
as a Peaeock" ad was the other commercial
of the year, winning awards in four
categories. Other winners included the sing-
ing cats for Meow Mix catfood, Levi's fly-
ing jeans and a "Close Encounters" takeoff
by Stroh's beer.
shooting pool, smoking cigars and doling
out bank loans while pushing products.
There is a new wave of liberated commer-
cials, featuring business women in domi-
nant roles. The woman asks the man over
for drinks. The woman tells the man what
kind of cologne to wear. The woman wears
a Wembley tie.
Say goodbye to Mrs. Olsen.
�More T&A. We've seen long-legged
women in Hanes panty hose, sleek women
in Mercury cars and "great balls of lather
What's left?
Lots. Many of the sexiest ads have never
made it on the air because of network cen-
sors who must approve each commercial.
Because of their strict guidelines in the
past, products like Playtex bras have been
advertised by stretching tape measures
across a woman's chest. Censors, you see,
wouldn't allow the company to show
human flesh underneath its product.
And if you ever wondered how the Ty-D-
Bol man came about, you need look no fur-
ther than the censors.
Since they didn't allow the company to
show a real, live toilet on the air (too
obscene, you know), Ty-D-Bol had to show
something inside a toilet bowl. And that's
Amongst this barrage of flying, singing when someone got the idea of having a little
and screeching objects, a few dominant man with lemons on a barge.
trends are cropping up on the airwaves as
we head into the '80s. Here's a sampling:
� The Bruce Jenner Syndrome. It's an
Olympic year, and every true American will
be buying the shoes, breakfast food and
beer of champions, right?
But the censors are getting more and
more lenient these days and maybe pretty
soon they'll even let us sec what a toilet
looks like.
�Talking Animals. Morris the cat
became a national celebrity after just 30
Just because someone filed a complaint seconds of finicking. But the secret to sell-
against Bruce for never having eaten ing is not in the animal's personality, spon-
Wheaties as a kid, does that mean he can't sors have found. It's merely in being an
plug them? Uh-uh. Bruce is back along with animal that talks or sings,
a barrage of smiley young gymnasts, pole The singing ("meow-meow-meow-meow.
meow-meow-meow,meow") cats are the
hottest thing on the tube these days. A feu
years ago when the first singing cat commer-
cial was shown to a test audience, 75 percent
of those watching were able to to recall it on
a written test afterward � the highest recall
ever for a commercial (the average is about
20 to 25 percent).
Since then we've been bombarded b
talking cats, imbibing chimps and beaven
that play with chainsaws. Don't be surpr
ed if someday soon you see Mr. Ed talk
about hemorrhoid relief.
�Comparisons. We've entered the age of
the Pepsi vs. Coke taste test. Or the
"spray-our-deodorant-under- our arm"
test. No longer are advertisers requiring you
to rely on their judgement. Thev want y .
to try it, vou'll like it.
And when they have comparison tests on
the air, no longer is it against some ominous
Brand X that no one gives a hoot about.
The war is on. Advertisers are naming the
competition. Maybe Brand got a r.
name by losing all those contests.
�More Stars. Celebrities sell Of so a the
admen. So every advertising team is out
signing on more stars to push its products.
Miller Beer, for one. probablv ahead) has
enough ex-jocks to fill three teams.
But the jocks are getting smart, too, and
charging higher and higher fees for their ser-
vices. Reggie Jackson, for example, after
becoming a World Series hero in 1977, rais-
ed his price from $25,000 to S35,000 pc
spot.
Sponsors these days are dishing out a
total of about S100 million a year to their
stars. Jocks. Movie Stars. Musicians. Even
New York models. You think Cheryl TiegS
takes those pictures for kicks?
But while all these are trends, none of
them explain the two Commercial of the
Year award winners � NBC's "Proud as a
Peacock" and McDonald's "Morning
Glory
According to Anderson, there i o w
to define a true work of TV commercial art.
It either plop, plops or fizz fizzes. Or
sometimes both.
Let's just hope none of them are still fizz-
ing 2000 years from now.
East Candidacy Will Challenge Democrats
"The race for United States
Senate is like applying for a job, ana
the voters of North Carolina are the
employers. There are two applicants
for the job and rather than one ap-
plicant trying to tear down the
other, each applicant should stress
what he can do and why he should
get the job.
��
This is the philosophy of Dr.
John P. East, an East Carolina
University political science pro-
fessor, who, barring unanticipated
circumstances, will face incumbent
Democrat Robert Morgan in the
1980 race for North Carolina's
United States Senate seat now held
by Morgan. East is widely known as
the "house conservative" at ECU
where he has taught since 1964, and
he realizes that he faces an uphill
climb in his challenge. In North
Carolina, where 75 percent of the
registered voters are Democrats,
"the Republican professor from Il-
linois" has his work cut out for him.
East is not without support,
however. The Republican National
Committee, the North Carolina
Republican Party and, most impor-
tant of all, the Congressional Club
are throwing their weight into the
East campaign. The Congressional
Club, the personal political machine
of U.S. Senator Jesse Helms, will
deHver key support for East.
The Congressional Club
acknowledges the fact that East will
ave a rough and rocky road to
travel before election day. Despite
the obstacles, which to many
political observers appear unsur-
mountable, the Club feels that East
will win.
East does, of course, have some
advantages other than just pure
cash. The national trend toward the
right combined with the rise of
Republicanism in the South, as well
as independent ticket-splitters, are
all pluses for a candidate such as
East.
East held in esteem
Despite his conservatism, East is
held in high esteem by all segments
of the university community where
all too often, according to East,
"liberalism is equated with in-
telligence, and conservatism with
lack of same He is viewed by his
colleagues as an intellectual conser-
vative with a tremendous amount of
energy. His counterparts in the
political science department at ECU
say that he is motivated much more
than the average professor in terms
of academics and political interest.
His students respect him for his ar-
ticulate ability as a speaker and for
his vast knowledge in the political
science field. Even those who
disagree with East hold him in high
esteem for his gentlemanly manner
and his intelligence. Intellectually,
Robert Swaim
East is viewed as being just a notch
or two above the average professor
by his students. He is a man who
works hard at his teaching job and
expects equally hard work on the
part of his students. Academically
he is seen as a man with strict and
very high standards.
Lincoln philosophy
Abraham Lincoln once said that
"The philosophy of the classroom
today is the philosophy of govern-
ment tomorrow East is a great
follower of that Lincoln
philosophy, as he teaches the con-
servative intellectuality to all who
cross the threshold of his classroom.
Unquestionably, East has the sup-
port and well wishes of most
members of the university family,
but many have qualms about how
successful his candidacy will be.
Even his advocates suggest that
North Carolina may not be ready
for two Republican senators. East
himself sees the grip of political par-
ties loosening. He believes that the
independents hold the key.
"Partisan labels mean less and
less says East. "This campaign
will be a media and grassroots ef-
fort The conservative political
philosophy of East is typically Jef-
fersonian: "Big government is bad,
and that government is best which
governs least East, like Helms,
sees the government as more of a
creator of problems than a solver of
them. Too many taxes, deficit spen-
ding, government regulations, and
excessive foreign aid are the roots of
inflation that stifle the economy, ac-
cording to East. Thomas Jefferson
said, some two hundred years ago,
"I predict future happiness for
Americans if they can prevent the
government from wasting the labors
of the people under the pretense of
taking care of them Dt East is in
strong concurrence with that opi-
nion.
Thinks like Eisenhower
East, like the late President
Eisenhower, believes that when
shallow critics denounce the profit
motive inherent in our system of
private enterprise, they ignore the
fact that this is the economic sup-
port of every right we possess and
that without it all rights would soon
disappear. Their conclusions em-
phasize the results; more and more
bureaus, more and more taxes,
fewer and fewer producers, and
finally financial collapse and the
end of freedom. Conservative
philosopher Dan Smoot once said
that our government cannot make
men prosperous any more than it
can make men good. The govern-
ment cannot produce anything, but
can merely seize and divide up what
individuals produce. Government
can give the people nothing which
government has not first taken away
from them. The amount which
government doles back to the peo-
ple, or spends to promote their
welfare, is always less than what it
takes because of the excessive costs
of governmental administration. It
is with the Jefferson-Smoot ideals
that East win hit the campaign trail
� with the conservative philosophy
deep in his bosom and dear to his
heart.
Domestically East would like to
see the government assume the role
of "protecting men and leaving
them to the fruits of their labors
The government should protect the
right of people to be productive.
Unfortunately the federal govern-
ment, in its present role, stifles pro-
ductivity, in Fast's fv�
On foreign polic
On foreign polics, the professor
wants the government to stop trying
to buy friends with expensive
foreign aid programs. He sees the
United States as the leader in the
worldwide fight to preserve freedom
and democracy against the tyranny
of communism and socialism.
"Repressive and brutal communism
is our enemy, and it is the duty of
the government to combat the
spread of such says East. "Our
foreign policy problems are self in-
flicted. For too long we have tried to
buy friends. The Soviets are the ex-
ternal force seeking to destroy us,
and freedom, throughout the
world
With his strong conservative
views � win, lose or draw � East
will definitely be a recognized
spokesman on the issues, and he is
determined to sell himself as a
spokesman. East will undoubtedly
receive the support of business, pro-
fessionals, white collar voters and
the true blue conservatives of both
parties.
With the same strong coalition
that marched doggedly to the polls
in 1972 and 1973 to send Jesse
Helms to Washington, East wttt pre-
sent a formidable challenge to the
Democrats
I
���-





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
JANUARY 15, I98U Page 5
The Rebel
Awards Announced
In Competition
By KF?�F5!torNDT � in the Autumn Wind. It was a Small Part of the Pan-
tomime
The winners have been announced. n the photography category, Brenda Davis receives
The Fifth Annual Rebel Art Show which is now hang- r,rst D"ze for her photo, "Glass House and Sid Davis
ing in the Kate Lewis Gallery, in Whichard Building, in- recejved second place.
eludes the winners in categories such as paintings, draw- First Place in tne drawing category went to Michael
mg and Photography. Loderstadt.
Prize money totaled over $1,000, which was donated
by the Attic and Jeffrey's Beer and Wine.
The show and judging has not been without con-
troversy. One piece which had been entered as a drawing
was ruled by the judges to be a mixed media piece and
was disqualified from receiving any monetary award.
However, the judges felt that the piece should be includ-
ed in the show, which it has been.
According to Sue Ayadellete, Associate Editor to the
Rebel, the judges were very surprised to find out that
they had awarded one person two of the prizes. The
names are covered before the pieces are judged.
According to one judge, Tom Haines, the show was
"strong in some categories and weak in others
He also expressed disappointment in the Rebel's in-
ability to have the show in Mendenhall Student Center.
Also because of the small amount of photos which ,f thev had been able to do this they would have been
were entered in the photography division, the two ab,e to delude several more categories, including three
categories, color and black and white, were merged dimensional pieces.
The Rebel Art Show
on display in Whichard building
Free Flick Reviewed;
Will Feature Matinee
By Steve Bachner
Feature Writer
Editor's Note: The film "Close
Encounters of the Third Kind" will
be shown in the Hendrix Theatre
this weekend. However there have
been two changes from the regular
format.
First the film will include
"Surroundsound This is the first
time this type of sound system has
been used in the Hendrix Theatre,
in terrorizing his little sisters in ways
inspired by science fiction movies he
had seen on television. A movie buff
since he was old enough to change a
channel, the adolescent en-
trepreneur made a sci-fi flick when
he was only 16. The movie ran some
two and one half hours and con-
cerned itself with visitors from outer
space.
Foruteen years have elapsed since
and it is expected to improve the that first effort, and the 30 year old
speculation about their son's future, the unknown enables the filmaker to
Speilberg, a teenager, would delight whet an audiences curiosity by pain-
ting a horrible picture of the films
major attraction and never letting us
get a good look at it until the climac-
tic sequence. You save the best
special effects until last and as long
as the situation is resolved, we are
sure of what is going to happen to
our favorite characters, then
everything is fine. Alfred Hitchcock
See REVIEWER Page 9, Col. 1
Each category had received five entries each.
A statement of purpose for the show reads, "To pro-
vide a showcase for quality art that is representative of
ECU students. All show pieces have an equal opportuni-
ty to be selected for the Gallery section of the Rebel
magazine
The Rebel magazine is an award winning publication
which received a second place award nationally last year
only because no first place award was given. It tied for
the honor.
Judges for the competition were Edith Walker, of the
Greenville Art Center, George Brett, a local artist, and
Tom Haines, of the Attic, who holds a B.A. in art from
ECU.
The winners are as follows (Not all categories have
the same number of positions such as first place, second
and third; some only have one winner, that being first
place. This decision was left for the judges' discretion.
Also, titles are given where available.):
The first place award in the printmaking division was
Michael Loderstedt, with second place going to David
Larson.
In the painting category, first place went to Robert
Daniel for his painting called "Figure Seated Second
place went to Lisa Bateman, and third place went to
Mark Peterson.
All students are invited to view the show which will be
up until January 19.
�MM
One of the Many
In the mixed media category first place went to Ella one of the entrants in the Rebel Art Show
Mallenbaum for her piece called "The Blackbird Whirl- o��p�
sound quality tremendously.
Secondly the film will be shown
one extra time. In addition to the
shows already scheduled at 7:00 and
9:15 on Friday and Saturday there
will be another showing at 4:30 on
Saturday afternoon.
The following is part of a film
review which was run when the film
first was released.)
Spielberg is now one of the most
successful directors in Hollywood,
ans has yet to grow up. The film in-
dustry should thank it's lucky stars,
it doesn't have many any more,that
he never did. For a while most of
Speilberg's concepts require inor-
dinatley complex treatment and a
weatlh of technology, the final ef-
fect in every case has been
Student Observes His Peers
By CHAD BUFFKIN
Features Writer
As a young boy, director Steven marvelously simple.
Speilberg's singleness of purpose Speilberg used two old tricks fro
left his Darents little room for the 50's here: First, fascination with
THE NODDER: This student
doesn't actually sleep, he just dozes
or catnaps. He can distract almost
Ever wonder by teachers and pro- as many students as the sleeper. The
fessors usually become gray at an students close by him like to watch
early age? The obvious reason is the his head doddle. It looks like it's
students. They come in many connected to his shoulders by a
shapes, sizes and styles, each with a "Slinky Occasionally while doz-
different view of what school is all ing, he will flinch or jerk, thus
about and an unlimited supply of knocking a book off his desk and
cute idiosyncracies. successfully interrupting the entire
The following types of students class.
crunch. His papers always carry the nities. This guy is on financial aid.
distinct odor of a Big Mac, usually His dad is a dog catcher,
attracting flies and stray dogs if left THE QUIET STUDENT: You'd
lying around. never know this one was in class.
THE WELL-PREPARED STU- Sometimes you think there is only
DENT: A tape-recorder, calculator, one word in his vocabulary, "here
slide-rule, pencil-sharpener, brief- The only time he was called on he
create the professors' gray hair,
hardened attitude, agree-with-
everything-but-don't-really -give-a-
damn personality, or drinking pro-
blem:
THE SLEEPER: "And can so-
THE MIDDLE-AGED WOMAN
STUDENT: This housewife student
and mother of two teenagers sits
front and center. Because she takes
only two courses and devotes six
hours a day to the study of each, she
meone tell me asks the professor, unfortunately knows more about
"what were the famous words of
John Paul Jones?"
"GLPPGLPGLPAZZZZZZ"
comes a snore from the guy asleep
on the back row. During the guf-
the course than the professor does.
She is the first one in class and the
last one to leave. She smiles all the
time and takes lots of notes.
Whenever the professor walks in
Close Encounters of the Third Kind
this weeks Student Union Free Flick
faws of the entire class, he awakes, and says, "Good morning class
looks sleepily around the room she quickly jots it down in shor-
through half-closed eyes and thand on her little pad.
wonders why everyone is laughing. THE EATER: This student
You'd think this guy didn't own a doesn't take time for lunch like
bed. Any day you expect him to talk everyone else; he takes his meals in
in with a pillow and a teddy bear. class. He has a very attentive
case, thermos, coffee cup, stop-
watch, battery-operated fan, ink
pen that writes 12 colors and a back-
scratcher are standard equipment
for this pupil. He looks like a walk-
ing student supply store. He most
started crying and ran from the
room.
THE ATTENTION SEEKER:
There's one in every class, normally
found on the back row. This good-
looking chap will do anything for a
always forgets his book and has to laugh short of setting fire to his
look on with the guy beside him. clothes. He can mimic any professor
THE POOR STUDENT: on campus and charm his way
Everyone feels sorry for this stu-
dent, including the professor. He
wears the same shirt every day and
has the holiest jeans in class. He
finally got enough money to buy his
books right after mid-term exams.
All he talks about is food. You'd
never know he drives a 914 Porche,
and his dad is a bank president.
THE RICH KID: This is the best
dressed student in class. Even his
note pad has a little alligator on it.
All his fees are paid a month in ad-
vance. He attends all school func-
tions and belongs to two frater-
through a brick wall. He never has
to speak, the class cracks up when
he raises his hand.
rHE DISTRACTER: This volup-
tuous young lady is a challenge to
many male professors. She too sits
on the front row. When she lights
up a cigarette in class, the smoke
drifts toward him like a beckoning
finger, causing him to stutter and
drool all over his lecture notes.
Everyday she wears a tanktop and
jogging shorts; even when it's snow-
ing.
Sa v oy Bro wn Disappointing
By PATRICK MINGES
and KEVIN McGALEY
From the first moment of our
hearing that Savoy Brown, one of
rock history's greatest blues bands,
would be playing in the Attic, we
were tremendously excited. The first
concert each of us had been to as
mere adolescents was none other
than the Savoy Brown Band in the
dawning of the last decade. To say
that Tuesday's concert at the Attic
in the beginning of this decade was a
disappointment would be an
understatement. To say that it was
an outrage would be perhaps stret-
ching the point a wee bit.
Somewhere in the middle of that
void would be approximately where
our feelings Ik.
The crowd seemed to be having a
big time, yet there wasn't exactly a
big rush to get to the dance floor.
Truly Kim Simmonds is an
astronomical guitarist and an in-
dividual whom we hold in the up-
most regard, but he seems to have
I
lost his sense of direction and
reaches out in the darkness in search
of musical values. The show was
definitely one of the most rocking
performances ever at the Attic, and
to borrow a phrase from Paul Mc-
Cartney, it was a splendid "rock
show
Yet we did not go to see a rock
show; we can do that any night of
the week. We went to see Kim Sim-
monds and Savoy Brown. Savoy
Brown was one of the more influen-
tial blues groups to emerge out of
the midus British blues boom, in-
fluenced directly by such American
artists as Robert Johnson, Muddy
Waters, Huddie Ledbetter, and
Willie Dixon. Other groups and in-
dividuals to emerge from this era
were Fleetwood Mac, Eric Clapton,
Led Zeppelin, and Free. It was one
of the most influential periods in
rock music history.
Savoy Brown most directly ac-
quired their early style from the post
depression blues born in the halls
and taverns of Detroit and Chicago.

Delta bluesmen went north to seek
work and were forced to change
their style, by amplification and ad-
dition of instruments, to ac-
comodate the more raucous
demands of the crowd. This
derivative, minimalist sound that
first emerged in Savoy Brown's
music elevated them to cult status
during the late '60s in the United
States, however they remained
unaccepted in their homeland.
The early Savoy Brown featured
Chris Youlden, a deep, poignant
vocalist and composer, and their
style was smooth, technically
dynamic slowhand. The group
grew, despite personnel changes,
and their peak appeared to come
with the release of the album Raw
Sienna, which featured superbly
written and performed material sup-
ported even by strings and a brass
section. Chris Youlden levt, and
shortly afterward guitarist
Lonesome Dave and drummer
Roger Earl departed (to form
Foghat). This seemed to leave Kim
Simmonds both musically and
spiritually impotent. Simmonds has
found replacements, but if Tues-
day's performance was indicative of
the present level of inspiration, it
may once again be a deteriorating
band.
We arrived at the Attic in time to
hear the front band, who in perspec-
tive seemed to be the better of the
night's guests. Tommy G. and Com-
pany are a nice bunch of fellows,
and the lady is a very pleasant addi-
tion to the band, musically and
otherwise. The lights dimmed and a
scrappy looking roadie shouted,
"Well, I am just a Chicago boy, but
1 am asking you folks in Greenville,
South Carolina are you ready for
Savoy Brown?" Well, we definitely
were not ready for this Savoy
Brown.
Perhaps the roadie's statement
put it most succinctly, the band did
not know where they were, obvious-
ly did not care, they were just there,
See Special Page 9, Col. 1
l"W� tvorw i mc Mi
Savoy Brown in Concert
some enjoyed k some did not





6 THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 17, 1980
Kappa Sigma
The Kappa Siema Fraternity is located at 700 East
Tenth Street beside Darryl's here in Greenville. One of
our national fraternity's major themes in recent years
has been "in pursuit of excellence We here at Theta Pi
Chapter are also striving to obtain this goal. You have
probably heard that many senators, congressmen,
presidents and many other major executives ot
America's largest corporations have been fraternity men
in the past. This obviously shows that fraternities help
to develop leadership characteristics in today's college
man.
We here at Theta Pi are looking for such men. We
want young men who are willing to contribute their in-
dividual qualities to help Kappa Sigma continue its
growth. Since its formation in 1966, we have obtained
excellence in various fields ranging from intramurals to
scholarships. However, we need future leaders. If you
feel you have these leadership qualities and wish to fur-
ther develop them, come and visit us during rush. You
are just the person we have been looking for!
Phi Kappa Tau
You come to take youi places in an ongoing entei
prise a umvers.tv. It was here before you same It pi
bably will be here after you leave. But you .an n �
vour mark upon it.
The Creek experience is invaluable in providing lean
ine opportunities above and beyond academics 1 c
abilitv to get along with others is often a lesson scl
ing misses and fraternities produce. Phi Kappa la .
certainly no exception
A special blend ol social, academic and athletic
cellence promises to make this another one ol our I
years. We are involved in eerv phase ol the e eg �
perience.
Through fund raising projects we heir,
positive self-image for all ol 1 asi c arolina.
We are all proud of the spin! and accomplisl
Phi Kappa fan.
Come on over and part) with the Phi T
Rush schedule:
Mondav � Celebrate the New Decade
until.
Tuesdav � Mixer � 8 p.m. until.
Wednesdav Big beer blast � s p.m. until
Tau Kappa Epsilon
Beta Theta Pi
L
Sigma Phi Epsilon Fraternity was founded as a
chapter April 15, 1961. Since then, it has grown from a
relatively small idea into a growing brotherhood with
high ideals. The three cardinal principles � virtue,
diligence, and brotherly love � have helped Sigma Phi
Epsilon rapidly become the second largest fraternity in
the nation.
The fraternity house is located across from the art
building on Fifth Street. Fund raisers, all campus par-
ties, and the aspect of brotherhood make it a fun and
active fraternity.
There are no stereotypes in Sigma Phi Epsilon. The
fraternity offers individuality, yet functions as a unified
organization. So, when considering rush, consider
Sigma Phi Epsilon.
Mon. � Keg Party
Tues. � Keg Party
Wed. � Keg Party
Thurs. � Formal Rush
Fri. � Formal Rush
Pi Kappa Phi
The Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity was founded in 1904 at
the College of Charleston in South Carolina, in the
great southern tradition indicative of Charleston's
heritage. Today, the Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity continues
its effort to keep up that great heritage with chapters as
their representative in over 100 locations across the na-
tion. With the contributions of these chapters, the na-
tional fraternity has been an innovative leader among
the nation's fraternities, with such accomplishments as
the fastest growing and fourteenth largest fraternity in
the nation, the first to establish a real estate holding
company for its chapters, and the creation and
maintenance of the fraternity's own national philan-
thropy � Project PUSH.
The Beta Phi chapter at East Carolina University con-
tinues to pursue the traditions of the national fraternity
because of the strong ties between the two entities. Pi
Kapps on this campus are among the leaders in Greek
life. An exciting balance is maintained by putting em-
phasis on the growth of the whole individual, so that
members may not only have a social outlet that is a part
of Greek life, but they also may have a chance for per-
sonal fulfillment in the areas of leadership, academics,
athletics, and a very special borid of friendship that is
often referred to as "brotherhood Pi Kapps have
always taken pride in the belief that not everyone will
become a Pi Kapp, and East Carolina can offer a person
many alternatives to Greek life.
I
i
Sigma Nu
Sigma Nu Fraternity was founded at Ml ,n 1869 and
is nourishing on college campuses nationwide. Our
fraternity has set goals and ideals. The ideals of love
truth, and honor are the cornerstones of Sigma Nu As
Sigma Nu s, we participate in various campus activities
and have a strong intramural program. Our men wot
the fraternity d.v;�on.soccer championship W c ;re
strong contenders for the president's cup Sigma Nu h is
the strongest and best little sister program "
Sigma Nu is genuinely an uncommon fraternit" We
cannot be stereotyped. So during rush week come bv
and see if you can. We dare YOU! -
���II- �TW�!f �





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 17, 1980
Sigma Tau Gamma
The dream was conceived at the beginning of the fall
semester 1977. A group of 34 ECU students joined
together to form a brotherhood. The Delta Alpha
chapter of Sigma Tau Gamma is composed of men and
little sisters who believe that an individual's uniqueness
shou.d not be restricted by an organization. Our
members are encouraged to have their own lifestyles and
not to fit into any stereotype. We are a social fraternity
that enjoys an atmosphere unique from the others.
Please visit Sigma Tau Gamma. Give us a call at
758-4140 for directions to our house. Sigma Tau Gam-
ma CARES!
Lambda Chi Alpha
I
Delta Sigma Phi
Delta Sigma Phi Fraternity is based upon three
specific principles: leadership, scholarship, and
brotherhood. We'd like you to know what this fraterni-
ty can do for you, as well as how you, as individuals,
can help us grow and prosper.
Scholastically, Delta Sigma Phi has the highest
overall average on campus for any social fraternity.
Leadership capabilities are more than welcome in the
fraternity. We offer the opportunity for talen'ed men to
eventually lead this fraternity through elected offices as
well as through appointed offices. The fraternity does
offer a full calendar of Greek and chapter events
because, after all, we are a social fraternity.
We just ask that you come by and meet the brothers
and find out more about the fraternity.
am
THOSE PART ICI PAT
ING BRING RECORD
OF TOUR SO NO
lSTPRZ�-
2-PRIZE-
3WPRI2E-
- KEG ?mY
-IBA.
-T.&V
EXCuwSiveor TTK6
Call
Jjio dchr
HOW TO PLACE A WANT AD
in The East Carolinian
findl COll! ToSaveOnAHW
inter Fashions
You may place a want ad (for
rent, for sale, etc.) at The East
Carolinian office MWF, 3-4 p.m
and on TTH, 11-12 noon. OR you
may mail your ad to our office with
payment. All want ads must be paid
for in advance (we accept in-state
checks). Want ads cost $1 for the
first 15 words and 5 cents for each
additional word. NO ADS ARE AC-
CEPTED OVER THE
TELEPHONE.
Announcements for meetings or
any event are not considered ads
and should be submitted to the
NEWS DEPT. as Announcements.
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8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 17, 1980
Reviewer Presents List of
Best, Worst In Year's Films
By PAT MINGES
Features Writer
It's me again. Nobody asked me to do it, but
everyone else is doing it. Time magazine does it.
Rolling Stone (Ugh!) does it. Even educated fleas
do it. Andrew Sarris, Tom Allen, J. Hoberman,
and Stuart Byron of the Village Voice do it. I feel
almost driven to burden you once again with my
selections for the better cinematic endeavors of
the year.
Let's call the awards the Jukes once again, for
consistency, and to accentuate the fact that 1 am
no more qualified than the bums on the corner of
Tenth and Pitt in determining the best pictures of
1979. These are just opinions. Opinions are like
other things, and I don't know if I am opi-
nionated or one of those other things. The less
said about that, the better. So here we go with
the First International Jukes awards for
Cinematic Endeavors.
1. Kramer v.s Kramer
2. Manhattan
3. Breaking Away
4. Apocalypse Now
5. Dawn of the Dead
6. North Dallas Fortv
7. Star Trek
8. Hair
9. China Svndrome
10. "10"
Kramer vs Kramer was the obvious choice for
ilie best picture of the year. It featured two poten-
tial Academy Award winning actors, Meryl
Streep and Dustin Hoffman, in one of the best
written screenplays in years by Robert Benton,
whose direction is superb even better than the
Woodman's. It deserves the critical acclaim it has
been receiving for it presents one of the finer
looks at the emotional bonds which affect people.
It presents the disintegration of a relationship
where there are no winners or losers, only sur-
vivors.
Woody Allen's Manhattan is my next selection
as one of the better movies of the year. Woody
and Marshall Brickman's script, Woody's direc-
tion (some of the finest scenes ever done in black
and white), and Dianne Keaton, Meryl Streep,
Mariel Hemingway in the same movie. I was over-
whelmed by feminine beauty. Allen is one of my
favorites.
Breaking Away is everybody's sleeper of the
year, and I don't really know what it means. The
story was delightful and enduring, that of coming
of age in America, and the cast was a fine collec-
tion of unknown, but respectable, actpersons. Big
fun. If this is what a sleeper is, it gets my vote,
too.
Coppola's Apocalypse Now and George
Romero's Dawn of the Dead were two shattering
and stunning motion pictures by the finest of
American directors. Both depict a hell on earth,
random madness, and possess an emotional depth
that performs a deep catharsis within the in-
dividual. Both were eagerly awaited efforts, and
were greeted under peculiar circumstances
Romero's flick could not even obtain a rating
from the M.P.A.A so it was released privately.
North Dalas Forty is one of the finer movies of
the year. Peter Bent's indictment of bigtime pro
football is the grandest attack on corporate ethics
since Paddy Chayefsky's Network. Nick Nolte,
Mac Davis, Bo Swenson, and John Matusak were
superb in portraying a world where players are
the equipment, and the conglomorate is the team.
Equipment can be replaced. The movie cannot.
I told you about Star Trek last week. Hair was
great. It was one of the finest musicals ever pro-
duced. Milos Forman took his movie miles
beyond the Broadway play; his screenplay and
direction made a whole new story. See it on
cablevision if you get a chance. John Savage and
Treat Williams were excellent.
China Syndrome was good, but more for its
theme, timing, and Jane Fonda than for its
ultimate worth. It carried a good message. Final-
ly, for number ten, I'll have to go with "10 for
the movie was a ten, and Bo Derek is an affir-
mative ten. Action, pretty girls, the beach how
could it miss?
Finally, we will have a list of the losers. These
guys finished last in our voting. You will definite-
ly see these on TV soon. Be sure and miss them.
1. Black Hole
2. Amitvville Horror
3. 1941'
4. Nightwing
5. Invasion of the Body Snatchers
6. The Jerk
7. Buck Rogers in the 25th Century
8. Animal House (no reruns)
9. Killing Me Softly
10. Blonde in Black Silks
Welcome Back
Dancers!
Grand Opening Sale
at our New Location
20-50 OFF
Leotards Warm-ups
Skirts Milliskin tights
At Barre, Ltd.
422 Arlington Blvd.
756-667J)
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BEDFORD ond FONCA
THE ELECTRIC
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HI A S I Ml liim .
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March of Dimes Funds Enable
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The Marathon Restaurant says
"Welcome Back Students"
To Show Our Appreciation
To Our Old and New Customers,
All Soft Drinks are
Vz Price This Month.
Come In and Try Our
Delicious Steak Sandwiches.
Want to be a
writer? Apply at
The East Carolinian.
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specializing in natural hair cuts for men & women
appointments only
758-7841
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 17. 1980
special Effects Highlight Film
;ontinued from page 5
K)k this idea one step
irther in THE BIRDS
v simply leaving us
hanging' in the end.
w second trick is to
jmpK let the camera
icak up behind the au-
ience and yell "boo
ne good screen jolt
k an audience on
edge of their seats
an t ic ipat i o n o f
aher. Hitchcock
ice again,this time in
ivcho. Speilberg's
rution of cinematic
n and names, CLOSE
ICOUNTERS OF
HI 1H1RD KIND is
culmination o' his
.vtorial expertise
v far. Special effects
tan more to the film
m the) have to any
icr motion picture in
its. In the period
its release around
istmas of two years
the til m has
tome not only a
�tuai success but a
COmmerical success as
pi I he director of
sc ience fiction films
of the 50's grossesd
nearly $40 million aftei
only 20 days followikng
it's release.
The $18 million vehi-
cle had to bring home
the bacon. Like the
movies premise, the
hype that has accom-
panied it is also out of
this world. First Col-
umbia Pictures released
full page ad-mats that
appeared in national
publications almost a
year before the films
Lighter in tone tha
some science fiction ex-
travaganzas, most
notably 2001; heavier
than others, the film
focuses more on the
human element than
people might think.
Just as in Speilberg's
invitation which will
lead to the first big
meeting of the aliens
and the earthlings. This
meeting lays the fonda-
tion for the film's
climactic spectacle
which fills the final
twenty minutes of the
film. The landing of the
cupation with children-
-four year old Cary
Guffey gives a
marvelous performanc
and , as performances
go, he steals the show.
The rest of the
characterizations are
well above average for
this kind of fare
release. The mats gave Jillian Guiler (Melinda
the project an aura of Dillon) represent a
mystery. Next came cross section of the
trailers exhibited in American public. And
theatres around the the unknown force that
country, some lasting compels them in their
as long as five minutes, plight is a fascination
exploiting the all star with the extraterrestial
previous film's, a small
group of people are mother spaceship, (especially Drey fuss')
depicted and their beatuifuly photograph- An added treat for
fascination with the ed by the Dennis
unknown is explored. Muren, is a sequence so
In this case Roy Neary dynamic that it defies
(Richard Dreyfuss) and description. The special
effects for this scene
rank with those in
"parting of the red
sea" sequence from
DeMille's THE TEN
COMMANDMENTS.
film buffs is the casting
of brillliant French
director Francois Truf-
faut in his first movie
role as international
UFO expert Claude
Lacombe.
tribute to
director turns out to be
a good choice for the
people who were more
realistically in awe then
their on screen counter-
parts.
The television in-
dustry is ever expan-
ding and with the cur-
rent use of video tapes,
if theatre chains are to
survive the boom, more
movies like Close En-
counters are a must.
Hats off to Steve
Speilberg, He has taken
the carnival at-
mosphere out of the
amusement park and
brought it back to the
Speilberg' movie where it belongs.
the great
ART&CAMERA PLAZA CAMERA
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and medicine
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sW.
For authenticity, the il- pat and Truffaut gives
personel and finally
feature stories in all the
principle newspapers
and magazines.
Needless to say, the
special effects are so
much suberb wizardry
enacted by the technical
genius Douglas Trum-
ball (Who performed
similar feats in Stanlev
Kubrick's 2001: A
Space Odyssey),
vehicles that they have
both had close to them.
Fascination soon
lusion is created.
Certainly one of the
films most attractive
qualities is a freshness
turns into compulsion of approach that sets is
which in turn becomes appart from other
a vivid psychic implant. Speilberg Productions.
The vision is shared by The film exudes in-
all who are uninhibited nocence and displays
enough to follow the the directors preoc-
the film an exotic
flavor with his french.
However the majori-
ty of the time the cast is
simply asked to stand
transfixed, eyes wide,
and mouths agape. At
one point in the movie 1
took a second to look
around me and saw
J
eviewer
naffected
The Student Union Coffeehouse Committee
presents
Lisa Anderson
Dan Hamilton
ABORTIONS UP TO
12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
J175 00 "all inclusive"
pregnancy test, birth con
trol, and problem pregnan
cy counseling. For further
information call 832 0535
(toll free number
800 221 2568) between 9
AM. 5 P.M. weekdays
Raleigh Women's
Health Organization
917 West Morgan St.
Raleigh, NC 27603
ptimit (I from page 5
g in their two
worth. It was
run of the mill
show. The bam
headlined Kim Sim-
moncK on guitar, back-
ed op b a pretentious
egoist (stage presenta-
tion, " course) on bass
and a drummer who
seewu.
Robe' Plant assimila-
tioja complex. I he
show was outlandishl)
lotrfnnd our cars ached
ev8�though we had the
� sense to stay away
kthe front of the
Ber cabinets. The
group sounded more
like Ted Nugent or Kiss
al Hies than the dear
boys e had come to
�v and love. It was a
bit disheartening.
Indeed. Simmonds is
a phenomenal guitarist;
tie carried the band.
Tile thm secti
mere . appeared to
sen. a vehicle
through which Sim-
niftnds could send wave
upon w a e of hard rock
Blisin. The beautv of
his slow hand seemed
lost in a forest of
Beaming and dive
Bmbing lead breaks
pd walls o( three
lord progressions.
hat was once an ar-
�rulate spokesman for
generation of
�uesmasters became a
�cared kid protecting
pimself through
usical masturbation,
fraid of failure if he
ursued the thing he
ved, Simmonds settl-
ed for the self gratifica-
ion of the rock star.
kVhat once were vices
re now habits.
Outside of Sim-
monds, the band had
virtually nothing to of-
fer, their composi-
tions were generally in-
sufficient, their total
group performance left
much to be desired, and
even they didn't even
really seem to be enjoy-
ing themselves. They
played a few
recognizable songs like
"Street Corner Talk-
ing" and "Hellhound
Train" (agonizingly
weak encore), but most
of the songs were about
rock 'n' roll panacea.
Occasionally, Sim-
monds would slow it
down and give us a
taste of the blues, but it
was mostly appetizer,
for the main course was
put on your boots, rojl
up your pantsleg rock
V roll without direc-
tion, sincerity or in-
spiration.
We were prepared to
do an interview with
the group, had resear-
ched their history and
influences, but when
the concert was over
most of our questions
out blues and Savoy
own seemed either
nappropriate or irrele-
vant. By the time we ac-
quired the courage to
ask the questions con-
cerning musical com-
promise and the demise
of a once former idol,
the group had split, not
entirely to our dismay.
The entire night
seemed to be like an act
out ol'ct'aretR Cfagi
comedy, where our
dreams and expecta-
tions seemed to go
astray in a frenzy of
black humor. What we
had hoped would be an
epic homecoming to a
renaissance of lost
youth proved to be
nothing more than a
diluted dream. Well, as
Thomas Wolfe, a
fellow North Caroli-
nian, once said, "You
can never go home
again
,
Fri.&SatJan.l8& 19 9& 10p.m.
Admission 50c Free Snacks!
AUDITIONS Jan. 25 & 26
Look for the Union Label
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REPAIR
113 Grande Ave.
758-1228
Quality Shoe Repair
KAPPA
SIGMA
Presents
THE FIRST AXXVXL
MISS EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
PAGEANT
Feb. 5th 7:00 p.m.
Wright And.
For information
or applications
Phone
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"11H11.
MONDAY NITES
- NOTICE-
TOALL
JUNIORS & SENIORS
ATTENTION: COLLEGE RING PRICE
INCREASE EFFECTIVE ON 1 2680
We HI write letters home for you. .
twice a week!
For the measely sum of $20 (or $15 if your
parents are graduates of East Carolina), The EAst
Carolinian will send copies of the paper home to
your parents�or to your friends�or to anyone you
choose.
Not only that, but we will send them to you for a
full year. A full year. That way, if you don't stay in
Greenville for the summer, you can keep up with
everything going on campus.
Think of it. Your parents won't have to asK you
what is going on at ECU. With the help of The East
Carolinian, they can read about it.
For more details, drop a note by The East Caroli-
nian for the proper amount. Please make sure that
along with the check, we have the address where you
want us to send the subscription.
If you are thinking about buying a college ring,
we urge you to place your order before January 26,1980.
Our ring manufacturer, Artcarved, has given
us special advanced notice that prices will increase
significantly on both men's and women's gold rings, due to
the rapidly escalating world gold price.
NOW is the time to order. Prices will increase
anywhere from $25 to $40 for womens and $50 to $95
for men, depending on sty le. As your bookstore, we
wanted you to know about this while you could still
benefit- and save. Order Today!
Joseph O. Clark
Manager
l
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
WRIGttr BUILDING
jj

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"� ����� .Ve1r - � - � �
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
JANUARY 15. 1980 Page 10
Riley scores 32
Lady Pirates Down UNC
Marcia Girven rebounds
By JIMMY DuPREE
Assistant Sports Editor
Junior forward Kathy Riley scor-
ched the nets for 32 points while
leading the Lady Pirates to an im-
pressive 71-68 victory over the Tar
Heels of UNC a non-conference
matchup of the two NCAIAW Divi-
sion I schools.
After the score was tied 34-34 at
intermission, the Pirates took the
lead to stay on a 20-foot jumper by
Riley with 12:41 remaining to be
played, but the Lady Heels never
admitted deeat until the final horn
sounded.
East Carolina never trailed again,
cruising to their biggest lead of the
night with 2:48 on the clock as Riley
flipped a Laurie Sikes around-the-
back assist into the net for a 65-56
lead.
UNC's Anita Jones came off the
bench to threaten the Pirate victory,
netting 10 points in just 15 minutes
playing time. Senior Bernie
McGlade paced the Heels with a
20-point, 14 rebound performance,
connecting repeatedly with her
delicate southpaw jumper. Deanna
Thomas added 16 to the losing ef-
fort.
The Lady Bucs built to a 69-64
margin as Sikes connected on a tree
throw with :24 left to be played, but
Jones' answered with a powerful
drive to cut the gap to three with :05
showing on the clock. The Tar Heels
called time out and as Riley put the
ball back into play, she was fouled
by Aprille Shaffer as the clock
wound down to three seconds.
The poised Riley stepped to the
charity stripe and connected on both
attempts to seal North Carolina's
fate. Thomas drove in for the final
Tar Heel bucket as time ran out on
the hapless visitors.
"This is the greatest victory we've
had at home since I've been at East
Carolina praised coach Cathy An-
druzzi. "I wish we play'd like this
all the time.
"It wasn't a conference game, but
it was very important to us
East Carolina kept the score close
in the first half, though allowing
UNC to slip away to a 26-20 lead
with 6:17 before halftime.
The Lady Bucs retaliated with
eight unanswered points to again
pass the Heels 28-26 as Riley scalded
UNC with driving layups as well as
jumpers from downtown Green-
ville.
"I did not anticipate Kathv Riley
being able to shoot trom outside the
way she did admitted UNC coach
Jennifer Alley. "We had seen her
play in our Chrstmas Tournament
and she scored most of her points by
pulling up inside.
"One thing I'm really impressed
with is their hustle after the ball. We
were standing around waiting for
the passes to come to us, while they
were meeting the ball. We let them
control the boards, also
Andruzzi, asecond year coach
from Staten Island, N.Y is known
for her enthusiasm and activity on
the sidelines during games.
"I'm glad the game is over�I was
about to pass out on the sidelines
she quipped. "Seriously, I think
Laurie Sikes did an excellant job for
our team moving the ball down
court and playing so much of the
game.
"I know right near the end of the
game she came to the sidelines dur-
ing a timeout and her knees were
giving her a lot of pain, but she
stayed in and just kept plugging
along
With the victory. East Carolina
improved their record to 13-4 while
the snapping a four game Carolina
winning streak. UNC now siands at
14-5 including winning 10 of their
last 11 games.
UNC (68)
McGlade 10 0 1 20. Thorna- 5 6-8
16, Walls 2 4-6 8, Shatter 4 0-0 8.
Boykin 0 0-0 0. Berry 0 0-0 0.
Crawford 2 0-0 4. Cermola 0 0-0 0,
White I 0-0 2, Jones 5 0-0 10, Bu
0 0-0 0. Totals 29 10-15 68.
ECU (71)
Thompson 2 2-4 6. Rile 1? 6-7
32, Girven 6 1-3 13, Rountree 5
10, Sikes 2 1-2 5. Owen 0 0-0 0,
Barnes 0 0-0 0. Bravbov 0 0 0 o
Hooks 0 0-0 0, Denkler 2 -Z 5
Totals 30 11-18 71.
Halftime: ECU 34. L C 34
Fouled out: none. Total fouls: ECl
15, UNC 18. Technical: none
A-700.
Offense The Key To Super Bowl XIV
DEFENSE, DEFENSE! The key
to football, right? Maybe not when
it comes to deciding who will win
Sunday's fourteenth rendition of
the Super Bowl.
It is a distinct possibility that of-
fense, rather than defense, could
turn out to be the key on Sunday
afternoon when Los Angeles and
Pittsburgh collide in Pasedena,
California.
Both the Rams and the Steelers
have superb defenses, ranking se-
cond and third, respectively, in the
NFL in total defense this season.
Vet it is probably the offense of one
of these teams that will decide who
becomes world champions.
The Steelers are favored and that
they should be, if not for their own
awesome offensive attack then for
the seeming ineptness of the Rams
Jusi take a look at the NFC
playoffs. It took two miracle passses
thrown right into the gut of the
Dallas defense to give L.A. a win in
the semis. The following game the
Rams won the NFC championship
over Tampa Bay via three Frank
Corrall field goals, 9-0. This marked
the first time in the combined ex-
istence of the NFL and AFL cham-
pionship series that neither team
scored a touchdown.
On the other side of the coin the
Steelers were simply awesome offen-
sively in the playoff semis against
Miami and more than adequate
against Houston in the finals.
Quarterback Terry Bradshwaw
displayed the same sharp, brilliant
style that seems natural for him
when playoff time arrives each
winter.
So the Steelers are a cinch right?
Wrong. Believe it or not, if the
Steelers win Sunday it will mark the
first time that Pittsburgh head
(
�r
-A
yftP"
Charles Chandler

coach Chuck Noll has ever beaten
the Rams.
As a matter of fact the Steelers
have only defeated the Rams once in
a total of fifteen games. Noll has
lost three to tfte Catifomatis, in-
cluding a 23-14 dcision at Three
Rivers Stadium in 1971.
The latest loss came in 1978 on a
special ABC-TV edition of Sunday
Night Football. THe Ram defense
totally shut down the Pittsburgh of-
fense, holding them to a measly
total of 59 yards rushing. The Rams
finished with 192 yards on the
ground, over 100 accumulated by
John Capelletti. The 10-7 loss was
the last for the Steelers in '78 as they
rolled to a third Super Bowl win.
In a search for a fourth win, Pitt-
sburgh finds itself in an unenviable
position. After ail, the last time a
Super Bowl was rated this much of a
mis-match (Pitt is rated an WVi
point favorite) was back in 1969
when Baltimore was a whopping
18 pick over the New York Jets.
And everybody knows what hap-
pened in that one.
So what must the Rams do to
upset the "establishment the
Green Bay Packers of the 1970's.
First and foremost, they must shut-
down the Steeler offense. Should
the Rams force Bradshaw into one
of his bad days � he does have a
habit of having then once every blue
moon � then there could be hope.
By forcing Bradshaw, fullback
Franco Harris and the remainder of
the Steeler offense into early errors,
the Rams could cause the defending
champs to try not to lose rather than
to win. This could do the trick.
Even if the Rams do stop the Pitt
offense to a degree the question if
"can L.A. score enough to win?"
Inexperienced QB Vince Ferragamo
has a lot resting on his shoulders.
Unlike Namath of the Jets in the
Super Bowl III upset, Ferragamo is
not an experienced and established
quarterback. He must remain calm
gainst tl.e vaunted Pittsburgh Steel
Curtain defense. If he cracks, the
Steel Curtain could turn into just as
big an offensive weapoon as Brad-
shaw is.
The challenges taced by the Karris
and by the Steelers, that in avoiding
an upset, is what make the garr
football what it is � an enla-
version of the game of chess. Sun-
day's game should prove no dif-
ferent.
Prediction: The Ram are playing
practicaly at home in Paseden. 1
their first Super Bowl and they are
overwhelming underdogs. This is all
they need to dig deep and puiJ out
an upset.
It's too bad, though, that the
Steelers just will not hear of this.
They consider themselves the b
team in the game and rightly so
Pittsburgh teams of the pasi
seasons rate wih any terams thai
have ever played the game. They are
3-0 in Super Bowl play and should
make it four Sunday.
Pittsburgh 2?
Los Angeles 16
'Radar' Is Red-Hot
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
Just call him "Radar
Herb Krusen, the 6-5 sharp-
shooting swingman of the ECU
basketball team, would probably
prefer it that way. After all, he does
dazzle fans with his seeming
magnetic outside shots. His .558
field goal accuracy exemplifies how
he earned the nickname.
But where did he learn to shoot so
well? "My friends and I used to
shoot all the time for money when I
was younger Krusen said. "We'd
play games like h. rse jusc for the
fun of it. You know, I wasn't any
better than any of them. When I
came down here, though, everybody
talked about my shooting
And those folks haven't stopped
yet. They're not likely to, either, as
long as Krusen has performances
like his 23-point game earlier this
season against Baptist college, when
he connected on nine of ten field
goal attempts.
"That night against Baptist was
just one where everything went
right he said. "I got the ball, and
Herb Krusen
I
the first few shots started dropping
in, so I kept shooting. Everybody
was moving well on offense, and
that makes a difference, too
Krusen said that nights like that
game at Baptist are a player's
dream-come-true. "Every player
hopes for a night like that, but it
takes more than just the shooter.
The whole offense must be click-
ing
The Baptist gairiw was not the on-
ly one that Krusen used his "radar"
to the fullest. He had a 10 for 14
night against Virginia Com-
monwealth, was 8 of 11 in the Nor-
thern Arizona game, 10 of 12
against Oral Roberts, and five of
seven against both South Carolina-
Aiken and N.C. State.
Krusen's season has not been all a
complete success, though. A
December slump has kept his field
goal percentage from being truly
remarkable. The slump ended,
Krusen said, in the State game.
"That was the only game that I
didn't start Krusen said. "I didn't
because Coach Odom felt we needed
a bigger lineup, and I understood
that. But I guess I felt I had
something to prove when I did get in
the game
After a shaky first half, Krusen
shot exceptionally in the second
stanza against the Wolf pack. "I
told myself at halftime that I would
concentrate and take the shot if I
had it he said. "I played hard,
and it payed off
The early slump can be related
directly to final fall semester exams,
says Krusen. "I'm not making ex-
cuses he said, "but I don't think I
had my mind on the game then like I
should have. I seemed to be concen-
trating more on books
The senior from Silver Spring,
Md noted that this year's version
of the Pirates, under first-year head
coach Dave Odom, was a more in-
tense team than those that he has
played with in the past.
"I look at our record, and we're
8-8 (actually 9-7 due to a forfeit),
and we were 12-15 last year
Krusen proclaimed. "I keep asking
myself how the two stack up. Coach
Odom has us well-prepared each
game. We probably had more talent
last year with (Oliver) Mack and
(Greg) Cornelius, but this season we
have the unity that we've never had
before
Krusen noted that the Pirate
record this season is dotted with
close contests. Indeed, eight of the
16 games were won by five points or
less. Five of those games were decid-
ed by a single point.
Five of the eight decided by five
or less have been lost by the Pirates.
Krusen thinks he knows why.
"The reason is a simple lack of
confidence he said. "If you check
back you'll see that we can always
come back. Like at Oral Roberts �
we were 11 down and came back.
Once we come back, though, we are
trying not to lose rather than trying
to win
Krusen added that he felt the ear-
ly defeats in those close games
would help the Pirates later on.
"We have 11 more games. We've
played well against both State and
Duke. I look forward to the rest of
the season and am sure we will learn
from our early season mistakes
One of the games that Krusen
anxiously awaits is the Feb. 13 mat-
chup at Maryland. "That's my last
chance to beat an ACC team said
the ECU senior. "It's also the las'
chance for me to play in front of my
friends and family in Maryland. We
play them right in the middle of
their conference schedule. Who I
knows? We might surprise some
people
So might the 6-5 Krusen if his
"radar" is in true form.





o
Bv CHARLES
CHANDLE
sports Editor
ftei its 63-52 loss to
fames Madison last
Monday night, the last
rolina basketball
n had a full week
before resuming
oa lanuary 21 at
e againsi Baptist.
could have
le Pirate coach
i Mum happiei.
W e have been on
-ally an NBA
l1 the past feu
Odom said,
ith a week bet
ames, I think we
some time off to
u ate, and I am
l�' ul thai we've eot
es Welcome
Week Layoff
�E!ASTCAROLINIAN
JANLARV P. 1980
veek ofl comes
J foi both the
and the
dom said.
semester is just
- "ell gel our
- oncentrate on
he said, jt
give t h e
stfi achance
the road
tot a aw hile,
. - alter
day span
a trip to
1 io (ace Oral
definitely
the rest. Foi
b Krusen at-
the loss to
Monday to a
obi em .
played a
a me said
we jusi
physical-
re ready men
seemed to
n the second
.iii,
Hei
;reed that a
nhould help
I think our
guys need and deserve
some time to rest and
get away from the
game he said. "In the
second half at Madison
we had our worst ex-
ecution offensively of
th-e year, h was'due
Partly to Madison's
Play, but fatigue
definitely hurt us
Eleven games remain
on the Pirate schedule,
eluding a stretch
beginning Feb. 2 when
ECU laces Detroit
South Carolina, Illinois
State. Delaware State
and Maryland, con-
secutively.
"The bulk o our
schedule is still ahead
pi us Odom said,
"and if we are to have a
winning season, which
ls our goal, then we
must play well in every
game. Sure some of
'bem are against big
names, but each one in
important to out goal
In Baptist, the
Pirates face potential
disaster. Baptist js
winlessat 0-10 and was
humiliated by ECU
Jan. 10, 99-77. A let-
down against such a
club eon Id really
dampen Odom's
troops.
In addition to their
10 losses this season,
the Buccaneers lost the
final 14 games of the
19 8-79 season, making
i heir losing streak a
depressing 24 contests.
The Bucs are lead bv
6-7 forward Eddie
ralley, who averages
16.7 points and 6.8 re-
bounds per contest.
Junioi guard tiric Ten-
nille contributes 14.6
points per game.
George Maynor, a
6-3 guard, leads the
Pirates' attack averag-
ing 14.1 points. Krusen
averages 12.7, and for-
ward Herb Gray has
been contributing at a
rate of 10.8 per game.
Gray is also the leading
rebounder, averaging
7.8 per contest.
PIRATE NOTES:
ECU is averaging 71.7
points a game com-
pared to 70.7 for their
o p -
poncnts surprisingly,
the Pirates are out-
rebounding their op-
ponents despite a
height disadvantage in
most games, 37.6 to
35.0forward Herb
Gray is the only ECU
player who has started
all 16 games played
thus faras a team
ECU averages 48.6 per-
cent from the field and
63.4 percent from the
free throw
lineKrusen and Gray
figure to become the
fourteenth and fif-
teenth Pirates to eclipse
the 1,000 point mark
sometime this season.
Krusen currently has
965 and Grav 896.
Dennard out
DURHAM
(AP)� Duke University
basketball player Ken-
ny Dennard has been
admitted to Duke
Medical Center for
treatment o complica-
tions involving a bruis-
ed thigh.
The injury means
Dennard will not plav
in Duke's Atlantic
Coast Conference game
with Wake
Forest.
Dennard, of King,
N.C was admitted
Sunday night for treat-
ment of the injury he
received in practice on
Jan. 4.
School officials said
Tuesday that it's
doubtful Dennard will
play in the ACC game
Saturday afternoon
against North Carolina
State.
11
WELL BABY CARg
I
PE0iAx - M,
� - � � a .s s
examines a healthy : � s a
leac� March - : .
�pnB�T
Distributed
By
Taylor
Beverage Co.
Goldsboro
IMPORTED
ECU's Tony Byles
Classifieds
PERSONAL
TYPING Term papers theses,
e'e- excellent skills and
reasonable rates Call 752 2724
FOR SALE
TRUMPET FOR SALE Appro
�mately 8 months of use. Made by
Kings Craftsmen. Case and
music stand included Call Cathy
at 756 68V7 Will negotiate pr.ee
FOR SALE Class stereo (all ac
cessones) very reasonably priced
(cheap) And portable color TV
Cali Bill at 752 2994
FOR SALE Peavey Guitar Amp
reverb, disfort.on, auto mix Ex
cellent Condition Call 752 6474
ask for Dave
79 vw VAN must sell reduced
price Yellow kitchen table metal
bottom $40. 756 0895. 757 6961 ext
268.
FOR RENT
ROOMMATE WANTED to share
three bedroom house, one mile
from campus. Call 758 5681
FEMALE ROOMATE needed to
sharer half rent and utilities
Apartment 5 blocks from campus
Call 758 0631
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed
immediately to share large housL
on Woodlawn Graduate student
of professional preferred. Call
758 7140 after 5:00.
Female Roommate, Needed im
mediately, preferably grad stu
dent Would have private room,
can be furnished Within walking
distance to campus Share half
rent, utilities, and phone Call
758 1636
Edelweiss Ski Haus
HAS A 24 HOUR
SKI REPORT
�DIAL GREENSBORO- �
NORTH CAROLINA
VIRGINIA
STEAKHOUSE
SPECIALS
Monday Jan. 21 thru Wednesday Jan. 16
No. 1 8 oz. SIRLOIN
50 OFF
Complete with Idaho King Baked
Potato, Texas Toast and Margarine
mmn
1890
Seafood
Thurs. Night
Specials
OYSTERS $4.7
FLOUNDER .�
TROUT $a.Wi
PERCH 1:
all you can eat
No take-outs please.
Meal includes:
French Fries, Cole slaw,
Hnshpnpples
Tuesday Night Only
SIRLOIN BEEF TIPS
$1.00 OFF Only $1
Complete with Idaho King Baked
Potato, Texas Toast and Margarine
We are proud to
announce that we
have added
one of the
AREAS FINEST
SALAD BARS
for your
dining pleasure.
OPEN FOR LUNCH
Daily
except Sat.) 1130 - SC
HOURS
, SUN-THUR
4&0-9:oo
mi. & SAT.
4:30-10:00
Heineken
HOLLAND
THEI IMPORTED BEER IN AMERICA
LET VICKS HELP YOU
THROUGH THE
WINTER COLD
SEASON
Prices effective Jan. 17-23
Vicks Cough Syrup 3oz.
regS 1.85 NOW NOW $1.35
Vicks VapoRub 1.5oz.
regS1.52OW$1.03
Vicks Daycare lOoz.
reg$2.81 NQW $2.49
Vicks Nycpiil lOoz.
reg$3.77jow$309
Vicks Sinex long acting
nasal spray loz.
reg$3.15 Now $2.39
Vicks Oracin Throat Lozenges
regular or eherrv
reg$1.73 NOW $1.19
Vicks Cough Drops
regular, wild cherry,blue mint,
or lemon flavor reg 30c each
NOW 4 for $1.00
Vicks Formula 44 6oz.
reg$3.14 NOW $2.79
Vicks Formula 44-D 6oz.
reg $3.32 NOW $2.75
tiwi
8903 E. 10th. St.
758-2712
Located On Evan Street
Quality e Competitive Prices e Service
t11 DteMmon Am. �h St. � Memorial Or.
75&J105 7SM1M





12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 17, 1980
NBA
Standings
National Basketball Association
M K (.lance
B� The Associated Press
r astern onference
Atlantic Ditision
W I
Hilton 2 II
Philadelphia 2 II
Washington 20 2 2
New Noik 22 26
New I ersey in s
( i i! 11 j I Division
MUnta ;x in
N - Antonio J4 2 l
Pel.
744
"44
476
4SS
1v)
(.H
I I '
12'
15
H
n
I) c I tl I I
Ka sas
( h cag '
- .
I ju name nm intituled
I nesd a j's
Is). New York I 10
u ishmgton 100
12J, New lersev I Is)
II. Ka isi . I -�
17 ! v tcrW

20 25
20 27
II J5
Western onference
Midwest DiMMnn
i 29 20
26 21
15 29
In �2
13 3
Pacific Division
U I 3
l 15
29 I 7
2h 23
:4 :4
14 1 I
J I I
500
444
426
239
S42
ss A
341
33
:si
72 3
h"4
630
531
500
31 I
Coaches Seldom Enjoy Flying
17
I I '
12'
14"
4'
s)
10'
19
t� j in e s
RALEIGH
(AP)�College coaches
who enjoy the
recruiting aspect of
their jobs are few and
far between, and one of
the most distasteful
aspects is traveling,
particularly in private
planes.
The subject has
received its fair share of
attention following the
death last Friday of
Louisiana State foot-
ball coach Bo Rein in a
light plane crash. The
former North Carolina
State coach and his
pilot presumably died
when their plane plung-
ed into the ocean off
the Virginia coast after
wandering more than
1,000 miles off course
during a recruiting trip.
Despite the fears
most express for flying
in small planes under
sometimes questionable
weather conditions,
most say the practice
will continue because
it's the most practical
way to do a competitive
job.
"You could drive it,
but you would leave
some recruits out. At
times, it is necessary to
fly said Monte Kif-
fin, Rein's successor at
N.C. State.
"It's essential said
Clemson football coach
Danny Ford.
"I don't think it
crosses people's minds
until something hap-
pens. When you bring
the situation close to
home, you start
wondering. But when
I've got somewhere to
get to, I've got to go
he said.
Football and basket-
ball coaches "need to
be in 40 different places
at one time said Bill
Cobey, athletic director
at the University of
North Carorlina.
"The way to expedite
is private aircraft. They
can't afford to spend
their time waiting in
airports Cobey said.
The problem of short
intervals between ap-
pointments with
recruits makes the pro-
blem all the more
acute, said Tom Flet-
cher, Virginia Tech's
head football recruiter.
"You can only do it
with private planes
Fletcher said. "We
have coaches that are
really worried. But if
you have a business
that requires flying,
you'll find a number of
people in the business
that are apprehensive
about flying. Unless
you made a commit-
ment to the Air Force I
don't think you'll ever
feel as safe in the air as
on the ground.
"The Rein crash hits
home. But statistics still
point out that air travel
is real safe in com-
parison with the
automobile Fletcher
said.
That may be so, but
N.C. State basketball
coach Norm Sloan sas
he gave up flying in
private aircraft three
years ago after an un-
successful recruiting
trip to see Gene Banks
in Philadelphia. Banks
later went to Duke.
"Flying doesn't seem
natural to me said
Sloan, who now
restricts his air travel to
commercial planes.
"Height bothers me.
not fear of crashes, and
I'm edgy from the time
I go up until I get back
down. My last private
airplane flight came
when I flew to
Philadelphia to see
Gene Banks play. It
was a real rough flight
and I decided 1 didn't
want am more o!
them
Wolfpack
Improved
B DICKBRINSTER
Associated Press Wriler
RAI EIGH�As far
as v. oach Norm Sloan
concerned, the dif-
nce in this season's
North Carolina Stale
basketball team is its
a b i I i t to handle
pressure situations.
For thar reason the
I6th-ranked Wolfpack
has taken charge when
the going has been
tough and carved out
the onlv perfeci early-
season record in the
v antic Coast Con-
x ate has in fact
ad matched its en-
victor total oi last
u ing which it
for last place in the
AC C with a 3-4 mark.
-car ago we'd go
to the tree throw line in
a crucial situation and
miss a one-and-one
said Tuesday.
his season we've
thrust into those
situations and we've
made those shots
Whatever the
reasons, N.C. State has
won 11 consecutive
games 8 its longest
streak since the na-
tional championship of
1974. That mark goes
on the line tonight
when the Wolfpack
visits ninth-ranked
North Carolina.
And the Pack,
despite the always-
difficult assignment of
playing at Carmichael
Auditorium, is a con-
siderably more formidi-
ble opponent than it
was just one year ago.
Two of the main
reasons are senior for-
ward Hawkeye
Whitney and freshman
guard Sidney Lowe.
Both are products of
DeMatha High School
n Washington,
perhaps the Rolls
Royce of" secondary
school basketball.
ARMY NAVY STORE
Backpacks. BIS, Bomber.

Field, Deck, Flight, Snorkel
J Jackets, Peacoats, Parkas.
Shoes, Combat Boots. Plus.
1 SO I S. Evans Street t
Leather Belts
$6 to $19
Leather Handbags
$10 to $25
Shoes Repaired to Look
Like New.
jRiggan Shoe Repair
3c Leather Shop
111 West 4th St.
Downtown Greenville
758 0204
Parking in Front
and Rear.
CORRECTION!
Due to error by Harris Supermarket, the coupon that appeared
in their Jan. 15 ad should read as follows:
Free 2 litre bottle of
A&W Root Beer
LIAAITONE PERCUSTOAAER
Expires Jan. 19,1980
ECU
VETERANS
Kri.Jan. 18- 7&9pm
Sat Jan. 1�- Matinee: 4:30. 7&9pm
mm
JSB Stutlmt I nion Films Committee
BECOME AN AIR FORCE OFFICER
YOUR PREVIOUS ACTIVE DUTY SERVICE, COMBINED WITH ENROLL
ING IN AIR FORCE ROTC.MAY LEAD TO YOUR BECOMING AN AIR
FORCE OFFICER. CHECK OUT THE AIR FORCE ROTC TWO YEAR PRO
GRAM AND THE BENIFITSOF AN AIR FORCE CAREER
Friday Special TGIF
Thank God It's Friday
3cked a pepperonf truck FREE
PEPPERONISONALL PEPPERONI PIZ7AS
6 f f1
f
I
I
I
I
I
K
I
I
I
I
I
r
I
I
I
I
$1$
LWMlajH S
w
on any 10" Supreme Pizza
With Coupon
$1.50$ OFF
on any 16" Supreme Pizza
With Coupon
$2.00$ OFF
on any 14" Supreme Pizza
With Coupon
I BJ on any 20" Supreme Pizza
Iwith Coupon Pus 2 FREE Quarts of Coke
1i-rlN EtiQ 5
NOTHING
Free Pizza
Every Thursday
iwiNfiais
CHANELO'S
WyM.PZZaV0UR CHOICE
2nd nmsFree
NOTHING
PIZZAS
OOUOM MAOi FfttAMOMtr
YOUR
CHOICE
CHANELO'S
PIZZA
Saturday
Special
10"
$2.90
3.50
3.50
3.50
3.50
3.50
OLIVE(Black or Green) olS
ANCHOVY ago
MUSHROOM 350
HAM 3.50
ADDITIONAL ITEMS .60
CHANELO'S SUPREME 5.50
CHEESE
ONION
GREEN PEPPER
PEPPERONI
FRESH SAUSAGE
GROUND BEEF
14"
4.45
5.20
5.20
5.20
5.20
5.20
5.20
5.20
5.20
5.20
5.20
.75
7.75
16"
5.30
6.25
6.25
6.25
6.25
6.25
6.25
6.25
6.25
6.25
6.25
.95
9.50
20"
7.70
8.95
8.95
8.95
8.95
8.95
8.95
8.95
8.95
8.95
8.95
1.25
12.70
UXE SICILIAN PIZZAS
THICK CRUST EXTRA CHEESE
Super
Supreme
COUPON
DAY
1 mrta DlJ?e m ourDinm9 Room, call Ahead- Your
OU IIUO y order will be ready when you arrive Better
Cnorl-il Yet' 9ive "s a call at 758-7400 for FAST,FREE
OpeCiai FRESH, PI PIN HOT Delivery in less than
30 minutes.
PepperonUtalian Sauajge, Mushrooms. Onions. Green Pepper
GrggnOlive, Anchovy on request. '
m SANPWICHES
� BREAD BAKED FRESH DAILY
Short Loaf $2QQ
Long Loaf jo qr
SUBMARINE "
Ham,Salami,Sauce,Cheese-Baked
HAM and CHEESE
Ham,Cheese.Mustard,Lettuce & Tomato
HOGIE
Ham,Salami,Mustard,Mayonnaise,Olive Oil,
Lettuce & Tomato
ITALIAN SANDWICH
Ham,Salami,Sauce,Cheese,Onions,Pepper
& Mushrooms-Baked
VEGETARIAN SANDWICH
Onions.Green Pepper.MusrKooms,Sauce
& Cheese-Baked
VERSUVIAN STEAK
Hamburger Steak,Lettuce & Tomato,
Mustard, Mayonnaise
Chef's Salad $2.95
Dinner Salad .89
Garlic Bread .79
CHEESE
ONION
GREEN PEPPER
PEPPERONI
FRESH SAUSAGE
GROUND BEEF
OLIVE (Black or Green)
ANCHOVY
MUSHROOM
HAM
ADDITIONAL ITEMS
SICILIAN SUPREME
10"
$3.50
4.10
4.10
4.10
4.10
4 10
4 10
4.10
4.10
4.10
4.10
60
6.10
14"
5.20
5.95
5.95
5.95
5.95
5.95
595
595
5.95
5.95
595
.75
8.50
16"
6 25
7.20
7.20
7.20
7.20
7.20
7 20
7 20
7.20
7 20
7.20
95
10.45
rnrMtai,anwSaU$a9e'Mu,hroXT,s- Omon.Green Peppe
Green Olrve, Anchovy on request
Dinners
20"
8 25
10.20
1020
10.20
1020
10.20
1020
10.20
10.20
10.20
1020
125
13.95
Spaghetti & Meat Sauce Hot Game Bread
Spaghetti & Meat Balls Hot Garlic Bread
Lasagna with Hot Garlic Bread
Extra Meat Balls - each
Dvrog$
Coke -Root Beer - Sprite
Tab - iced Tea - Coffee
S� 35 Lg. .50 Qt. .89
HOURS
MonThur. 4 p.m1a.m.
Jri�Y 4 p.m2 a.m.
S�urd�y 11a.m2ajn.
&�nd�y 11a.m12 Md.
FREE
2.50
2.95
3.50
40
Remember
Tues.
Pizza
All
U-CanEat
ONLY
$2.79
From 5 to 9 p.m.
Monday Big 10 Day
BUY ONE GET
All 10"
ONE FREE PlZZaS
LWLNlg&fS
p
DELIVERY
507E. 14th Street
Greenville, N.C.
758-7400
YOU DESERVE THE FULL RICH
LIFE, WHY SETTLE FOR f ESS
-W4J&BS
-� �-
b
is � � �
i





Title
The East Carolinian, January 17, 1980
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 17, 1980
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.31
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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