The East Carolinian, January 15, 1980






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Vol. 54 Noj�"
10 Pages
Tuesday, January 15, 1980
Greenville, N.C
('irculalion 1(1.(MM!
Iranian Students A t ECU Discuss Crisis
B MARIANNE HARBISON
News Editor
The following is an interview with
three Iranian students: Roya
Shokoufan, Asghar Memarzadeh,
and Mahmood Seyed-Mozaffari.
I he statements below are the opi-
nh ns of the participants and should
he regarded as such.
tast Carolinian: Have am of you
had problems at Last Carolina
which have resulted from the crisis
in Iran?
I nanimously: No.
East Carolinian: What steps did you
take in order to comply with Presi-
dent Carter's investigation of Ira-
man students, and how did you feel
after having fulfilled the re-
quirements?
Memarzadeh: We had to go to an
immigration office in Charlotte and
take papers from the school (ECU)
saying we were full-time students.
We had to verify our address. Also,
we had our pictures taken.
East Carolinian: And, then, how
did you feel?
Skokoufan: We were made to feel
like criminals because of the way
the Charlotte immigration officials
treated us.
Memarzadeh: The earlobe had to be
shown in the pictures it is like a
fingerprint.
Seyed-Mozaffari: I had to have my
picture taken four times my hair
or my beard was in the way each
time and my earlobe didn't show
until the fourth picture.
East Carolinian: Sort of like mug
shots?
Memarzadeh: Yes. It was just a way
to harass Iranian students. We were
investigated like we had done
something wrong against the
American nation. It was almost like
the American government treated
the Japanese in the United States at
the time of World War II. I agree
that illegal students should be
deported.
East Carolinian: Have American
students at East Carolina been sym-
pathetic to your presence here?
Memarzadeh: Those who know
about the situation and are inform-
ed are sympathetic, but those who
know only about the fifty hostages
and nothing about the causes behind
the capture of those hostages are not
sympathetic at all.
East Carolinian: Do you feel that
those who aren't informed are
hostile toward you?
Unanimously; Yes.
East Carolinian; Many American
students would probably like to ask
you questions about Iran, the
hostages, etc but are fearful of
asking because of hurting your feel-
ings or perhaps offending you. How
would you react to their questions?
Search For
Rein Suspended
CAPI CHARLES, Ya.
( VP) I nless more debris is sighted
and recovered, the wayward flight
and plane crash which apparently
killed 1 ouisiana Slate football
coach Robert "Bo" Rein may re-
main unexplained.
I he Coast Grard said Sunday it
has suspended its search for
wreckage ol the plane carrying
Rein. 34, and pilot Louis Benscot-
ter, both presumed dead after their
ne Cessna 441 crashed ear-
� 1 iday nearly 1,000 miles from
where it was headed.
1 t. Gene Brooks said the search
was suspended at sunset Saturday
"pending further developments
He said the search would resume on-
ly ii more debris were sighted or the
rch area expanded.
rwo Coast Guard aircragt and
vessel made eight or nine trips
igh the area in which the plane
K)0 miles northeast of its
ided flight from Shreveport,
! a to Baton Rough, I a.
A memorial service for Rein, who
had gone LSU just two months ago
after serving as head coach at North
Carolina State, was held Sunday at
Cary, N.C. In an emergency
meeting Saturday, LSU named
Jerry Stovall to succeed Rein as
football coach there.
Rein and his pilot had taken off
from Shreveport shortly after 9
p.m. Thursday for what was to have
been a routine 60-minute flight to
Baton Rouge.
Instead, the plane went into a
spin, plunged into the Atlantic
Ocean about 1(X) miles off the
Virginia coast and disappeared at
1:30 a.m. Friday as Air Force Capt.
Daniel R. Zoerb watched helplessly.
c oast Guard officials believe an
aluminum wheel sighted Friday
night by a Norwegian ship 1(X) miles
cast o Cape Henry "definitely
belonged to the aircraft, after talk-
ing to the owner Brooks said.
Memarzadeh: I would welcome
their questions. I feel it is a duty o
mine to answer their questions.
I would like to do this.
Skokoufan: Yes.
I'ust Carolinian: In the minds of
some students there is an uncertain-
ty about the Islamic republic and the
Islamic religion. How would you ex-
plain these, and do vou ove
them?
Memarzadeh: lv personal 0
isn't important. I he Man
want ii and
See STUDENTS Page 21
Ricky Lowe
Late Professor Respected
Parks
By DIANE HENDERSON
Managing F.ditor
"He had a tremendous love of life
which was reflected in his
teaching �
Dr.Lon Slone Felker, ECU
political science professor, spoke of
his friend and colleague Dr. Oral
E.Parks, who died December 30 of
leukemia.
Students of Dr. Parks agreed that
this outlook enriched his teaching.
"He tried to get you to relate
things that happened in everday life
with the material in the course. He
told stories to make the points more
interesting said Marianne Har-
bison, one of Dr. Parks's students.
One aspect of his personalitv that
both students and professors
recognized was Dr. Parks's will-
ingness to help, to listen and to talk
with his students, in short, his car-
ing.
'The term 'pro-student' could
I he Headache Of Registration Is Over
.for this semester
definitely be applied to Oral. I don't
think he ever lost track of why he
was here commented Herbert
Carlton, an associate professor in
political science.
"He was dedicated to students.
He liked students, and they liked
him said Dr. Lawrence Hough,
associate professor in political
science and assistant dean of general
college.
Dr. Parks was also considerate of
students'problems.
"He was willing to bend to make
allowances for student needs. If you
hsd a problem you could come to
him, and he'd try to help noted
Libby Lefler, a former student of
Dr. Parks.
"Dr. Parks took an interest in
students. Anything he knew about,
he'd be willing to sit down and
discuss with you. He was a super
teacher said Lynn Calder, a
political science major.
Although teaching was his major
concern, Dr. Parks shared many
other interests with friends and
family. One of his main interests
was collecting unusual or valuable
rocks.
"I remember one experience in
particular. Oral and I went to the
See PARKS Page 3 Col. 1
Soviets Veto UN Sanctions
UNIT! D NATIONS (AP) �
The United States called on other
I . N. members to join it in
"meaningful" action against
Iran after the second Soviet veto
in a week killed a Security Coun-
cil resolution authorizing sane-
Inside Today
Editorials Page 4
Olher Opinionspage 5
'I nain' OnstagePage 6
Dramap�Ke 6
Madison Downs Ml Pajje
lady Piralfs ,femsonPa�e 8
tions until the American hostages
are released. But Iran's foreign
minister said the hostages would
be kept until the shah is returned,
even if this took "forever
We urge all other members
of the United Nations to join
with us in the application of
meaningful measures against the
continued holding of the hostages
in defiance of international law
U.S. Ambassador Donald
McHenry told the council after
the veto Sunday night nullified a
10-2 vote in favor of collective
punitive action. "Only thus will
we demonstrate to Iran that their
lawless actions are viewed with
disfavor by all nations
The council in a resolution
Dec. 31 called on Iran to free the
hostages and said if they were not
released by Jan. 7, it would
"adopt effective measures
McHenry said this was a
"binding obligation" to adopt
sanctions which the Soviet veto
thwarted, and "the membership
of the United Nations at large re-
mains obliged to take effective
measures consistent with the
U.N. charter to carry out that
resolution
The Soviet Union abstained on
the first resolution, adopted by a
vote of 11.0. McHenry said the
Soviet veto on the sanctions
resolution was "an act of
political expediency designed to
buy Iranian silence on
Afghanistan and Soviet advan-
tage in the area
On Jan. 7, the Soviet Union
cast its first veto of the new year
against a council resolution pro-
testing the Russian military in-
tervention in Afghanistan.
Among steps against Iran be-
ing considered by the United
States is a naval blockade to en-
force economic sanctions and a
reduction of Western diplomats
in Tehran, U.S. officials in
Washington reported. Deputy
Secretary of State Warren
Christopher will discuss this with
America's allies in Europe this
week as he tries to line up allied
action on Afghanistan.
But Iranian Foreign Minister
Sadegh Ghotbzadeh said if the
United States continues to "play
politics" with the embassy im-
passe, the hostages will remain in
captivity. He told a Tehran news-
conference shortly before the'
U.N. vote that his government
was prepared to wait "more or
less forever" for the extradition
of ousted Shah Mohammad Reza
Pahlavi,
Lowe's Job
In Question
By DEBORAH HOTALINC
and
MARIANNE HARBISON
SGA Treasurer Ricky Lowe, after a
medical drop from final exams, officially
withdrew from classes before Christmas
holidays, technically relinquishing anv
position held while enrolled at ECU.
Several questions have been raised by
SGA legislators about the validity of
Lowe's reinstatement as treasurer because
of the statute in the SGA constitution
concerning vacancy of positions.
Rudy Alexander, assistant director of
student affairs, stated, "As I understand
it, the onstitution says that one holding
an executive position must have a 2.0
average and must remain a full-time stu-
dent during the term
Lowe's apparent abrupt withdrawal has
prompted speculation that a special elec-
tion will need to be held to fulfill SGA
constitutional requirements. Alexander
said that the decision to hold a special
election should be turned over to SGA At-
torney General Drake Mann for con-
sideration.
According to Alexander's interpreta-
tion of the constitution, "The Attorney
General has three weeks in which to call
the special election
Attorney General Mann commented,
"Nothing official has come to my atten-
tion concerning this matter
When asked for comment. Vice
Chancellor for Student Life Dr. Elmer
Meyer said he thought that since classes
had not been held during the Christmas
break and Lowe had withdrawn before
the break (when school was not in ses-
sion), he couldn't see anything wrong
with Lowe's reinstatement to office.
"Unless there is something specifically
against it in the constitution, I don't see
anything wrong with it Meyer said.
"The attorney general would have to rule
on that � it's not my rule
The present constitution of the SGA in
Section 7, Article IV B. states, "Should
any other executive office become vacant,
there shall be an election to fill the vacan-
cy within three weeks of its occurrence
Therefore, upon official withdrawal,
Ricky Lowe relinquished any executive
Journalism Meeting
position held in SGA
When questioned, Lowe
had in fact officially witl d i
school after earlier receivine a n
drop from his courses. - did oil
withdraw, but I decided tocomt
semester. I technically finished
semester (fall). I was not aware of tl
blem of readmission to scho
problem oi finishing m
treasurer
Spring semester, 1980 cla .
ficially on Friday, January 11
an approximate 1" day period
call a special election for the I
position of treasurer of SGA.
Goldsboro Man
Shot By Police
GOLDSBORO (AP)�A U
man was listed in stable cond
day night after he uas ihi polk
the end of an hour-long spree in which he
held a Goldsboro city alderman and three
other persons hostage.
Authorities filed five charges ol assa
by pointing a gun and tour counts
assault with a firearm on a police ofl
against John Ed Hobbs. 27, who was
hospitalized Saturday after he was shot
the leg during a confrontation with pol
Hobbs was reportedly upset becaust
was not to receive a tax refund
Officials identified Hobbs he
who entered the office of Goldsboro
torney and city alderman Earl
Saturday afternoon and held h ted,
another attorney. a secretary and a
at bay for several minutes.
Whined said the man described himse
as "being upset with the system
especially because he thought others wv
getting tax refunds and he was not.
After Hobbs escaped from he build.
he apparently tried to enter other
buildings, police said. When police caue
up with him, he pointed his shotgun
them and ran.
Police Chief CM. Gilstrap said officers
fired shots, but apparently did not hit
Hobbs.
Lemish Will Speak
Donald Lemish, vice chancellor for In-
stitutional Advancement and Planning,
will be the guest speaker for the Society
for Collegiate Journalists' Induction
Ceremony Tuesday, Jan. 15, 7 p.m in
the Mendenhall Student Center
Legislature Room.
Lemish
Lemish previously served as assistant
vice president and director of develop-
ment at the University of Alabama in Bir-
mingham before joining the East Carolina
staff. His media experience varies from
journalism teacher and director of
publications to sports director. He receiv-
ed his bachelor's and master's degrees in
journalism from Ball State University,
Muncie, Ind.
"The Society for Collegiate Journalists
is honored to have such a distinguished
guest speaker said Joyce Evans, presi-
dent of the SCJ. "Mr. Lemishs ac-
complishments are numerous, and we col-
lege journalists can learn a great deal
from him "
"We're inviting the English fraternity
to share this valuable experience with us.
Also, other interested persons who wish
to attend may do so she said.
The society will induct II student
members and two faculty members. Lhev
�include: Ramona Mills, Larry Zicherman.
Charles Chandler, Alison Bartel, John
Mueller, Btenda Vinson, Richard Green.
Paul Lincke, Karen Wcndt, Hugh
Johnson, Diane Henderson, and faculty
members John Warren and Susan
Donaldson.
Refreshments will be served alter the
ceremony, and inductees mav bring
guests.
5
.
'� !�





Students From Iran Speak Out On Issues
Continued from page 1
Seyed-Mozaffari: What aspect do
you mean?
Skokoufan: The rules basically
come from Koran.
Memarzadeh: Yes. The main pro-
blem is mass media has been trying
to destroy the whole idea of Islamic
republic. Mass media tries to protect
interests of, for example, Exxon,
Rockefellers, Amoco, and they
don't like it. When Iran says we
have the power over the oil matters,
the American imperialists don't like
it, and so the mass media doesn't
want to print this. The media has
fabricated the story in order to
allow the Americans to hear what
the media wants and not the truth.
Skokoufan and Seyed-Mozaffari:
Yes.
Memarzadeh: I think American
government is going to try to show
that Iranian people are detestable.
East Carolinian: Do you think the
outcome of the revolution in Iran
will be an Islamic republic?
Seyed-Mozaffari: So far in the
world, traditionally, any new
government must lean toward either
the United States or Russia. If the
government wants to stay away
from these two, it is doomed to
death. The revolution in Iran is the
first time an Islamic republic has
been attempted, and only the future
will answer as to whether an Islamic
republic will prevail. It has never
been allowed before.
Skokoufan: I personally don't think
the Islamic republic will succeed.
East Carolinian: Do you agree with
the idea of an Islamic republic?
Skokoufan: No, but the Iranian
people must be united regardless of
my opinion or ideas.
Memarzadeh: The majority of the
Iranian people believe in the IslarHc
republic and that is what is impo.
tant � not individual opinions or
ideals. Unity is what is important.
Seyed-Mozaffari: I approve of the
foreign policy of the Islamic
republic. It doesn't want domina-
tion of Iran by any other govern-
ment � and I don't want this sort of
domination on my conscience. I
don't want my government to be
pro-American or pro-Russian. I
don't want my government to give,
concessions to either superpower.
East Carolinian: Did you approve
of the deposed shah when he was in
power in Iran, and how do you feel
about his presence in Panama and
the United States' influence in his
move to Panama?
Unanimously: I don't like the ex-
shah and never have.
Skokoufan: The Panamanian
government is a puppet of the
United States, regardless of what is
said, and their people don't want
the ex-shah there.
Seyed-Mozaffari: Any government
which harbors a criminal should be
ashamed � not particularly the ex-
shah, but any criminal. The United
States sent the ex-shah to Panama
because they felt it was a good move
in order to get the hostages back.
After the hostages are returned, the
ex-shah will come back to the
United States.
Skokoufan: It will be a quiet return
� no big thing.
Memarzadeh: The ex-shah has $35
billion in gold and assets of the Ira-
nian people, and it is in American
banks. Because of this, the ex-shah
thinks he has the right to return
here.
Skokoufan: Yes, he has friends
here.
East Carolinian: Do you think that
the shah will ever get what he
deserves according to the Iranian
people?
figure in the Iranian government,
and do you think that he would
release the hostages before risking a
war with the United States?
Memarzadeh: We hope that at least at home to understand what was
justice will be attempted. really going on, but again, the mass
Skokoufan: Do you really think he's media destroyed their intention.
going to get it? Skokoufan: Sometimes one does
Seyed-Mozaffari: It takes patience, wrong things for the right reasons. Seved-Mozaffari' Force will do no
Memarzadeh: Yes, I think he'll get One can't judge the situation by the ood Khomeini nas stated that
it. last days or weeks. If you want to force wiU nol get the hostages back
Skokoufan: I don t think so. judge the situation, go back and
East Carolinian: What do you feel is look at the facts of history.
the ex-shah's destiny? East Carolinian: Do you think the
Memarzadeh: To me, he's definitely Iranian students at the American
not staying in Panama. His stay in Embassy in Iran should release the
Panama is conditional to begin hostages?
with. He'll either return to the Memarzadeh: They should not
United States, Israel, South Africa, release the hostages until they have
into the United States.
Skokoufan: No, Khomeini won't re-
main in power in Iran.
Hopefully, he'll return to Iran.
Seyed-Mozaffari: The United States
does not want the ex-shah to be tried
in Iran. The United States has done
many things in Iran and the ex-shah
would be a good witness against the
United States in such a trial.
East Carolinian: Do you think that
the students in the American Em-
achieved the goal which they set out
to achieve.
East Carolinian: And which goal is
that?
Memarzadeh: To get the ex-shah
back in Iran!
Seyed-Mozaffari: I don't think the
students have accomplished
anything by taking the hostages.
Seyed-Mozaffari: In many countries
people attack the American people
� it is not the people, but the im-
perialists who are to blame. A lot is
heard about the Russian attack on
Afghanistan, but you hear nothing
about the United States attacking
Oman. Do you know where Oman
is?
East Carolinian: No.
Seyed-Mozaffari: That's my point.
Memarzadeh: If American people
believe in human rights, I feel they
should stand up
Skokoufan: 1 feel that they should
search for the truth
Memarzadeh: The thing is, I talk to
Americans evry day, and they say
they understand and they are sym-
pathetic. Understanding and sym
pathy is one thing, but doing
something about it is another thing.
Understand the situation isn't just
for Americans, but should be for
everybody. I think that two years
ago if you had reported that people
had been killed in Iran or South
Africa or somewhere, that people
would have said, "Who cares?" But
now it is different, and what hap-
pens affects Americans and
everyone all ovct the world. Now is
the time lo care.
bassy in Iran were justified in taking Skokoufan: I don't think they
the hostages, and do you feel that
they have gained enough recogni-
tion from that act to free the
hostages and still obtain their goal?
Seyed-Mozaffari: To gain recogni-
tion was not their intention. The
students wanted the killer of their
families to be tried � the exshah.
Memarzadeh: Nobody justified get-
ting hostages. The hostages are in-
nocent, generally, but the American
should have taken the hostages to
begin with, but since they did, I
think they should not let up or give
in until they have achieved justice
for the ex-shah.
East Carolinian: Ayatollah Kho-
meini has been a controversial
figure both in Iran and in the United
States. Considering the recent op-
position to Khomeini by the
Ayatollah Shariat-Madari, do you
government has admitted that some think that Khomeini is a permanent
of them are spies. The students
wanted to get the American people
LONELY?The1
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V

t
I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY IS, 1980
Parks Was A Warm And Sensitive Person
Cowee Valley Creek
rockhounding. There
we were, sitting in our
ponchos in a pouring
rainstorm wiih 10 quart
buckets of gravel and
mud beside us. For
three days, we sat there
m or seven hours at a
time, water and mud
slopping on our feet,
searching for stones-
rockhounds are crazy!
When we started to
leave, the rain finally
stopped Dr. Hough
reminisced.
That trip, Dr. Parks
came away with a
beautiful ruby, and Dr.
Hough brought home a
sapphire. Dr. Parks
made these sojourns all
.ner the country, and
part of the attraction
was his love of nature.
According to Dr.
Hough, both neighbor
and colleague, there
was nothing Oral Parks
liked better than the
mountains.
On the wall of Dr.
Lon Felker's office (at
one time Dr. Parks's
office), is a poster
which readsLife is
either a daring adven-
ture or nothing Dr.
Felker explained that
the poster was there
when he came, and it
gave testimony to its
former owner.
"His outlook always
reflected his deep love
of nature, a concern for
his fellow man and his
search for truth and
justice both in his
academic work and his
life Dr. Felker ex-
plained.
His colleagues all
agreed that Dr. Parks
was very much a family
man. His wife, Helen,
who teaches at Lenoir
Community College,
and his 9-year-old son,
Duncan Stuart
Michael, shared many
of his interests.
"He loved to play
golf, and he taught his
son how to play. Dur-
ing the summer, they
played three or four
times a week. He also
belonged to a model
furniture club, and they
made six or eight pieces
over the last year said
Dr. Hough.
As Dr. Hough
pointed out, Dr. Parks
enjoyed working with
his hands. Besides
agate slicing and mak-
ing jewelry, wind
chimes, and other ar-
ticles from rocks he
found (many of which
he gave to staff and
faculty members on
campus), Dr. Parks
made a stained glass
window, collected
stamps and learned to
play the cello. His wife
said that music was one
of his greatest joys, and
he loved to attend con-
certs at ECU.
Part of his love of
life may have come
from his Texas upbr-
inging.
"He was very
reminiscent and ap-
parently had a very en-
joyable childhood in
Texas. He was a true
son of the panhandle
commented Dr. Felker.
Texans are famous
for being storytellers,
and both his students
and friends noted this
as one of Dr. Parks's
principle
characteristics.
"He was a great
storyteller. If you'd go
to his office, he'd be
willing to sit and talk to
you about whatever
you were interested in.
Hed say the most in-
teresting things said a
former student.
"He was a super
teacher and a versatile
person. He knew more
about more things than
anybody I ever met
Lynn Calder stated.
According to Dr.
Hough, "He fit the
Texan stereotype as far
as being a talker .
Dr. Parks's death
came as a shock to his
friends and co-workers
in the Political Science
Department. Although
his friends knew about
his rhumatoid arthritis,
the leukemia which Dr.
Parks suffered from
for years was never
brought to the atten-
tion of his colleagues.
Dr. Parks's attitude
toward life was
reflected by those
around him.
"He had a way of in-
spiring the students to
learn, moreso than any
other professor 1 ever
had Ms. Lefler said.
"A lot of people are
going to miss him, and
I know I am said Dr.
Hough, one of many
who made the same
statement.
Geology professor
Dr. Stanley Riggs sum-
med up perhaps Dr.
Parks's most
memorable qualitites.
"He was a sensitive and
warm human being, a
very gentle person, who
was very much in tune
with the world and the
people around him.
"He always had a
smile on his face
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Student Union Committee Chairperson Jan.l8-Feb.l
Student Union Committee Members Feb.4-Feb 18
The Student Union is responsible for sponsoring social,
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�tje iEaat �arnltman
Serving the campus community for 54 years.
Marc Barnes, semor Editor
Diane Henderson, Mam,g,g ����
Richard Green, copy Editor
Anita Lancaster, rttn Manager
Marianne Harbison, m&m
Robert M. Swaim, Director o ��
Steve O'Geary, mm Manager
Charles Chandler, �"��'
KAREN WENDT, Features Editor
TUESDAY. JANUARY 15, 1980
PAGE 4
A Decision Must
Be Made Soon
There is a dichotomy which is
found between politics on the cam-
pus level and politics on the national
level. Politics on college campuses is
simply not as important to the
world at large, or to how that world
operates.
Politics
Politics on campus is indicative,
however, of the larger whole. It
reflects all we have learned from
history classes and the CBS Evening
News. We have all watched political
rallies on television, read articles
about the upcoming Iowa caucauses
and listened as skilled reporters
have dissected major candidates on
national television.
SGA
Then we come to the campus.
Some of us choose to get involved in
local or state politics, and some of
us get inv Ived in national politics.
Some of us make our own politics
(like our own SGA) without benefit
of professional parties like the
Democrats or Republicans.
Little Trust
The problem with politics is that
there is little, if any, trust involved
between the so-called professional
politicians and the public. Such is
the case here at East Carolina, and
such is also the case almost
anywhere there are two groups of
people who oppose each other as
vehemently as they do on this cam-
pus.
Controversy
The SGA treasurer, as all elected
officials within the SGA, must be a
full time student to keep his posi-
tion. There is some discussion, in
light of Lowe's recent withdrawal
and subsequent return to school,
that he must relinquish his post.
Full-time Student
Student Government Association
treasurer Ricky Lowe's time in of-
fice has been marked in the past by
controversy. This time, Lowe made
the decision, based on personal
reasons, to withdraw from school at
the end of fall semester. He did
return to register for classes this
semester, however.
Decisions To Be Made
There is some discussion, further,
than an election should be held to
find his successor.
Without going into the merits of
either discussion, we feel that, quite
simply, some decision should be
made in open legislation if necessary
in this case. Failure to do this
borders on irresponsibility on the
part of the judiciary arm of student
government
It is incumbent upon SGA at-
torney general Drake Mann to offer
an opinion or a solution to the ac-
cusative speculation that has sur-
rounded this case since it began dur-
ing Christmas. Mann can end all of
the arguments, in one fell swoop, if
he will decide what the Constitution
says, and if he starts action of one
kind or another.
So Official Word
We find it difficult to believe that
Mann has not done anything yet
about the rumors that are surroun-
ding Lowe and his problems with
withdrawing from school and stay-
ing in office. His statement that no
"official word" had come to him
concerning the matter sounds like
an easy out to us. For Lowe's sake,
and for the Melvin Administration's
credibility sake, this problem should
be dealt with promptly.
Admitting A Mistake
Now about Ricky Lowe. Despite
his apparent problems, both in of-
fice and in private life, Lowe has re-
tained a dignity that is rare in public
office. He openly admitted that he
withdrew from school, and he
remarked to an East Carolinian
reporter that he did not know the
ramifications of his actions.
Fairness
Lowe was wrong, and if the Con-
stitution says so, he will be remov-
ed, we are certain. But we feel that it
should be done in an aboveboard
and fair way. Government should
always be of the people, and human
dignity should be afforded at all
costs.
75 THIS THE END OF THE LINE?"
4

3
Pauling Fights Cancer
By DAVID ARMSTRONG
You might say Linus Pauling is ac-
quainted with controversy. In 1954, he suc-
cessfully fought a State Department effort
to block his trip to Stockholm to accept a
Nobel Prize in biochemistry. In 1962, he
won another Nobel Prize, this one for the
very thing that enraged Cold War
bureaucrats eight years earlier, namely, his
impassioned work to stop the testing of
nuclear weapons.
In recent years, Pauling has largely for-
saken the political arena for medical
research. There, too, he has made waves,
first by claiming that vitamin C is of great
ilue in Heating the common cold, and now
by claiming it is an effective weapon against
cancer. Neither assertion is accepted by the
medical establishment, but Pauling keeps
on keeping on. Now 79, he's meeting the
latest controversy in his long career the way
he's always done it: head-on.
With Scottish surgeon Dr. Ewan
Cameron, Pauling has published a new
book. Vitamin C and Cancer, that details
the two men's unorthodox approach to
cancer and offers hope that the disease may
be prevented, controlled, and in some cases
cured, with very large doses of vitamin C.
The book is a fascinating, provocative reap-
praisal of a disease that strikes one in four
Americans.
In a recent interview in his Menlo Park,
California office, Pauling discussed his new
book. "We were getting letters here (at the
Linus Pauling Institute of Science and
Medicine) about vitamin C and cancer, so
many that we could no longer answer each
one individually. They came from cancer
patients and their relatives and friends.
Many also came from medical doctors. We
wrote this book to sum up our work for
them and the public at large
In Vitamin C and Cancer, Pauling and
Cameron assert that megadoses of vitamin
C�10 or more grams a day�help most
cancer patients and cure some, especially
when the vitamin is used in "combined
regimes" with conventional therapies, such
as radiation and surgery. Cameron himself
has used vitamin C with terminal cancer pa-
tients in a Scottish hospital, finding, he
says, that the patients taking vitamin C liv-
ed an average of 10 months longer than
those receiving only conventional
treatments.
"We believe that vitamin C works largely
by poteniating the body's own immune
system Pauling explained. "Most cancer
therapies concentrate on the proliferate
properties of cancer cells i.e they trv to
kill the renegade cells with drugs or radia-
tion or remove them through surgery.
"Vitamin C concentrates on their in-
vasive properties. We believe it acts to in-
hibit the production by tumors of the en-
zyme hyaluronidase, which eats away at
nearby normal cells. Vitamin C also ap-
pears to encourage the synthesis of collagen
fibrils the long chains of protein that
strengthen the intercellular "cement" of the
body.
In other words, vitamin C may fight
cancer by isolating diseased cells rather that
by blasting them outright.
Pauling and Cameron's theory is con-
sidered unproven at best, and quackery at
worst, by conventional cancer specialists.
Media accounts recently gave considerable
play to a clinical trial by the prestigious
Mayo Clinic in which an attempt to
duplicate Cameron's startungr.s�oqeps with.
vitamin C apparently ffflff1, �
But Pauling is having none of it. "Nearly
all of the patients in the Mayo Clinic con-
trol group had extensive courses in
chemotherapy Pauling said, "while only
four percent of Cameron's patients took
anti-cancer drugs. We believe that
chemotherapy suppresses the immune
system rendering vitamin C much less ef-
fective.
"On August 8, 1978, I wrote Dr. Charles
Moertel, the head of the Mayo Clinic study,
and urged him to choose patients how
hadn't had chemotherapy for his study
Pauling told me, "but I didn't hear
anything more until I read an account in the
newspaper of the results of the study
Pauling's own attempts to receive fun-
ding for clinical testing of vitamin C as an
anti-cancer weapon have fallen on deaf ears
at the National Cancer Institute and
elsewhere. "I applied for funding seven
times since 1973, and seven times I've been
turned down. My eighth application is
under consideration now
I asked Pauling if he thinks there is a
political dimension to his problem. Is there
a cancer establishment which feels threaten-
ed by his work?
"Well, there probably is an establish-
ment he replied. "There are a whole lot
of specialists, oncologists, whose profession
is that of deciding which anti-cancer drugs
cancer patients should be given. I imagine
that they're not especially imerested in
something that would take the place o the
anti-cancer drugs
According to Pauling and Cameron,
vitamin C is not, like other anti-can
agents, a dangerous "invasive" drug. In
fact, "It is not a drug with the specific abili-
ty to fight cancer they write. "It is instead
a natural, essential substance that mav par-
ticipate in all of the chemical reactions that
take place in our bodies and is required for
many of them
Pauling reports that cancer patients have
taken up to 150 grams of ascorbic acid (one
form of vitamin C) daily, and healthy peo-
ple as much as 20 grams daily, with no ap-
parent side effects, except diarrhea in some
of the healthy ones. He also maintains that.
contrary to prevailing medical opinion,
most vitamin C is not lost in the urine, but
is .put to work in the body.
Erueto'his activist past, Pauling believes
j hat cancer .can be preiwed by a combina-
tion of social and personal action: first, by
eliminating carcinogens in the environment
("that includes cancer-causing chemicals
and radiation from nuclear testing and
nuclear power plants"), and second, by
strengthening the resistance of the public to
the disease. That, according to Pauling, is
where vitamin C comes in, along with other
key vitamins and minerals, a healthly diet
and exercise, "especially for older people
Pauling practices what he preaches. He
takes 10 grams of vitamin C every day, in
the crystalline sodium ascorbate form.
Despite the uphill battle for acceptance of
his theories�a struggle that has made the
two-time Nobel Prize winner a virtual
pariah in the world of science�Linus Paul-
ing is optimistic about the future. He credits
much of his optimism to his colleague,
Ewan Cameron, with whom Pauling joined
forces in 1971, after reading an earlier book
Cameron published on the biochemistry of
cancer.
"I think muses Pauling, "that the
value of vitamin C in treating cancer will
eventually be recognized as perhaps the
leading contribution of this quarter cen-
tury. And most of the credit for that will
belong to Ewan Cameron
Washington Merry-Go-Round
Congress Is In A Demanding Mood
By JACK ANDERSON
and JOE SPEAR
WASHINGTON�Congress
comes back to work next week in a
grim demanding mood. The
legislators want some tough answers
from Jimmy Carter on Iran and
Afghanistan.
Since the seizure of the Soviet
takeover in Kabul, Congress and
Carter's potential White House suc-
cessors, Republican and Democrat
alike, have observed a reluctant
cease-fire while Khomeini and the
Kremlin have treated him as a
pygmy president.
They've been patient as he's pur-
sued a course of caution through the
United Nations and econimic
pressures that were scoffed at by the
captors of the hostages in the em-
bassy and the Soviet leaders who
overran Afghanistan with raw arm-
ed aggression.
The political sands are running
out on Carter at home in a presiden-
tial election year. When Congress
reconvenes on Jan. 22, questions
will be asked on the Senate and
House floors about the caliber of his
'� o hp and his advisers.
Members of both the Senate and
House Intelligence Committee are
preparing for early top-secret hear-
ings. CIA and administration of-
ficials will have to explain the Iraian
fiasco starting from the precipitous
White House decision to allow the
shah to enter this country for
medical treatment.
The Senate Foreign Relations
Committee is also anxious to in-
vestigate the handling of the crisis.
Our sources say the prestigious com-
mittee wants to know why in-
telligence agencies failed to predict
" the shah's entry would touch kofi
the violent response by Ayatollah
Khomeini's henchmen; why no ade-
quate response to the outrageous
embassy seizure was forthcoming
and why no one in Washington
knew who was really calling the
shots in the frenzied Iranian hierar-
chy.
Congress will also want to know
why the Cart- administration ig-
nored advance warnings by
Pakistan that the Russions were
about to embrace neighboring
Afghanistan in a bearlike grip.
We've learned that only a few weeks
before the airborne Soviet invasion
of Pakistan and Iran, a delagation
of Pakistani diplomats met with
Secretary of State Cyrus Vance and
his aides to sound the alarm.
They predicted that Red Army
units were prepared to move in on
the puppet regime, But our Foggy
Bottom policy makers ignored the
clear alert and Carter had to confess
that he was caught by suprise by the
Soviet move.
The president says he has now
learned to distrust the Russians-
almost as much as his State Depart-
ment experts disbelieved the
Pakistanis.
AMBITIOUS REDS: The Soviet
thrust into the Persian Gulf may
next claw off a bit of Iran according
to our intelligence sources. They say
Soviet troops now occupying
Afghanistan may provide help to
anti-Khomeini rebels in the
southeastern Iranian province of
Baluchistan. Red Army troops can
easily funnel arms and supplies to
the Baluchi insurgents across the
border to help undermine Kho-
meini's support.
We've also been toto to look for
the Soviets to offer the Baluchis
support in establishing an
autonomous state in return for the
Russian fleet being given access to
the port of Shabahar. That would
give the Red Navy a commanding
strategic port on the Indian Ocean.
WATCH ON WASTE: The
government took a hefty bite out of
every wage earner's paycheck begin-
ning this month for higher Social
Security deductions. The Social
Security Administration is crying
poverty as the excuse.
But we've learned that the ad-
ministration paid out nearly $20
million two years ago to the states
for administrative costs. Four
states, California, Colorado, New
York and Texas, overcharged the
federal government by nearly
$750,000. That's a 3.75 percent
ripoff. The Social Security tax rate
for the average American this year
amounts to 6.13 percent of his earn-
ings. Next year it goes to 6.65 per-
cent.
�Old Air Force generals don't
always fade away. Sometimes
they're kept alive on movie film at
taxpayer expense.
In recent years, film technicians
at Norton Air Force Base in Califor-
nia have gone Hollywood in
shooting "TMs-Is-Your-Lifc" type
movies for retiring brass hats. Here
are two examples of the military ex-
traganzas:
Upon his retirement in 1977, Gen.
Paul Carlton was presented with a
13-minute reel hailing his ac-
complishments as commander of
the Military Airlift Command. It
cost $14,000 of the Pentagon's
multibillion budget.
Strategic Air Commander Gen.
Russell Dougherty was the star of a
27-minute film when he left the ser-
vice. The tab was $2?,220 and
would have cost more except the
narrator, Tennessee Ernie Ford,
donated his services. A recent Air
Force investigation has finally writ-
ten an end to the spendthrift
scenario.
�Here's another bit of govern-
ment waste to make you weep. The
National Science Foundation has
ladled out $63,100 to Dartmouth
College researchers to study what
makes you laugh or cry. The title of
the project is known in scientific
jargon as "The Role of Facial Ex-
pression of Emotion in the Activa-
tion and Conditioning of Emotional
Behavior
Letters To The Editor
The East Carolinian
welcomes letters expressing all
points of view. Mail or drop
them by our office in the Old
South Building, across from
the library.
Letters to the editor must in-
clude the name, address,
phone number and signature
of the authorfs) and must be
typed, double spaced, or neat-
ly printed. Letters should be
limited to three typewritten,
double-spaced pages. All let-
ters are subject to editing for
brevity, obcenity and libel.
Personal attacks will not be
permitted. Names of authors
will be withheld only when in-
clusion of the name will cause
the author etnbarrassment or
ridicule, such as letters concer-
ning homosexuality, drug
abuse, etc. Names will be
withheld only on the authors





I HI EAS1 CAROL INIAN
Features
I l KV. 15. I �
I'auo i
Theatre, Arts
Sponsor 'Twain'
By KAREN WENDT
Features r dilor
Have you ever wondered what
Mark Twain was really like? Well,
you may have an opportunity to see
at least one man's vision of Twain
when John Chappel visits the ECU
campus January 21.
With the aid ol make up,hap-
pel recreates I wain on stage,
relating his opinions and thoughts
on a wide variety of subjects.
The Student Union Theatre rts
Committee calls the performance
"The Recreation ol Mark I wain,
out on a raid
Ghappel looks quite a bit like the
Saturday Night
At The Movies
Mark Twain On Stage
as portrayed by John C happel
Drama Makes Plays
Music tilled the air.
Shuttle on to Buffalo" were the
lyrics.
s I looked out into the hallway,
I saw a young man doing the old
burlesque shuffle to the tune he was
singing. Listening in on his conver-
sation I discovered that he was a
drama student who was graduating
after this semester � a good reason
for singing.
I was in the drama department �
a department about which jokes are
made (the general concensus of
some students is that drama is for
people who are to weird for art), but
it is greatly underrated by many
students.
If you think about it, the ECU
Drama Department and the ECU
Playhouse do an outstanding job
with a wide variety of plays.
So far this school year, the
playhouse has presented "The
Streets of New York by Barry
Grael, "For Colored Girls Who
Have Considered Suicide When The
Rainbow Is Enuf by Ntozake
Shange, and "The Childrens'
Hour by Lillian Hellman.
Planned for the upcoming
semester are three new presenta-
tions, and all are expected to be
received very well.
The first play will be a comedv
called "Boy Meets Girl by Bella
and Sam Spewack.
Vietnam
Portrayed
The Academy Award winning
film for Best Documentary in 1974
will be shown at the Hendrix
Theater Wednesday at 8 p.m.
"Hearts and Minds" is one of the
most talked about films in the past
decade.
The film deals with the Vietnam
War and the many different views
on the war.
Starring Walt Rostow, Clark Clif-
ford, and Gen. William
Westmoreland, it was produced by
Bert Schneider and Peter Davis and
directed by Peter Davis.
"It is an exploration of the
American psyche and a look at the
cherished ideals in conflict with
reality according to one writer.
The film features interviews with
many U.S. policy makers of the
period and also with Vietnamese
leaders and veterans.
The play is based in old
Hollywood with a plot detailing the
attempted revenge o( two writers
whose story is stolen.
However, their revenge backfires
and only a questionable business
deal between their studio and a large
foreign filmmaker saes them from
ruin.
The play, which was very suc-
cessful on Broadway, will be
presented in the Studio Theater,
Feb. 13-16 and again Feb. 18-23, at
8:15 p.in Tickets are expected to be
available the first week in February.
"An Evening ot Dance
choreographed by the ECU Dance
Faculty, will be presented at a new
date. Though they had been
scheduled for early March, they
have been rescheduled for March
19-23 at 8:15 p.m. in the Studio
Theater and a special show March
23 at 2:15 p.m.
The presentation will include a
variet) of forms ranging from
modern through jazz.
Hey! Wanna hear something
outrageously funny?The other night
a friend and I went to see Superman
at Mendenhall. We sat down in the
balcony and proceeded to do illicit
things like putting our feet on the
backs of seats and eating candy,
wantonly violating rules o( conduct
(that's not the funny part).
Here is the funny part: We were
sitting there in the balcony minding
our own business when we felt the
floor start to shake. At first we
thought we were too high, or
perhaps having simultaneous
flashbacks. Then we thought maybe
it was a minor earthquake, but we
ruled that our because earthquakes
only occur in California.
You know what it was? It was the
whole balcony shaking from people
walking down the balcony steps.
Not fat people, mind you, nor a
multitude of individuals, but just a
few people. The whole floor shook
like it was not supported well. It was
a riot! It would really be funny as
hell if the whole thing collapsed and
killed hundreds of people. Now that
would be big fun�a major attrac-
tion.
You know what else During the
same movie the fire alarm went off,
and everybody just sat there as if
protesting the Iranian situation. The
movie kept running�can't worry
about a fire when Superman is mak-
ing his big bid for Lois Lane. Sure,
it was a false alarm, but who knew
that? Certainly not everybody!
It would have been deliriously
funny it the entire audience
until the last moment n there
was a fire�Cincinnati a i
again. It would have been more
than a football game because
would feature audience pv
tion.
Even better, what it nv
fell and tore the elect! - al w iring
started a fire That would I
best o both possible disaster It
would get national a m�EC I
would become fa Maybe
Hollywood could � . the
greatest disastei flic! er in
W ow ! I iusi ,an'i -land it'
author and du
he is able I
I Aim charav' '
humorist and tl
( happel has
around the C
decade gi ing mai �
Hi- tir-t solo pei'
(raying a cl
Clarence Dai
( happel
motion pictui
pea" ing in the
files" and in
such a- "I he I i .
I a aid
Some ot his
's.naior Karl Mui
the Army -Mc ai
irt in "Nicl
Reynolds and k . O
made an appeal i
Side � M I
cla m thai
1 ickets for t
ow on salt �
n Mend
v' idents - - Sl.50; F
53.0
$4.00 For fu
the Centra Del
757-6611. ext. :� �
I)iar Of Adam And Eve
in April the I re Arts (
tion ol the pla I
Vdam and Eve" pi
in the Hendrix I
Mendenhall Student Center
Strasberg And Carney Also Star
Burns Is Back And'Going In Style'
By Marc Barnes
Senior Kditor
"doing in Style'1� starring
George Burns, Art Carney, and Lee
Strasberg�rated PG
Have you ever wondered, just for
the fleeting moment, what it would
be like to be 80 years old? With any
luck at all, we will all make it to that
age. to wit out our days on park
benches, reading newspapers and
generally feeling that we are wor-
thless.
"Going in Style" explores aging,
in a trigicomedy which combines the
elements of the beginning and the
end at the same time.
Burns and company play three
old men in just such a predicament
They are first seen living out their?
meager existence in a pocket park in
Queens. They look like millions of
elderly people, except that they are a
little different.
They decide, at Burns' urging, to
rob a bank to bring some excitement
into their lives. As Burns points
outWhat do we have to lose?"
They figure that if they get away
with it, they won't have to live on
Social Security for the rest of their
lives. They figure that if they get
caught, they will only have to serve
a short time because of their age. If
they are sent to prison, they will be
given free room and board, and
when they are released, the value of
their combined Social Security
checks-unused while they were in
prison-will be waiting for them.
Either way they have come up with
an ingenius plan to beat the system.
The first hour of the movie is
devoted to the comic�the plans for
the heist, including'the theft of han-
dguns, the hilarity of sorting out a
sackful of bullets by trying to fit
them into the several guns, and the
final consideration of what to wear,
how to travel, and even whether for
not to shave on the day of the heist.
The first thing the three must do
is to find a bank-a big bank with
lots of money and slovenly security.
For this ihey must journey into
Manhattan for the first time in twen-
ty years and the resulting search
provides for much hilarity. The trio

feels younger that they have for 30
years.
What happens next, according to
co-star Art Carney, is "both funny
and touching, but not what you
would expect
Casting for the movie began when
the script was delivered to Burns
who characteristically remarked,
"When you get to be my age, the
competition thins out How many
83 year old guys can you call on to
do comedy?"
Carney, for years Jackie
Gleason's sidekick on the hit T.V.
show "The Honeymooners" and
lately the star of the film "Harry
and Tonto is playing a man twen-
ty years older than the actor
himself.
"I was born old Came) said.
"1 was playing old gaffers when 1
was in my thirties. '
Lee Strasberg, for vears
America's most influential drama
teacher (and who won an Oscar
nomination for "God tat her II")
was initially uncertain about the
script, because unlike Burns and
Carney, his roots are not in comedv .
"That concerned me wwhen 1
read the script he says, "it is fun-
ny. But it's not farcical. It has a lot
of heart and a point of view.
Strasberg was also vocal in his ap-
praisal of the film's point of view.
Burns, Carney And Strasberg
star in 'Going In Style'
" The idea of an age at win.
pie turn into vegaiables is repugi
to me. Think of what we would ha
lost if George Bernard Shaw
been ordered to stop writing play - a
age 65 oi roscannini had hi
ed into retirement at the
hi poweis
One of the movies man) str ths
lie in its incredible reali- n. Pro-
ducers Bill and Fred F. Gallo decid-
ed to film the movie in the same
neighborhood in Queens that the
original short stroy was
published in. Astoria was the
that ihe late Edward Cannon chose
for his unpublished work
finally became Going in St vie"
The neighborhod, coincidently,
which houses the fourth lar�
sound stage in America.
This is a film that is. we feel, tot
those who like to come out of a
movie theatre and think about what
they have seen. The implications ot
old age are somthing we should con-
sider, because no matter what else
happens to the real world between
now and then, there is a g
likelihood that we will all get old
The point of view that we sec here
is a delicate balance between the
comedy ot three old men try me to
beat the system, and the IcrrtNc
reality which comes much i.iicr. a
reality which we have to pon.lci
Go see the movie. It's a treat for
all. But be forewarned you mav
have to reexamine your feelings
about the way the elderly arc treated
in this country. In terms of social
commentary, it is unsurpassed.

14





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY IS. 1910
New Album Releases: Buzzcocks
Parliament �
GLORYHALLASTOOP1D
crested. Just like in the mid-sixties when Night. Mike Chapman has succeeded very well in
American music was dominated by the California tearing Tanya apart and piecing her back together
sound, a new sound came out of England which to create his own commercial Frankenstein. This
forever changed the popular music scene. The ain't what country-to-pop crossover is all about.
corporate rock scene of the seventies must meet Poor Tanya.
the challenge of the New Wave, a music of power .
and sincerity. Perhaps the rule of the eighties will Dr. Hook� Sometimes You Win
be one of getting back to the basics. The Buzz-
cocks are a group with a future.
Tanya Tucker� Tear Me Apart
This album would be okay if it were not such a
sent, the new Beatles, has been offered for three
years by the Buzzcocks. Their music is composed
of short, simple, yet strong musical statements
Friends laugh and just can't seem to dig it when about adolescent love and the sturm and drang of
I put on George Clinton and Parliament on the adolescence. These guys are at the core of the new
stereo, and that's just too bad that they let pre- British invasion which is assaulting the more
uidiee interfere with their appreciation of a good banal sounds of the American rock scene.
thing. It is the same way when I put on the Clash The songs on Singles Going Steady area an an-
or the Talking Heads. We have got to get our thology of hit singles in the United Kingdom,
heads out of the sand and look around us, pieced together chronologically to present the
because there is a whole big beautiful world out unacquainted with a dose of rock and roll,
there, and we shouldn't let anything stand in our Buzzcocks-style. It is a delightful mixture of inno-
way of enjoying it. cent desires and street-wise enlightenment, full of
Cieorge Clinton is perhaps the most dominant pleasing hooks and nice backing vocals. This is glaring example of what the commercial rock
black performer to arise from the previous rock and roll gone back to its primitive roots � scene can do to an individual. Tanya Tucker used
decade, excluding Stevie Wonder, who began in sheer power and simplicity without the overin- to be a mild, unassuming young girl who was
es. Clinton began receiving national ac- dulgent production and multi-tracking that has once the darling of country music. She had a long
i 1972 with such catchy ditties as "Maggot dominated the American sound. Forget Blondie string of country hits beginning when she was just
' and "Cosmic Slop and his first big and Cheap Trick � this is unadulterated New a child, and even had a few religious songs in her
i vas Chocolate City. In 1974, P-Funk was Wave.
li itely recognized as a driving musical force This chronological ordering of songs on Singles
v ik of the most experimental, guitar-oriented Going Steady is a very interesting procedure. It
bands in R&B or rock. It wasn't until George enables one to hear a group become more
gave up on "honky-baiting" and took off into developmentally sound, and the Buzzcocks seems
space funk via his Mothership Connection that he to grow tighter with each progressive cut. It also
bcean to receive commercial success. shows the compositional development of leader
His new album, GLORYHALLASTOOPID, Pete Shelley, the pop stylist, and his writing
cohort Steve Diggle, the power guru. The rhythm
section, which always drives the New Wave
sound, features John Maher on drums and Steve
Garvey on bass (aargh-aargh).
The Who and Johnny Rotten and The Sex
to emerge in 1979, for it sets the standard for the Pistols (a vastly underrated rock group) started and simply plugs Tanya in, but it just doesn't
dance-trance psychorhythms (Barry Cooper, something in Britain which has not yet even fully come off as well as Pat's In The Heat Of The
1979) of the eighties. It is also one of the most
self-searching and intrinsically revealing efforts
to emerge from the "me decade
Sometimes you don't!
All albums courtesy of the Record Bar,
Carolina East and Pitt Plaza, except Singles Go
ing Steady, courtesy of Apple Records.
has become an immediate success. The album is
already in the top one-hundred albums on
Billboard album charts and is in the top five on
the Soul charts. GLORYHALLASTOOPID may
be one of the most eclectically-influential albums
tally of hits.
Hollywood, and exclusively Mike Chapman,
her producer, took her and made her into a rock
and roll animal, full of lust and steaming sexual
excitement. They sell her like a playmate who
plays up to your sexual fantasies by singing about
going out and getting some. This is not liberation,
it is exploitation, and it gets me deep in the gut.
It is not that the music on Tear Me Apart is all
that bad � it is some pretty heavy rock and roll
� but it just don't seem kosher to me. It does not
appear to be sincere. Mike Chapman takes the
same musical formula he created for Pat Benatar
mem wmmmm mm ��. mm m a mw in
GKEESVILLE, N.C.
'
What Bob Dylan has done with his Slow Train
Coming, Clinton does more stylistically on
GLORYHALLASTOOPID, being a search for
religious identity revealed through lyrical and
imusical imagery. It is difficult to tell whether
George is in the process of recognizing God as the
(force in his life, or establishing himself as a god
ind presenting this album to start his own church.
he cartoon pictorial on the album cover further
romments on the American scenario of media
riind control and the seventies egocentric orienta-
tion.
This latest Clinton release is one of his finest
ndeavors, released from the depths of the "black
holes" (Harlem, Watts, Johannesburg � the
(world is full of them). Clinton, as Starchild,
weaves some of the most potent funk ever, pro-
pelled by Rodney Curtis and Bootsy on bass, and
keyboard-wizard Bernie Worrell. Michael Hamp-
ton on guitar and the sparkling horn ar-
rangements provide the perfect counterpoint for
the rhythmic palpitations of the low funk. As
always, the vocals are dynamic, featuring the con-
trasting sounds of Ray Davis and Jessica Cleaves,
and the pop-magic of Phillip Wynne (formerly of
the Spinners).
The only song on GLORYHALLASTOOPID
that is not too impressive is the boring "Party
People a watered-down version of funk pro-
ably aimed at those on the fringes of funk.
heme From The Black Hole" and "May We
You?" are definitely hit-bound, and
lour Me Funky" is Clinton's Finest since
hlight" (the definitive dance song of the
seventies). James Brown, who invented funk and
black consciousness, is payed tribute in "The
Freeze
GLORYHALLASTOOPID is an album that
will prove to be a powerful influence over a wide
variety of musical styles. It is an expose of Clin-
Ws self and questions many values we hold
Ilosophical and religious. It is a spark to in-
ectual discussion. Moreover, it stirs those in-
r desires to put your body in motion and leave
ur inhibitions behind. This is what the music of
e next decade will be all about. A progressive
llbum.
iuzzcocks� Singles Going Steady
Power personified. This is the future of the new
rock and roll. What the Knack attempted to pre-
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j







I'HI EASTC KO: INIAN
Sports
I M R i isn Paced
Madison Downs ECU
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
HARRISONBURG, Va. � The
East Carolina basketball team
found out the hard way last night
that this small Virginia town had
more to brag about than Ralph
Sampson as it fell to a tough James
Madison team 63-52.
It was surely a happy night in
Harrisonburg, home of both Samp-
son, the Virginia center, and
Madison, the university, as Madison
rallied after being deadlocked with
the Pirates 31-31 at the half.
leading the way for Madison was
freshman Dave DuPont with 17
points. Forward Mike Gibson led
the Pirate scoring with 14 points.
Senior swingman Kyle Powers was
the only other ECU player in double
figures, adding ten to the Pirate
cause.
Just two days before the loss to
James Madison, the Pirates over-
came a suprisingly game Atlantic
Christian club for a 72-63 win in
Minges Coliseum.
Trailing 34-30 to the small Wilson
college at halftime, the Pirates came
back in the second half behind the
strong words of Coach Dave Odom
and the strong play of senior for-
ward Herb Gray.
The 6-8 senior from Seat Plea-
sant, Md scored 12 second-half
points, including two exciting slam
dunks, to ignite the Pirate com-
eback. Gray finished the game with
17 points and seven rebounds.
Gray spent much of the first half
on the bench, scoring only 5 points
due to three early personal fouls.
Also scoring in double figure for
ECU was sophomore forward Dave
Underwood, who tallied 16. Under-
wood shot well all the night, making
six of his 12 field goal attempts and
all four of his free throw tries.
Senior Herb Krusen, a 6-5 sw-
ingman, finished the night with 13
points, giving him a total of 59 in his
last three games. The sharp-shooter
nicknamed "Radar" had scored 23
points in each of the Pirates' last
two games.
In addition to his own offensive
production, Krusen dished out four
assists in the win over ACC. Guard
George Maynor had five.
Following the win over Ac C and
the loss to Madison, the Pirate
record stands at 9-7.
This mark i one game better than
it would be because ot an ineligible
player on the Kent State club that
defeated the Pirates 73-72 in the
Wolf Pack Classic in Reno. Nevada
during the Christmas holidays.
I he Pirates no t weel
before hosting winless Baptist Col-
lege in Minges Coliseum next Mon-
day night second consecutive
home contest will follow on Satur-
day, when Ml -s i sc
Asheviile. Both games :at I 7 ;
p.m. tip-off tin
Michael Gibson
HiTh dra
Riley, Thompson Honored
Underwood Up For Shot
Lady Pirates Split In Clemson

gttmm
Charles Chandler
trip to visit the War Eagle campus
and came away pleased. Evidently,
VCU coach J.D. Barnett convinced
the big man that the cowboy state
was not tor him.
Ol IVER MACK, ex-ECU cage
star, appeared on national television
for the first time Sunday when his
I os Angeles 1 akers took to the
floor against the Boston Celtics.
CBS-TV billed the game as a
rematch between I .As Magic
Johnson and the Celtic's Larry
Bird, the two stars o last season's
NCAA finals.
As it turned out, Johnson's groin
injury limited his playing time while
Bird was at his best. Nevertheless,
the Lakers came away with a two-
point victory.
Mack did not play but appeared
on the tube while the team huddled
during a timeout. The Queens, N.Y.
native has seen limited playing time
all season long, averaging 2.2 points
per game and dishing out a total of
15 assists.
There is good reason for Mack's
lack o' time, though, as the Lakers
are as loaded as any team in the
league at the guard position.
EX-ECU HEAD football coach
Pat Dye is now almost completely
part of the Steeler special teams this settled at his new home in Laramie,
season, often being the first man Wyoming. Dye said via telephone
downfield on kickoffs and punts last week that his family had just ar-
and making hits on many of those rived and were presently moving in-
occasions. Early in the season to the house provided them by the
University of Wyoming.
In attempting to build the
Cowboy's fortunes. Dye will run in-
to many roadblocks. First of all, the
Cowboys have not had a winning
season in ten years. Secondly, and
perhaps most importantly,
recruiting will be a problem as the
Pac-10 powers will surely grab many
of the horses that Dye will need to
get his Cowboys galloping instead
of grazing.
"Guys wait a lot longer out here
to sign Dye commented. "Most
wait until the national signing date
because of the influence of schools
like Southern California and
UCLA
Wyoming's schedule should af-
ford Dye to win at least six or seven
games a year beginning possibly this
season. He should then have the
Cowboy program on strong footing
after three or four years then, right?
Maybe.
The Cowboy schedule will get
By JIMMY DaPREE
Assistant Sports F.ditnr
CLEMSON,S.CAfter being
upset in the opening round of the
Clemson Invitational Tournament,
the Lady Pirates bounced back to
soundly defeat James Madison
93-68, to take third place honors.
Forward Rosie Thompson's field
goal with 11:41 remaining in the
first half gave ECU a 10 point lead,
but Madison forward Anne Sonoga
came off the bench to help her
squad cut the margin to 49-41 at in-
termission.
Pirate junior Kathy Riley came
alive in the second halt, scoring 19
of her 23 points as the ECU fast
break swamped the Duchesses. Fast
Carolina silenced Sonoga and fiesty
guard Barrie Grice in the final frame
after allowing them to tire in 13 and
11 points respectively in the first
stana.
"This is the first time we've
played a better second half than we
did first half praised second year
ECU coach Cathy Andruzzi. "I can
honestly say we played the best se-
cond half we have all season
Thompson, who recently passed
the 2018 career points amassed by
Bobbv Hodaes to become the all-
NOTES AND COMMENTS.
SUPER BOWL XIV is less than a
week away and persons around the
Greenville area are becoming very
anxious for a very special reason.
Zack Valentine, a defensive end
for the East Carolina football team
last season, is a Pittsburgh Steeler
linebacker and, as everyone knows,
the Steelers are the favorites to WIN
the Super Bowl.
For Valentine it would mean go-
ing from an Independence Bowl
champion to a Super Bowl cham-
pion in just one year, should the
Steelers triumph over the Los
Angeles Rams on Sunday.
Valentine has been an integral
Pirate Swimming Action
time Fast Carolina scoring leader,
held the hot hot hand throughout
the night, netting 2v points and
hauling down 10 rebounds.
Junior I vdia Rountree added 16
points, while center Marcia Giren
grabbed 11 caroms and freshn
larv Denkler 10.
rhompson and Riley were award-
ed all-tournament honors for their
performances in the two day event.
"When Kathy got held up on the
fast break, then we went to Rosie in-
side said Andruzzi. "Our g
kept their cool when Madison went
to the press.
"When we can score 20 points in
the first eight minutes of the second
half while the other team only gels
seven, then you know something has
to be working right. The girls
capitalized on the things which they
do best
Unlike the Madison effort, ECl
held as big as a 34-21 ad van 1
over Mississippi University for
Women, but faltered in second half
and lost 0-69.
Mississippi leading scorer Sue
Johnson drove the lane and con-
nected with :04 remaining for their
irst lead oi the game.
The I ady Pirates had one final an
opportunity to win. after point
guard Laurie Sikes was fouled with
:01 on the clock. Since ECL was not
in the bonus situation, the ball had
to be put in play. Rountree's 20-foot
field goal attempt was blocked by-
Carrie Ball as the buzzer sounded.
I-asi i arolina, � 12-4
the 1 rat Hec UN
V ednesday at 7p.m Minges (
iseum in a NCA1AW i
MISS. UNIV. FOR Wt ll 7
Henson ; 1-1 7, Ba � 2
Johnson 9 2-4 20, Pow t 2,
Hughes 3 1-2 7, 1 .
Murphy 1 0-0 2. Satchei 2 5-6 S
Kerlev 2 0-0 4, Dunn 0 0-0 0. r
30 10-15 7
I Cl (69)
Thompson 8 2-5 18, Riley 7 2-2
16, Girven 4 0-0 8, Sikes 5 0-0 10,
R untite 4 o-o s, t od
Hooks 0 0-0 0, Denkler 3 3 4 -
Totals ?l 7-11 69.
MADISON � -
M irsden 0 0-0 0, H � I I
2o. Railey I 0-0 2, :e 4 9
Waddell 4 2-3 10,
Sonoga 5 6-8 16. Meadows 0 1-2
1 . eba igl � �' 2 I . 2- 2 :
68
I Cl (93)
rhompson 12 5-8 29, Riley I :
23, Girven 3 0-0 6. Sikes ; 2 2 8
Rountree 7 2-3 16. Owen 0 2-2 2
Ranieri 0 0-0 0, Barnes 0 0-1 0
loodv 0 0-0 0, Ho, ks :
Denkler 4 0-1 8. lotals 39 15-24
Halftime: ECl 49, M
fouled out: none. Lotal fouls: ECl
24. Madison 21. Technicals
A-350.
Valentine saw some duty at
linebacker while those at the posi-
tion who were ahead of him were
suffering from various injuries.
PLAYING ON A POTENTIAL
Super Bowl champion is not the on-
ly thing in Zack Valentine's life that
he has to concern himself with. He
now has a bride-to-be to worry
about.
During the Christmas holidays,
Valentine presented star ECU Uady
Pirate basketball star Rosie Thomp-
son with a diamond ring. This
dynamic duo have dated for quite
some time. Thompson, by the way,
recently became the number one
scorer in ECU basketball history,
man or woman.
REMEMBER AL TYSON? Sure
you do.
The 6-11 center who left the East
Carolina basketball team at the start
of this season after playing only one
Pirate Tankers Dunk
Touted Gamecocks
season as a Pirate has finally found markedly tougher as time goes on
a new home. Tyson is now enrolled says ECU assistant Henry
as an official student at Virginia Trevathan, who recently returned
Commonwealth University in Rich- from Laramie. "By the time Pat
mond, Va. gets his sort of people in the pro-
VCU, by the way, won over 20 gram said Trevathan, "they begin
games last season and was invited to playing teams like Oklahoma,
play in the National Invitational Nebraska, Arizona State and Co�-
Tournament in New York following orado. It won't be easy
the regular season. They have a dire That it won't. But Dye realizes
need for a big man because 6-11 this. "1 know there will be tough
Kenny Jones, a senior starter, will times Dye said. "But I have faith
be departing after this season. that someday the word 'Wyoming'
For a while Tyson seemed headed will be associated directly with win-
for North Texas State. He made a ning football
By JIMMY DuPREE
Assistant Sports Kditor
East Carolina's men swimmers
recorded their most impressive vic-
tory of the young season Saturday
with a 5-8-55 upset over the Univer-
sity of South Carolina.
The Pirates established six new
meet records, while the Gamecocks
claimed five, but it was down to the
last event to decide who would get a
mark in the win column and who
would scratch the right side of the
ledger.
The team of Mike Triau, Scott
Ross, Jack Clowar and Ted Nieman
captured the 400 freestyle relay,
thus claiming six first-place points
compared to USC's three.
Senior co-captain Nieman posted
meet records in the 200 and 500 yard
free, while fellow co-captain Bill
Fehling claimed honors in the 50
and 100 free, as well as swimming
anchor in the victorious 400 medley
relay.
John Richards, Kelly Hopkins
and Clowar built to a slim lead in
the 400 medley before Fehling
brought home the gold with a
3:32.52 meet record.
"The key to the meet was doing
so well in the freestyle events said
ECU assistant coach John Sultan, a
former Pirate natator himself. "It
came down to the last relay and was
the most exciting meet we've had so
far.
"It was really a total team effort.
We needed every point we got from
our second and third place
finishers
The Pirate women didn't fair so
well, bowing 77-28, but the ECu
coaches still expressed optimism
concerning their performance.
"We swam very, very well com-
mented Sultan. "We weren't disap-
pointed at all. They (USC) have one
of the top five teams in the country
in my opinion
The Lady Bucs set numerous
school and freshman records, with
frosh Tammy Putnam leading the
way. The Pleasant Garden native set
varsity and freshman marks in the
100 individual medley with 1:02.51
and the 400 IM with 4:43.06.
Putnam's 400 IM time along with
sophomore Karen Daviason's
4:46.21 qualified the pair for AIAW
National cut-offs.
The men, who also defeated
Maine 69-43 Thursday, now stand
at 3-0 and remain idle until a Jan 26
matchup with UNC-Wilmington
The women slide to 0-2 and venture
to UNC-Greensboro Saturday.
Thompson Sets On Defense
f
k





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 15, 1980
l�
Pi
1
Stargell In Pasadena
Classifieds
By
WII I (.RIMS! KY
P speciaU orrespondeni
When the champion
Pittsburgh Steelcrs
square off against the
I os Angeles Rams Sun-
day, in football's Super
Bowl XIV, you may
blink twice when you
see a hulking man in a
wild plaid sports jacket
running up and down
the sidelines snapping
pictures.
No, it's not a camera
hug who slipped
through the steel ring
of security. Nor is it
just another of the
scores of pro
photographers from
the newspapers.
magazines and wire ser-
vices.
lt the Steelcrs No.
$S�a��SSSSSSSis!SsS�
1 fan and the greatest
booster of Pittsburgh's
newest label, "The City
of Champions" 8 old
Willie Stargell, the
most decorated athlete
of the season.
"Sure, I'm a big
Steeler fan said the
38-year-old first
baseman o' baseball's
World Series champion
Pittsburgh Pirates. "I
saw every game 1 could
on television and the
playoffs from the
stands.
"Since 1 was coming
to the West Coast for
the game anyhow, I got
a job shooting sideline
pictures for Sports Il-
lustrated
Every time you turn
around these days,
there is old "Pops as
his teammates call him,
picking up another
trophy or endorsing
some product for a
good wad of cash. He is
sports' hottest commer-
cial commodity at the
moment.
"I'm friendly with
most of those Steeler
guys " Bradshaw, Fran-
co, Mean Joe Greene,
you name 'em he
said. "Man, they are
tUilirr �
Ladies Night
and
Lightfoot
Thur.
Lightfoot
Don't forget
Friday aft.
STOREW1DE
CLEARANCE
34
OFF
SALE
Vl
Ski Clothing
Warm-ups
Assorted Basketball,
Tennis, & Running
Shoes.
r t
Hunting Clothes
H.L.H0DGES1
AND COMPANY, INC.
2LQ J 5th St. Phone 752-4156
The Coffeehouse i a
not so common place
Auditions! jan.25&26
1 he C offeehoust is now taking applications for auditions. persons
arc urged to come I � the Student Union Off ice in Mendenhall. Please leave
iui name, address, and telephone number with the Secretary
Lcok for the Union Label mm
DAIRY CUP
v " Delicious & Nutritious"
FOOT LONG
HOTDOGS
only 85 �
CHICKEN
FILET SANDWICH
0111795
Large
selection of
SUNDAES
"GOOD FOOD FOR
GOOD TIMES"
FAVORITES r�
� HOT DOGS
� HAMBURGERS
� FRENCH FRIES
� FISH SANDWICHES
� MILK SHAKES
� MANY MORE ITEMS
COUPON
50 off Minimum order
of $1.50 I per customer
1. D. Required
Offer good Jan. 10-16
family, too
Stargell, the Most
Valuable Player of the
World Series, was nam-
ed "Male Athlete of the
Year" last week by The
Associated Press and
shared Sports II-
lustrated's "Sportsman
of the Year" honor
with his gridiron
counterpart, Terry
Bradshaw.
"The Steelers,
they're like us said
the hulking slugger.
"They've got pride and
determination. They're
willing to go that extra
mile
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Albums and 8 track
tapes forilandtJ Artists Range
trom A (America) to Z (ZZ Top).
Come by (114c Scott) or call to a
qood buy. Ask lor EO.
79 VW VAN. must sell, reduced
price; yellow kitchen table metal
bottom S40. 754 0895, 757 496! � 268
FOR SALE: Aria bass guitar.
Practice amplifier, extendable
cord, case, strap and beginners
book included. All equipment in
good condition. Guitar is black and
sunburst with brown neck. Will
sell for st25 or best offer. Call
Barry Hood at 752 7290, or come by
104 Umsted.
RANGES G.E. ELECTRIC 30
inch. Clean, great condition 10 or
more 545 each. Call Harry
91973S8421
FOR RENT
Wanted mature, responsible male
roommate for nice three bedroom
house with fireplace $92 per month
plus utilities, phone. 752 7414.
FEMALE ROOMMATE: wanted
to share J bedroom apt at River
Bluff. One-half rent and utilities,
apt. completely furnished with ex
ception of your bedroom furniture.
Call Lisa at 758 8529
Female Roommate, Needed im
mediately, preferably grad stu
dent. Would have private room,
can be furnished. Within walking
distance to campus. Share half
rent, utilities, and phone. Call
758 134
ROOM FOR RENT in home, 920
14th st. behind dorms Furnished,
private bath, no cooking
priveleges 185 Call 758 2S8S
NEED FEMALE ROOMMATE,
low rent, low utilities, near cam
pus. Call 752 1792
PERSONAL
DIDN'T get school pictures
because they were too expensive?
Get two color portraits and 10
wallet for J5.00. Call 758 3903.
BABY SITTER, Wanted for 18mo
old baby boy. Occasional, daytime
sitting after 1200 a.m. Tar River
Estates Call 752 4444
CLIFF'S
Seafood House and Oyster Bar
iMMMI
ORANGE JULIUS
Carolina East Mall
2 For 1 Sale
On any reg. price
Julius Drink with
this coupon
Offer expires Jan.31,1980
We sell Oscar Mayer Hot Dogs
ALL YOU
CAN EAT $2.95!
MONDAY-THURSDAY
TROUT, CRAB CAKES
and FLOUNDER. $3.25.
i
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2 Golden Fried Crab Cakes
French Fries, Slaw, and
Hush Puppies. $.99.
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SALAD�50� EXTRA
ASST. VAR.
PIZZA
NO CAMY0UT
$199
ONLY
1
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WITH FRIES & COLESLAW
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1
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WITH GARLIC BREAD
ITALIAN
SPA
WITH FRII OLE SLAW
99
THUR.
FRIED
FISH.
ONLY
$199
1
FRI.
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By making one convenient trip to your
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radios to footballs and more all at
cost cutter prices. No matter what your
plans, complete them with one easy trip
to your Kroger Sav-on.
Magazines and
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Records and
Tapes
rSscouglS
Up
To
REFRESHING
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$
Btls. Plus Deposit
PABST
Blue Ribbon Beer
12388
12-Oz. 1 W
Cans
COLONY WINE
Chablis, Burgundy
" & Rhine
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Pizza
$
Busch
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Priced
From
199
I Each
6'
12-Oz.
N.R.
Btls.
88
RETAIL
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AM Brands
Motor Oil
SOLD
AT
IHVOtCf
FRACMMC�$ 20
Little Debbie Snack Cakes & Archway Cookies
BAGGED
Chips, Snacks & Bagged Nuts
POUCM PACK
Sauces & Gravy Mixes g � fc fl
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10
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aata In each Kroger Sav-on Store except aa specifically ncted in
ad If we do run out of an advertised item, we will offer you your choice
of a comparable item, whan available, reflecting the same savings
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edvertlaed price within 30 days.
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59
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on
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MDSE. STORES
NONE SOLD
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Phone 756 7031





hi
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 15, 1980
Grapplers Pin West
Chester State, 36-6
By ED WILLIAMS
Staff rotei
The East Carolina
wrestling team won
their match against
West Chester State last
Saturday by a 36-6
count. "We wrestled
real well understated
first-year coach Ed
Steers.
Steers ran down the
(dividual perfor-
mances, which included
impressive wins by Jim
Osborn, Steve
Milanese. Scott Eaton
and a host of others.
"Osborn was a big
surprise Steers com-
ma "He replaced
! rank Frew it t who was
lied in the Carolina
ten. But he did a real
iob for us
Steers also praised
Milanese and Eaton,
claiming that both gave
"good, solid efforts
Steve Goode
defeated national
qualifier John Licata,
8-4, in his match in the
167 weight class, Steers
said.
The Pirates go up
against East
Stroudsburg tonight at
7:30 p.m. in Minges
Coliseum.
According to Steers,
East Stroudsburg is
from the Easterns, a
"167-team league. The
conference is the best in
the east and East
Stroudsburg is a strong
representative in the
conference all the
time
Steers commented
further on ECU's next
opponent by saying,
"They are a well-
balanced, fairly young
team
East Stroudsburg
features the wrestling
talents of Jim Vargo in
the 167 weight class. He
is a National Qualifier,
according to Steers.
With only two other
home matches remain-
ing, the opportunity to
see such outstanding
performers as Revils
(23-1 in the 177 weight
class), Goode (22-4 in
the 167 class), and
heavyweight Joyner
(22-2) is running out.
Gymnasts Improve After
National Clinic In Florida
Gymnastics at East Carolina University took a
step up the ladder of acclaim as they placed third
in a five team meet Friday at James Madison.
Madison placed first in the competition with an
overall 122.2 total, followed by Maryland with
121.4, ECU 117.9, Memphis State 115.3 and
Montgomery Community College 91.0.
"We made an 11 point improvement over our
first meet (with UNC-Chapel Hill) and I'm really
pleased with the way our girls are performing
right now said first year coach Jon Rose.
Rose credits a holiday training venture to
Florida for the team's improved performance.
They attended the National Gymnastics Clinic at
C.rcus World in Orlando Dec. 31-Jan. 2.
"Without the Florida trip there's no way we'd
be as far along as we are now said Rose.
Standout performers for the Pirates included
Susan Mcknight with an 8.4 to establish a new
school record and claim first place in the event.
Rose also cited Cindy Rogers for third place in
floor exercise (8.3), Kim Lowe second (8.1) and
Lawrence third (8.05) in the vault, and Carol
Layton third (7.6) and Elizabeth Jackson fourth
(7.5) in the balance beam.
"They're really starting to reach their potential
now added Rose. "We should reach 120 points
soon and that's where I want us to be. That would
make us one Hell of a respectable Division II
team
East Carolina, now 2-4 overall, hosts Georgia
College Friday at 7p.m. in Minges Coliseum.
�����������pnHi
ECU's Elizabeth Jackson
THIS WEEK ATTHE
jan is
Jan 30
SUN
TONIGHT
Tues. Jan. 15
SAVOY
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We 7 write letters home for you
twice a week!
t C I MuHcnls �! SO
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PuhlK SI 00 (,rups I IMI
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I HI M HI AR1SPROIH C I ION
For the measely sum of $20 (or $15 if your
parents are graduates of East Carolina), The EAst
Carolinian will send copies of the paper home to
your parents�or to your friends�or to anyone you
choose.
Not only that, but we will send them to you for a
full year. A full year. That way, if you don't stay in
Greenville for the summer, you can keep up with
everything going on campus.
Think of it. Your parents won't have to ask you
what is going on at ECU. With the help of The East
Carolinian, they can read about it.
For more details, drop a note by The East Caroli-
nian for the proper amount. Please make sure that
along with the check, we have the address where you
want us to send the subscription.
Flounder $2.95
all you can eat
I No taKe-out� please.
Meal Includes:
rench Fries, Col slaw,
Hush puppies.
We are proud to
announce that we
have added
one of the
AREAS FINEST
SALAD BARS
tor your
dining pleasure.
� The Student Inion
MM Films Committee
ana presents
HEARTS
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MINDS
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�Zimmerman, Newsweek
Produced by BERT SCHNEIDER
and PETER DAVIS
Directed by PETER DAVIS
A Touchstone-Audjefl Production for BBS
A HOWARD ZUKER, HENRY JAGL0M
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Wed. Jan. 16
Thur. Jan. 17
Fri. Jan. 18
Sat. Jan. 19
Sun. Jan. 20
Mon. Jan. 21
Tue. Jan. 22
$1.14 Chili Macaroni
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l .49 Liver & Onions
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OD-Ed � Other Opinion
S JANUARY 15. 1980 Paae 5
How Far Should

Government Go
The following column was written
by Claude Sit ton, editor of The
Raleigh News and Observer.
The settlement of a lawsuit
against the Raleigh Fire Department
taises the old question of how far
government should go to end racial
discrimination. Some whites and a
good many blacks say government
has not gone far enough. Others say
it has gone too far. Whatever the
answer�and there's truth on both
sides�the means of achieving the
goal have taken a bad turn.
Government has applied three
different policies to the problem in
the last 25 years. First, there was the
so-called separate but equal policy
of segregation, which permitted ma-
jority discrimination against
minorities. Next came equality of
opportunity or non-discrimination.
This policy in turn gave way to one
demanding equality of results and
permitting discrimination against
the majority in favor of minorities.
The result for the Raleigh Fire
Department will be a firefighting
and officer corps whose makeup
will be determined first by racial
quotas and only then by merit.
Within three years, according to the
settlement's terms, at least 16 per-
cent of the firemen must be black.
Further, the number of black
firefighters promoted must repre-
sent the same percentage of eligible
black applicants as the number of
white firefighters promoted
represents the percentage of eligible
white applicants.
The fallacies of this "Counting by
Race" and the judicial and
bureaucratic carpentry that brought
it about are recounted in a recent
book of that title by two North
Carolinians. They are William J.
Bennett, director of the National
Humanities Center in the Research
Triangle Park, and Terry Eastland,
editorial page editor of The
Greensboro Record.
The book examines the conflict
between the ideas of "moral equali-
ty" and "numerical equality
Moral equality stems .from the
Declaration of Independence.
Because all men are created equal,
say the authors, "no man should be
discriminated against or benefited
because of his race and no man
because of his race should have his
claim evaluated on a basis different
from another man That concept
became the linchpin of the civil
rights movement, one endorsed by
the late Martin Luther King Jr. and
others of its leaders.
Numerical equality came into
fashion in the middle and late
10's. Its basis is the contention of
its supporters that America must
compensate blacks for past
discrimination by restoring them to
the position in society they would
have occupied absent that
discrimination. "They offer the vi-
sion of a society in which resources,
rewards, and benefits are apportion-
ed in accordance with the percen-
tages of blacks, browns, yellows,
reds, and whites in that society
say the authors.
the vision of a society in which
resources, rewards, and benefits are
apportioned in accordance with the
percentages of blacks, browns,
yellows, reds, and whites in that
society say the authors.
The results of numerical equality
reach far beyond the Raleigh Fire
Department. Reverse discrimina-
tion, as it is often called, is com-
monplace in college admission (and,
i' appears, retention) practices, as
well as in public and private hiring
and promotion. The authors see it
rightly as a source of racial bit-
terness and potential conflict. And
they dispute its founding principle
as fallacious.
Compensation by race is ground-
ed in the false assumption that vic-
timization, suffering and depriva-
tion of blacks in recent years are
group, as opposed to individual,
characteristics, argue Bennett and
Eastland. "As a result say the
authors in reference to college ad-
missions, "the remedial principle is
denied in two ways. One, the pro-
grams fail to distinguish the relevant
differences among minority ap-
plicants themselves, for some have
suffered, others have not. And,
two, the programs fail to benefit
poor, disadvantaged white ap-
plicants who have suffered as much
as, or more than, minority ap-
plicants
No doubt many poor whites have
been penalized in this fashion by the
University of North Carolina's
desegregation practices, even
though those practices are under
continuing attack by federal of-
ficials as insufficient. But blacks
will suffer, too. As the authors
point out, respect and moral equali-
ty may be denied not only by harsh
measures such as slavery but also by
such seemingly benign ones as
special compensatory policies on
race. A benign insult is an insult
nonetheless.
"The notion that blacks and
other minorities 'just don't have it
and must be 'given something in
order to be something' not only
violates the assumption of moral
equality by which democratic socie-
ty is ordered and by which other
minorities have advanced; also, it
simply isn't true contend Bennett
and Eastland.
The federal pressures for coun-
ting by race are strong. Defending
the principle of moral equality
against demands for quota's is a
costly, time-consuming process. It
promises little or no success in view
of recent Supreme Court decisions.
Merit goes out the window. Stan-
dards are lowered. The noble princi-
ple of non-discrimination is
destroyed. And all of society pays
the penalties.
The Appropriate Ending
The following is an editorial
reprinted from The Greensboro
Record, Friday, January 4, 1980.
The "Me decade a time of un-
surpassed national self-indulgence,
ended with some sadly appropriate
fireworks. A New York woman
baked her son to exorcise him of a
devil-induced fever. A Quebec
reveler incinerated 44 co-convives at
a New Year's bash. And in North
Carolina, Jerry Lee Couick, who,
mistaking his t-shirted son for a
white-tailed deer, killed him, tear-
fully blamed the state for the death.
If there had been a law requiring
hunters to wear orange hunting
vests (as all prudent hunters do,
anyway), he argued, Roger Lee
Couick would be alive today.
In his anguish Mr. Couick
brilliantly summarized the sen-
timents of a nation that, despite its
purported conservatism, wants
government to regulate misery and
conflict out of existence. The "Me
generation" also is the
"Do-it-for-Me" generation, a
generation paralyzed by fear, crippl-
ed by stagnant New Deal liberalism,
dependent upon the guidance of Big
Brother.
Yet if the past decade has proved
anything, it's proved that govern-
ment cannot solve men's personal
crises. Indeed, it is doubtful that it
can solve even the public problems
for which it has taken responsibility.
An example: in Westfield,
Massachusetts, two almost identical
sewer projects are in progress. One
is financed by the city, the other bv
Uncle Sam. The first is on budgt
and will be ready to take contracts
in early spring. The second is only
halfway through a four-step process
required before Washington will ap-
prove funding. In step three, the city
must ask each and every citizen if he
uses a sewerline, how effective it is,
and so on. During steps one and
two, the cost of the project
quadrupled. The moral? Do it
yourself.
In a more perfect universe, in-
dividuals would have the courage
and common sense to dirty their
hands and rebuild their com-
munities. But the "Me generation'
perpetuated the tragic mvth that in-
dividuals are powerless and unim-
portant, and that only government
and business have the insight or
power to achieve anything � in-
cluding spiritual renewal.
We are not the venal and stupid
creatures depicted by the "Me"
manifesto: time and aaain
Americans have shown the capacity
to improve themselves and their
communities, to support fairness
and equality, to restore order, and
to promote republican virtues
without the avuncular assistance of
the federal government. Uncle
Sam's primary duty is to protect.
not to mother. If he tries to do more
than prevent lawlessness and
violence at home and defend our in-
terests abroad, he gets spread too
thin to be effective and we find
ourselves in messes like those we
now face in Iran and Afghanistan.
UN Is Impotent

The following editorial is
reprinted from The Greensboro
Record, Friday, January 4, 1980.
Perhaps nothing better sym-
bolizes the impotence of the United
Nations than the picture of
Secretary General Kurt Waldheim,
ostensibly on a peace mission to
Iran, huddled like a frightened fawn
in the corner of a van, trying to
escape from Iranian students deter-
mined to rip him limb from limb.
And perhaps nothing better sym-
bolizes world respect for the
organization than the Iranian televi-
sion biography of Mr. Waldheim
that interspliced an accurate sum-
mary of his diplomatic career with
carnage filmed in the shah's prisons,
the implication being that the
genteel Secretary assisted in the
murder of Iranian dissidents.
Mr. Waldheim and his organiza-
tion are the Rodney Danger fields of
the diplomatic world. Their con-
demnation of Israel and trade sanc-
tions against Rhodesia amounted to
naught. Their peacekeeping mis-
sions have failed to stop wars in
Africa and the Middle East. They
get no respect.
Even as Mr. Waldheim was strug-
gling to remain intact, President
Carter was announcing that he
would combat the Soviet invasion of
Afghanistan by requesting that the
very same United Nations condemn
the act, maybe even place sanctions
on the venturesome Russians.
The decision would have done
Neville Chamberlain proud. With
one swift stroke, Mr. Carter effc
lively ceded Afghanistan to th.
Union of Soviet Socialist Republics
� just as Chamberlain made the
Sudetenland a peace offering to
Hitler. In addition, the President
contemplated other "severe" ac-
tions � weakening trade relations,
boycotting the Olympics, postpon-
ing the SALT vote.
Almost immediately the price of
gold shot past the $600 mark. A jit-
tery monetary market reflected the
fears of a world already skeptical of
America's willingness to defend
itself and its friends.
A side effect of the hike will be in-
creased inflation here, and con-
tinued weakening of the dollar. And
that will mean greater economic
hardship for the United States
because the timid Georgian could
not take a stand during the most im-
portant crisis of his presidency.
That, too, is appropriate. In a
single act of indecision, Mr. Cartr
consolidated some foreign and
omestic woes into a single sj mboli
mess. The plummeting dollar and
the burning flag represent the inept-
ness of his domestic and foreign
policies, respectively.
But nothing better symbolizes the
weakness of his resolve to defend
freedom than the decision to place
Afghanistan's fate before the
meekest of the meek and weakest of
the weak � the United Nations.
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Title
The East Carolinian, January 15, 1980
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 15, 1980
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.30
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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