The East Carolinian, November 1, 1979






"Were it left to me
to decide whether
we should have a
government without
newspapers or
newspapers without
government, I
should not hesitate
a moment to prefer
the latter
�Thomas Jefferson
The East Carolinian
Vol. 54 No. J
10 pages today
Thursday, November 1, 1979
If you have a story
idea, a tip, or a
lead, please tele-
phone us:
757-6366
757-6367
757-6309
Greenville, N.C.
Circulation 10,000
Board
discusses
Herald
By KAREN WENDT
News Editor
At the regular Media Board meeting held
Wednesday, The Ebony Herald was again the major
topic of discussion.
Members of the board questioned the feasibility of
reinstating a new editor for the paper and whether the
paper was necessary.
According to Rudolph Alexander, associate dean of
student life, "Unless there is negative action taken,
there is still an Ebony Herald
After a large amoung of discussion on the matter,
action was postponed pending the results of an
advertisement which will be placed in The East
Carolinian. The ad seeks proposals for a possible
"minority publication
The possibility of changing The Ebony Herald into
more of a magazine type format came up at the
meeting, and it is possible that the board will decide to
reinstate the publication with such a style.
The repeating of news had been a topic of discussion
at a subcommittee meeting held the day before, but no
decisions were made at the meeting.
Some other business of the meeting concerned
reports presented by Marc Barnes, editor of The East
Carolinian, and Pete Podeszwa, head of the Photo Lab.
The problems of the two organizations have been solved
to a large extent, according to the reports. It is expected
to take a while longer to work out all of the difficulty in
the two organizations, but progress is being made.
Salaries (or East Carolinian employees has been a
topic at previous meetings, and at this meeting, the
advertising staff had been requested to come and
present their point of view on the matter.
Though the advertising staff was present, it was
decided by the board to do a long term study on the
past and current salary policies and then possibly
propose changes in the structure.
In the meantime, the budgets for each of the media
have been approved, with the exception of The
Buccaneer.
Buccaneer Associate Editor Barrie Byland presented
to the board a list of the bids received by The Buccaneer
staff from different printing companies and their choice
of printers. It was necessary for the board to approve
their choice before they could sign the final contract.
The board decided to ask The Buccaneer to present a
more detailed list of the bids which would explain more
fully why the staff has chosen the company in question
to do the printing.
Alexander commented, "We have a moral obligation
to do this
The proposal was tabled until the next meeting, to
be held Tuesday at 3 p.m.
SALT II
ECU professor attends
White House briefing
By BRENDA VINSON
Staff Writer
Janice H. Faulkner, an English
professor at ECU, recently took part in a
Strategic Arms Limitation Treaty (SALT)
II briefing at the White House. The
briefing was presented Wednesday Oct. 24
by President Carter and national security
affairs assistant. Dr. Zbigniew Brzezinski.
(File Photo by John Crogan)
John Jeter, General Manager of WECU Jeter still hopes to get the station on the
radio station has still had no luck in air this year,
having the station's FCC permit granted.
WECU without
FCC license
By BRENDA VINSON
Staff Writer
Federal Communica-
Itions Commission (FCC)
approval of the university-
operc'ed radio station's
construction plans is still
pending, according to
WECU station manager
John Jeter.
WECU has been wait-
ing since last spring for
FCC licensing which will
permit construction of an
FM transmitter tower. An
amendment to the original
application for approval
was filed in the spring.
After encountering several
problems since last filing
in 1978, Jeter said that a
decision on the present
of a new policy being
considered by the Com-
mission. The new policy
concerns a change in the
or stop has been FCC's general position on
the application education radio stations.
application should have
been reached in August.
said that a
Jeter
"hiatus"
placed on
for so that action has been
halted.
Authorities say that
FCC officials support the
new regulation which
Jeter has enlisted the
help of N.C. Congressman
Walter B. Jones in getting
the delayed application
approved. According to
would limit the number of Jeter, Congressman Jones
FM stations in university
systems. If the new rule is
passed before WECU's
application is approved,
there may be no chance
has promised to act as
soon as possible.
"He
contact
said he would
personally
me
as
for an FM station at East soon as something comes
Carolina.
According to sources at
FCC offices, the permit
has been held up because
up Jeter stated.
At present,
17 stations in
system.
there are
the UNC
Subcommittee discusses
publications problem
By KAREN WENDT
News Editor
The reinstatement of
The Ebony Herald was the
subject of a special Media
Board subcommittee meet-
ing held on Tuesday.
The board had asked
several black leaders to
attend the meeting to
discuss whether there was
a desire for The Herald, or
whether it was necessary
to reinstate the paper.
The Ebony Herald has
not been printed since
October, 1978 due to
management and other
problems.
of
Ricky Lowe, treasurer
the SGA, Jerry Sim-
mons, former Herald ed-
itor and Shelton Barnes,
president of SOULS, were
asked to the meeting to
discuss whether or not
they felt that The Herald
was wanted or needed on
campus.
All felt strongly that
The Herald was needed on
campus and that it should
begin publication as soon
as possible.
However, only one
person has applied for the
position of editor, and
most members have heard
little interest expressed.
When board members
questioned the need for an
Ebony Herald, Adderton
stated, "The interest is
there
Problems with past
Herald staffs have caused
board members to be wary
of attempts to renew the
paper.
In the past two years,
only two issues of The
Herald have appeared, the
last issue being in October
of last year. Salaries were
paid to staff members
until February 1979.
Lowe repeatedly stated
that he felt the people he
had talked to expected to
see The Ebony Herald
during this fall semester.
At the hearing held hi
February, then Editor
Jerry Simmons said that
After Brzezinski's briefing, the Presi-
dent joined the group and spoke
informally about the necessity of ratifying
the arms treaty. The thrust of the
President's remarks concerned the threat
of instability in the rest of the world if the
United States does not come to an
agreement with russia.
Carter emphasized the
other nations building up
either of the two major
possibility of
arms against
powers if no
Faulkner said that she received a letter
from White House Administrative Assis-
tant Ann Wexler inviting her to attend the agreement is reached
briefing. She was told to inform the White , . � .
House as to whether or not she would be . Aier hls talkf' theL Prflde"1 enJer"
able to attend and to send her Social tained questions from the floor for about
Security number to be used as a security 4,� minutes. Carter and Dr Brzezinski left
check when she arrived. When Faulkner the podium together at 4:00, marking the
arrived in Washington, guards checked end of the briefing
in wasmngton, gua
her identification to make sure it matched
the Social Security number she sent in
earlier.
Faulkner and more than 50 other
guests from North Carolina entered at the
Southwest gate of the White House for
the 2 o'clock session. The Southwest Gate
is the one the Carter family uses.
They were then ushered into the East
Room where the public sees President
Carter most often during his televised
presentations. There the guests were
introduced to Brzezinski who spoke for
approximately 50 minutes.

Representatives of the State Depart-
ment, the Department of Defense and the
U.S. Senate were alio present
Afterwards, Faulkner and other
guests were invited to the State Dining
Room for a reception. Faulkner left the
White House to return to Greenville after
the reception.
Prior to the White House visit, the
N.C. group had lunch with Sen. Robert S.
Morgan, D-N.C, in Raleigh,
Faulkner, who has long been active in
all levels of political affairs, said that she
doen not know exactly why she was
chosen to attend the briefing. She was
told that criteria for those invited was that
they be dedicated civic, business and
professional leaders of their respective
communities. Faulkner added that not all
of those invited to Washington were
Democrats nor were they necessarily
During his briefing, Brzezinski covered supporters of the treaty. They represented
four major areas of the SALT II issue.
They are as follows:
.Review of the history of SALT.
.Outline of the four objectives of SALT.
.Information on which objectives had been
Police report
a cross-section of
sional businesses.
opinions and profes-
Guests for the meeting personally
financed the trip to and from Washington.
Charges possible
the inability to gain access
to The Fountainhead
(name of the campus
paper at that time) layout
room made it impossible
for the Herald staff to put
together the paper.
When asked why he
had been paying salaries
to Herald employees, Sim-
mons replied, "because Trkia MorrU Chairperson of the Media Board, was a
they have been doing the memher of the subcommittee that is looking into the
w0 Ebony Herald problems. (Photo by John Grogan)
By ARAH VENABLE
Staff Writer
An ECU student found
with drugs in Slay dorm
on Oct. 18 may face
charges, according to Cap-
tain Wiggins, police in-
vestigator. A plant sus-
pected of being marijuana
and 93 tablets of what
appears to be LSD were
found by police. No
charges will be made until
lab analysis reports are
concluded.
Wiggins added that
charges have not yet been
filed on the drug incident
in Umstead dorm. The lab
analysis is expected at any
day.
A male student was
assaulted by two other
males on Monday around
1:25 a.m. Campus Police
Chief Frances Eddings
said the assault took place
in the vicinity of 506 E.
9th St. near the dirt
parking lots. The two men
attempted to rob the
student but did not
succeed.
On Wednesday, three
male students were appre-
hended for breaking win-
dows out of the stairwell
on the second floor of
Graham building. Eddings
said they were throwing
something through the
windows. The students
have not been charged but
have been referred to
Dean Mallory.
In another instance of
vandalization, the pipe on
the fourth floor water
fountain in Scott dorm was
broken off by three male
students. Dean Mallory
will also handle this
incident.
Around 8:45 a.m. Mon-
day, a student reported
that someone had cut the
top off his convertible
Among the food stolen
was 13 qts. of orange
juice, one half gallon milk,
3 pounds sausage, 2
pounds of bacon and one
dozen eggs. Police have
not yet determined how-
entry was gained.
A fight started in Jones
dorm on Monday when
one student supposedly
cut up the pillow cases
and napsack of another.
Charges will be ma !e
through the men's resi-
dence council.
Another argument re-
sulted in an alleged
assault this weekend. Po-
lice got a report from a
female stating that she
and her boyfriend had an
argument which ended
with him assaulting her.
No charges have been
during the night The car made but he
was parked on the south student has been referred
A policy was then
adopted by the board to
use a "wait and see"
attitude concerning The
Herald. They decided that
no paychecks would" be
issued unless a paper was
printed.
Fountainhead Editor
Doug White said he had
heard nothing from the
editor of the Herald
concerning use of the
layout room.
No paper has appeared
since that time and no
editor has been named.
CT&T strike may end
Members of the striking Communica- ment broke down over an automatic
tions Workers of America voted yesterday cost-of-living adjustment demanded by the
and will vote today to decide the fate of a
proposed two-year contract with Carolina
Telephone and Telegraph Co.
The results of the balloting will not be
released until late Thursday night, after
all votes are tallied at the Ram ads Inn In
Greenville, according to union negotiator
Delbert Gordon.
The telephone company workers have
been on strike since Oct. 1 when contract
negotiations between labor and manage-
union.
Approximately 3,100 of CT&T's 5,100
workers are represented by the union.
About 250 union members are with the
Norfolk-Carolina Telephone Co which
serves all or part of six northeastern North
Carolina counties and which is in the
process of being merged with CT&T.
The two groups axe voting on basically
the same proposed contract.
side of Jones dorm, and a
radio and speakers valued
at $305 were stolen.
Another car was bro-
ken into on Sunday, and a
student reported that her
pocketbook was taken. The
window of the car was
broken, and the purse
containing $25 and a
couple of rings was stolen.
The car was parked at the
northwest corner of Min-
ges.
It is also not known
who broke into an Um-
stead room Saturday. Po-
lice said that money and
jewelry worth approxi-
mately $68 were taken in
the robbery which occured
around 11:00 p.m.
At 1:00 Tuesday morn-
ing, Eddings said police
received a report that the
gallery at Jones Cafeteria
had been burglarised.
to Dean Mallory.
Inside
today �
Do we need it?
page 4
For colored
girls
, page 5
Dye look
at offense
page 8





Page 2 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 1 November 1979
Hypertension study
School recieves grant
Carter; J or don to
pay parking fees
The East Carolina
School of Medicine will
soon be involved in a
unique project to develop
a new drug, according to
Pharmacology Professor
Dr. John P. DaVanzo.
The USV Pharmaceuti-
cal Corporation has recent-
ly granted the ECU
medical school $57,000 to
develop a drug that has
been effective in lowering
high blood pressure in
animals.
According to DaVanzo,
the grant represents the
first time that a private
corporation has engaged
an academic institution in
the direct development of
a commercial product.
"It's a new concept in
academia, and it shows
the trust and confidence
the company has in East
Computing majors
recieve third place
A team of ECU Com-
puter Science majors won
third place in a regional
programming contest held
in Raleigh Saturday.
Fifteen colleges and
universities from North
Carolina and neighboring
states competed in the
contest, which was spon-
sored by the Association of
Compuing Machinery.
Each team was given
four problems to program
into a computer, using a
language known as
FORTRAN-4. Winners
were judged according to
the ease and speed with
which solutions to the
problems were then ac-
quired through the com-
puter.
Computer science ma-
jors david Sowell, Gary
r
Boswook, Tim Finnell and
Kevin Flannery were the
ECU team members.
According to Dr. Mi-
lam Johnson, a Mathe-
matics professor who ac-
companied the team, suc-
cussful computer program-
ming requires skill in
analysing problems as well
as accuracy in anticipating
how long their solutions
must be handled by the
computer.
Johnson also noted that
the ECU chapter of the
Association for Computing
Machinery will meet Tues-
day Nov. 6 at 4 p.m. to
discuss the ECU team's
methods and results in the
contest.
N.C. State University,
which hosted the compet-
ition, placed first among
the entrants.

Student Phone Directories
are in room
228Mendenhall
at the
Student Government Offices
Iart&camera PLAZA CAMERA
526 S. Cotanche St. Pitt p,aza
Down Town Shopping Center
tt$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$g
g KODACOLOR g
� Developed and Printed 2
n
J
No Foreign
12
EXPOSURE
ROLL. ONLY
$075
mm
Film
20
EXPOSURE
ROLL ONLY
$395�
KODACOLOR
� Developed and Printed
$435
?J
No Foreign
Film
24
EXPOSURE
ROLL. ONLY
36
EXPOSURE
ROLL ONLY
$57 5
sTide$$$$$$$$$l
FILM DEVELOPING �
20 EXPOSURE
KODACHROME
AND EKTACHROME
PROCESSING ONLY
36 EXPOSURE
KODACHROME
AND EKTACHROME
PROCESSING. ONLY
ft93l
4& LOW, LOW PRICES ON
Movie
PROCESSING
KODACHROME
AND EKTACHROME
PROCESSING ONLY
SUPER e AND STANDARD 8 MOVIES
LIMITED OFFER
OFFER EXPIRES.
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
Carolina University said
DaVanzo.
High blood pressure,
or hypertension, is a
serious condition affecting
millions of Americans.
Medications for its treat-
ment are available on the
market, noted DaVanzo,
but newer and more
effective drugs are need-
ed.
"We hope ECU can
play a major role in filling
this need he said.
DaVanzo will head a
team of four investigators
who will conduct extensive
studies on the new drug.
Although the drug lowers
blood pressure in animals,
how it works and the
mechanisms involved re-
main unclear.
"The team will actually
be developing the whole
drug, not just a portion of
it DaVanzo said.
The physiology and
pharmacology departments
of the medical school will
cooperate in the study.
Other members of the
research team are Drs.
Samuel lams, Alphonse
Ingenito and John Yeager.
The grant will cover
research costs for one year
and is renewable.
By FRANK CORMIER
Associated Press Writer
WASHINGTON - In
another month, Hamilton
Jordan and other top aides
to President Carter will
begin paying $32.50 a
month for the privilege of
parking inside the White
House fence.
Carter's principal as-
sistants hold assigned
parking slots right beside
the White House West
Wing. For many years,
these slots have been
provided free of charge as
a fringe benefit to pres-
idential aides.
Last April 1, Carter
announced that regular
fees would be charged for
these and thousands of
other parking spaces al-
lotted to federal workers in
the Washington area.
If parking costs money,
Carter reasoned, bureau-
crats might be motivated
to take public transit or
join car pools. The ob-
jective, of course, is to
save energy.
Carter said the fees
would be imposed Oct. 1
but, perhaps predictable,
the red tape involved has
delayed implementation of
the fee system until Dec.
1.
At $32.50 a month,
staff chief Jordan's park-
ing tab will be a bargin.
Commercial rates near the
White House run to $5 a
day or more in many
cases.
The imposition of
parking charges represents
such a jolt to the personal
budgets of may federal
employees, however, that
a decision has been made
to have a one year, half-
price transition period.
After 12 months, the fee
for parking inside the
White House compound
will jump to $65 a month.
East Carolina Playhouse
Presents
L
APPLY YOURSELF
today. Education after high
school can be the key to a
better life.
United States
Office of Education
For Colored Girls
Who Have Considered
Suicide
When The
Rainbow
Is
Enuf
g by ntozake shange
A pass.onately spellbinding choreopoem
which captures the inner feelings of
todays Black woman
Directed Dy
Edgar R. Loessin
October 31 through November 3
November 5 through 7
8:15p.m.
Studio Theatre
Tickets are $2.50
ECU Students $150
For reservations and information
call 757-6390
between 10 and 4
Monday through Friday
J
ALL YOU CAN EAT 1
SPECIALS
4:00 8:00 PM
SALAD�50 EXTRA
NOCARflYOUT
ASST. VAR. 14
PIZZA. .�nl? 1
WITH FRIES & COLESLAW
FRIED
CHICKEN ?�
WITH GARLIC BREAD
ITALIAN i
SPAGHETTI! �.
WITH FRIES & COLE SLAW
FRIED S4oo
FISH.
The folks at Kroger Sav-on know the
complete student has a party side,
too. So they have what East Carolina
University students need for any bash
. . . from party platters to disco plat-
ters all in one convenient loca-
tion. Don't be incomplete this
year�shop Kroger Savon today
7V
I
FRA6RAHC�$r
ISCOyNTEOl B
UP TO
TIMEX
WATCHES
Beta
ONLY
REG. OR DIP
COUNTRY OVEN
Potato
Chips
8-Oz. Twin Pak
OFF MANUFACTURER S
SUGGESTED RETAIL
V
LET THE DELI DO IT! Planning a party? Let the
Kroger Sav-on Deli supply the fixin's. Finest
quality meats, delicious cheese, & tasty
salads combine to make our party trays
perfect for entertaining. Just phone ahead to
place your order!
?
a
O
jij
a

Records and
Tapes
iSGHSIB up
Busch
Beer.


12-oz. 199
cans
Rossetto
15
Lambrusco m.
BUSCH BUSCH JftlSCH
K
L ,
ljMk;
OFF
MFB
SUG
RETAIL
Copyright 1979
Kroger Sav-on
Quantity Rights Reserved
None Sow To Dollars
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Each of thaaa advertised Rams ia required to bo readily available for
Ml In aach Krogar Sav-on Store except aa �pacifically noted in this
ad. If wa do run out of an advertieed Item, we will offer you your choice
of a comparable item, when available, reflecting the �eme savings or
raincheck which
,r
advfti�d orica
i you to purchase the advertieed Item at i
30 days.
5�)
JsiUHr
FOOD, DRUG, GENERAL
MERCHANDISE STORES
PRICES EFFECTIVE TUES
NONE SOLD
I
AIERS
OPEN 7 AM TO MIDNIGHT
MON
THRU
SAT
OPEN SUNDAY
9 AM TO 9 PM
600 Greenville BlvdGreenville
Phone 756-7031





Il4l
1 November 1979 THE EAST CAROUNIAN
IdW
e, places, and
srea clustei mI 11 usi l ecu ccc
The Law School Ad-
mission Test will be
offered at East Carolina
University on Saturday,
December 1, 1979. Appli-
cation blanks are to be
completed and mailed to
Educational Testing Sen-
vice, Box 966-R, Prince-
ton, N.J. 08540. Regis-
tration deadline is Nov. 5,
1979. Applications may be
obtained from the ECU
Testing Center, Speight
Building Room 105.
f c Ik I U il
Folk Festival at the
Treehouse, Saturday,
November 3. Folk dancing,
Greengrass Cloggers, Ole
Time and Bluegrass mu-
sic.
There will be an SNEA
Cluster meeting for all
area chapters on Novem-
ber 6 at J.H. Rose High
School in Greenville. Ex-
hibits will be displayed
from 8:00 a.m. to 1:00
p.m. All members are
encouraged to attend.
sfc Dttle bus
The shuttle bus be-
tween the Allied Health
Building and Mendenhall
Student Union will not
operate after November 2,
1979.
H
(re
The Graduate Record
Examination will be offer-
ed at East Carolina
University on Saturday,
January 12, 1980. Appli-
cation blanks are to be
completed and mailed to
Educational Testing Ser-
vice, Box 966-R, Prince-
ton, N.J. 08540. Registra-
tion deadline is November
28, 1979. Applications may
be obtained from the ECU
Testing Center, Speight
Building, Room 105.
l(r 3tat
Jelta
The next Sigma Tau
Delta meeting will be held
November 14. Terry Davis,
author of Vision Quest,
will speak.
I t�tt ill
The ECU Racquetball
Club is trying to identify
all interested faculty, staff
and students. Clinics and
tournaments are being
planned with competition
between schools being
scheduled. All interested
persons, please contact
Nancy Mize, 757-6387, 204
Memorial Gym.
Screenings will be held
Thursday November 8 in
the SGA Cabinet Room,
Mendenhall for student
positions on faculty com-
mittees. For an appoint-
ment, call the SGA office,
757-6611, ext. 218. The
following committees need
to be filled:
Admissions
University Curriculum
Library
Student Recruitment
Career Education
Instructional Survey
General College
il oil i
There will be a Rho
Epsilon meeting on Thurs-
day, November 1 at 4:00
p.m. in Room 221 Men-
denhall. All members are
urged to attend.
act
The American College
Testing (ACT) will be
offered at East Carolina
University on Saturday,
December 8, 1979. Appli-
cation blanks are to be
completed and mailed to
ACT Registration, P.O:
Box 414, Iowa City, Iowa
52240. Registration dead-
line is November 9, 1979.
Applications may be ob-
tained from the ECU
Testing Center, Speight
Building Room 105.
The James B. Mallory
Men's Residence Council
scholarship will be award-
ed this semester to a
young man who is a
member of the Men's
Residence Council. The
scholarship will be based
on need and residence hall
contributions. Applicants
must have at least a 2.5
grade point average. Ap-
plications may be picked
up in each dorm coun-
selor's office.
I II It ill
An organizational
meeting for women's and
men's Team Handball
Clubs will be
Thursday, Nov.
p.m. in 104
Gym. All students inter-
ested in this action-packed
Olympic sport are invited
to attend.
held on
1, at 3:30
Memorial
recital
On Sunday Nov. 4, an
organ recital will be
presented by Mickey
Thomas Terry at 8:00 p.m.
in the sanctuary of Jarvis
Memorial United Meth-
odist Church. Performed
will be "Fantasia and
Fugue in G Minor" by
Bach, "Introduction and
Passacaglia in D Minor"
by Max Reger, "Choral in
B Minor" by Cesar
Franck, "Meditation"
from the Trois Improvi-
sations and the "Finale"
to the Fifth Symphony by
Louis Vierne.
A graduate student at
ECU, Terry previously
studied under Mrs. Selina
Forbes, Dr. E. Robert
Irwin and Dr. David L.
Foster. Terry is also
organist of Jarvis Method-
ist Church as well as
having served as organist
for the Greenville Com-
munity Chorus in former
years hradditional to
occasional recitals, just
recently Terry returned
from Washington, D.C.
where he played at the
National Cathedral. The
admission to the recital is
free, and the public is
cordially invited to attend.
' The ECU Collegiate
Civitan Club will have an
organizational meeting at
7 p.m. on Nov. 6 in
Flanagan 201.
The ECU Club is
sponsored by the Green-
ville Civitan Club.
Collegiate Civitan Clubs
are dedicated to service to
others with special em-
phasis on mental health
and mental retardation.
Any student carrying 12
semester hours or more is
eligible to become a
member. For further in-
formation, see Dr. R.A.
Klein, Flanagan 235 or
phone 757-6274.
mrc
cimereem
If you like pinball, pool
or foosball, the place to be
is the MRC GAMEROOM.
Located in the basement of
Aycock Dorm, it is open
from 10 a.m12 p.m. ev-
ery day. The gameroom
also serves as the checkout
area for tents, canoes, car
racks and life preservers.
Remember, the Men's
Residence Council pro-
vides these services.
bewllr
Take advantage of
these bowling specials at
Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter: "Red Pin Bowling" �
7 p.m. to 10 p.m. every
Sunday bowlers get a
chance to win one FREE
GAME with every game
bowled. "Rent-A-Lane" �
Every Saturday from noon
to 6 p.m. you can rent a
lane for $3 for one hour.
"Discount Day" � 13 off
the price of bowling every
Monday from 2 p.m. until
6 p.m.
ammafceta
111
Gamma Beta Phi will
have a covered dish
supper and meeting
Thursday Oct. 18 at 6:30
p.m. in the multipurpose
room in Mendenhall.
Volunteers needed
for War on Winter
The Greenville "War
on Winter" will be
sponsoring a woodcut and
a winterizing service to
local homes in need.
The "War on Winter"
is an energy movement
which is being sponsored
by several groups in the
Greenville area.
The woodcut will begin
at 8:30 a.m. on Saturday
November 3 and Saturday
November 10 at the Pitt-
Greenville Groundstation.
Local people are asked to
"Bring yourself, any
woodcutting equipment
you can and pick up trucks
if you can
The projects chairman
is David Goehring.
Lunches will be pro-
vided by local merchants.
The wood that is cut
will be distributed to
people who need it to keep
warm this winter from the
REAL Crisis Center and
the Silvation Army sta-
tion.
The winterizing service
will begin at 8:30 a.m. at
the Old Fire Station on
West Chestnut.
Linda Hicks, of the
Junior Woman's Club of
Greenville Conservation
Department has asked that
anyone who has hammers,
screwdrivers, stapleguns
or anything else that
would be helpful to bring
it along.
Volunteers are needed
to work on needy homes in
the area.
Local businesses have
provided food for the
workers and winterizing
materials.
HEAVEN
CAN
WATT
PG A PARAMOUNT PICTURE
AUTO SERVICE SPECIALS
988 -4rtS�sStf
$12.V ssSsReg

itm11-
You
C�
��
;�?�
Cf
PART
TIME
JOB
Looking for part-time
job with flexible hours
and real buftiness
experience? Nortliwett
Mutual Life Int. Co.
has openings for college
agents. Call before noon
for appointments!
OUT
W
���
All size
tires
available
WE SERVICE NATIONAL ACCOUNTS
�iPGoodrich
TIRE CENTER
MUL4�rJI
Coggins Car Car
756-5244
fWtlM
ML
criemlstiy
There are immediate
openings for tutors of
Chemistry 1120 and 1050.
Applicants may be grad-
uates or undergraduate
students who are profi-
cient in these areas.
Contact Dr. Bridwell or
Dr. Hensel in 208 Rags-
dale Hall or call the
Center for Student Oppor-
tunities at 757-6122, 6081,
or 6075.
11
Screenings will be held
Thursday November 8 in
the SGA Cabinet Room,
Mendenhall for SGA ad-
ministrative committees.
Call for an appointment
(757-6611, ext. 218). The
following committees need
to be filled:
Alcohol Drug Educa-
tion
Soliciting on Campus
Residence Life
Status of Women
Student Health Ser-
vices
International Student
Affairs
University Traffic
Appeals
Are You
Confused?
about your portraits
The Buccaneer Staff apologizes for
any confusion you may have concerning
the procedures of selecting your
yearbook portrait. In order to have your
picture in the 1980 Buccaneer, you must
specify your choice by writing.
"YEARBOOK PORTRAIT" on the back
of your favorite pose. Then mail all
proofs back to Yearbook Associates.
You are under no obligation to order
any pictures for your personal use and
your yearbook portrait will be in the
1980 book free of charge.
�upt)
The Student Union
Program Board will meet
Nov. 1 at 7 p.m. in Room
212 of Mendenhall Student
Center.
ccc
The ECU Christian
Choir and Orchestra will
rehearse Thursday night at
7:30 at the Presbyterian
Church. If you would like
to know more, call 752-
9612.
plhcme t)cck�
The 1979-80 phone
books are in. If your do not
have one yet, they are
available in the SGA office
located on the second floor
of Mendenhall, Room 228.
BONANZA'S FAMOUS
RIB EYE DINNEI
2 FOR
m
i
i
Imagine, this delicious steak plus a steaming hot baked potato or french
fries and a slice of grilled Texas toast. And salad you can pile a mile high
as often as you like . . . fresh greens and vegetables from our "Discov-
ery" Salad Bar. What a treat! And now you can get two complete meals
for just $5.99! Delicious!
Call 756-5508 to reserve banquet
room for groups
BONANZA'S FAMOUS
I
Offer valid with Coupon Only
thru Nov. 30, 1979 I
���

t"�
X
�:�:�:�:
jZy

a"
"Let's worm up and have an ice-cold Stroh s
�-��
For the real beer lover.





The East Carolinian
Editorials
& Opinions
Thursday, November 1, 1979 Page 4
Greenville, N. C.
Change the Herald
The Ebony Herald has been revived,
at least in the minds of the Media
Board, who were recently called on to
decide the fate of the minority
newspaper.
We cannot agree with bringing back
the Herald in the form that existed last
year. Our feelings are based on a
variety of reasons. For example:
�We cannot see a need for it.
Minorities on this campus should
realize that The East Carolinian serves
ALL the students on this campus. To
this end, we have appointed a minority
affairs reporter, whose sole job will be
to report on news of interest to
minorities.
�To say that The Ebony Herald of last
year was of poor quality is an
understatement. On page one, The
Herald featured two press releases and
a report on the activities of S.O.U.L.S.
Inside, there was coverage of black
fraternities and sororities, as well as a
crossword puzzle and news of a new
Latin course being offered. A good
story on Sickle Cell anemia did appear
on the back page.
� The Ebony Herald appeared only once
last year. Former editor Jerry Simmons
cited problems in production with The
Fountainhead (the former campus
newspaper) as a reason for this.
However when an effort was begun to
straighten out the problems, no one on
the staff of The Herald contacted
former Fountainhead editor Doug
White.
�In past issues of The Ebony Herald,
stories have been printed in both the
minority newspaper and in the student
newspaper as well. We cannot see
spending large amounts of money to
print matching stories in two different
newspapers.
We have no criticism of a minority
forum on this campus; rather, we have
sharp criticism of what the last Ebony
Herald had become. We do offer some
suggestions as to what we feel The
Ebony Herald should be like.
�First, The Ebony Herald should
change its name and turn into an
entirely different entity. All layout and
design of the past Ebony Heralds
should be scrapped, and new design
should be its primary concern.
�Any new editors chosen for The
Herald should make quality their first
priority. They should have logged time
in professional newspapers or maga-
zines, or they should have taken the
advanced Journalism courses offered by
the English Department.
�A new operations manual, like that
required of all other media, should
specify who does what in this new
minority publication.
�This new publication should cover all
minority students, rather than the black
student population only.
�This new enterprise should have a
magazine type format, and it should
appear twice a semester, rather than
one proposal we heard of having it
appear twice a month. A new staff will
have enough problems in getting
together enough material in the
beginning for a twice a semester
newspaper.
Finally, before anything else is
done, an effort should be made to find
out what needs the minority populations
of East Carolina have, and then
determine what a minority publication
could do to meet those particular
needs.
If no needs are found, or if student
apathy results in no applications for
editor, the entire project should be
scrapped.
American Journal
Nukes breed overseas
JACK ANDERSQN-jOE SPEAR
SPECIAL
Carter's High-Interest Policy
May Wreak Ruin on the Economy
By JACK ANDERSON
and JOE SPEAR
WASHINGTON Jimmy
Carter kept his family
peanut business afloat with
free-and-easy bank loans
from his Georgia buddy Bert
Lance. He profited from low
interest rates and extended
credit.
Now, as president of the
United States, Carter has
bestowed his blessing on a
tight-money, high-interest
banking policy that may
well drive farmers, peanut
or otherwise, into bankrupt-
cy. His appointee as head of
the Federal Reserve, Paul
Volcker, has ordained higher
bank interest rates that
could also cost hundreds of
thousands of American
workmen their jobs, prove
ruinous to small business-
men and squeeze the budget
of every housewife in the
country.
Playing politics with our
pocketbooks. Carter is
trying to play catch-up with
inflation by going along with
the Volcker Plan that hikes
the prime interest rate to
dry up the money supply for
such vital sectors of the
economy as home building,
plant expansion and long-
range investments.
Unfortunately, the Geor-
gian and his advisers have
been guessing wrong on the
American economy at every
turn and the nation is headed
into a deep recession. Secret
Cabinet minutes furnished
us from last February show
the president's chief eco-
nomic adviser, Charles
Schultze, predicting "the
economy should begin to
slow down" and later opti-
mistically discerning "some
signs of a desired non-reces-
sionary slowdown
As Carter's efforts to curb
the engulfing wave of infla-
tion proved as futile as King
Canute's order that the tide
stop coming in, some of the
president's men suggested
price and wage controls.
According to the secret
es.
At the dark end of the eco-
nomic tunnel is. the Ameri-
can consumer.
Family Efforts: With the
president desperately striv-
ing as an underdog to win
re-election, a number of
states would adjust
White House Cabinet states will soon become the
minutes, "the President site of Carter family reun-
noted that he has ncrauthon- i0ns jimmy Carter recently
ty to impose mandatory tut-tutted that the presiden-
pnce and wage controls and tial race was starting too
that even if he had such early and he shouldn't have
authority, he would not to leave the White House to
exercise it. scramble for delegates in
Like the emperor with no tne Democratic primaries.
clothes, Carter is politically But- wife Rosalynn,
posturing on the devastating mother Lillian, sonXhip and
It's clear from intelli-
gence reports that the other' enriched
Arab states have not adjust-
ed. Now the Egyptians are
growing disillusioned. They
expected immediate eco-
nomic benefits for cooperat-
ing with President Carter.
Instead, the living standards
in Egypt have deteriorated.
By DAVID ARMSTRONG
As several hundred
thousand gallons of radio-
active water continue to
confound technicians at
the damaged Three Mile
Island nuclear power
plant, the American nu-
clear industry is stepping
up efforts to export
dangerous atomic tech-
nology abroad. This move
Is a direct result of the
increasingly unfavorable
climate for nukes here that
has cut orders for new
domestic reactors to nearly
zero.
The campaign to export
American nuclear tech-
nology got a boost in early
October when the State
Department approved the
export of a key component
for a controversial nuclear
power plant in the Philip-
pines. The go-ahead must
still be approved by the
Nuclear Regulatory Com-
mission, but President
Carter can override the
NRC and permit the
shipment anyway. Last
year, Carter okayed the
export of seven tons of
uranium fuel to
India � despite his stated
policy of limiting U.S.
sales of nuclear know-how.
canoes are within 90 miles
of the partially-completed
plant, as are several major
earthquake faults.
Controversy has dog-
ged the Morong plant
from the first. Construc-
tion costs have shot ug to
$1.1 billion for only one of
the two reactors � over
four times the original
optimistic estimate. Local
fishermen, who account
pines Ministry of Energy
itself has estimated that
the country's present elec-
trical needs could be met
by hydroelectric power.
Geothermal power is also
undergoing rapid develop-
ment in the Philippines.
According
critics and
Morong is a
strength for
nuclear industry in
U.S. � one that
to nuclear
researchers,
key test of
the ailing
the
the
the American nuclear
industry is stepping up efforts
to export dangerous atomic
technology abroad
of Morong's
income, report
impact the Volcker Plan
will have on the average
American working man and
his family. He gave a pre-
posterous pledge to a con-
vention of construction
unions that he would not
trouble-shooter, Ambassa-
dor Robert Strauss.
will hit
cans in
daughter Amy are already
taking the show on the road
for votes. Faced with the
challenge from Ted Kenne- The Ambassador indicat-
dy, they hit the campaign ed that the economic prob-
trail in Florida to pull out a lems facing Egypt were
cosmetic caucus victory for very complex and that
ITL 'L??�� k Jimmy and wasted no time American involvement in
thI nrlonmJn�n aH�ie headin for Iowa for the the economic support of
The president s own advis- next round of party Egypt would be critical to
ffhtir �?air�H" caucuses Snowbound New its long-term future the
fLl �?"TJT Jfl; HamPshire voters are very secret minutes state.
SSL,aiaht ilgI 82 likely to hear some Mii "Ambassador Strauss
Carter s tight-money tack Georgia accents on the win- reported that Prime Minis-
millions of Amen- ter air before they go to the ter Begin spent consider-
hlhea�T fShaant P�lls in March ale time emphasizing the
�rtoJi S2? JS� No Deal: There have been need for American invest-
mortgage money available secret, ominous reports that ment in Egypt to solidify the
to finance housing will dwm- Preside.it Carter's diploma- peace treaty "
die, fewer homes will be cy in the Middle East is
Small businesses will have ir� V gypi as a Stabilizing
E?- 4U force in the Middle East
He recognized that the
treaty had isolated Egypt The United states has xnt
from its Arab neighbors. But millions' worth-of aid to
he expected a happy ending Egypt Blt this has faUen
l ne president s secret
White House minutes show
that he "noted the difficult
The Philippines plant,
near the village of Morong
on the island of Luzon, has
drawn the fire of anti-
No less than Israeli Prime nuclear activists for sev-
Minister Menachem Begin eral reasons. Morong is
urged the United States to only 45 miles from the
rush aid to Egypt. This mes- populous capital city of
sage was brought back from Manilla and only 10 miies plant argue that nuclear
Israel by President Carters from an yolcano
for most
municipal
that fish moved away from
the shoreline site when
construction began in
1977. The fishermen now
have to go out to sea to
find food.
Local opposition to the
plant, although apparently
intense, is not tolerated by
the dictatorial Philippines
president, Ferdinand Mar-
cos. Last winter, 1,000
armed police swarmed
over Morong, breaking
into private homes,
searching, they said, for
antinuke activists. A lead-
ing nuclear critic, Ernesto
Nazareno, has mysterious-
ly disappeared, and some
Filipinos charge the Mar-
cos regime with Naza-
reno's murder.
Filipino critics of the
energy is unnecessary in
Three other active vol- their country. The Philip-
industry feels it can't
afford to fail. The Morong
plant is being heavily
underwritten by the U.S.
Export-Import Bank, a
consortium of private
banks and government
agencies that underwrites
the cost of such projects
with American taxpayers'
money.
Exim has been verv
active in recent years,
having bankrolled 45 nuc-
lear power plants around
the globe. Nearly half of
them are in underde-
veloped third world coun-
tries, many with notor-
iously repressive regimes.
The governments of South
Africa, Brazil, Argentina
and South Korea have all
benefited from American
nuclear aid. So has India,
which in 1975 diverted
nuclear waste from a
Canadian-built reactor to
make an atomic bomb.
Morong plant is a bad deal
for the Philippines from an
economic as well a- an
ecological point of view.
The Philippines must rel
on American multinational
corporations for mainten-
ance, spare parts and
uranium fuei.
Interestingly enough.
the Morong plant is
located near the Bataan
free-trade zone, an eco-
nomic enclave where tav -
on foreign-owned industry
are virtually non-existent.
This gives rise to specu-
lation that the main
purpose of the plant is to
provide electricity to for-
eign industry in the zone
which will, with cheap
Filipino labor, make inex-
pensive goods tor ship-
ment to the I S.
If that is true, the
Morong plant will not only
use local people as nuclear
guinea pigs, it will mater-
ially hurt American work-
ers, since it will enable
cheap foreign goods to
flood these shores and
take jobs away from
Americans. Activist groups
opposing the plant � such
as the Campaign tor a
Nuclear-Free Philippines
and the Third World
Energy Action Group, both
based in Washington.
D.C. � liken the situation
of "runawav reactors to
that of runaway shops.
President Carter and
the NRC have until the
end of 1979 to rule on this
latest accident-waiting-to-
happen.
(David Armstrong is a
Critics charge that the syndicated columnist.)
to pay higher interest rates
to borrow the money to
maintain inventories and
thousands may go to the
wall. Agriculture Depart-
ment sources say that farm-
ers compelled to go to the
banks to borrow against position of President Sadat
their upcoming crops will be vis-a-vis the other Arab
hard-pressed and may have states, but expressed the
to seek higher market pric- belief that the other Arab
far short of what the Egyp-
tians expected. Now the
whole Israeli-Egyptian deal
is in trouble.
Copyright. 1979,
United Feature Syndicate, Inc
The East Carolinian
MANAQINQ EDITOR
Richard Green
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Anita Lancaster
NEWS EDITOR
ASST. NEWS EDITOR
FEATURES EDITOR
ASST. FEATURES EDITOR
EDITOR
Marc Barnes
DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING
Robert M. Swaim
ASST. DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING
Terry Herndon
ASSISTANT TO THE EDITOR
Leigh Coakley
BUSINESS MANAGER
Steve O'Geary
Karen Wendt
Terry Gray
Bill Jones
John Ross
SPORTS EDITOR
ASST. SPORTS EDITOR
COPY EDITOR
AD TECH. SUPER.
Charles Chandler
Jimmy Dupree
Diane Henderson
Paul Lincke
THE EAST CAROLINIAN Is the student
newspaper of East Carolina University
sponsored by the Media Board of ECU
and Is distributed each Tuesday and
Thursday during the academic year
weekly during the summer.
Offices ere located on the
fhe Publications Cantor Old South
Building. Our mailing address is: Old
South Building, ECU, Groomtit. NC
27834. m
The phone numbers are: 757-6366, 6367
6309. Subscriptions are $10
alumni $6





The East Carolinian
man
features
Thursday, November 1, 1979 Page 5
Greenville, N.C.
Symphony will perform
By BILL JONES
Features Editor
The ECU School of
Music will present three
days of musical enter-
tainment this weekend.
This Fridav and Satur-
day at 8:00 p.m. the ECU
Opera Theater will stage
Scenes From Opera, their
annual Fall Scenes Pro-
gram.
This year's Scenes will
be the third act of
Engelbert Humperdinck's
Hansel and Gretel, Act 2
of Giacomo Puccini's Tos-
ca and scenes 1 and 2
from Carl Orffs Der
Mond.
Hansel and Gretel will
feature a Children's Cho-
rus including 8 fourth
v!
graders from the Green-
ville City Schools. Dr.
Clyde Hiss, who has
directed the ECU Opera
Theater since 1965, will
direct all scenes and acts.
Charles Moore, an ECU
School of Music faculty
member, will narrate the
scenes from Der Mond.
Symphony
This is the 197th
anniversary of Beethoven's
Eroica symphony, which
was completed in August,
1804. Eroica, the Sym-
phony No. 3 in E-flat
Major and Ginastera's
Concerto for Harp and
Orchestra will be per-
formed this Sunday after-
noon by the ECU Sym-
phony Orchestra. Robert
Hause will conduct.
and Orchestra will feature
harpist Marian Harding.
Harding is the harp
instructor for ECU and Old
Domonion University in
Norfolk, Va.
Harding lives in Wil-
liamsburg, Va where she
is harp soloist at the
Regency Dining Room of
the Williamsburg Inn. She
also offers private instruc-
tion in her studio.
Born in Philadelphia,
Harding has played with
the Richmond Symphony
and the Norfolk Sym-
phony. She is currently
harpist with the Virginia
lassical Symphony.
The ECU Orchestra
program will be held in
Wright Auditorium this
The Concerto for Harp Sunday at 3:15 p.m.
"For Colored Girls
is provoking , personal,
spiced with dance
By ALISON BARTEL
Staff Writer
The sparse and simple
scenery accompanied by
charoscuro lighting sets the
stage for the production
"For Colored Girls Who
Have Considered Suicide
When the Rainbow is
Enuf As the house lights
go down, the lonely,
isolated atmosphere is
abruptly broken by sounds
resembling native chants
of Pamela Henry, Vernon
Jones, Melinda Richardson
and Earlie M. Washing-
ton.
This introduction is the
prelude to a thought
provoking and personal
theme produced by a cast
of seven women: Charla L.
I Davis, Penelope Alford,
Debra Zumbach, Renee
DuLaney, Gloria Brewing-
ton and Crystal Barnes.
Each actress represents
the attitude of a girl
attempting suicide in an
American city. The per-
i formance of Gloria Brew-
l ington, "The Lady in
I Blue was outstanding
; with her pleading voice
� accompanied by her
; flamboyant elocution and
I contorted facial expres-
I sions. This performance is
only one of the highlights
t of the show. Another is
' the beautiful dancing of
the entire cast thatJnt
I prets the theme
5 show extensively.
The costuming is rela-
tively simple, but it
doesn't detract from the
production. In fact, it
enhances the show, com-
bining elaborate verse so
that the audience can
accept few costume
changes. Choreopoet
ntozake shange's compli-
cated lines are exactly
wrought.
The scenery is any-
thing but elaborate; how-
ever, it is very effective.
The scenic plainness is
developed with colorful
lighting techniques. The
effective lighting serves as
Monitor diver speaks in Kinston
a device for scene changes
as well as focusing on
specific actresses.
When Edgar R. Loes-
sin, director of the show,
was asked what prompted
him to select this show for
direction, he replied, "I
saw it in New York and
thought it would be a good
experience for the stu-
dents
"For Colored Girls
will be showing through
Wednesday, Nov. 7. Cur-
tain time is 8:15 p.m and
tickets are on sale at the
Drama Department Box
Office.
Several East Caro-
lina University students
were privileged recently to
hear scuba diving arche-
ologist Richard Lawrence
speak on this summer's
work on the Civil War
ironclad Monitor.
Lawrence, who spoke
at the monthly meeting of
the East Carolina Dive
Club in Kinston, is one of
only four divers who have
visited the underwater
site. His presentation in-
cluded a brief history of
underwater archeology in
North Carolina, beginning
with the Modern Greece
project in 1962 and the
establishment of the un-
derwater Branch of the
N.C. Division of Archives
and History.
The Monitor Project is
the latest and most
ambitious undertaking win
which the Underwater
Branch has been involved.
Monitor, in the first
naval engagement be-
tween ironclad vessels,
fought CSS Virginia to a
draw on March 8, 1882 at
Hampton Roads, Virginia.
On the last day of that
year she sank in rough
seas off Cape Hatteras
while being towed south
by USS Rhode Island. An
expedition from Duke
University found the site
in 1973. Later projects
filmed and mapped the
wreck, but this summer
marked the first time that
divers have actually
worked on the historic
ship.
surized chamber and went
about the work of setting
up their reference grid and
"Our biggest
problem was
convincing the
people that our
purpose was to
determine the
condition of the
off a lot of
souvenirs.
ii
The survey group,
composed of personnel wreck, not to cart
from the National Ocean-
ographic ann Atmospheric
Administration (NOAA),
the Harbor Branck Foun-
dation and the N.C.
Underwater Branch, work-
ed from Harbor Branch's
ship RV Johnson. De-
scents to the 225-foot deep
wreck were made via
Johnson's four-man sub-
mersible craft. On the site
the divers locked out of
the sub through a pres-
excavating a selected 5' X
5' section of the officers'
quarters.
Aside from the great
depth, which necessitated
the use of a special
breathing mixture of he-
lium and qxygen in place
of air, work was often
hindered by adverse wea-
ther, bad visibility and
strong currents across the
wreck.
Illustrating his talk
with slides of the work
area, Lawrence showed
how samples of wood and
metal were carefully re-
moved for laboratory anal-
ysis. Each piece was
replaced with sections of
non-corrosive materials to
prevent further deterio-
ration. One wine bottle, a
relish jar and three small
mustard containers were
recovered from the exca-
vation site.
"Our biggest problem
was convincing the people
we were working with that
our purpose was to
determine the condition of
the wreck, not to cart off a
lot of souvenirs Law-
rence reported. "Arche-
ology is delicate and
exacting work. You can't
just start ripping artifacts
out of a site or you destrov
any information you might
have been able to gain
from them. Some of our
co-workers just could't see
that
He stated that although
some of the main timbers
and the larger metal parts
seem to be in good shape,
the overall condition of the
wreck is quite fragile.
When asked if the ship
could be raised, Lawrence
was not optimistic.
"Not with the technol-
ogy and resources avail-
able today. The whole
thing would probably fall
apart and we'd lose it
forever. The wreck is
better off left where it is
until some future date
when raising her is more
feasible
The ECU Sociology-
Anthropology Club is cur-
rently trying to schedule
Lawrence to speak.
of the
Rural crime increases
By LEE MITGANG
AP Urban Affairs Writer
Indiana farmers used to worry about kids
cherry-bombing their mailboxes. Now those same kids
are often high on drugs or booze, and farmers are
locking their doors against thieves and vandals.
Cattle-rustling in New Mexica jumped 300 percent in
the past year.
Fruit by the truckload in routinely ripped off in
Florida.
From the cornfield of Ohio to the coalfield of West
Virginia to the cow country of the Southwest, an almost
fivefold increase in crime in the past two decades is
threatening the easygoing, secure lifestyle of rural
America.
Annual FBI statistics show that since 1960, crime in
rural America is increasing more rapidly than in urban
areas.
See CRIME, page 7
o�
&
&
.vv

&
BLACK ARTS
The ECU Black Arts
Festival will begin Nov-
ember 1 and continue
through November 9. An
art exhibition which kicks
off the Festival will be on
display in the MSC Gallery
throughout the duration.
GOSPEL CONCERT
There will be a Gospel
concert on Sunday, Nov-
ember 4, which will
feature the New Birth
Chorale Ensemble, the
Fountain of Life Choir,
and the ECU Gospel
Ensemble.
JUBILEE!
The Theater Arts Com-
mittee presents Jubilee a
celebration in song with
tunes from Porgy and
Bess, Shouboat, The Wiz
and more. Jubilee! will be
held in Hendrix Audi-
torium at 8:00 p.m.
Artist equates art with communication
J
By ALISON BARTEL
Features Writer
"We limit ourselves by
trying to create. Art is a
way of communicating,
saying 'I'm happy or
'I'm sad or 'the world is
bad' or 'the world is
good says Bobby Sim-
mons, a graduate of ECU
School of Art and a
teacher at Sampson Tech-
nical Institute.
Simmons, for whom a
reception will be given by
the Student Union Art
Exhibition Committee this
Sunday, feels that being
an artist offers many
things beyond just the act
of creation.
"Art is also a way of
escape, and I can com-
municate all these things
(the feelings mentioned
above) just by a stroke of
a pen or pencil. Then,
afterwards, I can still be
the same person Sim-
mons added.
Simmons did not take
art lessons until he was in
his senior year of high
school. He then entered
ECU and graduated in
1978. His favorite medium
is oil, but that doesn't
prevent him from experi-
menting with other types
of media. His style is a
combination of collage and
Picasso's later style of
painting. Realism appeals
to him, too, when he is
able to add a touch of
abstract.
Besides his teaching at
the technical institute,
Simmons conducts classes
at a prison unit and
teaches drawing to inter-
ested people in the com-
munity. Simmons believes
Bobby Simmons, an ECU Art graduate, is a born-again artist
the student must learn to
trust himself and his
emotions in order to "see
art
method wouldn't be to
give a class, a student, an
abstract idea such as
'morning' or 'evening' and
have them draw what they
"My ideal teaching think. People need to
know how to see art as
they can think it Sim-
mons said.
See ARTIST, page 7
Folk
music
festival
By BILL JONES
Features Editor
"Bluegrass music has
moved up in the world
says Lorraine Jordan. For
what used to be uncul-
tured hillbilly music,
"people are paying $8 and
$9 just to see one blue
grass band So, the ECU
Folklore Classes' 3rd An-
nual Folkmusic Festival
will be a real treat for
lovers of bluegrass and
"Old Time" music.
The Folk M.usic Festi-
val will be held at The
Treehouse this year. In
past years the festival has
been held in the Art
building, but according to
festival organizer Lorraine
Jordan, holding the event
at The Treehouse will
make it much easier for
people who want to go
downtown Saturday night
to attend.
Jordan, an ECU grad-
uate, plays mandolin for
Blue Grass '78, a Raleigh
band, who, along with
Greenville's Green Grass
Cloggers and Carolina
Bluegrass (a band from
Piney Neck, just outside of clogging entourage. The
Vanceboro, N.C.) will pro- Cloggers will again be
vide music and entertain-
ment for the event.
Bluegrass '78 is one of
the top bluegrass bands in
North Carolina.
Carolina Bluegrass fea-
tures Dickey Robinson, the
"No. 1" fiddler in the
state, according to Ann
Massengill, one of the
Green Grass Cloggers.
The Green Grass Clog-
gers are a widely traveled
sponsoring their annual
Clogger's Day on Decem-
ber 1. Clogger's Day will
be held in Wright Audi-
torium and will include
workshops in fiddle play-
ing, banjo, clogging and
English contra dance.
Saturday's Festival will
begin at 9:00 p.m. The
jam session is open to all
who can play an instru-
ment or clog.
Admission to the Festi-
val is FREE.
mt
LEAKitMr A tour Couxg f tte HMto lAtol
ti PWID A)0KKI5
REM1 fOR 00 AM DTEHA
NW1, MOW THAT TU�0K.
1H3 0TIO0HJ3 Od WY2DH
HIS H00�3S rooj3
CMfcrv MWJ. Win MilH
'





Paoe 6 THE EAST CAROClNIANf j Novemher 1979
Heaven Can Wait promises immortality
The Student Union
Films Committee will pre-
sent Warren Beatty and
Julie Christie in the
romantic comedy Heaven
Can Wait this Friday and
Saturday night at 7 and 9
p.m. in MendenhalPs
Hendrix Theater. Admis-
sion for students is by ID
and Activity Card. Faculty
and staff may use their
Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter membership cards.
Warren Beatty's Heav-
en Can Wait has recap-
tured the spirit of the
glorious films of the
1940's, added a few stars
and a lot of color.
His film is a remake of
the 1941 Here Comes Mr.
Jordan, a fantasy about a
prizefighter (Robert Mont-
gomery) who is accident-
ally sent to heaven before
his time and forced to find
a new body to occupy.
As co-writer, co-direc-
tor and producer, Beatty
has crafted one of the
most likeable screen char-
acters in recent memory.
His performance of the
confused Joe Pendleton is
bursting with a celestial
spirit that he enjoys even
more on earth than at his
heavenly detour.
Pendleton is a quarter-
back with the Los Angeles
Rams who is informed at
the outset of the movie
that he has overcome a
serious knee injury and
will start against Dallas
that Sunday.
The following day,
however, Pendleton is
involved in an accident
while riding his bicycle.
Soon he is being led
through the clouds to a
weigh stationin Heaven by
an impatient celestial es-
cort (Buck Henry). Joe
protests that there has
been some mistake � that
he can't be dead. When
the arch-angel Mr. Jordan
(James Mason) arrives, he
makes a quick check which
confirms that Pendleton is
not due in Heaven for
another 50 years. The dis-
illusioned Pendleton is
rushed back to earth, but
it is too late. His body
has been cremated.
Jordan immediately be-
gins a search for a new
body. After rejecting sev-
eral possibilities, they
arrive at the estate of Leo
Farnsworth, a wealthy
businessman who is in the
process of being murdered
by his wife Julia (Dyan
Cannon) and his personal
secretary Tony Abbot
(Charles Grodin). Not
wishing to get involved
with the two, Pendleton is
about to leave the estate
when Betty Logan (Julie
Christie) arrives.
She demands to see
Farnsworth about a re-
finery his company is
going to build which will
destroy her village in
England. Sympathizing
with her plight and im-
pressed with her spirit as
well as her beauty,
Pendleton agrees to tem-
porarily use Farnsworth's
body so he can help her.
� - ' '

j$fe
I,H�,
-&
Warren Beatty will star in this week's free flick "Heaven Can Wait
DEL TA ZE TA
BIG BROTHER
RUSH
A T THE HOUSE
801 5th 7:00-9:00
GUYS COME TO MEET
The Student Union
Coffeehouse Committee
presents
Ufiix DxL & Sat
7 & g fx.m.
cMinaiix. Jhcutxc
�fioni.ox�.d by
ike. StutUnk iXnion rfmi CommikUc
and
Distributed By
Taylor Beverage Co
Goldsboro
IMPORTED
Heineken
HOLLAND BEER
THE 1 IMPORTED BEER IN AMERICA.
Fri. & Sat Nov. 2 & 3
9&10pm
Room 15 Mendenhall
Admission 50
Free snacks!
STUDENT UNION
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
Jordan explains about the
exchange of bodies: in-
wardly he will still be Joe
Pendleton, but outwardly
everyone will still see and
hear Leo Farnsworth
(throughout the film we
continue to see and hear
Warren Beatty as Pendle-
ton).
Naturally, Julia and
Tony are shocked to find
Farnsworth still alive and
set about to murder
him once again.
In one of Heaven
Can Wait's best scenes,
the fumbling Pendleton,
obviously out of place off
the football field, is forced
to attend one of Farns-
worth's board meetings
where he delivers an
expertly comic monologue
that Is laced with football
lingo.
He
is
able to help
Betty by rescinding the
order to build the refinery
in England. She is over-
come with gratitude and a
bond quickly develops
between them. Hence, a
twist is in order when it
becomes more and more
evident that Pendleton is
becoming a bit too content
with his temporary body.
He even goes so far as to
get in shape for the Super
Bowl, only to receive the
crushing news that he
must give it up because
"it is not in his destiny to
continue on as Leo Farns-
worth
All of this is handled
very well, including the
elaborate football se-
quences, and, this being a
strict Holly wood fantav.
the loose ends and
See HEAVEN, page 7
SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE
CAUTION
Vo-i may lose money il
uu miss the Shoe
Gallery's, buy one pair at
lull price get the second
pair at 'i price, COUPON
SALE. ou must bring
luupoti with you.
10-6, MonSat.
1st pair must be
at least $10.00
1 he bhu Caller
720 Atlantic at
Dick in .oh .
r3alR, by Nature's Way
specializing in natural hair cuts for men & women
Downtown Mall
Greenville
appointments only
758-7841
FRIDATS
1890
Seafood
Thurs. Night
Specials
HRIMP $4.95
YSTERS $4.75
FLOUNDER 3.5
TROUT $Z.95
1PERCH $2.95
all you can eat
No take-outs please.
Meal include:
French Fries, Cole slaw,
IHushpupples
I
We are proud to
announce that we
have added
one of the
AREAS FINEST
SALAD BARS
for your
dining pleasure.
OPEN FOR LUNCH
Dally
(exeep Sat.) 1130 - MO
HOURS
SUN-THUR
4:30-0:00
IFRI. � SAT.
4:30-10:O0
v
(






1 November 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 7
CRIME
continued from page 5
Heaven Can Wait is straight forward fantasy
iAn Zl ' , FUral CFime rate was 423 incidents per
I00,000population. In 1977, the latest year for which
hgures are available, the rate stood nearly five times
higher at 2,012 per 100,000 population. During the same
period crime in metropolitan areas rose about four
times higher.
Put another way, in 1960 the odds of someone in a
rural area being a crime victim were about one in 236.
B 177, the odds were one in 49.
Professor Howard Phillips of Ohio State University
says the FBI figures show that rural crime is now
roughly equal to urban rates reached in 1967.
The question I have says Phillips, "is do you
have to catch up to the problems of urban centers before
W ashmgton and others will pay attention?"
Information on the nature and extent of the problem
i sketchy, but researchers generally agree rural crime
ha- certain characteristics: Property crime is the leading
problem, especially vandalism and theft. Phillips
estimates that in rural Ohio, vandalism accounts for as
ich as 50 percent of crime. Purdue University studies
two Indiana counties found vandalism accounted for
23 percent of crime.
In Hampshire County, W. Va farm equipment theft
the most prevalent crime, according to researchers
omas Bean and Layle Lawrence, and a local hunter
here was recently caught shooting up a farmer's house.
rhis summer, someone took a four-wheel drive
vehicle and ripped through cornfields on the outskirts of
roleda, Ohio.
Around the country, tractors, combines and other
expensive farm machines are easy prey for thieves,
because many rural Americans can't get used to the
idea of locking things and removing kevs.
-Rural crime is generally not as violent as urban crime,
but the murder rate in rural areas is only slightly less
than in cities.
-Rural criminals are almost always voung males.
Ihe usually commii their crimes in their home county,
although net in the same town.
One thing's tor sure. It's not people from
metropolitan areas running out and victimizing rural
is, says Purdue researcher Joseph Donnermever.
Several reasons are ottered for the rise in rural
crime. A leading cause cited is the lack of law
enforcement personnel in rural areas.
second tactor is the wealth in many county towns:
there's plenty worth stealing and not much protecting it.
Rural America is much more affluent these days.
In Montmorenci, Ind Thunderbirds are parked in
' $100,000 homes. As often as not, the keys are
leit in the cars, and the front doors of the houses are
unlocked.
Inside are stereos, color TVs and microwave ovens.
New highways and new industry have helped open
the way tor crime in rural America. Strange cars cruise
continued from page 6
hopeless situations are all
tied together neatly in a
single passage; everything
is resolved in the end.
As it should be, Beatty
and Christie communicate
almost exclusively through
eye contact. The film
relies very heavily on plot
and Beatty has managed
to get the best work out of
his cohorts. Elaine May
has turned in some of her
funniest scripting since the
early days with husband
Mike Nichols.
She has rewritten the
old script for Here Comes
Mr. Jordan so that her
jokes about money, mar-
riage and adultery are not
out of context. The film
ends happily and makes
you feel good chiefly by
implying that we will
live forever.
So at this point in his
career, no one has more
potential to change the
outlook of films in the 70's
than Warren Beatty. With
Heaven Can Wait it has
now become evident that,
in many ways, the films of
the forties are the films of
through, strangers move in.
In many towns, city people buy country homes. The
distinction between country and suburb is gradually
blurring.
Phillips notes that the past decade witnessed the first
increase in rural population in years. Rural communities
are losing their first line of defense: knowing your
neighbor, knowing who belongs.
"What you have is homogeneous communities
becoming more heterogeneous. People don't know each
other he says.
Life for rural teen-agers has also changed. In many
states, tight money has forced small high schools to
consolidate into sprawling county schools just as
crowded as their city cousins.
Donnermever says peer pressure and lack of adult
attention in these county schools often lead to drug use,
drinking, and sometimes crime.
Ironically, according to sociologists, rural America
tinds itself facing the same basic problem faced by
crime-ridden city neighborhoods: the ripping of the
social fabric, of knowing and caring about neighbors.
Many, including the federal Law Enforcement
Assistance Administration and the National Sheriffs
Association, feel the answer is to restore the strength of
country neighborhoods, to make neighbors care again.
Since 1972, the sheriffs' group has received an
annual $250,000 grant from LEAA to operate a National
Neighborhood Watch Program. The program, initially
geared toward the suburbs, is shifting its emphasis
toward rural crime.
Director Ben Gorda says the program teaches people
to fight crime with common-sense precautions like
locking doors and vehicles and installing anti-burglary
devices.
It also encourages people to keep an eye on strange
cars driving along rural roads, and note license plates if
they appear suspicious.
Warren Beatty in the 70's.
And if we want to
understand what the cin-
ema stands for today, few
filmmakers can give us as
much insight as Warren
Beatty.
Beatty is one of those
directors who has made
films more modern by
taking us backward in
time. Though they are
very much a product of
our own time, his films
have always been cut off
by their position as a mass
form of entertainment
from the influences of
other, more inventive art
forms. In the recent past,
Heaven Can Wait would
have been considered an
experimental film and
experimental cinema has
been no more than a
fringe activity and has had
as little influence on the
film industry as a whole as
the equally specialized
form of the cartoon.
Beatty has customized
the commercial movie,
typified by Hollywood,
which was always seen to
be simply a form of
storytelling, as the popular
novel had been in the
nineteenth century. In
Heaven Can Wait, Beatty
has poured all of his
efforts not into rivaling the
most up-to-date literature
of the day, but into finding
the film equivalents of the
storytelling methods of
Charles Dickens.
The traditional cin-
ema's favorite forms like
the western and the gang-
ster film continued to tell
their stories with a
straightforwardness that is
lost in many of today's
movies. With the success
of Heaven Can Wait, the
cinema could continue on
in this way for the
audience for which it
ago the
different
a much
new
caters is one that still likes
good stories excitingly and
grippingly told. Certainly
times have changed, but
the more things change
the more they stay the
same.
Five years
cinema had a
audience, and
reduced one.
generation of freer film-
makers with wider hori-
zons had arrived and were
not that well received
except in small art-film
circles. Beatty exemplifies
the director of the 40's
whose style persuades us
to lose ourselves in the
swiftly unfolding events of
his stories and makes us
identify with his heroes (as
we do when John Wayne
leads a cavalry charge).
Beatty does not try to
remind us that what we
are seeing is no more, and
no less, than a film. His
style is larger than life.
Heaven Can Wait gives
us straightforwardness,
excitement, fantasy and
humor all rolled into one.
Its success relies on the
studio structure in films
which is so crucial to an
understanding of the A-
merican cinema, and the
contributions of writers
and producers are no
longer passed over in the
cult of the director.
Thanks to the success
of this film, our knowledge
of Hollywood can grow
even further and ulti-
mately we can no doubt
expect a full-scale re-
assessment which takes
into account social and
economic pressures and
faces the critical problems
posed by Hollywood as a
popular art.
The customary deroga-
tion of Hollywood films as
escapist is unfair. What
Heaven Can Wat, does as
an escapist film is invite
further analysis of its
function. Its success at the
box office obviously re-
flects moral values, as it
offers a model of behavior
and basic reassurance to
the audience. We don't
need another world war to
begin to enjoy the escapist
fare Beatty and other
filmmakers are currently
churning out.
Chanelo's
Italian Foods, Inc
Wave Forms on display
ECU NEWS BUREAV
GREENVILLE -
K ave forms" and other
kinetic sculptures by Bif
Bream of Chapel Hill,
senior student in the East
Carolina University School
rt. are on display this
week at the Baptist
Student Center gallerv at
511 East Te nth St. here.
Bream noted that his
moving sculptures, made
from wood and dacron, are
designed to enable the
low er to "participate
physically as well as
emotionally and intellec-
tually
This sculpture is a-
nalagous to light and
sound waves that are the
of human per-
eption he said.
Bream, a member of
LCI 's Visual Arts Forum,
a candidate for the
Bachelor of Fine Arts
degree in design with a
minor concentration in
sculpture.
ARTIST
continued from page 5
About being a black
artist, Simmons said, ' I'm
a black artist because I'm
black I'm black in
nature also, but other than
that. I consider myself an
artist seeking the truth
Simmons believes that
producing art is a talent
from God. He is concerned
that too many people allow
their talents to be wasted.
s an artist, Simmons
finds his work a liberating
force for the mind, but as
a private person, he
acknowledges another,
more powerful force.
'Tin a born-again
Christian. The most im-
portant motivating factcJr
in my life is Christ,
Simmons said.
A reception sponsored
bv the Student Union Art
Exhibition Committee will
be given in Simmon's
honor. It will be held in
the upper gallery of Men-
denhall Student Center
November 4th at 7:00 p.m.
Everyone is cordially in-
vited to attend. Refresh-
ments will be served.
During his senior stu-
dies at ECU. he has
taught introductory cour-
ses in drawing and art
history at ayne Com-
munity College in Golds-
boro and has worked in his
own Greenville Studio.
His parents are Dr.
and Mrs. Charles R.
Bream of Buttons Road,
Chapel Hill.
ABORTIONS UP TO 12TH
WEEK OF PREGNANCY
$175.00 "all Inclusive'
pregnancy test, birth control and
problem pregnancy counseling For
further information call 832-0535 (toll-
free number 800-221-2568) between
9AM-5PM weekdays
Raleigh Women's Health
Organization
917 West Morgan St.
Raleigh, N.C. 27603
xWASH 111 E. 10th St.
lj"i ioc across from
nUUofc Krispy Kreme
Donuts
"A full service laundry"
New Maytag Washers
Carpeted lounge with color T.V.
Fluff and Fold service
Pinball Machines
Excellent professional Dry Cleaning
I FREE!
One wash and a soft drink with this coupon
I Valid thru Oct. 31.
j 8:00-6:00
I Limit one per visit
DINE IN
FAST - FREE
DELIVERY
CARRY-OUT
MONDAY
'RETURN OF THE 25 DRAFT
4:00pm til closing
��???. �.
???
This FRIDAY Only
2 FREE QUART COKES
with the purchase of any large pizza
Be sure and visit Chanelo's in Appalachain
Nov. 3rd 835-A Faculty St. 262-1770
& PEKING
PALACE
Jvjnday thxu. Sutuxduy ii.OO a.m3:30fx.m.
Sunday !Huffe.t uU you can eut 1f:OOu.m4:OOf.m.
$3 95
Urctccr ffiefiu-
Luncheon Special 2.45
"��fr'1 �� O ��M�.�lli��PU
JVo. - JV0.5 Choice one
ctl Se.xve.ti witft Eag Uxofi Soufi & cMot Uea
JVo. 1. CkicHen Ckow Jein, Dxied J?lce & Eaa J?ott
JVo. 2. J?oait Poxk Eag 3oo tyoung, 3xied cRlce & Egg eRoi
JVo. 3. Beef Witn xeen Peex, DxUd J?ice & �99 J?olL
JVo. 4. Chicken Witk cAUond, Dxied eRice & Eaa J?oCt
JV-y. 5. Sweet & Soux Poxk, Dxied J?ice & Eaa zRofl
xeenvLLle Sauaxe
ZPkone: 756-1l6g
novemBep 8,1979 � 800 p.m.
henfcuix theatae � east Caaoliiu university
puBliCt $4.00, Qeoups of ao or more. $3.00
:
ATTENTION: Music Appreciation Students receive double credit for attending


?
i
i
A Theatre Art Presentation
(






The Easl Carolinian
lian 1 �
sports
Thursday, November 1, 1979 Page 8
Greenville, N.C
Tyson, ECl finished
I he soap opera has ended.
ast Carolina basketball center Al Tyson has put an
it. After a controversial one-year stint with the
the sophomore from Winterville has officially
hdrawn from school and will look for another campus
all his , ii.
�m the wrv beginning of his career at ECU, Tyson
� Hi- recruitment by the Pirate staff,
h Larry Gillman, was protested by the
sippi State staff, who claimed that Gillman and
e about getting Big Al in the wrong way.
complaint brought on an NCAA investigation,
s a long, drawn out one that ended
-ummT. f ie result - ECU's basketball
was put on one-year probation. This meant that
'uld not appear on television or compete in
urnament.
he probation Tyson was a big question
He uit the team at the end of last season and did
trip to Notre Dame with the Pirates. His
hat he had had it with East Carolina, and
Gillman.
I nu Tyson must surely have
fell as though he had a monkey
on his hack.
;ood reason to be fed up with his coach at
1 he 6-11 center had not honestly been
chance by the controversial Gillman. A
was the aftermath oi hi- sparkling
perforn last year at N.C. State. The
nmediat ly after that Tyson saw very little
. It seemed as though he were being benched for a
e, rather than being rewarded for a good
Perhaps disgust with situations like that one were
Ivs � s iceasional lackadaisical effort on
"s there seemed to be something
hi- mind.
Gillman and the hiring ol ex-Wake
m seemed to breathe new life into
inced the big man to give it another
ryson even went as far as to attend
�hat he might be able to play-
next roadblock. Even though he met
NCAA requirement concerning academic
n was suspended from the team at the
�i practice by Odom. The new coach
did not meet his requirements
i. though, that Tyson could return as
rea h -i the point where he met the
- Odom said that he felt Tyson would be
�rig his time working on his studies, rather
until he reached that point. Al agreed.
r.vsn so tar as to say that he would be out of
m for only one or two weeks.
rhen came the grand finale. Tyson withdrew from
last Tuesday. Odom was out of town at the time,
uld not be reached. The coach later made it
�n did make an effort to contact him in
id am e ol the taken actions.
Odom spoke with Tyson last week concerning his
ns "He related to me that he felt it would be
r him if he left Greenville and East Carolina
) dd. "He had so much pressure on him here. He
- a local boy and there was a great deal expected of
him He felt it would be better if he could go somewhere
where he would be somewhat of a stranger
rrue, ryson must surely have felt as though he had
� on his back. Everywhere he went he was
-il recognized, if nothing else for his 6-11 frame. It
seemed as though almost everyone he saw would ask
him the same questions, all about basketball.
See TYSON, page 10
Dye looks for
'offensive show'
Down goes Billv Johnson
(Photo hv John Crogan)
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
'Anybody that wants to see an
offensive show should be in Boone
Saturday said Fast Carolina football
coach Pat Dye at his Wednesday press
luncheon as he looked forward to
Saturday's game with Appalachian -
"I've always thought that defense wins
football games Dye continued, "but
with the way we and Appalachian move
the football, that might not be the case
Saturday
Dye certainly has a point. The Pirates
rank tenth in the nation in total offense
with an average of 128.6 yarl- ime.
ECl s 259 yards rushing per game is
the fifth best mark in the nation, while
their 29 points per game scoring average
stands 15th in the latest NCAA Mats.
The Mountaineers are nol without
impressive offensive Mats either, ranking
11th nationally in passing offense. ASl
quarterback Steve Brown ranks fourth in
the nation in total offense, while end Rick
Beasley leads the entire country in
receiving with an average of 6.2
game. Beasley's nine touchdowns is
second best mark in the nation.
Appalachian is a er. ver
team to me live said. "th the
type ol team that can score enough I
a game solely on offensive perfoi
The two team- are similar in that I
both employ the wishbom nse. But.
Dye said, the Apps run a more pass
oriented attack than do the Pira
"W ishbone team- usually rank high in the
national statistics in total off ut vou
can usually find them among the top
rushing team Appalachian is different.
Brown and Beasley make up a great
combination for them. There's no dubt
they can score on anybody
So Dye knows that the Pirates must
move the football well in order win
"But
ved th
There
ensive
number
� X' optional -� as Hi
with an 8 i
nation .
97. 1 v ard-
Perin Yan, )
Is per g
Quarterbai K I

q u a r �
said. "H
Despii
ha
foil
nationally-ranked
llli!
It � �
frus
told th
i.
W hat is
important
Carolina Dye -aid. "I jus
I players
Brown leads passing attack
ASU dep
By JIMMY DuPREE
Assistant Sports Editor
Saturday's contest between the Pirates of East
Carolina and the Mountaineers of Appalachian State
could prove to be more of a contest than many
speculators give credit if the Apps can untrack their
potent passing attack.
But qualify that with a big IF.
Appalachian quarterback Steve Brown enters the
contest with an impressive 332.5 vards total offense per
game, fourth best in the NCAA.
Junior split end Rick Beasley (6-1, 180) should
present a familiar problem for the Pirate secondary; an
expert receiver teamed with a quality passer.
The primary weakness of the Mountaineers offensive
attack will be their inexperienced front line. To beat a
defense with the power and ability to blitz which ECU
has, a team has to be strong in the trenches.
Tight end Stan Cunningham (6-2, 229) and guard
David Turner (6-3, 228) return as ASU's only seniors on
the line. Sophomore tackle John Sellers is the most
massive of the linemen at 6-2, 250.
"Their offense is similar to ours said ECU
assistant Wayne Hall. "They run the wishbone, but they
switch off and run the I-formation as well
on
�ff
Hall feels that the Pirates will have to be warv of the
run ami not expert ASU to unload passes on every plav.
People tend to over-compensate for the run when
they are playing a wishbone team and that's how
the) ve been able to roll up so much passing yardage.
It you can throw out of the wishbone, then chances
are you're going to have a lot of success. Over the past
few years, the wishbone teams have begun to improve
their passing games to balance their attack
Defensively, ends Craig Bonner (6-1, 190) and Sami
Killman (6-4, 225) provide leadership and strength to
battle the Easl Carolina speedsters.
One fact reassuring after the 24-24 tie with UNC last
weekend is the fact that Appalachian State has a track
record of losing close games through their 2-6 effort
thus far. Four of their losses have been by less than a
touchdown, and another bv a TD and a field goal.
"They've been in close games all year long said
Hall. "The last couple of times we played them they had
a quarterback hurt. The last time we plaved them with a
healthy quarterback, thev beat us.
"I don't think we're the big point of their season,
but a win would help them a lot
ASU coach Jim Brakcfield
; Clark's return strengthens defense
Noah Clark
By JIMMY DuPREE
Assistant Sports Editor
It seems like a long time ago that the Pirates of East
Carolina rolled into Raleigh and faced the Wolfpack of
N.C. State, but no player counted the days until ECU
faced North Carolina last Saturday with more
anticipation than senior defensive tackle Noah Clark
"I was finally ready to play said Clark, who
suffered a knee injury in practice the week after the
34-20 loss to State.
. 7 t6?1 VOr the knee any- Fve tried to keep mv
mind off that (injury)
"We're glad to have Noah back on defense " said
assistant coach Wayne Hall of the 6-1, 229 native of
Robersonville. "He makes a lot of big plays.
"At defensive tackle, when Noah's there, we have a
lot of depth along with Tim Swords, Vance Tingler and
Nate Wigfall. He's a super athlete
Clark made his presence known to the Tar Heel
running backs early in the contest, making two no gain
tackles in the first two UNC possessions.
"We were down after the first half he said. "We
knew the offense was moving the ball, but we had hold
Carolina
Clark had confidence that the Pirates could beat the
15th ranked Tar Heels, though they had had limited
success this season with other Atlantic Coast Conference
rivals.
'There was no doubt in my mind that we could win
the game Clark stated. "We had to approach it as i( it
were the last game of the season.
"Take nothing away from Carolina; they're a great
football team offensively and defensively. They deserve
to be ranked
The Pirates final opportunity for victory fell short as
exhausted place kicker, split end Vern Davenport's 57
yard field goal attempt fell just a few yards short of
target.
"I was just hoping said Clark. "I knew he was
very tired after running pass patterns all day, though
The physical pain of his injury was minor compared
to the mental anguish of having to sit helplessly on the
sidelines as East Carolina lost to Duke and Wake Forest
before whipping VMI and The Citadel in homecoming.
"It was tough on me mentally he said. "The
Sports Medicine department kept me in shape and I ran
for two weeks before I could work out with the team.
"They stayed on me about rehabilitating my knee. I
was back faster than I thought I would be
Clark expressed disappointment in the Buc's 3-3-1
record and the 24-24 tie with UNC.
"As a team we have to put it behind us and shoot to
win the rest of our games he said. "We didn't get
started as good as we should have this season It w �s
especially hard after the defense was ranked second
nationally last year.
The defense administered battle scars to several T ir
Heel backs, most noticablv Amos Lawrence and Doug
raschal.
"I noticedI Paschal had his leg bandaged before the
game, said Clark, "but I think we might have hurt i, a
little more.
Lawrence, who suffered from a groin pull prior to the
contest, left the game ,n the third quarter with another
. (gr.7 PU,1) a bothering me real bad in the firs!
half, said Lawrence. "I just hid it so I eould stav in the
game. � r
"When I left the game, my entire left arm and
shoulder were numb am1
Clark has his own version of how the injury occured
The defense had been hitting him hard all dav " he
said. They put the clamps on him and he was out the
rest of the game. He was spinning and got hit
turned to face the line g hU as he
The Pirates must now focus on the Mountaineers of
Appalachian State, a wishbone team with an impressive
passinc attack. passive
"We just have to control the ball anA i l r
run as well as the pass ' and look for �he





1 November 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Pane 9
The Fearless Football Forecast
Sports
ECU AT APPALACHIAN STATE
DUKE AT GEORGIA TECH
VIRGINIA AT GEORGIA
LSU AT MISSISSIPPI
UNC AT MARYLAND
NAVY AT NOTRE DAME
NEBRASKA AT MISSOURI
N.C. STATE AT SOUTH CAROLINA
WAKE FOREST AT CLEMSON
OKLAHOMA AT OKLAHOMA STATE
ARIZONA STATE AT STANFORD
TEXAS TECH AT TEXAS
CHARLES CHANDLERJIMMY DuPREE
(66-28-2)(57-37-2)
ECU 49-24ECU 45-21
Georgia TechGeorgia Tech
GeorgiaVirginia
LSULSU
UNCUNC
Notre DameNotre Dame
NebraskaNebraska
N.C. StateN.C. State
Wake ForestWake Forest
OklahomaOklahoma
Arizona StateStanford
TexasTexas
TERRY HERNDON
(58-36-2)
ECU 41-10
Georgia Tech
Georgia
LSU
UNC
Notre Dame
Nebraska
South Carolina
Wake Forest
Oklahoma
Stanford
Texas
DAVE ODOMGARY DORNBURG
ECU Basketball CoachWolf pack Sports Network
ECU 35-21ECU 35-29
Georgia TechGeorgia Tech
GeorgiaGeorgia
LSULSU
UNCUNC
Notre DameNotre Dame
MissouriNebraska
South CarolinaN.C. State
Wake ForestClemson
OklahomaOklahoma
StanfordStanford
TexasTexas
Kuhn's ruling questioned
'Say Hey' kid forced to resign
By WILL GRIMSLEY
AP Special Correspondent
illie Mays' dark eyes
widened in that naive,
little boy way of his and
he said he didn't under-
stand why he couldn't
work for an Atlantic City
resort hotel and still wear
his New York Mets
uniform.
'They say it's because
the hotel has a gambling
casino he said. "That
has nothing to do with me.
I don't know anything
about gambling.
"Besides, look at all
the owners in baseball
who have race horses.
That's gambling, too. If
you gamble, what differ-
ence does it make how you
do it?"
Mays' question was
being echoed all around
the country today � by
pinstriped executives hav-
ing lunch at the athletic
club, guys tossing a few
beers in the neighborhood
pub, kids, taxi drivers and
housewives.
Why? Really, why?
Commissioner Bowie
Kuhn gave his explan-
ation�a forthright dictum
that fit nicely the straight-
laced corset of base-
ball�but a majority of
people were left confused.
After all, little old
ladies fly out to Las Vegas
to feed nickels into the slot
machines. Secretaries en-
ter office pools at Ken-
tucky Derby time. Kids
pitch pennies at a crack in
the sidewalk. Churches
hold bingo games and
preachers are not averse
to engaging in a two-buck
Nassau on the golf course.
Millions play the football
:ards.
Where does the sin of
gambling actually lie? Can
you be half pregnant?
Kuhn says this is
largely immaterial. The
key factor, he insists, is
that the one thing baseball
has going for it is
integrity, which should
never be jeopardized.
"The commissioner's
main job he says, "is to
protect this integrity at all
costs
Baseball, he reasons,
must avoid not only evil
but the appearance of evil.
It must guard against the
slightest intrusion�even if
it's a tiny germ�that
could ultimately contam-
inate the whole sport.
Gambling, in his view,
is a dire threat. He
always, he contends, has
opposed legalized as well
as illegal gambling and
will combat it at every
gate. Acceptability of
baseball involvement in
horse racing was deeply
entrenched when he took
office in 1969 and there's
little he can do to change
it.
He can only try to
prevent the spread of the
infection, which he did 10
years ago by persuading
Charlie Finley of the A's
and three Braves directors
to divest themselves of
stock in a company with
casino noldmgs. iiie Wil-
lie Mays affair is the first
such case since then.
American pasttime, a
sport that has not sold its
soul to the money chan-
Tou can't fault the
commissioner's idealism.
Baseball still is the great
gers and has remained
within reach of the com-
UNCC hooters defeat injury
plagued ECU Pirates, 4-0
By DAVE SEVERIN
Staff Writer
Sophomore Fernando
Sosa scored his 25th and
26th goal of the season to
lead the UNC-Charlotte
46ers over an injury-
riddled East Carolina soc-
cer team 4-0 Monday
afternoon at the Minges
soccer field.
"We did not play well
at all cited Coach Brad
Smith. "We were worn
out from the Carolina
game Saturday. We had
no movement whatsoever
to the ball and we showed
a great lack of team play.
It just wasn't our day
The lack of play cer-
tainly showed in the first
half of play as the 49ers
took control of the game
early and scored all four of
the goals within a span of
18 minutes. But a lot of
the lack of play was due to
the loss of Chip Baker and
Phil Martin.
"Chip hurt his foot and
there's a possibility it is
broken. Phil has a severe
sprained ankle and will be
out a couple of weeks. The
rest of the team is either
aching with bruises or
ailing with colds and
viruses
But out of this big
black cloud of dilemmas,
Coach Smith still found a
trace of silver lining.
"We got to play some
of our younger players and
found we have a little
depth he said. "I was
especially pleased with
Howard Beimus. He came
off the bench and played
an exceptional game
Coach Smith also point-
ed out Mike Hitchcock and
Brad Winchell as playing
well against UNCC.
It is clearly evident
that what the Pirate
booters need is a little
consistency.
"Our guys will play
great one day and play
bad the next game we
play. A good example is
our coming off a close
game against Carolina in
which we played very well
and turn around and play
bad against UNCC. It's
something we'll have to
work on; and we'll find
it
The Pirates will be
trying to improve on their
current 4-10-2 record when
they travel to the Univer-
sity of Richmond this
Friday at 3:00 p.m.
SAAD'S SHOE
REPAIR.
113 Grande Ave.
758-1228
Quality Shoe Repair
ABRAMS
Bar -B - Q
FREE BEVERAGE WITH
COLLEGE I.D.
Daily Specials from
$2.25 - $2.50
Building a Reputation
Not Depending On One
Located Just Across
the Bridge on
N. Greene St.
RMY-NAVY STORE
Backpacks, B-15, Bomber,
Field, Deck. Flight, Snorkel
Jackals, Peacoats, Parkas,
Shoes, Combat Boots Plus
Over 400 Different Gl Items
1501 S. Evans Street
Leather Belt
Hto$1�
Leather Handbags
$10 to $25
Shoes Repaired To Look
Like New
Riggon Shoe Repair
& Leather Shop
111 WEST 4TH ST.
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
7564304
Parking in front
and Rear.
crfafifiy
THE PARTY BEVERAGE CENTER
Corner of 10th & Evans St.
Open 24 Hours
CALL US FOR ALL YOUR PARTY NEEDS WE
HAVE DELIVERY & CATERING SERVICES
752-6303 or 752-5933
WE SUPPORT THE PIRATES
VISIT CENTRAL NEWS
& CARD SHOP
FOR
Local & out off town papers
Hardback & paperback books
Complete Selection of magazines
321 Evans St.
752-3333
HOURS 9-9
7 DAYS A WEEK





Page 10 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 1 November 1979
Lady Bucs scrimmage
By JIMMY DuPREE
Assistant Sports Editor
"We have a lot to do in the next twelve days said
Lady Pirate basketball coach Cathy Andruzzi following a
Tuesday scrimmage with Louisburg College.
Andruzzi stated that the team did an excellent job of
working the ball around to the open player for a shot,
but added that they "need to concentrate on teamwork.
"I mean they need to learn to help each other on
defense; to help cover she explained. "The offense
was working very well
The team opens regular season play in Minges
Coliseum November 27 against William and Mary, and
Andruzzi feels the scrimmage benefitted her squad as
well as Louisburg.
"Louisburg was a very good team to scrimmage
against said Andruzzi. "Our big team was not quick
enough for their fast team, and when we put in our fast
team we gave up a lot of height
Andruzzi stated that defense was her main concern
after viewing the scrimmage.
"We didn't take them out of their offense like I
thought we should have she said.
"We're very aggressive when we play against each
other every day in practice, but they got out on the
court, they calmed right down.
"We played with a lot of intensity at times she
?aid, "but it has to be maintained throughout the
ame
The competition was the first for the eight new
members of the Lady Pirate program, and Andruzzi
stated that she was pleased with their overall
performance.
"Our freshmen are something else; they're young,
they're inexperienced, but they feel for each other out
Ion the court
The second year head coach from Staten Island, N.Y.
expressed concern over ECU's failure to dominate the
boards as they should have.
"We were pushed under the boards she said.
"Louisburg was a much more physical team than we
were last night (Tuesday). We were boxed out all
night
Sophomore guard Lillion Barnes saw no failure of the
team to work the ball on offense.
"We did very well on offense Barnes said. "Even
with all the new players we haven't had any trouble
adjusting to one another.
"We've still got a lot of work ahead of us before
we'll be ready
Depth will be a new dimension to the Lady Pirate
scheme in the 1979-80 season, with several players six
feet tall or over and better ball handlers.
"Everybody should get a chance to play said junior
center Marcia Girven. "We had ups and downs against
Louisburg, but overall we're a much better team than
last year. We'll all be able to rest more during games.
"We need to work on defense and denying the ball
We let them move it too easily
The 6-0 Girven played against N.C. State's 6-2 Genia
Beasley and 6-5 June Doby, as well as Old Dominion 6-5
all-American Inge Nissen, but admits that smaller
centers such as High Point's Ethel White gave her more
trouble.
"The shorter centers usually are faster and have
better moves than the 6-5 girls she explained.
The Lady Pirates will face Peace College Monday in
Minges Coliseum at 5:30 p.m. and Louisburg November
12 at 5 p.m.
"The team would like to see the students come to
Avatch the scrimmages and show support said
Andruzzi. "I think student support is essential to the
program growing as we want it to grow
Kansas State forms winning team with
Dickey father-son combination
HERSCHEL NISSENSON
AP Sports Writer
Darrel Dickey, Kansas
State's hotshot freshman
quarterback, has lived
with the Wildcats' head
coach for almost 20
years�he'll be 20 on Dec.
6�but there's no recruit-
ing violation involved.
Darrell's father, Jim
Dickey, is Kansas State's
head coach and last
weekend he gave his
son his first starting
assignment. Darrell re-
sponded by throwing two
touchdown passes as the
W ildcats upset missouri
19-3 before 70,000 people
atColumbia, Mo.
He completed 15 of 25
passes for 187 yards to
earn Big Eight Offensive
Plaver of the Week honors
from The Associated
Press. Six of his comple-
tions came on third-down
plays with more than 6
yards to go and he
completed seven of eight
passes in the Wildcats'
three scoring drives.
Darrell was redshirted
in 1978 after throwing for
2,800 yards and 24 touch-
downs in two years at
Chapel Hill High School
�Jim Dickey was an
assistant at the University
of North Carolina before
getting the head job at
K-State�and was voted
conference Player of the
Year in 1977. That created
the problem of which
college to attend.
"I figured out the
people who were telling
me about all the problems
I would have playing for
his father were just trying
to recruit me for other
schools Darrell says.
"And I remembered that
everything my dad ever
told me was true, that he
had never lied to me. So I
decided to come to Kansas
State and everything has
worked out exactly like he
said.
While Darrell was
growing up, Jim was
serving as an assistant
coach at Houston, Okla-
homa State, Oklahoma,
Kansas and North Caro-
lina.
"I guess he probably
made a nuisance of
himself, but there's no
doubt being around foot-
ball all his life has helped
him to understand the
game
And, says Jim Dickey,
he, had an advantage over
other recruiters "because
I'm close to the kid's
mother
Tyson saga ends
Continued from page 8
The simple reason Tyson quit the team was probably
that he realized this situation could only get worse. If he
played elsewhere, the pressure would not be nearly as
great and he could settle down to being an average
student-athlete, hopefully.
The fact that Tyson left ECU creates no hard
feelings, said Odom. "I feel for Al he said. "I told
him that I'd be glad to help him out in any way I could
in his relocation. He told me that he wouldn't hesitate to
call me
Now that Tyson is gone, there is no one left on the
ECU squad that had anything to do with the team being
put on probation. The recruiters are gone and now so is
the recruitee.
Are there hard feelings because the school must
suffer and the culprits are gone? "Not on my part
said Odom. "And I'm sure the team has no hard
feelings. But I'm sure that has crossed a lot of people's
minds. I look at it from a positive standpoint. Those
elements are gone now. We can now look to a bright
future
Let's hope the same can be said for Al Tyson. After
what he has been through, he deserves it.
VW "BUG" OWNERS
We give YW owners
up to JfljOOO and a free custom
paint ob just for taring a good time
You've probably seen BEETLEBOARDS featured on
"60-Minutes" or the ABC-TV and NBC-TV National News
-We're the people who have transformed over 9,000
VW "Bugs" like yours into custom painted supergraph-
ically decaled BEETLEBOARDS!
Now here's your opportunity to become a member of
the world's most unique international car club and
receive over $1,000 in cash and merchandise values!
If you have a VW "Bug' or Super Beetle, no matter
what year or mileage, and minimum state auto insur-
ance, call the BEETLEBOARDS 24-hour toll free num-
ber for more information!
'Cash and Merchandise-
Call now�There are limited BEETLEBOARD openings
in your area.
Beetlebooids
Call toll free 24 hours, 7 days a week
(800) 528-6050 Ext. 3060
(Photo by John Grogan)
Matt Kupec (12) scrambles
(Photo by Chap Gurley)
Defense traps Amos Lawrence

DRIfE-THRU BEVERAGE STORE
ON THE CORNER OF CHARLES & 14th ST.
GREENVILLE, N.C.
BEER
SPECIALS
Full line of Domestic &
Imported Beers.
-Wines-
-Munchies-
-Gasoline-
Plaza
cinema
756-0088
PITT-PLAZA SHOPPING CENTER
Now
Showing!
A tempting tasteful comedy
tor adults who can count
BLAKE EDWARDS
iVW
TO"
,R�g�
$ Fun Shows Daily
2:30-4:50-7:10-9:30
Read
V
f
unvty.x
Monday-Friday
2:00-5:00 p.m.
small draft (lO os.) 30
large draft (16 Oz.) 45
wlth student I.D.
Come by and visit our complete
gams room.
Plnball, video games, f ootsball.
SOS E. 10th St. 758-2446
START
LOSING
WEIGHT
ON TOUR COFFEE MEAK!
THIN-DOWN-CUBES FOR FA8T WEIGHT-LOSS
HELP BURN FAT AWAY WITH JUST 3 CUPS A DAYf
It't ihMtt tM IMi tt It tml TIM SIP I M
SUNDER WEISHT-LOSS PIMMM n aaaatf to , � mf
ravatatlaataa tflatMfl Jnt araa � IMi-nm- TlM-DtWI- JO.OU
caba Into yaar cotfit, tM at Bay aat
ni say palp n aicasa pwwOft. Eack
CMphll RtlpS Mt VMf ISfftttl M SMtf M
caa ralsx and aajay a safa, aaay aw
�ray ta staady aMajfct Ian. SIP �
Tkla-DMrn-CybM ibMld be Mad trrardi� la
� �w�w wwn wiww ajwvpw ww ��� aaprwaaaajp vw
its
$7.50
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED OR MONEY REFUNDED!
Quality � CoropotMvo Prfcps 0 Sorvico
911 Dickinson Avs, Sth St. A Msmortsl Or.
752-71JS 75M104
FRIDAYS
1890
Seafood
I
Fridayf � Seafood
2311 S.Evans St.
LUNCH ONLY
Lunch 11:30-2:30
SunThurs. 4:30-9:00
Fri. and Sat. 4:30-10:00
MjLHi Ladle's Day-Free trip
to salad bar wit h
each full meal
laaaMafc Ladie's Day
Free cup of clam
chowder with each
full meal
Wed.
Soup n' Sandwich
$2.25
Soup iV Salad
$1.75
frl. all the trout you can
eat for $199 with
fries and slaw
SSJBb Family Day
� Lunch and Dinner
All you can eat
Shrimp $4-95
Oysters $475
Flounder $3�sc
Trout $2.95
MonThurs. 5-IO
Frl.& Sat. 5-10:30
Thurs.





Title
The East Carolinian, November 1, 1979
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 01, 1979
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.19
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy