The East Carolinian, September 18, 1979






The East Carolinian
Vol. 54 NO. 7
16 pages today
Greenville, N.C.
Tuesday, September 18, 1979
Circulation 10,000
The Buccaneer has returned to ECU
By KAREN WENDT
News Editor
Distribution of the 1979 edition of the East Carolina
Buccaneer began yesterday.
"I'm very pleased with it said Craig Sahli, editor
of the BUC. "I think it is one of the best books East
Carolina has ever put out
This will be the first edition of the Buccaneer to
appear in three years. Problems have plagued the last
two stalls.
The 1977 stall fell victim to a budget dispute
between the editor and the SGA (at the time, the SGA
was in charge of all Media funding).
The SGA rejected what was termed an
unnecessarily large budget which had been submitted
bv the editor. Upon rejection of the budget, the editor
and the entire staff resigned. No compromise was able
(o be reached.
A second editor was named, and given a smaller
budget, but due to the time which had already elapsed
and a bre.ak-in at the Photo-lab, during which quite a
bit of equipment was taken, the book was cancelled for
the first lime in over 70 years.
In 1978, the second editor was re-appointed
However the staff was still not informed about just
what needed to be done, and so again there were
problems.
Though the editor promised that the book would be
finished, it never came, and in November of 1978 the
Media Board, who had taken over funding from the
Beer rules
discussed
By KAREN WENDT
News Editor
A Student Union Sub-
committee will consider
consumption of beer and
wine on campus and
make a proposal to the
Committee on Campus
Solicitation. The MRC
and the WRC will do the
same for the residence
halls.
The Committee on
Campus Solicitation met
Thursday, Sept. 13, to
discuss campus policies
concerning the consump-
tion of beer aqd wine on
campus, the sale of items
on campus, and the
posting of handbills and
posters on campus.
Charles Sune, presi-
dent of the Student
Union, suggested the
formation of the sub-
committee and said he
thought the students
could create a policy that
would appeal to the
Board of Trustees and
satisfy state regulations.
The Board of Trustees
must approve the final
proposal.
State law prohibits
the sale of "malt bever-
ages" or wine upon the
campus or property of
any public school or
college in this state
However, individual
campuses are allowed to
make their own policies
concerning the consump-
tion of intoxicating bev-
erages on their campuses.
Director of Campus
Security, Joe Calder, said
that "we evidently have
the strictest policy in the
(UNG) system
Rudolph .Alexander
Associate Dean of Stu-
dent Life, agreed that
ECU has the strictest
regulations among the
larger institutions in the
state.
Rules concerning the
sale of t-shirts, bumper
stickers and other novelty
items on campus and at
games will be strictly
enforced.
The sale of such
items is prohibited on
campus, with the excep-
tion of the Student
Supply Store. The store
provides scholarships
from its revenues, and
the sale of these items at
garrres and other events
takes away from possible
Student Store revenues.
Money to pay for the
new Soda Shop is
presently coming from
possible scholarship
funds.
The committee de-
cided to allow any
campus organization to
hold flea markets on
campus.
Former restrictions
confined such sales to
dormitories.
The committee will
look into the illegal
posting of handbills and
posters on campus.
Calder said that the
Student Union was a
major offender, but he
cited no evidence
Sune replied that "his
comments are completely
unfounded
Tke Solicitation Committee will consider proposals to
permit ike sale of beer ami tame on campus.
(Photo by John H. brogan)
I ll�� IllJfWJl
SGA, cancelled the book.
The money was redistributed ,to several campus
organizations.
But this year's small 18 member staff has done
what had not been done before.
Most students interviewed had mixed emotions
about the new Buccaneer.
"I can't believe it, but it's nice. I'm glad said
Deborah Smith, a junior.
Haywood Straupe, a junior, commented, "It's about
time. I've paid for it for three years
Elizabeth Franklin, a junior, said, "I think it's
terrific. I think it's about time. I'm glad to see they
finally lived up to the responsibility to get it out
Joseph Matusek said, "I don't know, I'm only a
sophomore
Some students were wary. "I'll know after I read
it said Kathy Pace, a sophomore.
Karen Mitchell, a sophomore, said, "I think it's
about time
The new Buccaneer flaunts a distinctive cover designed by Ellen Etshburn.
vi11� �i� t John H. Grogan)
Jarvis face lift disputed
By TERRY GRAY
Assistant News Editor
The recent face-lift given Jarvis Dormitory may
please ihe students who live there, but it is raising
questions among others at the University. SGA
President Brett Melvin believes that the improvements
made in the women's dorm may violate Title IX.
Title IX stales that students of both sexes must
have "comparable facilities including housing. But
since Jarvis was renovated this summer it has become
the best equipped dorm at ECU. Renovations there
include complete carpeting, except for each individual
room, new or relinished furniture, independent
air-conditioning and heat controls, installation of fire
and smoke alarms, overhead fluorescent lighting, a
new root, new ceilings, and complete rewiring.
in a meeting yesterday, Melvin said that this in
itself is no violation of Title IX. The possible violation
would be because male students have no access to
"comparable facilities
"It is true that the women must pay $50 per
semester more for these rooms, but the men don't
even have a chance to live in dorms like that. Right
now, Vice Chancelor of Student Life Dr. Meyer and I
arc going to do some preliminary studies, and then we
arc going to take it to the Board of Trustees Melvin
said.
He added that there were two alternatives under
consideration: either Jarvis could be made into a co-ed
dorm, or one of the other men's dorms could be
brought up to Jarvis' level.
Melvin also mentioned that the construction of a
new dorm mav become a subject lor discussion at East
Carolina.
1 he last time a dorm was built on this campus
was in 1 X9 when there were roughly 8,000 students at
this school. Todav we arc up to about 13,000 students,
and there arc still onlv 5,300 dorm spaces. Over 200
students had no place to stay at the first of this
semester, fhal should be an indication that we don't
haw enough on-cam pus housing at East Carolina he
said.
Concerning the question over Jarvis Dormitory,
Melvin said that he was only trying "to see to it that
East Carolina does fulfill the requirements of Title
IX
H Bomb plans published
MADISON, WIS.(AP)
� A diagram and the
complete text of a con-
troversial letter that the
government says contains
secret information about
the hydrogen bomb were
published Sunday on a
special edition of the
Madison Press Connec-
tion.
The letter � written
by Charles Hansen, a
computer programmer
from Mountain View,
Calif. � "figured in a
Saturday night ruling by
a federal judge in San
Francisco, who issued a
temporary restraining or-
der barring the student-
run Daily Californian of
Berkeley from publishing
it.
As published in the
Press Connection, Han-
sen's 18-page letter is
about half technical infor-
mation on what he says
is how to build and
trigger a hydrogen bomb
and half social commen-
tary on the need of the
American people to have
the information so they
will understand the wea-
pon's destructive power.
The letter also com-
plains that several scien-
tists have released secret
data related to the bomb
and have not been pro-
secuted, while free-lance
writer Howard Morland,
who wrote an as-yet un-
published article on the
bomb, and others work
ing from those docu-
ments have been the
target of Energy Depart-
ment action.
U.S. District Judge
Robert Schnacke ordered
the Daily Californian and
two of its editors not to
publish or give anyone
else matter from the
letter, which the gov-
ernment classilied earlier
in the week as "secret
restricted data" under
the Atomic Energy Act of
1954.
No injunction was
issued to the Press
order in California.
"We decided it was
urgent for us to get on
the streets (with the
letter) as quickly as pos-
sible McCrea said.
McCrea said he con-
siders it essential to
publish technical infor-
mation about the hydro-
gen bomb to impress on
the public "how awe-
some these weapons
are and how much
production of nuclear
weapons costs the nation
in resources.
McCrea denied that
" When you read it it you realize it
would he virtually impossible for
anyone but a major power to build a
hydrogen bomb
Connection, however.
Mark Sheehan, a
Justice Department spo-
kesman in Washington,
said the department had
no information on the
publication and would
have no immediate com-
ment.
Jim Bishop, Energy
Department spokesman,
also declined comment.
Ron McCrea, editor of
the Press Connection,
said the decision to jmt
out the special edition
was made Saturday,
shortly before Schnacke's
publication of the letter
would lead to prolifera-
tion of nuclear weapons.
"When you read it
you realize it would be
virtually impossible for
anyone but a major
power to build a hydro-
gen bomb he said.
"The government secrecy
is just a way of keeping
us quiet while the
nuclear arms race
builds
U.S. Attorney Frank
Tuerkheimer in Madi-
son said he had been
directed to forward a
cop ol Sunday's Press
Connection to Washing-
ton.
Hansen, 32, says his
hobbv is collecting docu-
ments about nuclear wea-
ponry. Copies ol his
letter, written to Sen.
Charles Percy, R-UI ap-
parent!) had been sent to
as many as seven news-
papers and several indi-
viduals.
The Press Connection,
which normally does not
publish on Sunday, print-
ed an eight-page extra
edition, most of it
devoted to the text of
Hansen's letter.
The newspaper said it
decided to publish the
material as an answer to
what it called govern-
ment censorship.
The Milwaukee Sen-
tinel reported Saturday
that Energy Department
officials asked its editors
to give up their copy of
the letter, but they re-
fused.
In an editorial across
the top of its front page,
'the Press Connection
said, "The shadow of
government censorship
has fallen across the
United Stales. On March
8, the Justice Depart-
ment, acting on behalf of
the Department of En-
ergy, ordered the Madi-
son-haaed Profressive
magazine to refrain from
publishing an article on
See BOMB, page 2
The book contains 348 pictures, mam of them
lull color, and has been done in a magazim
format.
"There are lots of full color picture- and spi
effects not found in the average yearbook - hli.
T think it will be well received b) the students.
The cover is one of which the staff is very pr
is a silver-embossed original design done
Fishburn, a senior Communications Art- major, ll .
custom designed for the Buccaneer.
According to Sahli, "The cover u-
overlooked in the past
"Input from the plant (Josten's American V
Co who printed the book) has indicated thai
good vearbook according to Sahli.
Students may pick up the book, free of i
the Buccaneer Office, on the second floor ol
South Building (the Old Cafeteria Budding) wh
across Irom Joyner Library.
You must have a valid I.D. and haw
lull-time student last year to be eligible to pi
book. No freshmen arc eligible.
One other style-change Irom traditional
is a chronological format. Instead ol doing pi
topics, it has been done in order of occurrence.
NX ork has alreadv begun on the 1980 B .
Sahli, who was renamed Editor of the Bui
sa)s that taking photos of individuals will beg
September 21. All students who come to pici
books are asked to make appointment- fur thi
at that time.
Students are also asked to have their 1.1)
when thev pick up their book.
BFC gives
party
Bv TERRY GRAY
. l.sstslunl News Editor
Rush Week lor ECl 's
r raleriulies began under
clear skies Sundav a
approximate!) 1500 stu-
dents gathered at the
bottom of College Hill
Drive to enjov the music
and free beer offered at
an lFC-poiisored parlv.
Concern in the Admin-
istration over the amount
ot beer to be served at
the parlv proved ground-
less as ft) kegs ot dralt
were lapped drv without
ail) intoxication prob-
lems.
. vccorduig to Mike
Smith, President ol the
Inler-Fraternit) Council,
the purpose ol the event
was to acquaint freshmen
with the iralernilv svs-
icm at ECL and to allow
liicni a chance to meet
prospective Iralernilv
brothers.
Smith stressed that
this was the tirsl vear
thai the member Iraterni-
lies of the 1FC hail
collective!) planned and
linanced a Rush Week
part) ol this size. Two-
thirds of the $1800 bill
lor the parlv was paid lor
bv contributions Irom
area businesses, with the
1FC donating the rest.
ihe Sundav afternoon
gathering marked the
first time that a student
organization was permit-
led to distribute such a
large amount ol alcoholic
beverage-
according is
cording tu
celloi ol 5
Finn i M.
uecti -� iini win
illlHllt-l I .llliMi �
students luitfl
uiuili ami iauM' prob-
lems, but ffur�- were
lep 'i -
betiav i
1 in
the 11alein11x -
� in -hi
inaitagt
ibit, I) i. M
Smith
uiirodut tor)
become an
ai ECl . and
Oui turn tiou
wcii Sundav. 1 l
kaa a gl
hope! u 11 v pros
iun loi all
1 n.i-t
� I -ire to Join a I
(vill get a closei
what Iilc mi tli
hoods is 11 ki a- tin
ditlereitl Ira tern i
open house this
itusliccs w ho
tortital bid Irom
irateriul) ol their i
, 11 u -1 then
pledge period
a eeks betore the) I
i me lull-Hedged br
ilici
Buses will be
between the men
dm all lFt. Iral
everj 3U minutes 1
ami f ue sd a )
beginning al p.m. and
ending al 1 a.in .
Correction
In a September issue
of the East Carolinian,
there was an error in the
use of a certain term.
At the Media Board
meeting on Sept. 10,
SGA president Brett
Melvin notified the Board
oi a possible SGA
referendum to ask stu-
dents how effective they
thought the Media Board
was.
flic referendum would
have appeared on the
SG.v elections ballot.
1 be referendum will
not appear on the
election � ballot.
liudolpli vlexandor
had -uggc-led that the
Board conduct a survev
ot the students through
an impartial group, pos-
siblv ECL marketing
students
Inside Today
� Fraternities of ECUSee page b.
� Duke stuns ECU 28-14See page 7.
� New album by Peter Tosh. For a
re viewSee page 12.
� Student to be aide to Patricia
HarrisSee page 12.





Page 2 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 18 Saotrnnlw 1Q7�
Sunny skies, free beer, and good music made the IFC Kickoff Rush a success Sunday.
(Photo by John H. Grugan)
French foreign exchange student
gives impressions of life here
B KENNETH TYNDALL
Staff Writer
Editors Xote: This is the
first of two interviews
being done with foreign
exchange students who
are attending ECU.
During a recent inter-
view. Nathilie Baudoin, a
student from Paris, re-
flected upon some of the
differences -between stu-
dents in France and
those here at East
Carolina.
She has been living in
Greenville and attending
ECU since August 25th.
She will be here for one
ear, studying and as-
sisting teachers in some
French classes.
So far Baudoin likes
America cr much. This
is not her first visit to
our country. When she
was seventeen, Baudoin
spent a month with a
family in Indiana. Two
years later, she traveled
the East Coast with some
friends.
First of all, she felt
American students ap-
pear more relaxed and
don't seem to work very
hard � not that they
don't work hard, they
just act much more at
ease about schoolwork.
Also, while many
ECU students take week-
end trips, "In France,
usually when we are in
school, we just work. I
liardl) ever go on week-
ends, said Baudoin.
What does she do
with her spare time?
"I'm busy all the time,
really. I don't have any
spare time
Baudoin hasn't been
to the nightclub area of
Greenville yet but would
Phi Sigma Pi oldest
fraternity here
nke very much to go.
She did find time to
attend her first football
game, ECU vs. Western
Carolina. What did she
think? "It was great;
very new for me. We
don't have cheerleaders
in France. To me, this is
very American
The way students
here dress is also differ-
ent for her. According to
her, "We never wear
shorts; never. Only when
we play tennis. If we are
at the beach we can wear
shorts, but I would never
wear shorts in Paris
Greenville social life
is another thing Baudoin
likes. "In France she
says, "you take your
classes and you go back
home. There is no social
life. We don't know
everybody like you do
here She also says that
her school doesn't show
movies as our Student
Center does; nor does
her school have a news-
paper.
How does television
in America compare to
television in France? "I
hate TV anyway. But I
think your TV is worse
than ours What is it
about our television that
Baudoin doesn't care for?
Commercials, of course.
France has government
controlled TV and what
commercials there are
appear only between
shows, not during them.
American food is
another new aspect to
her, and she said, "I like
the American food. There
are some very good
things Baudoin likes
eggplant, sweet potatoes
(which they don't have in
France), and banana
pudding. These items are
all new to her.
So far Baudoin's stay
at East Carolina has been
very enjoyable for her
and, hopefully, beneficial
to us all.
East Carolina Univer-
sity is the home of Phi
Sigma Pi National Honor
Fraternity's Tau Chapter.
I ju chapter was char-
tered in 1936 and is the
oldest fraternal organiza-
tion on the ECU campus.
This interdepartmental
fraternity's requirements
include a 3.3 grade point
aerage, leadership and
social qualities. For 13
consecutive years Tau
chapter has been award-
ed most outstanding
chapter in the nation at
its annual conventions.
The Fraternity's acti-
vities include fund raisers
lor Cerebral Palsy and
the Heart Fund, a
Christmas party for un-
derprivileged children
and an Easter egg hunt
lor retarded children.
The fraternity also holds
various social functions
such as two chicken
pickins, a beachweek,
senior party and others.
The fraternity encour-
ages participation in ex-
tracurricular activities
and has claimed leader-
ship positions in all
facets of campus life and
inlei departmental honor
societies. Phi Sigma Pi
will hold a "smoker" in
October for those inter-
ested in joining the
fraternity.
The Rebel is now accepting poems,
jegsays, interviews, and short fiction.
Send all correspondence to The
Rebel, Mendenhall Student Center,
East Carolina University, Greenville,
NC 27834. Deadline for submissions is
November 1, 1979.
'eon 4
Bomb
continued from page 1
nuclear weaponry, de-
spile the fact that all of
the research was based
on unclassified docu-
ments in public circula-
tion.
"Saturday night, the
same thing happened to
the "Daily Californian in
Berkeley. The shadow of
government censorship
has fallen across the
land. It must stop, and it
must stop now
The front page of the
extra edition included a
diagram that the Press
Connection said was on
the 18lh page of Han-
sen's letter, showing a
cross section of a hydro-
gen bomb, with detail of
the bomb trigger.
The Atomic Energy
Act of 1954 provides
penalties for anyone who
possesses or communi-
cates what it terms
"restricted data" � re-
gardless of the source. It
defines such data as
anything about the "de-
sign, manufacture or
utilization of atomic wea-
pons the production of
special nuclear material
or the use of special
nuclear material in the
production of energy
Violation of the act
carries penalties of fines
up to $10,000 or im-
prisonment for up to 10
vears.
-invites the homecoming
representatives to have their
portraits made.
Specializing in
black and white 8 by 10V
203 S. Evan 752-3980
1
Time is running out!
ElboRoom
Special semester memberships
can save you money!
But only if yon purchase now
Don't wait!
Special memberships can be
purchased 9am to 3pm
daily and nightly
State issues guide for
public school systems
RALEIGH AP - The
state's first detailed guide,
to what students should
learn in each grade has
been completed and will
be in all the schools by
the beginning of next
month.
The 280-page guide is
called the .Competency
Coals and Performance
Indicators and took two
years to complete.
The guide was de-
veloped to help teachers
and school administrators
develop instructional pro-
grams and to help
parents understand what
educators are trying to
teach, according to
George A. Kahdy, assist-
ant state superintendent
of public instruction.
But the contents of
the guide, are intended
only as recommendations
so schools may choose to
use just portions.
"We put down what
we thought would be
good competency indica-
tors Kahdy said.
The guide was de-
veloped after consulta-
tions with 1,500 North
Carolina educators and
review of literature from
other states. It has been
used experimentally in 67
school districts during
the past school year,
Kahdy said.
The guide is a
follow-up to the "Course
of Study for Elementary
and Secondary Schools
adopted by the state
Board of Education two
years ago. That guide
outlines courses that
should be taught in the
schools.
"We decided that this
the course of study was
good but too general
Kahdy said. "We de-
cided we could provide
local - units with more
specific recommenda-
tions
Although the new
guide is more specific,
Kahdy said it should not
stifle teacher creativity or
lead to a mechanical
curriculum. Nor is it
intended as a device to
measure teacher compe-
tence, he said.
"We are not trying to
standardize curricu-
lums he said. "But we
are saying schools have a
responsibility for teach-
ing the whole child
Kahdy said the next
step would be to develop
a parents' version so
parents can look at it and
know what the schools
are trying to teach their
children.
The new guide says
11th graders should be
able to take 20 sentences
and "correct inappropri-
ate usage of pronouns,
verbs, agreement of sub-
ject and verb, and
antecedent reference
A fourth grader
should be able to deter-
mine how much change
should be received from
a dollar after a purchase
totaling 40 cents, 55
cents or 80 cents.
SAAD'S SHOE
REPAIR
113 Grande Ave.
758-1228
uality Shoe Repfir
BISCUIT INN
323 S. Greene
help wanted!
Apply In Person
Daily 3-8
ARMY
MEDICAL DEPARTMENT
BULLETIN BOARD
SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM: The US Army Health
Professions Scholarship Program offers a unique
opportunity for financial support to a number of
students in the health professions. The program
is substantial, both in the size and scope of the
scholarship and the number offered. Every
student or potential student of medicine,
osteopathy, veterinary medicine, optometry,
psychology is invited to examine the program and
submit an application, if eligible.
Financial support in the scholarship includes
approximately 5600 per year. In addition, tuition
and certain other expenses required by all
students in a particular course of study will also
be paid by the government.
A fact sheet containing information as to
eligibility criteria, pay, a service obligation, and
application procedures is available from your
nearest Army Medical Department Personnel
Counselor. The personnel counselor will also
answer questions your may have about this or
other programs and will assist you in the
completion and submission of your application.
Army Medical Department
Personnel Counselor
Major Roy J. Leatherberry, III, MSC
Federal Building, Suite 310
Post Office Box 27524 (919) 834-64136414

RISE AND DINE
With the best eatin all around
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Our fresh breakfast biscuits are rising every morn-
ing, baked from scratch right in our kitchen. Whether
you savor sizzlin' sausage, have a hankerin' for country
ham or tender steak, or get "eggs" cited over eggs, you'll
find a breakfast that'll start your day off with a smile at
Hardee's! Served 'til 10:30 a.m. every morning.
I FOR $l.GO With this coupon, good till 10:30 a.m.
� Good at all participating Hardee's. Please present �
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� please.Customermustpayanysalestaxdueonthepur- �
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�Coupon expires October 1,19791 m�MHMmkKA. �





THANK YOU SALE
UBE is slashing prices
for its biggest sale;
of the year
We want to thank you, ECU
Students for making this our
hp.�t fall pver! To show our
18 September 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page
f
528 S. COTANCHE
GREENVILLE, N.C
appreciation, we're slashing
all our sportswear prices.
Clip these coupons and come on down to UBE and save.
ECU T-shirts and
novelty T-shirts
Reg. $2.95
and $3.95
$1.00 off
ECU and plain zipper
front hooded I
sweatshirt
Reg.$9.95
to $11.95
SjkOOoffj
8 weatpants
Reg.$.95
$1.00 off
ECU women's
co-ordinated
short sets
Reg. $11.95
1 2 price
Tennis shorts
Reg. $6.95
and $7.95
$1.00 off
I
"ECU and plain
pullover sweatshirts
Reg.$7.95
$2.00 off
ECU sportshirts
Reg. $9.95
to $10.95
$2.00 off
WILD COUPON
20 off any
sportswear
I
Gym shorts
Reg $2.99
to $5.95
$1.00 off
ECU and plain
"I
Reg $5.95
to $7.95
$1.00 off
i i
ECU and plain
nylon jackets
Reg $9.95
to $17.95
$3.00 off
"ECU and
plain jerseys
Reg. $5.95
to $6.95
$1.00 off
$ave
Prices will never be this low again
Sale ends Saturday, September 15





The East (laroli
Editorials
Opinions
Tueedey, September 13, 1979,page 4
Greenville, N.C.
Freedom of the press
alive and well at ECU
Oh no, not another "freedom of the
press" editorial.
Americans have heard the term
�free press" so many times that it has
almost lost all meaning, or gained a
new meaning. Some people believe that
freedom of the press is the right of the
media to invade the privacy of
individuals and to print or broadcast
whatever will sell newspapers or
broadcast time. Unfortunately, the
media have made mistakes and poor
news judgements, but on the whole, the
public has benefited from being
well-informed.
The First Amendment to the United
States Constitution states: "Congress
shall make no law abridging the
freedom of speech or of the press
Plain and simple, no law can be made
to restrict these rights. But the majority
of Supreme Court Justices agree that
there are exceptions: libel laws to
protect individuals from unfair attacks,
FCC regulations to hold broadcasters to
the public interest, and antitrust laws to
prevent monopolies.
But whv should government allow
the media to function autonomously?
Journalism students learn this in JOUR
2000, the introductory course to mass
media, in the very first chapter.
"The American government was
founded on a radical political theory:
representative democracy. According to
this strange notion, the people of a
.iation should control the government by
electing officials to carry out their will.
The mass media necessarily play a
central role in representative demo-
cracy. It is through the media that the
people get the information they need to
decide what they want their officials to
do. And it is through the media that the
people find out if their officials are
doing it (MEDIA Sandman, Rubin,
Sachsman, p. 7.)
So as long as the government makes
"no laws abridging the freedom of the
press and the media are privately
owned and financed, the public will be
informed without interference. Not long
ago, the media of East Carolina were
controlled by the Student Government
Association, at least financially. Holding
the purse strings, the SGA could
theoretically dictate policy for the media
by dangling purchase orders and payroll
checks over their heads.
Fortunately, the Media Board was
created to decide the media's financial
needs, and the popular fallacy that the
newspaper was "an SGA newsletter"
vanished. Unfortunately, the SGA
president has a seat on the board, but
he can easily be overruled or outvoted.
imagine Jimmy Carter having a vote on
the editorial board of the NEW YORK
TIMES.
Freedom of the press prevails at
ECU, and as a result, we have a
BUCCANEER and a more professional
and modern newspaper. Freedom, of
any kind, is a most valuable asset and
should be defended at all costs.
Uppity Women
English is sexist
By G.C. CARTER
One of the most
important disciplines pur-
sued in an academic
community is the ef-
fective use of verbal
language to communicate
ideas. Language is a
legacy of culture. The
essential values and
viewpoints of a society
are reflected in the basic
medium of spoken and
written language.
With the develop-
ment of world-wide com-
munications, there are
probably few of us who
are aware that the
English language is con-
sidered, in the world
community, to be one of
the most difficult lan-
guages to learn. Persons
attempting to learn Eng-
lish as a foreign language
complain of the am-
biguities, the double
meanings and numerous
"nonsense" terms that
make up a relatively
large part of our modern
spoken language.
While the English
language as spoken in
America could expect no
less a verdict than guilty
as charged by the above,
let it be stated in defense
of our language that it is
a reflection of our
American culture. We do
not speak "the King's
English and, as a
nation, should be proud
of that fact. We speak
"the people's English
which reflects the ever-
changing aspects of a
culture that is not bound
to a rigid tradition or to
the tyranny of govern-
ment-controlled speech
and press.
While there are criti-
cisms of our language
that have validity, such
as an excessive number
of "technological" words
as opposed to more
"humanistic" ones, my
main "beef (figure that
one out) with the English
language is that it is
blatantly sexist.
No matter how hard
they try, no one can
convince me that the
word "men" includes
women as well. I just
don't buy it� never will.
I pay my money to go
to school just like any-
body else, but all the
textbooks and most of
the lectures refer to
"he "him "men
and "man-kind When
informally addressing
classes, most teachers
use the term "you
guys
This is all very well if
one is a male, but where
does it leave one, if one
is not a male?
There is a prevalent
macho attitude in this
country that if one does
not have a proposed
solution for a problem,
then one has no right to
complain about the prob-
lem. This seems to me
rather like the situation
of the country peasant
woman whose home is
located where two op-
posing governments have
chosen to wage tech-
nological warfare. Her
"problem" is that her
homeland is being dev-
astated and her children
are being wounded and
killed. Her "proposed
solution" is, of course,
that the bombing be
halted immediately. But
no, she is informed, a
diplomatic situation is
required for this prob-
lem. Since the peasant
woman is not a diplomat,
she cannot propose a
diplomatic solution. Since
she can offer no accept-
able solution to the
problem, therefore, ac-
cording to the afore-
mentioned rationale, she
has no right to complain.
Whether "in here" or
"out there one is
usually confronted with
the classic situation of
the worker and the boss,
in which case one usually
finds oneself in the
position of the worker, at
the start anyway. How-
ever, in an academic
setting, there is usually
much greater opportunity
for the worker (the
student) and the boss
(the teacher) to interact
successfully and with
mutual benefit.
Most teachers are
very willing to help a
student who displays
interest and ambition,
and out of this group of
teachers there are some
who will go far out of
their way to see that
their students receive all
of the benefits of educa-
tion that they (the
teachers) are able to
provide.
Regretfully, most of
us students do not have
regular contact with clair-
voyants, who would prob-
ably be very quick to
point out that such
concerned, helpful at-
titudes are few and far
between when we move
out of the sphere of
academia (with the ex-
ceptions of the attitudes

V
displayed by campaigning
politicians and counselors
at mental health centers.)
Being only human, we
are prone to take for
granted those things that
we should appreciate �
at least until we don't
have them anymore.
Of course, if this was
always the case, there
wouldn't be much point
in writing this, right? But
we as humans possess
higher faculties than
well-developed hind-
sight. We have the
capacity for vision and
the ability to reason. If
we do not make use of
these qualities which
distinguish us from other
life-forms on our planet,
it is inevitable that we
will have to travel our
paths walking forward
while looking backward.
In terms of every-day
life in the academic
community, this means
that we students can
benefit from setting goals
for ourselves, challenging
ourselves. Our teachers
can't help us very much
if we don't know where
we're going. Teachers
can guide us and stimu-
late us, but they can't
make up our minds for
us.
If this sounds like a
sermon, please keep in
mind that this writer has
been exposed to similar
"sermons" over the
years. But the "advice"
always came from people
who were so straight-
laced and smelled so
much like the dry-
, cleaners and the Sunday-
school building, that they
had no credibility to me,
at ail.

Students help students
The BUCCANEER staff should be
commended for bringing the university
community a yearbook we can all be
proud of, for the first time in three
years.
Craig Sahli, editor of the BUC, spent
long nights burning the midnight oil to
get the book ready for publication.
Sahli had the odds against him all
year. Faced with the poor record of his
predecessors in the editorship of the
campus annual, he delivered the BUC in
the face of opposition.
The success of the campus yearbook
is directly tied to the success of the
Media Board, in its relatively short
period of operation. The Media Board
also did not give up when the going got
tough. It has consistently tried to insure
that the students of this university get
the best campus newspaper, radio
station, and yearbook possible. While It
is not made up of journalism minors,
the board is more than willing to learn
about how we gather and report the
news.
Letters to the Editor
While the board does not exercise
editorial control over the media, it does
add an extra measure of responsibility
in allocating funds to the various media.
This takes a lot of pressure off the
editors and business managers of
publications because they cannot be
accused of mismanaging funds.
Openness is the byword of the
Media Board. Any student on this
campus can attend Media Board
meetings to find out what is happening
with the campus media.
Finally, the Media Board is made up
of different student leaders, chosen
according to the offices they hold. The
presidents of the Men's and Women's
Residence Councils, the Panhellenic
Council and the Interfraternity Council
are all represented on the board. These
student leaders represent a cross
section of the student body on campus.
The board is dedicated to improving
the quality of the campus media for the
student body. Students helping other
students�that's what the Media Board
is all about.
To the Editor:
it seems as though
only a week ago the
students of East Carolina
were groaning through
the pains of final exams
and eagerly anticipating
the warmth of the days
to come.
In this, the third full
week of fall classes, the
prevailing question of
many returning students
is�what happened to
those days? Already
we're back without so
much as a memory of the
previous fifteen or so
weeks. Once again the
four-wall syndrome
strikes our campus�
classroom fright.
Many students have
cured this ailment by not
attending classroom ses-
sions praying that sum-
mer has not really come
to an end. But there are
also those who have
endured through an ago-
nizing summer awaiting
only the day that they
return to their Greenville
Homes.
Motivated by a dedi-
cation to academics and
the promise of a brighter
future, they greet the
campus with open arms
and open minds. To
those people, 1 extend
my hand in admiration.
As for myself, I'm still
asking�what happened
to those days?
Ron Sistare
The East Carolinian
MANAGING EDITOR
Richard Green
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Anita Lancaster
NEWS EDITOR
ASST. NEWS EDITOR
FEATURES EDITOR
ASST. DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING
EDITOR
Marc Barnes
DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING
Robert M. Swaim
ASSISTANT TO THE EDITOR
Leigh Coakley
BUSINESS MANAGER
Steve O'Geary
Karen Wendt
Terry Gray
Bill Jones
Terry Herndon
SPORTS EDITOR
ASST. SPORTS EDITOR
COPY EDITOR
AD TECH. SUPER.
Charles Chandler
Jimmy DuPree
Barry Clayton
Paul Lincke
THE EAST CAROLINIAN is the student
newspaper of East Carolina University
sponsored by the Media Board of ECU and
is distributed each Tuesday and Thursday
during the academic year (weekly during the
summer).
Offices are located on the second floor of the
Publications Center (Old South Building). Our
mailing address is: Old South Building, ECU,
Greenville, NC 27834.
The phone numbers are: 757-6366, 6367,
6300. Subscriptions are $10 annually, alumni
$6 annually.





Fecple places and ���
c lit LI Jl
certei
The Ledonia Wright
Afro-American Cultural
Center is open daily from
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday
thru Friday.
Organizations wishing
to use the center during
evenings and on week-
ends are to contact the
director of services of
Mendenhal Student Cen-
ter.
�(a
scj
The Society for Colle-
giate Journalists will hold
its pi ' rr" :al meeting
� n ��) , ept. 19 at 6
!� a. in Mendenhall Stu-
nt Center, Room 247.
vil members should phin
10 attend. The agenda is
he Publications Work-
shop for Sept. 29.
til
i i's Park and Re-
el, ate. The Parks, Rec-
reation, and Conserva-
tion Society will conduct
its organizational meet-
ing on Sept. 18 at 7:30
p.m. in the PRC building
on 9th and Cotanche
Streets. All interested
students and faculty are
invited to attend. Drinks
will be served.
tc knew
As of today, Sept. 18
no items for People,
Places, and column
will be accepted unless
they are typed, double-
space, and include on the
bottom a name and
phone number of a
person who can be con-
tacted if there is some
problem with the piece.
We reserve the right to
edit for brevity, and will
only run the items we
consider most important
to the most students.
Due to space limitations
we are unable to pring
all of the items received,
but we will do our best to
print as many as pos-
sible. Deadlines are 2:00
p.m. on Fridays for the
Tuesday edition, and
2:00 Tuesday for the
Thursday edition.
pM �Hmai pi
Phi Sigma Pi will hold
its monthly dinner meet-
int at the Western Steer
on Wed Sept. 19 at
6:00. All members are
urged to attend and a
glass blowing demonstra-
tion will be held.
pcetty
dance
Students interested in
filing for SGA Represen-
tative or class officer may
do so by going by the
SGA office (Room 228) at
Mendenhall. The last day
to file will be Tues
Sept. 18 at 5 p.m. For
more information, call
757-6611, ext. 214.
CSC
The Center for Stu-
dent Opportunities (CSO)
in the School of Medicine
is presently hiring tutors
who will be able to earn
an income at standard
campus rates for tutoring
in the areas of medicine,
premedicine, nursing, al-
lied health, biology,
chemistry, physics, and
related health professions
curricula.
If you are interested
in the possibility of
employment as a tutor or
would like to participate
in the cost-free tutorial,
readinglearning skills,
or counseling services,
contact Dr. Bridwell in
the Center for Student
Opportunities, 208 Rags-
dale Hall, or call 757-
6122, 6075, or 6081.
tiuinei
The Greenville Hun-
ger Coalition meets each
Tues. at 8 p.m. at 608 E.
Ninth St. for study and
action addressing local
and world food and
development issues.
ic vie lit
The East Carolina
Road Club invites all
bicycling enthusiasts to
participate in our weekly
program of events. The
club offers weekly races
and lours, and monthly
meetings with programs
on bike care and similar
voptcu of interest.
For up to the minute
details, call Mike's Bike
Shop (752-5291) and ask
lor Mike.
iet el
THE REBEL is now
accepting high quality
literature submissions.
Poetry, essays, plays,
interviews, and short
stories will be accepted.
All work must have
name, address, and phone
number of writer. Ad-
dress manuscripts to
THE REBEL Menden-
hall Student Center,
Greenville, NC 27834.
tyamma beta
A F.OLK-FOR-A11
evening of clogging, folk,
country and square
dancing will be held in
Mendenhall Student
Center on Wednesday,
19 September, from 7
p.m. to 9 p.m Guest
dance leaders will be
Nelson Jarvis (square
dancing) and Bea Seal
(round dancing). Every-
one is welcome and
refreshments will be
provided.
clubs
-
Organizational meet-
ings for the formation of
several recreational clubs
will be held at Menden-
hall Student Center.
CHESS CLUB (Mon
Sept. 17, 7 - Coffee
house).
BACKGAMMON
CLUB (Tues Sept. 18, 7
- Coffeehouse).
TABLE TENNIS CLUB
(Tues Sept. 18, 7:30
p.m. - Billiards Center).
STRATEGIC GAMES
CLUB (Wed Sept. 19, 7
p.m. - Coffeehouse).
Sign up today at the
Mendenhall Billiards Cen-
ter if you would like to
participate in any of
these clubs
srea
There will be an
organizational meeting of
the Student National
Educator's Association
(SNEA) on Wed Sept.
19, at 4 p.m. in Menden-
hall StudentCenter.Room
244. All elementary and
secondary education ma-
jors and those interested
in educational fields are
invited to attend.
4 III I lllS
The East Carolina
Catholic Student Newman
Community celebrates
mass each Wed. from 5-6
p.m. followed by a get-
together and free dinner.
608 E. Ninth St. behind
the library.
�e wt lt
Applications are being
taken for Student Union
Artist.
Qualifications: Full-
time East Carolina Uni-
versity Student with a
background in Commer-
cial Art. Applicants may
apply at the Student
Union Office, Room 234
of Mendenhall Student
Center, between the
hours 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m
MonFri.
I lll I
services
18 September 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 5
If you are interested
in dinner and a ride to
services to celebrate
ROSH HASHANAH on
Friday evening, Sept. 21,
call: Mike Freelander
752-9473 or Dr. B.
Resnik 756-5640;
757-6232.
Hillel, the campus
organization for Jewish
students, is having its
first membership meeting
of the 1979-80 school
year on Thursday, Sept.
20 at 8 p.m. in BB 205.
Please attend so you can
find out what Hillel is all
about.
icubles
Mixed-doubles and
men's and women's
bowling leagues are now
being formed at Menden-
hall Student Center. Sign
up at the ground floor
bulletin board in Men-
denhall. League play will
begin Mon Sept. 17 and
Tues Sept. 18 at 6 p.m.
Bring some friends and
sign up today!
billfolds
Interested in joining a
billiards league? All bil-
liards players interested
in forming a league to
meet weekly, sign up at
the Mendenhall Billiards
Center. An organizational
meeting will be held
Mon Sept. 17 at 6:30
p.m. in the Billiards
Center. Trophies will be
awarded in several di-
visions.
emceptlcral
The East Carolina
Student Council For Ex-
ceptional Children will
have an organizational
meeting Wed Sept. 19
at 5:00 p.m. in Room 129
Speight. All members
and all prospective mem-
bers are asked to attend.
For any information call
Joey Crutchfield - 752-
8796, Tricia Furr -
752-1861, or the Special
Education office. Please
plan to attend!
The Poetry Forum
will be holding its weekly
meeting Thurs Sept. 20
at 8 p.m. in Room 248 of
Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter. Those interested in
getting feedback on their
poems should bring copies
to the meeting.
beta wd
Beta Nu Chapter of
Sigma Theta Tau will
hold its first business
meeting of the '7980
year on Sept. 25, 1979 at
7:00 p.m. in Room 101 of
the nursing building.
Sigma Theta Tau is a
national honor society of
nursing. All members
are encouraged to attend.
rcsl
The North Carolina
Student Legislature pro-
vides an -ffective means
for student to voice their
opinions in reference to
the state legislation which
governs North Carolina.
There remains much to
be accomplished in the
upcoming year. Screen-
ing sessions for new
members will be fecld
Tuesday night, Sept. 18
at 7:30 in Room 248
Mendenhall. The sched-
uled weekly meeting of
the organization will be
held on Tur&yvSett�
Mendenhall.
pbl
Gamma Beta Phi will
meet Thursday, Sept. 20
at 7:00 in Room 244,
Mendenhall.
st.tirctMes
St. Timothy's Episco-
pal Church, Second An-
nual Lobster Fair will be
held October 6th from
10-3. Tickets are $7.00
for live and 18.00 for
boiled lobsters, ranging
from 1-lVi pounds in
size. No tickets will be
sold at the door, and
must be purchased by
September 20th. You
may buy them at the
Kitchen Cupboard, The
Book Barn or call the
- Ticket Information at
j 752-3482.
ECU STUDENT SPECIAL
UNITED FIGURE
SALON
Limited Time
2 for the
Price of 1
Last day to file
for SGAdaydor m
representative
or class of Sicers is
Bring a friend $Q7 QO
and share the Of .OUaach
coat of a 4 month program
756-2820
RED OAK PLAZA
264 ByPatt
ELECTROLYSIS
PERMANENT REMOVAL
OF UNWANTED HAIR
Electrolytic la tha ONLY permanent mothod of
halrromoval. Safe and comfortable.
FREE CONSULTATION
Mrs. Vlckl Smith, Lleonaod Electrologlet
103 Oakmont Dr. Qraonvillo 756-3780
Twee. Wait. Frl. 10:00-5:00 Thvraday -2:00-7:00
today at 5:00
in room 228
Mendenhall
What's Happened
W
to RECORD
PRICES
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Major label LP's! Top artists!
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
WRIGHT BUILDING
Sale Now In Progress
Prices Start at $1.98
COME EARL Y FOR BEST SELECTION
GET YOUR FAVORITES AT
BIG DISCOUNTS






pppv 9
Page 6 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 18 September 1979
Fraternities
- SIGMA TAU GAMMA
The DREAM was con- ,
ceiveti in ihe beginning
ut the Fall Semester of
1977. A group ot thirty-
lour students joined to-
gether to lorm a BRO-
THERHOOD.
" ihe Delta Alpha
Chapter ol Sigma Tau
Gamma is composed ol
MEN and LITTLE SIS-
TERS who believe that
an individual's UNIQUE-
NESS should not be
restricted by an organi-
sation. Our members are
encouraged to have their
uwn hlestyles and not lit
into an) stereotype.
We are a SOCIAL
FRATERNITY that en-
joys an atmosphere
unique Irom the others.
Please isil Sigma Tau
Gamma. Give us a call at
Tjo-H W to get directions
to our house. Sigma Tau
Camilla -cares
btgtna Tau Gamma
Rush Schedule
Mou. � Hawaiian Party
1 ucs. � "Smoker"
Wed. � Party Party
vll start at 9:00
PHI KAPPA TAU
M
ternily, is composed of a
diversified group of easy
going people. Danny
Thomas, Elvis Presley,
Ronald Reagan are a-
mong the distinguished
alumni of the TKE.
We have been on the
ECU campus since 1968
and each new year finds
us continually growing.
The TKE house is
conveniently situated at
the bottom oi College
Drive, 5 minutes from
most classes.
One of ECU's most
popular events is the
.uitiual TKE Boxing Tour-
nament held each Feb-
ruary, of which part ol
the proceeds go toward
St. Jude's Children's
Research Hospital.
We invite all prospec-
tive rushes to come down
and enjoy the TKE
experience.
TKE Rush Schedule
Mun Rock-N-Roll Nile
Tues Country Rock iNite
Wed Gel Down and
N Jam Nile
1 Thurs. Formal Rush
t Fri Formal Rush
Plenty of Cold Beer
ll Nights
KAPPA SIGMA
uu come to lake
our places in an on-
going enterprise, a uni-
versity. It was here
be tore ou came. It
probably ' will be here
alter ou leave. But you m
run make your mark
upon it.
1 Ik Greek experience
i3 invaluable in pro-
viding learning opportu-
nities above and beyond
academics. The ability to
gel along with others is
utleii a lesson schooling
misses and fraternities
produce. Phi Kappa Tau
i- certainly no exception,
v special blend ol
aocial, academic and
athletic excellence pro-
niiscs lo make ihis
another one ol our finest
h-ji's. We are involved in
cico phase oi the
college experience.
through socializing
with other greeks, our
Greek System is streng-
thened and so is our
iraiei uilv.
llirough lund raising
projects we help project a
positive sell-image lor all
oi East Carolina.
Our activities continue
llirough blood drives,
intramural sports, block
pai ties, and serenades.
W e are all proud of
the spirit and accom-
plishments ol Phi Kappa
I au.
W e hope lo see you
iluiiug rush.
Phi Kappa Tau
Rush Schedule
Mon. � Celebrate the
End ol a Decade. Last
summer ol the 70's
Plu Tau Crab Feast
):W � 1:00
lues. � Beer and Good
tunes the Phi Tau
Vav! 9:00-1:00
wed. - Mixer 9:00-1:00
1 nurs. � Formal Rush
Part) (lnvilalion Only)
lit KAPPA EPSILON
Tau Kappa Epsilon,
ilie world's largest Ira-
Kappa Sigma is lo-
cated at 700 E. 10th
Street, beside Darryl's
1U7 Restaurant, near
the ECU campus. Our
close location to campus
,s one ol the many
advantages offered to our
members, yet, we ai
Kappa Sigma are looking
tor what you can oiler
Us.
East Carolina chapter
lias always encouraged
individuaisini along with
brotherhood and we are
constantly in need ol
leaders to keep this ideal
alive.
Statistics about Ira-
leruiiy men in leader-
ship positions speak lor
mcmscUos, and we are
looking lor those luture
leaders to help us. II you
leel tlial vou have these
leadership qualities a-
long with the desire to
have a good lime, come
join us lor rush, you're
jusi the man we're
looking lor.
kappa Sigma Rush Plans
Mon. 17 � Beer Blast
lues, 18 � Beach Party
Wed. 19 � Playboy
Bunny Part)
DELTA SIGMA PHI
Delia Sigma Phi Fra-
leruil) is based upon
three spccilic principles;
leadership, scholarship,
and brotherhood. We'd
hke you lo know what
Hits. Iralernity can do lor
)ou, as well as how you,
as individuals, can help
us grow and prosper.
rjcholaslically, Delta
Sigma Phi has the
highest overall average
on campus lor any social
Iralernity. The adage
that you can't do well in
school and have a good
tune just doesn't hold
true at Delia Sigma Phi.
Leadership capabili-
ties are more than
welcome in the fraternity.
we oiler the opportunity
to talented men to
eventually lead this fra-
ternity through elected
offices.
The fraternity offers a
lull calendar of Greek
and Chapter events be-
cause after all, we are a
social fraternity.
We just ask that you
come by and meet the
brothers and find out
more about the Ira-
lernity.
Delta Sigma Phi
Rush Schedule
Mon. �t Monday Night
Football. Cookout: Hot
Dogs Hamburgers
Tues. � Casino Party
Hairy Buffalo
Wed. � Beer Blast
SIGMA NU
Since 1971, Eta beta
chapter of Sigma Nu
Fraternity has been a
part ol the Greek System
on ihts campus.
Fraternity aimed at
the students' total college
experience, striving to
assist men in building
low aids and achieving
goals ol excellence.
Sigma Nu, a strong
nationwide Fraternity,
has been given continu-
ous recognition in the
past and is a strong
leader in the ECU Greek
System.
Sigma Nu continue,
to work towards goals ol
scholarship and other
contributions to the uni-
versity and surrounding
i oiiiuiunilv.
Sigma Nu Rush Schedule
Mon. � Beer Blast
lues. � Beer Party
w ed. � Beer Party
Ihuis. � Formal Rush
Fn. � Special Parly
a strong alumni program.
Joe Hallow, a well-known
merchant of Greenville,
is a Pi Kapp alumni.
The Pi Kapps are
strong in IFC and make a
strong showing at IFC
functions throughout the
year.
The Pi Kapp Little
Sister organization is
well-known and the girls
work hard for the frater-
nity and campus as a
whole. Pi Kappa Phi
Brotherhood is diverse,
and the members take
pride in v their strong
unity. Whereas some
fraternities talk brother-
hood, Pi Kappa Phi does
something about it.
Pi Kappa Phi Rush
Schedule:
Mon�Party on Pi
Kappa Beach.
Tues�Keg party with
That Golden Beverage.
Wed�Open bar.
Thurs�Formal rush.
Fri�Formal rush.
ALPHA SIGMA PHI
vlpha
PI KAPPA PHI
Pi Kappa Phi national
Iralernity is the fastest
growing' "fraternity in ' ihe
L.S. Being 75 years old
this year, Pi Kapps have
more fraternities than
anv national in N.C
S.C and Georgia.
East Carolina's chap-
ter ol Pi Kapps enjoys a
strong reputable name as
well. The Pi Kapps have
Sigma Phi is
the 10th oldest national
social Fraternity in the
nation. It was founded on
the principles of friend-
ship, advancement ol
scholarship, social better-
ment, promoting pa-
triotism, maintaining so-
cial lies alter graduation
and mosl of all the close
interpersonal lies created
by brotherhood.
Nu Clu Colony of
vlpha Sigma Phi, the
newest ol 102 chapters,
was lounded last year.
Nu Chi is presently
working towards char-
tering m October. We
idler the chance lor men
who wish to lead rather
than lollow to establish a
Iraiernily with new and
lresh ideals.
We presently have no
house but are working
towards the purchase ol
one. We presently reside
mainly in Scott dorm and
an) one wishing to get in
touch can contact Jay
Morris at 758-0742 or
come bv 102B Scott.
Alpha Sigma Phi
Rush Schedule
Mon. � Beer Blast
Tues. � Beer Blast
Wed. � Beer Blast
KAPPA ALPHA ORDER
In September of 1958,
East Carolina's first fra-
ternity was founded.
These same southern
ideals and traditions that
then made Kappa Alpha
the school's most out-
standing fraternity can
still be found today.
Once a KA, you are a
KA for life and the ties
and relationships made
between KA's are the
strongest to be found
anywhere. The tightness
and strength of our
brotherhood is exem-
plified by our success in
everything we do.
During 1978-1979,
Kappa Alpha again dom-
inated intramural athle-
tics and greek activities.
We at ECU would not
trade our experiences
wilh Kappa Alpha for
anything, we would like
to tell you why during
Rush.
Kappa Alpha Order
500 East lllh Street
758-8957, 758-8999
. .Sunday Night: We will,
be in the dorms talking
lo potential rushees.
Monday Night: (8:30
until () Open house at
the home of "The
Southern Gentleman"
Tuesday Night: (8:30
until .) Open House at
The Home of the
Southern Gentleman"
Wednesday Night (8:30
until i) Open House at
The Home of the
Southern Gentleman"
Thursday: Pig Pickin'
(By lnvilalion Only)
SIGMA PHI EPSILON
Sigma Phi Epsilon
Fraternity was lounded
as a chapter on April 15,
1901. Since then, it has
grown from a relatively
small idea, into a grow-
ing brotherhood with
high ideals. The 3
cardinal principles: vir-
tue, diligence, and bro-
therly love have helped
Sigma Phi Epsilon rapid-
ly become the 2nd
larges.t Fraternity in the
nation.
The Fraternity house
is located across from the
Art Building on 5th
Street. Fund raisers, all
campus parties, and the
aspect of brotherhood
make it a fun and active
fraternity.
There are no stereo-
types in Sigma Phi
Epsilon. The fraternity
offers individuality, yet
functions as a unified
organization. So when
considering rush, con-
sider Sigma Phi Epsilon.
Mon. � Keg Party
Tues. � Keg Party
Wed. � Mixer
Thurs. � Formal Rush
Fri. � Formal Rush
BETA THETA PI
Beta Theta Pi was
assembled early last
school year by a group of
young men interested in
joining the other 115,000
men who have pledged
themselves lo "mutual
supporl and assistance,
absolute faith and con-
tidence in each other and
progress in knowledge
and scholarship
In the short time Beta
has been on the campus
ol Easl Carolina, it has
won honors and gained
the respect of the faculty
and students alike. This
year the Betas plan on
making new friends and
becoming involved in
ECU campus life more
than ever. Feel welcome
anytime at the new Beta
house at 603 East 9th St.
the brothers will be
more than happy to show
you around.
Monday: Meet the Bro-
thers with mixed bev-
erage, starting at 8:00
Tuesday: Cookout start-
ing at 0:00 ending at
8:30. Live band fol-
lowing cookout: Air-
play, with the best in
Beach, Top 40, disco,
& Funk
Wednesday: Porch Party
Open bar
Thursday: Formal Rush,
Hors D'oeuvres served
Friday: Formal Rush
6:00 � 9:00
Pool Party starting at
9:00 till with mixed
beverages
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA
Lambda Chi Alpha,
one of the oldest and
proudest fraternities at
East Carolina, is located
at the closest thing to a
fraternity row in Green-
ville.
Our brotherhood,
bound together by a
ritual unsurpassed, is
strong and maintains a
true uniqueness, col-
lectively and individually.
A. one of the top
and
vents), petals and par
ues campus activities
audent govern-
lany v
,n ,nlramurals Lambda
Ch, Alpha Field Day a
Kail Race (co-greek
such as, sl-
ment and various honor
Iraternities.
The fraternity ol hon-
est friendship invites you
to stop by and see us,
Lambda Chi Alpha.
Lambda Chi Alpha
Rush Schedule
Mon. - Beer Bash
Tues. - Revolving Room
Party
Wed. � Cook-Out
OTSWOHLU
announces
ECU NIGHT
every Wed. 6:30-10:00
featuring
JWSL
mams
Ah students admitted for $1.00
(includes skate rental) when
presenting ECU I.D.
104 Red Banks Rd.
Behind Shoney's
756-6000
Htmsrs
1890
Seafood
Tuesday Night
Specials
The Marines Are Coming! trout $2.95
Platoon
Leaders
Class
Officers
Candidate
Class
PERCH $2.95
all you can eat
No take-outs please.
Meal Includes:
French Fries, Cole slaw,
HnthpnppUt.
Air Ground Law
THE PLATOON LEADERS CLASS PROGRAM (PLC) OFFERS A COMMISSION AS A 2ND
LIEUTENANT IN THE U. S. MARINE CORPS AFTER GRADDATION FROM COLLEGE.
FRESHMEN THROUGH GRADUATES INCLUDING LAW STUDENTS ARE ELIGIBLE TO JOIN.
HERE ARE A FEW OF THE PROGRAM FEATURES AVAILABLE TO MEN WHO CAN QUALITY:
i 1. No on campus requirements (Sunnier Training - Good Salary).
2. Aviation, Ground and Law options available.
3. $100.00 a month during school year.
4. Challenging career with competitive salary and benefits sfter
college.
5. Option to drop from program up to graduation from college.
MAJOR COOK FLORENCE WILL BE AT THE BOOK STORE THE 18TH, 19TH AND 20TH OF
SEPTEMBER 1979 TO INTERVIEW THOSE INTERESTED. " COME AS YOU ARE. NO
RESUME REQUIRED
FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION CALL MAJOR FLORENCE'S OFFICE COLLECT AT
755-4174.
We are proud to
announce that we
have added
one of the
AREAS FINEST
SALAD BARS
for your
dining pleasure.
OPEN FOR LUNCH
Dally
(except Sat.) 1130 � 2:30
HOURS
MON�THURS
Stee � tetse
FRI. ft SAT
steexetse
V
i





The East Carolin
&Dorts
1 �
mm.
Tuesday, 18 September 1979 page 7
Greenville, N C
Blue Devils stun Pirates, 28-14
Defense key-
to second loss
The East Carolina football team has problems.
There is no denying that after Saturday's 28-14 loss to
Duke, their second straight loss. U these problems are
not corrected soon furthur such embarassments can be
expected.
On Saturday, the defense was constantly
outsmarted by quarterback Stanley Driskell and the
Duke offense.
Meanshile, the Pirate offense fumbled twice while
preparing to score, deep in Duke territory. The offense
also fumbled once deep in their own territory and gave
Driskell and the Devil offense the ball on the ECU
three-yard line. The result was a Blue Devil
touchdown.
These three mistakes were certainly important
factors in Duke's win. Driskell and his teammates
played a great game, but not too great to be beaten.
I he Pirates could have easily won the game had
these iumbles not occurred.
But all the "credit" for the loss does not belong to
the offense. The East Carolina defense definitely did
its part in aiding the Duke victory.
There is a big difference in ;Tthe defense of this
season and that of a year ago. Laslt season the defense
ranked second nationally in total defense. A mere 12
touchdowns were allowed in the 11 regular season
games. So far this season, 10 touchdowns have been
scored against the Pirates in only three games.
There is no longer a "swarm" defense. Last season
there was constant gang tackling, especially on plays
lhai ran wide. This season has been a story of missed
assignments and lack of positioning.
"We're just not getting around the ball said
Pirate defensive tackle Noah Clark. "We're not being
aggressive
"We're not completing our assignments at all
-aid Pirate coach Pat Dye. "Right now this is the
poorest coached defensive team that East Carolina has
ever had.
"We missed these same assignments last week at
State (a 34-20 loss) and made some changes in practice
last week. Heck, we've probably got them so damned
conlused now that they don't know what to do
Can the Pirates come back and be ready for this
Saturday's game with Wake Forest, a team that beat
SEC power Georgia 22-21 last week? Yes, only if a
lugetherness is developed.
Tin confident in all my teammates said Clark.
"We've just got to find one another. This has got to be
our turning point. We'll just have to make it a whole
new season.
Dve was worried about his team following the Duke
loss. "We don't have anything right now that to me
would make a great football team or even a good one.
Ther is just no oneness. Some people seem to be
playing as individuals.
Maybe this adversity will bring us together Dye
continued. "I've seen it happen in the past. I just hate
to see it come this way
Better that way than never. The Pirates simply
must recover for the Wake Forest game if they are to
salvage the 1979 season, a season that began with
ultra-high hopes.
A loss at Wake would put the rirates at 1-3 on the
season and 0-3 against Big Four-ACC com
petition. The pressure is definitely on the Pirates.
Pal Dye and company have always picked
themselves up in the past after facing adversity.
History simply must repeat itself.
A
Green looks for receiver
(I'lioto by John Grugan)
Collins gathered 133 yards
Phuto by John Grogan)
Wilson cited for inspiration
Duke offense marches
past surprized Pirates
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
DURHAM �The Wallace Wade
Stadium scoreboard messenger read
"The Red Era Has Begun" after Duke
had shocked favored East Carolina
28-14 Saturday in Blue Devil coach Red
Wilson's debut as a major college
coach.
Excitement had been building in
Durham and all around the state ever
since Wilson was named head man,
replacing Mike McGhee, soon after last
season. Wilson had promised an
exciting Duke teamiJ a team that
would play a wide-open game. Duke
lans welcomed this news and waited
anxiously for the opener with the
Inghl)-favored Pirates.
Wilson's promise of a wide-open
ollc-iise was certainly carried, through
as the Blue Devils threw a pass on
their very first play from scrimmage.
Duke even threw once late in the game
when the) were protecting a 14-point
lead.
The man of the day for Duke, even
surpassing Wilson, was quarterback
blanlev Driskell. A senior from Atlanta,
Ga Driskell came off the bench
replacing ineffective starter Craig
Browning just after the start of the
second quarter with the Devils trailing
0-0.
Whal Driskell would do to the
Pirates was evident on the first play he
was in the game. All Driskell did on
this play was roll left for nine yards,
lliat run started an 80-yard touchdown
drive that ended on a Keith Crenshaw
dive tur a score.
Driskell went on to rush lor 119
ards on just 13 carries, score two
touchdowns, and throw lor yet another.
Alter the contest a dejected East
Carolina head coach Pat Dye said, "I
don't think there is any doubt who
Duke s quarterback is
1 he game's first score came late in
ihe lirsl quarter on a 26 yard jaunt by
East Carolina halfback Anthony Collins.
Collins run capped a 44-yard Pirate
drive. Bill Lamm's extra point attempt
missed and the first quarter ended with
the Pirates ahead 6-0.
East Carolina blew an excellent
opportunity to score early in the first
quarter when bad exchange between
quarterback Leander Green and
halfback Mike Hawkins resulted in a
tumble at the Duke 16. This was the
first in a series of fumbles that sealed
the Pirates' doom against the Blue
Devils.
.wiolher ol these crucial mistakes
came near the end oi the second half.
Green had driven the Pirates deep into
Duke territory. The ball was on the
Blue Devil 20. Fullback Theodore
Sullon then bulled his way up the
middle of the Duke defense for 13
yards to the 7-yard line. It was then
that Anthony Collins got the call and
advanced to the one before he fumbled
the football into the end zone.
The ball was recovered by Duke's
George Gavvdun, turning what ap-
peared to be a sure Pirate touchdown
into a stalled drive.
Driskell and the Duke offense then
w i
Sam Harrell
mail lied 80 s ards in sev
loucluhw ii. 1 In- �c ��
u a usuaI play.
i He Pirate one w il h -�
A A dele use was
would try to run ;In ha
lht- was nol the case,
two backs "V it i lie t
and I lire quick!v rig
li'Ui f i edci irk. an LCI
cud � me. Scott McK
gav v Duke a . �
to Hie h
I lie T,
mi isii I ami moved �
iluu ii l itlil. ouc-var�J run i I
a louehdow u capped a
iiai ixMj&iatciJ " i'� plays. Grt'i
Mnitd a livo-ooinl i ��i v itmi i fofovt
I in- touchdown.
I Ins proved
Ot I tin '1 . , w hiel
game lied a.
Duke
quarter, eoni
the Lhird. v si.
and an ex I j ,
Duke a 21-1 I lead.
l)u the ensuing -
trouble handling thi
unable to make
1 iraU's pool
-f V I'll .
Leaudci Gum
i H g in i.�� i ake o i thi
ui icn-e w lieu
attempting to option
r. . Marling made the rei
Pirate three.
Driskell scored on the
pla. McKinney - kuk put tin Pi
don ii Jo-1 1 and lei I them in u
iiicv i uuhl uever gel
viler the game Dve had
il his lean) - pert rmai
very, very disappoint ii
De said. Kiglii in
poorest coached lootbj
sivelv lliat East Carolii
had. '
Olletisively, the Pirates i
ball well, gaming a total ol J33 d
compared to Duke s 369.
Collins finished ihe game wilh
vaids on 10 carried and led all rushe
in a
Driskell, Frederick pace Duke win
By JIMMY DUPREE
Assistant Sports Editor
i
"The decision to start Craig (Browning�-quarter-
back) was made Wednesday or Thursday said Duke
star Stanley Driskell. "I really had no feelings one way
or another.
"I just tried to keep my mind toned to the game
Toned to the game indeed.
Driskell, the senior who came in to relieve the
frustrated sophomore Browning, picked up nine yards
on an option keeper on his first play from scrimmage,
selling the scene that was to be repeated for the
remainder of the contest as the slippery speedster
thwarted all efforts of the East Carolina defense to
silence the Blue Devils running game. .
Eight plays and 68 yards lafer, DristoeH handed off
to running back Keith Crenshaw, who bolted the
remaining three yards to the Pirates' end zone.
As if to tell new head coach Red Wilson who the
starting quarterback should have been, Driskell
repealed ihe feat on the DevUs' next possession,
inarching the ball to the ECU oije yard line with 30
seconds remaining in the half.
Calling timeout, Wilson sent in the play that would
surprise the crowd of 33,800 gathered at Wallace
Wade Stadium.
Expecting a running play, the ECU defense
charged hard, but Driskell bootlegged right and flipped
a TD pass to wide receiver Ron Frederick, standing
unattended in the end zone.
"We run that (bootleg) a lot said Driskell.
"When the play came in from the sidelines, I was
really enthused about it. That was a miss-direction
play. Thay sent the corners in and Ron was wide
open
Frederick, a transfer student from East Carolina
playing his first game in the Duke blue, admitted after
the game that the play was not as simple as it may
have seemed.
The play called for the quarterback to bootleg out
and I ran a 10-yard out pattern Frederick stated.
"We gambled that they would blitz and fortunately for
us, the did.
"There was nobody standing near me. A lot of
limes you do something wrong; you tense up or lose
concentration. Tonight, everything went all right. That
play gives the quarterback the option of running wide
il the cornerbacks don't blitz or if they do, one of the
receivers has got to be open.
"It's a play you can't slop on the goal line
Frederick expressed relief that his first
confrontation with his former teammates was a
successful venture, bul he also admitted the pressure
was greater than he had anticipated.
"People kept trying to make hard feelings out of
my transfer here to Duke he said. "I really just like
the school belter and the offense we run is better for a
person playing my position.
"After the game I went over and talked with Rocky
Butler and some of the other East Carolina players.
Coach (Henry) Trevathan was really nice to me when I
was there and 1 was glad to see him.
"1 was really nervous last night and this morning,
bul as soon as 1 got to the stadium, 1 forgot all about
il.
"East Carolina has a great team, but today we
were belter Frederick added.
See DRISKELL, page 8
Stanley Driskell
.






Page 8 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 18 September 1979
Michi
remain
By
HEKSCH N1SSENS0N
AP Sports Writer
V hat's wrong with
tins statement? The Big
Ten seems to have a Big
Two again in Ohio State
and Michigan State.
Ordinarily, it would
be Ohio Slate and
Michigan, but Ohio State
and Michigan State are
Uno ot the league's three
unbeaten teams � In-
diana is the other �
I olio wing Saturday's
nun-conference upsets of
I if th-ranked Purdue (31-
21 b UCLA) and sixth-
rated Michigan (12-10 by
No. 9 Notre Dame).
The only other loser
among The Associated
Press fop Twenty was
No. 12 Georgia, shocked
by unheralded Wake
Forest 22-21.
"There's not a great
team in college football
Michigan Coach Bo
Sehembechler said after
his Wolverines were
knocked off by the
Fighting Irish on field
goals of 40, 44, 29 and 39
yards by Chuck Male.
Southern California
has been touted as a
super team, but Coach
John Robinson wasn't
having any ot that even
though the top-rated
Trojans clobbered Ore-
gon Slate 42-5 without
I he services ol All-
American tailback Charles
While and star tackle
Anthony Munoz.
"We're nol No. 1
Robinson said. "We're
just struggling to get
through. Our kids, if you
notice, don't hold up
their lingers for No. 1.
We don't want that
label
Alabama probably
wouldn't mind having it
but ihe second-ranked
Crimson Tide was idle
over the weekend. So
Driskell
cont. from page 7
was fourth-ranked Texas,
while No. 3 Oklahoma
sputtered to a 21-6
triumph over lowly Iowa.
Rounding out the Top
Ten, seventh-ranked
Penn Stale crushed
Rutgers 45-10, No. 8
Nebraska downed Utah
State 35-14, and No. 10
Michigan Stale whipped
Oregon 41-17.
In the Second Ten, it
was No. 11 Missouri over
Illinois 14-6, No. 13
Houston over Florida
11-10, No. 14 Washing-
ton over Utah 41-7, No.
15 Ohio Stale over
Minnesota 21-7, No. 16
Pitt over Kansas 24-0,
No. 17 Arkansas over
Colorado State 36-3, No.
18 Florida State over
Arizona Stale 31-3, No.
19 NX. State over
irguiia 31-17, and No.
20 Southern Methodist
over Texas Christian
Rick Bashorc was the
architect of UCLA's up-
set ot Purdue. The senior
quarterback threw touch-
Both Frederick and Driskell noled that the Duke
umK receivers were surprised to find themselves open
,�� several occasions in the Pirate secondary.
�The) were wide open all day said Driskell. 1
,ul couldn't always gel ihe ball to them
Dn.kell himself rushed for 121 yards on 13 carries
eluding iwu fourth quart r touchdowns ol six and
, dree yards. . , �
AW fell that we could run against ECU il we could
, our pla)a oil before they were set in their
Vhc Blue Devil defensive unit, as both standouts
stated, held strong despite doubtful forecasts.
�The wishbone is nol a very easy otfense to defend
against, said Driskell. They weren't physically sound
ami iliai made a big difference.
We didn't waul their offense to have the ball; and
� lhe) did, we wanted them to have to move 80 or 90
vards against our defense. They block very well, but
mil hue held up very well, also.
Out attitude is more positive than last season,
Un,U4l uttered. "Coach Wilson has all the players
iii'licviiig in themselves.
Frederick, �d�� hud live receiplioiw including his
(ucl.d.mii grab, attributed the Duke upset to the new
, u ol Duke loolball.
IVui.l used in think ol Duke as slow,
complained Frederick. "But we're as fast as ECU.
"Charles Bowser (6T, 215) runs the 40 yards in 4.5
,(lll(, and he's a defensive end. If that's not team
, .ecd, iheii 1 don't know what is
' I uc Blue Devils now lake lo the road on a tour
� ,treul. including a matchup with the Univers.ty
1 Virginia, who narrowly missed a come-from-behind
uo.M over VC. Stale Saturday-
down passes of 13 yards
to Michael Brant and 23
yards to Willie Curran
and scored on a couple of
1-yard runs. Freeman
McNeil didn't score but
he rushed for 176 yards
and sel up UCLA's first
touchdown with a 51-yard
dash on the game's first
play.
The game was played
in extreme heal � the
temperatures at game
lime was 93 degrees �
and ihe worst Los
Angeles smog in 25
vears, which caused red
eyes and headaches
among ihe crowd.
Sehembechler had a
couple ol headaches �
Michigan's offense,
vv Inch managed only a
touchdown and a Held
goal against Noire Dame,
and the kicking game,
which set up Male's
game-winning Held goal
with a short puni and
then had a field goal
attempt blocked with one
second remaining.
Paul McDonald com-
pleted eight of nine
THE
passes for 108 yards,
including scoring strikes
ot 10 and 23 yards to
Kevin Williams, and then
sat out the second half of
Southern Cal's rout of
Oregon Slate. The Tro-
jans also got two short
touchdown runs apiece
from Marcus Allen and
Mike Harper.
Billy Sims, the 1978
Heisman Trophy winner,
recorded his 10th con-
secutive 100-yard game,
rushing tor 106 yards on
23 carries, but Oklahoma
needed his touchdown
runs ol 1 and 3 yards to
turn back stubborn Iowa.
5fflfflfflfflWtffflffffi
Sports
Writers
Needed
Call
757-6309
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$Lr 1 CENTER
PART OF YOUR
GAME PLAN!
te�i
iOT
I t I I SHU I'YOt (.1 I IHIN
,NIS1A I HA! WAY'
' l Al I TODAY � MIcWIi
lose 17to25pounds x(cFNTFR
IN JUST 6 WEEKS!
ITS FAST �n SA��nSB�XI�NSM
I
In the Sept. 13 issue of
lhe East Carolinian there
appeared an advertisement
for Kroger's that contained
an incorrect price. Stroh's
beer was advertised at
$1.39 per 6 pack of 12 oz.
cans. The correct price is
$1.69.
OISCOUITHI1
n
, DRUG, GEN.
STORES
Prices Effective
Tues Sept. 18
Sun Sept. 23,1979
OFF MANUFACTURE �$
SUOOHTEO UTAH
COSMETIC
DEPARTMENT
Stocked with � oomptat exaction ot
national brand, and nationally aduortleed
pioducts to assure you. our shopper that
you are getting trie beat brands at tow eat
possible prices
' Almey
, Bern Be � Mew Ce.(Eii�l
. Charles et the Rttt � Uwe fra�a�at
,Cety � U�Q-i ���
i Deieshy Gray
ALL AT KftOQBR SAV-ON
NONE SOLD
DEALERS
OPEN 7 AM TO MIDNIGHT
MON
THRU
SAT
OPEN SUNDAY
9AWT09PW
600 Greenville BlvdGreenville
Phone 756-7031





Id September 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 9
Foot-washing (middle ground)
is part of a revival meeting in a
tent near Knoxville, Tennessee
with guest lecturer:
Rev. Kenneth Hammond
MEKDENHAIX
STUDEOT CENTER
SEPT, 18,1979
ef AUDITORIUM 24
8:00 p.m
ART EXHIBITION COMMITTEE
Sam Harrell pushes for yardage
Photo by John Grogan)
Lady Pirate volleyball team
opens season with N.C. State
B JIMMY DUPREE
Assistant Sports Editor
Following a successful
29-13 campaign in 1978,
the Easl Carolina Uni-
versith women's volley-
ball squad opens their
home slate tonight with a
7 p.m. matchup with
North Carolina State
University.
The lady Pirates have
held tour pre-season
scrimmages, including
Louisburg and Chowan.
Though none oi the
teams equal the compe-
tition thev will lace in
regular season plav, coach
Ahla D-llon admits "1
I'd I prettv good about our
shovs mg thus tar.
Those teams are
prettv weak compared to
Stale and Carolina and
other teams ve will face,
fundamentally sound than
we did at the same time
last year
Setter La Vonda Duncan
and spiker Ginny Rogers
return as the nucleus of
the Lady Pirate's hopes
ol a slate championship.
The pair oi seniors were
recently elected co-capt-
ains by iheir teammates.
Also returning lor
their final year of eligi-
bility are Linda McClelland
and Jo Forbes.
Forbes "continues to
give good defensive play,
ami her hitting has
improved over last year,
also states Dillon.
Sophomores Yvette
Lewis and Lorella Holden
also return, providing
depth and experience
sorelv missul last season.
"We've got some that
an- hitlers and some thai
greal deal on defense
Dillon offered.
Newcomers to the
Lad) Pirates include
transfer Sharon Perry
from Louisburg junior
college and freshmen
Stacv Weilze,GailGorham,
and Milzi Davis.
"Slate returns as the
defending state cham-
pions said Dillon. "They
have a large nucleus of
thai team returns.
"We always seemed
lo win the first game of
our matches with them
last ear and then lose
the next two and the
match
"We've had break-
downs on ol tense and
defense, but 1 think we
benefilled to see what
areas will work in a game
situation.
N.C. Slate is unde-
lealed thus lar, having
beaten Appalachian Stale
University, Guilford St.
Auguslincs and Elon
College.
Last Carolina Univer-
sity students are admitted
free wiih their ECU
identification card and
registration card.
DKT RUSH
Tuesday: Mixer-beer blast
Wednesday: Smoker
"A Legend for All Time
409 Elizabeth St.
Rides 752-4379 Rides
99
bul we looked more will be contributing a
Munson at fault
in fatal crash
NEW YORK (AP)-
Ihurman Munson was
directlv al lautt lor the
jet crash in which he
died last August, accord-
ing to a report by a
lederal investigator.
Edward J. McAvoy of
the .National Transpor-
tation Safely Board,
heads the team investi-
gating the vug. 2 crash
al Akrou-Canlon Airport
that killed the Yankee
catcher and injured pas-
sengers David Hall and
Jerrv Anderson.
He told the New York
Tunes ol his findings,
and m its Monday
editions, the Times re-
ported that McAvoy said
he would issue his report
to the board "in about
two weeks The report,
the paper said, would
show improper use ol
throttles and flight con-
trols" by Munson and
that those failings by the
.vll-Slar ballplayer were
the probable cause ol the
crash of the $1.4 million
Cessna Citation.
The jet crashed and
burned 870 feel short of
the airport runwav.
McAvo) noted that:
� Munson made a
lun approach lo the 0,100
tool ruiivva) and failed lo
make proper adjustments
despite the presence ol
ruuvva) �pe indicator
lights tor guidance.
� Munson let ihe
jet's airspeed drop to
11.5 miles below a sale
speed.
� He didn't lower the
jet's landing gear, even
though reminded to do
3� bv Hall, and didn't
compensate with enough
power lo overcome the
drag.
� Munson apparently
wasn't familiar with or
had temporarily forgotten
how to recover from a
tow approach.
�The jel was ap-
proaching ihe airport
without using its flaps,
which add hll lo a plane.
IQDESSIB
INVITES YOU TO A
TECHNICS STEREO SALE
by panasonie
smi�
Reg Price �200
NOW
9159.95
Turntable
Ouartz Phase-locked Stereo tuner
Direct Drive Model ST-8044
Semi-Automatic Turntable FM - AM Stereo Tuner
Reg. price 80� "Active Servo Lock
NOW 9164.95
- - Q Q � �&
utilus
THE
FITNESS
CLUB
for men one women
w$
Come by or call
TODAY and set
up an appointmentl
for a free workout.
�����
Stereo Integrated Amplifier
Model SU-8077 SL-1401 Turntable
60 watts per channel Professional Quarts Phase - locked
High Speed Fluorescent Power meters � - -
I00t IVAMt �T.�"ir
amcNviuuc. �.c trass
Reduced Student Rates
Features Included:
Male a Female Instructor
Nautllua Machlnea � - � ��
sophis.ic.ea exercise machine, made).
�OLYMPIC BARBELLS
�r.OED HOURS 'FEMALE HOURS
AND DUMBELLS � SAUNA
�SHOWERS, AND LOCKERS
�WHIRLPOOL'DIET PLANS
�COLOR TV AND LOUNGE
AT NAUTILIS FITNESS IS
OUR SPECIALITY
756-9584
DC Power Amp-OS THD
Reg. price 0 45�
NOW �337.50
Store Hoars
MonFrl.
8:30-8:30
Sat. 8:8�-l:3�
IQDSESc!i?r&
107 Trade StGreenvillc
PAIR EEECTROKICS BUILPHVG next door to TAR
Direct Drive Semi'
Automatic Turntable
Double Isolated Bass
for Feedback
Reg. Price 830
NOW
�250.00





'
arbook
traits
ill be
aKulla

Sept. 24-
Oct. 20
Where:
Call the Buc
office for an
appointment:
757-6501
c Yea'tx
rboc Associates M.iiers Fails Massachusetts





18 September 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 11
Sports shorts
Almost Anything Goes announced
By RICK GLIARMIS
Staff Writer
ALMOST
ANYTHING GOES
Don't be shy! It is
your chance to "let your
hair down" and have
some old fashioned, good
time, silly, fun! I'm
talking about the ECU
Almost Anything Goes,
to be held Oct. 3, on
College Hill.
In order to enter
exciting events such as
silly centipede, human
slingshot, the wacky
relay, and others, you
must get a team ot" three
males and three females.
Sign up in the Intramural
Office in Memorial Gym
b Monday, Oct. 1.
FLAG FOOTBALL
Flag Football has
begun. A large turnout of
Hi teams signed up to
participate in the sport
lIns ear, 70 of which are
men's learns and 17,
women's teams.
For scores of last
weeks1 games, see the
bottom of the article.
HORSESHOES
Horseshoe singles
etitr) dates are Sept.
17-27. Sign up in the
Intramural Office. Play
begin? Oct. 1.
ARCHERY
Archery entry dates
are Sept. 14 through Oct.
4. Play will begin on Oct.
9.
GOLF
Golf season begins
Sept. 25 with a tourna-
ment which will be held
at the Ayden Country
Club. Teams will consiste
of five players. Four of
the scores will be ave-
raged to determine the
overall score for the
team.
If you haven't tried
team gold, now is the
time. Registration dead-
line is Sept. 20.
SOCCER
Soccer entry dates are
Oct. 1-11. Play will begin
on Oct. 16. A captain's
meeting will be held on
Oct. 15 at 7 p.m. in
Brevvsler B-102.
CO-REC SOFTBALL
A captain's meeting
lor Co-Rec Softball will
be held on Sept. 17 at 7
p.m. The meeting will be
held in Brewster B-102.
Pla begins Sept. 18.
ONE-ON-ONE
BASKETBALL
The entry deadline for
THE DELI
KITCHEN
Home -cooked meals at
reasonable prices
open 7a.m. to 7:30p.m.
AFTER 5:00P.M. SPECIAL
$2.75 meal includes meat,
2 vegetables,biscuit or corn
bread, and iced tea
Eat in or Take out located on cornei
I of Dickinson and Raleigh Av.
752-5339
One-on-One basketball is
Sept. 20. Play begins
Sept 24.
CROSS-CAMPUS RUN
Entry dates for cross
campus run are Oct. 1
through Oct. 12. This
event will include a two
and a half mile run and a
five mile run.
FENCING AND
SKIING CLUBS
All persons interested
in fencing and skiing
clubs should contact Dr.
W. Edwards at 757-6387
for information.
FLAG FOOTBALL
SCORES
Independent Men "A"
Adidas
Dough Boys 44, ROTC
Minulemen 6; Jones
Jocks 16, Undecided 30;
Village Green Meanies
27, Ripple Raiders 6.
brooks
Sadaharu Oh's 36, AP
.11 Americans 30; Bronx
Zoo 12, Star Trekkers 0;
Jocks 16, Warriers II 14.
Bronx Zoo 22, AP
All-Americans 6; Sada-
haru Oh's 32, Star
Trekkers 0; Jocks 28,
Zodiacs 0.
Converse
Animals 28, Renegades
12; Lightning Flash 36,
The Swarm 8; Phi
Epsilon Kappa 20, Team
X 12.
- L

Pony
Aycock Gladiators 30,
Scott Sudden Death 22;
Belk Running Rogues 24,
Scott Challengers 14;
Scott Scotlsmen 20,
Jones One-Hits 14.
Residence
Halls Men
Residence
A
Halls Men
Keds
Aycock Top of the Roost
7, Jones Jets FL; Scott
Stooges 34, Belk Second
Story Stud Farm 12;
Scott Scrubs 25, Jones
Left Wingers 19.
Mew Balance
Aycock Aerials 20, Scott
Banshees 8; Belk Bandits
18, Scott AnyThings 14;
Belk's Captains of Crush
26, Jones Buccaneers 22.
Mike
.veock
Desolation An-
gels 32, Jones Raiders 8;
Scott Second Rale Studs
31, Belk Too-Buzzed 6;
Jones Orioles 30, Scott
Towels 28.
Puma
Jones Hall Steelers 22,
Aycock Third Regime'nt
20; Belk Wizards 14,
Scott Nasty and Despi-
cable 12; Aycock Bomb-
ers 24, Scott Seahawks 6;
Scott Third Rate Studs
18, Aycock Sidewinders
14; Aycock Third Regi-
ment 44, Scott Nasty and
Despicable 38; Belk Wiz-
ards 40, Jones Hall
Steelers 14.
Fraternity
Hercules
Lambda Chi Alpha 54,
lpha Sigma Phi 8;
Sigma Tau Gamma 42,
Kappa Alpha "B" 0;
Kappa Sigma "A" 28,
lau Kappa Epsilon 20.
Zeus
Phi Kappa Tau 30, Delta
Sigma Phi 0; Kappa
Alpha "A" 42, SigmaNu
14; Sigma Phi Epsilon
16, Kappa Sigma "B" 8.
Residence Hall IIndepen
dent Women
Riddell
Counlr) Club Bummers
12, Garretl Dorn 0; IBAC
58, ECU BBLs 6; Tyler
Hearlbreakers 37, Flem-
ing Hall 0.
ABORTIONS UP TO 12TH
WEEK OF PREGNANCY
$175.00 "all inclusive"
pregnancy test, birth control and
problem pregnancy coir.seiing. For
further information call o32-053� (toil-
free number 800-221-2568) between
9A.M5 PM weekdays
Raleigh Women's Health
Organization
917 West Morgan St.
Raleigh, N.C. 27603
CklTAlM
Times
110 E. 4th St.
A
M
jUaJl f$fea
Uw. 201 By Pass
' 730-2072
Sigma Phi Epsilon
FRATERNITY
US. f� KEGS &QQ
" IglIl�I'l�� IHWlO ����n !�
VeetfPUNCH
1
Suit by
(Stanley Blacker
Blazer and skirt
powder blue tweed.
Moire" taffeta blouse.
Use our layaway plan
for something
different this fail!
CMTAIN
THIMCS
(across street from fhe Attic)
�John Simon,
New York Mag.
'Cousin Cousine is a marvelous film. It
will elate you and make you feel
exuberant with happiness and joy
�Gene Shalit, WNBC-TV
"Cousin Cousine' is the most happy
healthy sensuality I have seen on fjlm
"One of those rare
delights you'll want
to see again and
again and again!
� Judith Crist,
Saturday Review
"Cousin
Cousine is
fetchingly
loony and
great fun
�Janet Maslin,
Newsweek
'Frankly,
movie
made me feel more romantic
and wholesomely sexy than any
movie I've seen in years. Enjoy,

enjoy, Cousin Cousine
�Liz Smith, Cosmopolitan
"A delicious
adult comedy about
love and unchained
sensuality
�Bruce Williamson,
Playboy Magazine
'A frank, direct,
fyfcaly comfc,thorougMy
healthy approach
to love

�Vincent Canby,
New York Times
Wed night
at 7 In the
Hendrix
Theatre
pins
MADAME ROSA
at 9 p.m.
Sponsored by the Student Union Flints Committee
V
PIRATE
SPECIAL
rjp
iSi
Hv
6oz. Narenated
Teriyaki Steak
� Baked Potato
� Free Salad Bar
� Free Soft Drink SiH
� Free Jell� or Pudding
Offer valid seven days a
week-Lunch and Dinner to
COLLEGE STUDENTS
Show your College I.D.
to ordertaker to tfet the Special
CALL 756-008
to reserve Banqnet Room for Groups
I. Greenville Blvd.
(�64 Bypass). Greenville





The Kast Carolinian
Features
Tuesday, 18 September 1979 peg 12
Greenville, N C
Peter Tosh
Mystic Man is scary
By PAT MINGES
Features Writer
Peter Tosh is, without a doubt, the most dynamic
force in Reggae music today and the most refreshing
artist to hit the popular scene in many years.
He has just released a new album, Mystic Man,
and it establishes Peter Tosh as a first class musician
and one of the most potent lyricists recording today
His music, lyrics and production eclipse even Bob
Marlev in his finest hour. . . ,
Tosh, a highly moralistic and religious individual, is
one of the true prophets of the recording industry for
hi, lyrics strike out against injustice and gaze into the
crystal ball to catch a glimpse at the future. He has
transcended the commercial world of the recording
Indus' to produce an album of truly mys,tical qualrty
This reallv is a scary album, for Jah speaks
through the mind of Peter Tosh. As Tosh states in the
title cut:
"Cause I am a man ot the past
And I am living in the present
And I am walking in the future.
The roots of Reggae go all the way back to Africa
but the immediate source can be traced to the
influence of post-war rhythm and blues which managed
o reacManfaica from the U.S. This blend of American
oui music and Jamaican rhythm resulted in;a sound
known a, "ska and was performed by arasts like
Bvron Lee and Prince Buster.
' In 1966, the music had become more relaxed and
ye. more electric and complex. The emphasis shifted
from horns to more intense rhythm dominance, and the
lyrics began to call attention to social conditions there
were simultaneous influences; the religious revolution-
ary creed of Rastafarianism began to win a fashionable
cult following, while the rude boys - the Outlaws -
of Jamaica's shanty towns began to move into the
studios, celebrating their own chosen lifestyle. This
ultimately led to a rougher and heavier style, which
paed the way for Rock Steady.
R.vST.vS
The Rastas are extremely religious individuals, and
their god is the same as Christianity's, except he goes
by the name of "Jah The Rastafarians are no less
devoted to their god than a Christian brother. The
parallel- between the two are amazing, and yet they
are diametrically opposed to each others ideal.
The first song to reach acclaim in the U.S. was
Desmond Dekker's "The Israelites in 1969. This
song was followed by Johnny Nash's "Stir It Up' , and
the first "skinhead" to release a Reggae cut was
"Mother and Child Reunion by Paul Simon.
The first time Reggae was brought to a rock
audience was on Eric Clapton's 461 Ocean Boulevard,
with Bob Marley's "I Shot the Sheriff. Bob Marley
rocketed to fame shortly after this, with Peter Tosh
leaving the Wailers just before the release of Marley's
finest album, Natty Dread. Marley's fame has
continued to climb, but Reggae has not really received
the acclaim it deserves.
Peter Tosh released several albums but did not
receive popular notice until last year's Bush Doctor.
The album was recorded on Rolling Stone's Records
and produced by the Glimmer Twins, featuring Keith
Richards and Mick Jagger on several cuts. From Bush
Doctor came Tosh's first U.S. single, "You've Got to
Keep On Walking which received much FM airplay.
Peter appeared on "Saturday Night Live" with Mick
Jagger and performed his single, the itle cut, from his
album. Bush Doctor was a commeicial and critical
success, but Mystic Man should be received by a much
wider audience.
STATUS
Mystic Man is an album of momental status, for it
is the most powerful combination of Reggae, revolution
and Rastafarianism ever released. The music is the
most complex and multifaceted Reggae that has been
recorded, featuring a plethora of musicians and session
men This is a significant distinction from Marley s
music, for only on Burnm and Natty Dread does
Marley approach the "wall of sound" that Tosh
weaves. It is more than just primitive, rhythm-
propelled sound. Tosh's music is composed and
arranged better than most popular music today.
Tosh's lyrics sail far above most of his
contemporaries, capturing the idiosyncrases and
chaotic conditions that exist in our world today. 1 he
biting edge of his Rastafarian beliefs may offend those
unacquainted with Reggae, but they picture the hunger
and strife of the Third World. The pursuit of the
Rastas is the eventual overthrow of the white world,
and the distribution of its immense wealth throughout
the hungry nations of the world.
Mystic Man is an album of almost supernatural
quality, and the power of Tosh's lyrics foretell an
ominous future. m
Tosh learned from the Glimmer Twin s production
techniques, and Mystic Man delivers the same punch
of Bush Doctor. He arranged and produced Mystic
Man with the aid of his group, Word, Sound, and
Power. Mystic Man is the finest recorded and
produced Reggae album that has been released, a
tribute to Tosh's stature.
seeMYSTlCM.u,pagel2
Auditions
being held
ECU Art Exhibit
well attended
The East Carolina
Playhouse will hold audi-
tions on Wednesday night,
Sept. 19, for Ntozake
Shange's spellbinding
choreopoem, For Colored
Girls Who Have Consid-
ered SuicideWhen The
Rainbow Is Enuf.
A fluidly staged col-
lection of vivid narrative
pieces, some in prose
and some in free verse,
performed by seven young
black women, For Col-
ored Girls .is almost
exclusively concerned
with the cavalier and
sometimes downright bru-
tal treatment accorded
women by their men.
Capturing the inner feel-
ings of today's black
women, the play pro-
ceeds further to achieve
a kind of universality.
It is a triumphant
event, filled with humor,
joyous and alive, affirma-
tive in the face of
despair. Tragic and fun-
ny, proud and compas-
Girlsis pure theatre.
Edgar R. Loessin,
Chairman of ECU's De-
partment of Drama and
Speech, will direct. A
sisting Mr. Loessin
staging the produeiid
will be Mr. Alfred
Gallman, Guest Lecturer
in Dance at ECU.
Auditions will be held
from 7:30 until 10:00 on
Wednesday, September
19, in Room 214 of the
Drama Building on the
ECU Campus.
In addition to the
seven speaking roles,
dancers and musicians �
especially guitar and
drums � are needed.
Auditions are open to
ECU students, faculty
and stall, and to mem-
bers of the Greenville
community at large. Au-
ditionees are urged to
read the script, on
reserve at ECU's Joyner
Library, prior to au-
ditions.

By WILLIAM JONES
Features Editor
The Wanderers is a
story of coming ol age.
On the edge of the
crevasse which separated
the greasers from the
hippies, an Italian high
school gang called The
Wanderers is approach-
ing the leap from the
nest. Still very much
caught up in adolescent
pranks like "elbow-
litiin (copping a feel
from a female passerby),
the members ol the
gang are more and more
frequently faced with the
inevitable fact of adult-
hood.
While on a elbow -
liltin' spree, Richie (Ken
Wahl) is told to 'grow-
up' by Nina (Karen
Allen). Richie listens (not
intending to follow the
advice), because Nina is
attractive, but the point
begins to drive home.
The most remarkable
aspect of The Wanderers
is director-writer Philip
Kaufman's method of
dealing with teenage
fears and fantasies
through symbolic inci-
dents. At a Wanderer's
party, Richie and Joey
(John Friedrich) go up-
stairs with Despie Gal-
asso (Toni Kalem), Rich-
ie's steady and Nina (the
new friend acquired via
elbow-litlin') for some
privacy. They wind up in
a game oi strip poker
where their mounting
appetites are brought to
a premature and by
Despie's realization that
Richie has design on
Nina. This is soon over-
shadowed by the more
dangerous threat of an
attack by a rival gang the
Fordham Baldies.
The Baldies are the
baddest' of the gangs.
So called because of their
shaved heads which seem
little more than, as Joey
called them, dicks
with ears They are
led by a 6'6" 425 lb.
behemoth called Terror
(Erland van Lidth de
Jeude). Terror dwarfs his
girlfriend, Peewee (Linda
Schooner goes merchant
By JULES LOH
AP Special Correspondent
THOMASTON, Maine
( P)Ned Ackerman has
launched his schooner
and it is as lovely as his
dream.
Its wooden hull is
white, trimmed in lip-
stick red. It rides in the
water as gracefully as a
swan. Its carved figure-
head is that of a fox,
grinning, a chicken fea-
ther lingering on its lips.
As soon as its top-
mast is raised and its
rigging rigged, we shall
find out whether Ned
Ackerman is as crazy as
some think or is crazy
like his figurehead -
crazy like a fox.
"We really won't
know until I've operated
the boat for a couple of
years he said. ' But
the way the business is
coming in 1 believe 1
could operate a whole
fleet of them
Ned Ackerman, mer-
chant adventurer, has bet
his all on a belief that
the world of commerce is
now ready to revive the
age of sail.
The boat he has built
is a coasting schooner, a
cargo vessel out of the
last century. In 1876 the
Owl's Head lighthouse
keeper counted 16,000 of
them entering this har-
bor. All gone.
Now there is one, the
"John F. Leavitt
Ackerman aims to fill its
big belly with trade
goods - it will hold as
much as five trailer
trucks - and thumb his
nose at the fuel shortage
and go with the wind,
the free wind.
"I've already heard
from a man in Massa-
chusetts who wants to
ship lumber to Haiti and
a man in South Carolina
who wants straw goods
and tanned leather from
Haiti. That's one trip.
"I've been contacted
about shipping spruce
from Maine to The
Netherlands, logs to Bre-
men, Germany, wool
blankets to South Ameri-
ca, salt fish to Brazil.
"Somebody even
wants me to sail up the
Amazon to get Andean
cedar. I have no desire to
push this boat 2,000
miles up a river, though,
so I'll pass that one
Ned Ackerman, 37,
insists he is a practical
businessman, not a ro-
mantic, though he did
follow a dream; a dream
inspired by a man, a
book and a bowl oC fish
house punch.
Manz), who appears to
be all of twelve years
old. Terror represents
the invulnerable citadel
behind which Peewee can
find protection, while
Peewee is Terror's free,
squirely alter ego.
The most frightening
of all aspects of growing
up may be that of being
overwhelmed by the mys-
terious, unfamiliar world
which one is about to
enter. Kaufman stages
this aspect through the
nightmarish appearances
of the Ducky Boys.
Kaufman deliberately
leaves the Ducky boys
uninlroduced. They are a
mystery even to the
gangs. The Ducky Boys
are short Irish boys and
men who seem more a
breed of sub-humans
than a gang. Being
small, they fight only in
large numbers. When
Turkey (Alan Rosenburg)
accidentally wanders
drunk into Ducky Boy
turf, he invites a Ducky
to go 'to the park' with
him.
The Ducky, grinning,
slashes him across the
face with a switchblade.
Then dozens of Ducky
Boys chase the hysteri-
cally screaming youth up
the steel ladder of an
underpass. Turkey loses
his grip and falls to his
By WILLIAM JONES
Features Editor
The ancient woman's
eves stare ironi a vacuum
of loneliness and despair.
Though she gazes out-
ward, her eves mirror an
inner hollow emptyness
ol great lo
The pencil drawing is
tilled, The Widow. Drawn
Rav L. Elmore, The
J
U tduw is one ot many
arresting works of art
now on display at the
ECL Faculty Art Show.
A well attended re-
ception lor the art show
was held Thursday, Sept.
1J.
Ihe show features a
wide variety of media
and style. This Toaster Is
Shut Tontu, is exactly
what the pun implies �
a toaster shot lull ol
holes, with a miniature
cowboy hat attached to
the pedestal beneath by
a door hook. Norman
Teller takes credit for
this piece of humor.
Wes Crawley's pencil
drawings, Conversation
with a Student, reveal an
extraordinary amount of
sensitivity and patience.
(Not being an artist, I
was amazed at the
accuracy of Crawley's
blind sketch in particu-
lar.) Crawley's cast stone
sculpture, Jeff, displayed
the same sensitivity nec-
essary to capture the
innocence of the child
subject m Student.
George Danhires' Two
Nudes, an oil on canvas,
contrasts flesh tones with
I he rich velvet verdure of
a pillowy couch. Dan-
hires' use of light makes
his paintings seem photo-
graphically realistic.
Offering something
tor every taste (no matter
how sirange), the Faculty
vrt Show will be on
display through Oct. 3, in
ihe W.B. Gray Gallery.


Coming

attractions?



Williams
Herman

Mike Williams will
(perform on Sun Sept.
W23, at 8 p.m. The concert
will be held on the
�University Mall. Rain
location is Hendrix The-
atre, Mendenhall Student
Center.
Revival
�r Tonight, the Art Ex-
lubilion Committee pre-
Tsents Rev. Kenneth
Hammond. Rev. Ham-
mond will lecture on
aspects of the revival
experience. The lecture
is in conjunction with the
Smithsonian Traveling
"Exhibit REVIVAL! now
�Con display upstairs in
Mendenhall.


The 1979-1980 Artist'J
jries presents its tulC
Herman k
guest, Woody
and his orchestra. on�
Sept. 26, in right
Auditorium. Tickets ma
be purchased at the
Central Ticket Office in�
Mendenhall. Substantial
savings may be gainedL-
by purchasing season J
tickets.

Cotton t
Gene Cotton will dp-yC
pear in concert at nght
Auditorium Tues Sept.
25 al 8 p.m. Tickets areC
$1.50 for students, $3.00
for the public.
Education and experience
Co-ep places students in jobs
By RICHARD GREEN
Managing Editor
SeeWANDERERS,pagel4
I think experience
counts more than school.
But the twenty-year-
eld, business education
major from New Bern is
taking advantage of both
education and experience.
Linda Hale just left
for Washington, D.C
where she will work as a
special assistant to Pa-
tricia Harris, the secre-
tary of Health, Education
and Welfare.
This is the second job
Ihal Linda has secured
through the Federal Co-
op Program at ECU.
Co-op places students
in various jobs with the
federal government and
private businesses a-
round the country.
Last summer Linda
worked as a secretary for
Congressman Walter B.
Jones in Washington.
"He's not what I
expected a congressman
lo be. 1 guess I just
expected I hem to be cold
people. But he was so
nice according to Hale.
She said that he
would do thoughtful
things, like bringing a
seafood casserole to the
girls in the office. "I felt
so relaxed around him
she said.
And her paychecks
had a soothing effect,
loo. She was drawing a
salary of $10,507 a year
as a GS-5 federal em-
ployee.
Students in the fed-
eral program work for
iwo nonconsecutive se-
mesters with government
agencies such as NASA
and HEW and receive GS
ratings without taking
the PACE test.
Co-op students also
enjoy the benefits of non-
competitive job place-
ment upon graduation.
Today, that means more
lo students than a
diploma.
About her job with
HEW, Linda said that
she will probably be
working in educational
planning or as a secre-
tary. She hopes to move
up to federal pay scale to
a GS-7.
How does a girl from
xNew Bern, N.C like
living in Washington,
D.C.?
"The people are used
to living at such a fast
pace. I don't like that
part of it' And she can't
help feeling a little
homesick.
"The thing I miss
most is the yards.
Nobody has yards, and I
like to see flowers and
green grass
The soft-spoken honor
student is pursuing a
teaching degree, but she
has no tuture plans lor a
leaching career. She
wants to be a lawyer tor
the government.
When asked where
she will go to law school,
she replied laughingly.
"I hale Carolina, but I'll
probably go there
Linda has combined
her educational exper-
ience with on-the-job
training to obtain a
bright and secure future.
But she cautions that
anyone interested in the
Co-op program should
inquire before they be-
come a senior.
The junior year is the
last year that most
employers want to take
students in the program.
"That's what's so bad �
people find out about
(Co-op) too late
LCARNtfe A60UT CollCG fW Mfrp jjgj
ti Pawp Atomus
SO, feY CLONING, WINv
IpCNTICALCOflO CN
6C MAP Of TH�
oatGiNAicaipoMofc?
i Eve. fGQ uscp
OrOIX hi A





Nantucket
catches on
By RAY STURZA
Features Writer
Born out of a situation peculiar to the Midatlantic
Coast region, Nantucket was founded almost a decade
ago when Jacksonville (North Carolina, not Florida)
locals Larry and Mike Uzzell teamed up with Tommy
Redd and the late Ronnie Harris to form what came to
be one of the most popular 'beach and show' bands in
Eastern North Carolina, the 'Stax of Gold
Beach music was (and still is) the title affixed to a
hybrid brand of rhythm and blues or soul music that
gained a following during the early '60's along the
Atlantic Coast, primarily between Virginia Beach,
Virginia and Myrtle Beach, South Carolina.
However, as the times changed, so did the musical
interests of the fellows in the 'Stax of Gold That
name eventually gave way to 'Nantucket Sleighride a
reference to the Leslie WestMountain L.P. of the
same name. The name choice was designed to signal
an end to the beach music routine and usher in more
contemporary rock and roll.
v With the addition of Mark Downing on guitar,
Eddie Blair on sax and keyboards, and Kenny Soule on
drums, Nantucket (the Sleighride' just withered
away) began touring the nightclub circuit throughout
the Southeast. A 'Nantucket' appearance insured a
packed house at the Attic in Greenville and became an
annual event during the Azalea Festival in Wrightsville
Beach.
Their popularity continued to grow with the release
last year of their longawaited album on Epic Records,
antucket. The influence of the earlier days of 'beach'
music punctuated the material on that L.P
characterized by strong vocals laced with jazzy
interludes coupled in contract to Tommy Redd's rude
rhythm guitar and Dowftig's sharp solo work.
Nantucket had managed to fuse their soul music roots
with the urgency and drive of'rock and roll.
Their music defied definition except to those who
went through the same musical transition with them.
Around Eastern North Carolina the people knew what
it was; it was party music. Judging from the success of
the tirst album, one of the best selling debuts on the
Epic label, people all over the country are catching on
to Nantucket Band.
The production team has been changed on their
second album, Your Face or Mine? released earlier
this spring. To the surprise of many, some Nantucket
favorites left off the first L.P. ('Rescue 'Rooster') fail
to appear on the new album as well.
Eight of the nine tunes on the 'Your Face or
Mine?' release are relatively new numbers not heard
before by local audiences when the band was still on
the nightclub circuit. The only 'old' song showing up is
Is It Wrong to Rock and Roll?
Two tunes on the new effort seem to be receiving a
lot of local attention: 'Devil's Way' (often coupled with
Ts It Wrong on local FM stations) and 'I Live for
Your Love The tempo has been stepped up a bit, and
the production is a bit cleaner. The focus of the
material is the same, love, sex, and rock and roll.
18 September 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 13
Scheduled to appear later this month in Raleigh
with fellow Epic artists Mothers Finest, Nantucket
appears to be following their earlier trend of hooking
up with major tours whenever possible to promote
their album sales. They have appeared as the opening
act for Kiss earlier this year at several sites.
Now receiving airplay on flagship progressive
format stations like KWEST in California and W4 in
Detroit, Nantucket appears to be on the right track
toward establishing themselves as a major attraction
and erasing many ill founded stereotypes about North
Carolina and the South in general along the way.
"Red Cross
canbea
life saver
Crab Bowl no bowl of soup
By LARRY POPELKA
Horses were meant to
race. They've got sleek
bodies that move grace-
lully around a track.
They're lame and easy to
handle. And watching
them run is something a
person can relate to.
The Kentucky Derby
is our country's number
one race for good reason:
Horses do it.
But a few weeks ago
someone told me about a
race in Maryland that
was more important in
lhat state than the
Preakness, the Belmont
or the Kentucky Derby.
What could that
be?" I asked. "What's
left alter the Triple
Crown? The Boston Mar-
athon
"No she said. "The
National Hard Crab Der-
by
Crabs? Eight-legged
crustaceans? With claws?
In a race?
"Yeah she said,
"They race in the Crab
Bowl. It's a stadium we
built lor them in Cris-
lield
Labor Day weekend
she invited me to this
Crab Bowl in Crislield,
Md to see what is billed
as "the Kentucky Derby
ul crab races
Crabs from Florida,
Massachusetts and Ha-
waii were on hand vying
lor the title ot the
country's fastest crab.
And some 20,000 people
showed up lor a weekend
ot races in this Crab
Bowl.
m1. I didn't quite
understand, so I asked
the Crislield mayor,
Charles McClenahan,
what the point ot it all
was.
"The) have races for
horses, dogs and cars.
W liv not a race lor
crabs?" he said. "Crabs
are just about the only
itiuig here
"Indeed they are.
Crabbing is the towns
only major industry. The
high school football team
is called the Crisfield
Crabbers. Every year the
town has a Miss Crus-
tacean Beauty Pageant
for local girls. ("Could
you see it if they called
her Miss Crab?") And
judging from the road-
side restaurants, a typi-
cal meal in Crislield con-
sists of crabs and Pabst
Blue Ribbon.
One day 32 years ago,
when even ne got tired
of eating crabs and
having beauty pageants,
the citizens of this
Chesapeake Bayside town
of 3,078 decided to start
racing them against each
other.
McClenahan's father,
who was then the
assistant editor of the
"Crisfield Times the
town newspaper, got a
bunch of crabs from a
local fisherman, drew a
big circle in the center of
Main Street and dumped
all the crabs in the
middle to see which one
See CRABS, page 15
ATTIC
N.C. No. 3 1 Nightclub
1 ues.
wed.
i llUls.
rn. & bat.
Bruce Frye
Diamond Dog
Razz Ma Jazz
Choice
campus division
SOCIETY FOR THE
ADVANCEMENT
OF MANAGEMENT
First meeting of the year!
ALL interested persons
urged to attend
LEARN FROM THE OUTSIDE
BUSINESS WORLD
WED. 4:00 RAWL 108

Ijfitchell s Hair Styling
�Pitt PImi Shoppv.g Cr�i'�
XCrfcnv.llf North Croima 37&J4
Our Stylists Are
Available
at NO Charge
to Groups for
Lectures, Demonstrations
and Consultations.
For More Information Call: 756-2950
PITT PLAZA
GREENVILLE
I
Located on corner 3rd and Jarvis St.
Check These Meat Buys, We're No. 1 the Home of Greenville's Best Meats. Thanks to You, Overton's has the largest meat department ln
Eastern North Carolina and we are second to none. Tell your friends about us, they may not know what they are missing.
Grade "A" Whole Fryers 39 lb.
Fresh First Cut Pork Chops89�lb.
Fresh Sliced 7-9 Chops
14 Pork Loins $1.49lb.
Gwaltney Franks 12oz. pg 99
Overtone Finest Carolina Beauty Rubbing Alcohol
Ground Beef 3lb. pkg or more $1.59lb. 16oz bottle Reg Price
Rath Bacon 120Z. pkg 89 7oz tube Reg price $1.53 Our price 3 $1.00
Rath Sausage pound pkg 59 Maalox Antacid 1202 bottle
Morrell Pride Reg price $2.60 Our price $1.88
Full Cut Round Steak $1.89lb. Lux Soap bath size bar Reg price 37 Our price 25
Compare our prices . Our prices are lower than ever before.
Everyday low prices on over 500 items, Greenville's lowest meat prices,
and clip the coupon specials. Low.low prices, friendly personnel,
land super faat service that's the Overton's way. Check us out,
Bounty Towels 48
I GIA.NT KOIX i
I with lliis coupon and $7.50 or more food order
Dawn Liquid Detergent quart bottle 98
White House Apple Sauce 303 can 3$i oo
Scope Mouthwash Reg Price $1.98 Our Price $1.38 j ���� specials, without coupon 68 g
Crest Toothpaste 7oz tube Reg Price $1.58
Our Price $1 -08
ccilb.
m
difference
��
Town Talk Ice Cream half gallon carton 98
Royal Guest Sliced Peaches 58
Kraft Macaroni & Cheese Dinner 7oz. pkg 28
id-Lives or Purina Cat Food 6 oz. can
TM Bkfl 4$1.00 All Flavors
14oz. pKQ
Morton' Frozen Glazed Donuts 2$1.00
quart Jar
Duke's Mayonnaise 98
ie South Pie Crusts 4 pkgs1 $1.00
pkg of two
luncan Hines Deluxe11 Yellow Cake Mix
Listerine Mouthwash and gargle
24oz bottle Reg price $2.79 Our price $1.78
Lipton Tea Bags 100 ct box $1.78
Golden Bananas 4lb, $1.00
Green Mountain Cabbage 8lbs $1.00
White Potatoes 10 lb bag 78
Limit one coupon per customer, Expires September I
PLEASE HAVE COUmUPreVTm
White Cloud 68'
t-roll pkg.
with iln coupon and ST.50 or more food order
I excluding advertised specials. Without coupon 88
I cents.
Limit one coupon per customer. Expires September 22.
please haVe Coupons clipped separately.
c
Coca- Cola 88
I
I
10 oz. carton oi 8 -
with this coupon plus deposit and $7.50 or more food
order excluding advertised specials. Without coupon
I
di.08 plus deposit.
Limit one coupon per customer. Expires September 22.
PLEASE HAVE COUPONS CLIPPED SEPARATELY.
AJax 88
LvUNDRY DETERGENT, GIANT BOX
I
I
! with this coupon and $7.50 or more food order
I excluding advertised specials. Without coupon $1.08.
I
t i �ii ���� ����.
Limit one coupon per customer. Expires September 22
PLEASE HAVE COUPONS CUPPED SEPARATELY.
PIRATE SPECIAL
5 ECU
Dlcount Coupon
-3
1.
Prlcea effective Wedneaday- Saturday Quantity rlghta reserved. VISA and Master Charge
Home of Greenville's Best Meats. 211 Jarvis Street, 2 Blocks from ECU, Phone: 752-5025

U






Page 14 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 18 September 1979
Mystic Man
Word, Sound, and Power is a very talented
collection of musicians. Mikey "Mao" Chung could be
the member who contributes most significantly to
Tosh's unique Reggae sound. His prominent
synthesizer and horn arrangements are the keynotes to
Peter's composition.
The rhythm section propels Reggae and the Word,
Sound, and Power rhythm section. It is composed of
Robbie Shakespeare on bass and Sly Dunbar on drums
and percussion. Robbie Lynn plays the organ and
piano, and Ed Walsh makes a significant contribution
on Oberheim synthesizer. At least a dozen other
musicians fill in on horns, percussion or the
particularly melodic backing vocals.
The highlight of Mystic Man is Tosh's magnificent
use of lyrics to profess the beliefs of his Rastafarian
Creed. The Rastas seek the eventual unification of all
black brothers in the Third World. When the
technologically dependent world of the industrialized
nations collapse because of the abuses of nature, the
Third World will endure because of their relative
independence on material goods. If it becomes
necessary, the brothers of the world may take to armed
insurrection to cast out "de vampires
The title cut of Mystic Man is a celebration of the
purity of the Rastafarian lifestyle. "Recruiting
Soldiers" is about recruiting individuals to fight
against the forces of Satan. The third cut, "Can't You
See features an exciting guitar, more in the vein of
Peter's last album, for it is a lover's plea for fidelity.
"Jah Seh No" is an inspiring song for its lyrics
decry the injustices committed by Babylon (the
industrialized world is Babylon). Two verses represent
the total concept behind the song and give evidence to
Tosh's lyrical genius:
"Buck-ln-Hamm Palace" begins side two and is
Peter's first attempt to bring Reggae to the disco. It
would be the ultimate paradox should this cut become
a hit, for its malice is disguised in the very symbol of
Babylon. It speaks of the burning of "spliff" in the
very halls of Buckingham Palace and the House of
Congress.
"The Day the Dollar Die" and "Crystal Ball" both
are premonitions of the day when the U.S. ultimately
falls. In the former, the once mighty dollar looked at
what he was worth, had a heart attack and died, and
the world became a better place. In "Crystal Ball
Peter sees the demise of our capitalistic society:
I see people picketing, prices rising,
Gas shortening, and the dollar devaluing
In the city, inna you shitty.
I see deur churches lock down
And schools close down
Politicians promising cause
Teachers striking
In the city, inna you shitty
continued from page 12
I see youths rising
Blood running
Fire burning
God crying
Ina the city, ina the city
It is shitty
"Crystal Ball" is a magnificent song, and its
prophecy may be imminent unless there is an
awareness of the abuses we inflict upon our existence
Kumours ot War' is the tinal song of Mystic Man
and may be the most symbolic of the theme of the
album. Across the waters, and in our own
neighborhood, pots are boiling in the heat of injustice,
threatening to boil over in revolution. All that is
needed is to check the water and spread around a little
of our vast accumulation of spices.
Revival lecturer
to speak tonight
Illumina, the Art Ex-
hibition Committee of the
East Carolina Univer-
sity Student Union, is
responsible for providing
the campus and com-
munity with visual arts
experiences.
This year's premiere
show is a Smithsonian
Traveling exhibit, RE-
VIVAL an exhibition of
photographs, artifacts,
and recorded sound deal-
ing with revivals.
As a part of this
show, Reverend Kenneth
Hammond of Cedar Grove
Baptist Church will pre-
sent a lecture on the
sociological, psycholo-
gical, and religious as-
pects ol the revival ex-
perience.
The lecture is open to
ihe community, and we
hope you and your
members will be able to
attend. The program is
on September 18, 1979 at
8:00 p.m. in Auditorium
244 ol Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center. A reception
is to follow.
Must righteous live in pain
And always look to shame
Jah seh no, Jah seh no
Must they be found guilty
And always get the blame
Jah seh no, Father seh no,
He's gonna tear down the walls
of down-pression.
Drive away transgression
Clean up the corruption
Rule equality
1 will not stay poor and live in poverty
Jah seh no, my Father say no
Him gonna come clean up corruption
Drive away transgression
Tear down Babylon
Set the captives free
"Fight On" is a further description of the African
brothers' struggle to thrust off the hands of
transgressors and colcludes side one.
Wanderers
continued from page 12
death. The Ducky Boys
each ceremoniously touch
his body with the sticks
lhey carry.
Hie Film version of
The Kanderers differs
markedly from Richard
Price's superbly written
novel on which the
movie was based. Char-
acters and situations are
drastically modified. The
film, while different, is
nearly as successful as
the book in communica-
ting the vicissitudes of
coining of age.
classified
pgrsonci(j)
B vBVSlTTER: Faculty
member needs mature
reliable babysitter for 5
year old tor some eve-
nings during the week,
weekends and occasional
business trips. Must
have own transportation.
Call 752-0578 after 5
p.m.
LUbf: Girl's double
strand serpentine chain
bracelet at ECU and
Western Carolina football
game. Please return
because of strong senti-
mental value. Reward
ottered. Call Millie,
58-0209.
CAR POOL: Rocky
Mount commuters lets
ride together. Leave
Kocky Mount 7 a.m.
return 3:30 p.m. MWF.
Contact Jenkins in math
department.
DANCE CLASSES: Sun-
shine Studios�beginning
Sept. 19. Classes in
ballet, jazz, yoga, disco
and Arabic (belly dance).
Call 758-0736 or 756-
7235.
IVPING: Fast, accurate
typist at reasonable rates.
Call alter 5 p.m. 752-
2721.
tor pert (g)
FEMALE ROOMMATE:
wanted to share 2-story,
2-bedroom apartment
very close to campus.
Preferably a senior or
graduate student. $185
month rent phis utilities.
Call Maureen at 752-
7635.
FEMALE ROOMMATE:
Wanted ECU student to
share furnished 2-bed-
room apartment at East-
brook. $150 month plus
2 ol utilities. Call
752-8077.
M.vLE ROOMMATE:
Needed to share 2-bed-
rooin apartment at Tar
River. Immediately. Call
Mark or Mike at 752-
2013.
FEMALE ROOMMATE:
Wanted to share 2
bedroom apt in Tar River
Estates. $69 per mo. plus
'3 utilities. Call 752-0392
FEMALE ROOMMATE:
wanted to share 2
bedroom trailer. $75 plus
'2 utilities. Call after 2
p.m. 758-0312.
FOR SALE: 1970 VW
Square back, green.
03,500 mi. Good condi-
tion, gas and tires.
Overhauled 5,000 mi.
ago. $1000. Call Debbie
at 758-6531.
FOR SALE: 1973 Mus-
tang Mach 1, excellentI
condition. Good gas
mileage. Sporty green
color. A bargain atj
$1900. Call 758-9322.
FOR SALE: 2 acoustic
guitars. Conn 6-string,
like new. $150 wcase.
Ventura 12-string, like
new $150 wcase. Call
752-3426.
FOR SALE: 1978 Ford
Courier, 5 speed, 30
mpg, AMFMCBtape,
camper lop, new cond.
Call 7560895.
FOR SALE: 14 carat
diamond ring. $400. Call
758-3124.
V
3
ACADEMY AWARD WINNER
"A luminous performance and a film to cherish!
ts story is universal, and whether you're from Sacramentt
Sioux City or Staten Island you'll be moved by a film
with an inner glow of truth and hope
-Gene Shalit, NBC-TV
"It is a genuine pleasure to see a film about real people
told with so much artistry and sensitivity
�Rex Reed, Syndicated Columnist
"No one who admires
art can let Signoret's
altogether brilliant
essay on
perfection
slip by
�Charles Champlin,
Los Angeles Times
�n
� v
m
�.
Miss Signoret has her
best role in years!
A very good,
very firm
movie.
Directed
beautifully
�Vincent Canby,
New York Times
Simone Signoret
MADAME ROSA
AFIIJdYMOSHEMIZRAfflwithSa
Wed. night at 9 p.m. in Hendrix Theatre
pins COUSIN COIJSIWE at 7 p.m.
Sponsored by the Student Union Films Committee

V







Early classes: A necessary evil
18 September 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 15
fo-
Wl SUSAN FERNALD
Features Writer
Getting to an eight
o'clock class on time
appears to be an un-
reachable goal of most
students.
It would seem to the
layman that making it to
class on time is a
relatively simple task.
But let's face it, except
for those rare few who
at dawn, jog, do
calisthentics and eat two
eggs over easy with
bacon, Wheaties and a
glass of Florida orange
juice, eight in the
morning is just too
earlv.

of course the com-
mon response to this
plea for mercy would be
that we students are a
lazy race. This is not
rise
true,
crazy
we re
about
just not
mornings.
Crabs
continued from page 12
would crawl to the
outside first. A crab he
had named Scobie won.
That was the first
Crab Derby.
Today the folks of
Crislield are still racing
their crabs. But the rules
have changed a bit.
Instead ol racing across
Main Street the crabs
race down a 16-foot
plywood ramp. All the
races arc held in the
Crab Bowl, a 1,200-seat
835.000 stadium that was
built seven ears ago for
the races.
And now every year
on Labor Day weekend
anyone can pay $3 to
enter a crab down and
have it race for the
coveted Derby Cup. More
than 200 enter each year
with crabs named every-
thing from Hopewell
Hope to Dirty Butt.
I he race became such
an attraction that 20
years ago a second race
� lor governors of the
50 states � was also
added. It started when
Maryland Gov. J. Millard
Tawes, a Crisfield native
and crab fanatic, chal-
lenged the governors of
the other 49 states to
enter crabs from their
slates in a race against
his Maryland entry.
Twenty-two governors
had entries this year to
try to win the famed
Governor's Cup, but only
three brought their own
crabs. The rest entered
crabs caught in Maryland
and supplied by crab
derby officials.
Hawaii � one of the
few slates to bring its
own � Hies in a huge
Stone Crab (nearly three
times the size of the
other crabs) in a private
plane lo the Crab Bowl
each year. The huge
beasl is a perennial
favorite, though it has
won only twice.
"Last year during the
race, the Hawaiian crab
tried lo eal the Vermont
crab said Jerry Nicho-
las, an announcer for the
local radio station who
does a live play-by-play
of the Derby each year.
"Last year that thing
tore off part of the
Vermont crab's claw, so
they disqualified it.
Every year you think the
Hawaiian crab's going to
win it because it's so
damn big, but he always
gels sidetracked going
alter something to eat.
He eals the losers
Hawaii's crab, Holo-
Kiki, flew in as a big
lavorile again this year,
taking swipes at his
irainers as they marked
an entry number on his
back in shoe polish.
When the gun finally
sounded, and the crabs
look off down the track,
Holo-Kiki charged out to
an early lead. But about
halfway down the track
he began twisting side-
ways as if eyeing a piece
of meat.
Meanwhile a tiny
Blue Crab named Brown-
ie, entered by Maryland
officials to represent
Wyoming, crept into the
lead and stumbled across
the finish line in 22
seconds lo win.
It was a fast race, but
well off ihe record of four
seconds set by Diamond
Pete of Delaware in 1977.
Wyoming's win, how-
ever, caused much frus-
tration among the East-
ern Shore natives, since
Wyoming is not exactly
the crab capital of the
world.
Whoever thought hu-
man beings were func-
tionable enough to at-
tend a chaucer, account-
ing or philosophy course
at eight needs to be left
tied to a giant ant hill
until he comes to his
senses.
The student who ex-
periences the joy of
sleeping in and getting
to class reasonably com-
posed, without having to
wonder if he zipped his
fly, is a much better
listener and conversa-
tionalist in class.
Further, it can't be
too exhilarating an ex-
perience for professors
to be continually con-
fronted each morning
with puffing, sweating
students whose eyes are
buldging from climbing
six flights of stairs. And
Leather Belts
$6 to $19
Leather Handbags
$10 to $25
�Shoes Repaired To Look
Like New
Riggan Shoe Repair
& Leather Shop
111 WEST 4TH ST.
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE.
756-0204
Parking in Front
and Rear.
then the final indignity;
having the lazy slobs
doze off in the middle
of a lecture on Tolstoy
and Kant they so pains-
takingly prepared the
night before.
But, eight o'clock
classes are a necessary
evil that is here to stay.
So, be sure to get up
by at least five 'til, then
you will have plenty of
time to slip in the door
before an irate teacher,
who probably eats
W heaties, locks you out.
RESEARCH PAPERS
10,250 on File � All Academic Subjects
Send $1.00 for your up-to-date, 306-page mail order catalog
ACADEMIC RESEARCH
P.O. BOX 24873
LOS ANGELES, CA 90024
r
NAME
address
�city
I
ISTATE
I
ZIP
w
y o m i n g!
-an!
one man in disbelief.
"Have they ever seen a
crab in Wyoming?"
"1 don't know said
Hep. Ray Baker of South
Carolina, accepting the
trophy for Wyoming Gov.
Ed Herschlen. Tin sure
he'll be honored, though.
Who wouldn't be hon-
ored to win the Kentucky
Uerb) ot crab races?"
Maybe Secretariat.
�.
CLIFF'S
Seafood House and Oyster Bar
Washington Highway (N.C. 33 Ext.) Greenville. North Carotin
Phone 752 3172
AU YOU
$a.75 CAN EAT
MONDAY-THURSDAY
TROUT, FLOUNDER,
CRAB CAKES
TEA is included with meal
Looking for a part-time
job with flexible hours
and real business
experience? Northwest
Mutual Life Ins. Co.
ias openings for college
igents. Call before noon
ror appointments!
7SS-4080
m lm,Um H.
tr�-mil� 1. C.
WED. LADIES NITE DOUBLE HEADER
MIKE LIGHTENING WELLS
MITCH BOWEN
it's Miller time
H�gh l� BccfT
�Jr
!���
an
mm �
NAVY OFFICER. ��M,
YOU GET RESPONSIBILITY THE MOMENT
YOU GET THE STRIPES.
CUFF'S SUPER
SPECIAL
WEDNESDAY
CRAB CARE SPECIAL
2, Golden Fried Crab Cakes
French Fries, Slaw, and
Hnsltpnppies. �))0
AIA oC CAW EA1, SAIAD BAI1 wIth �"�1
A lot of big corporations offer you a big
title. But how many offer a young college
graduate a really important job?
As a Navy Officer, you don't have
to wait to do a job that counts. We give
you one as soon as you've earned your
commission. A job with responsibility for
the lives of others, and for millions of dollars
of complex equipment. A job that requires
skill and leadership.A job thatNavy Officers
have been doing proudly for 200 years.
If that's the kind of job you're looking
for, speak to a Navy recruiter. You'll find
that Navy Officers have unequalled
opportunities in fields like Nuclear Power,
Aviation, and Engineering.
Or call toll free 800-841-8000. (In Georgia,
toll free 800-342-5855.) Early responsibility.
It's what being a Navy Officer is all about.
B7 29
NAVY OPPORTUNITY
INFORMATION CENTER
P.O. Box 2000, Pelham Manor. NY. 10803
I D Send me information on Career Opportunities
in the Navy (0G).
? Call me at.
NAME
(Area Code)
First
i Print)
ADDRESS.
CITY
.STATE.
.ZIP.
DATE OF:
tUnivwrwty.
CN 99
Birth
tCoU�S Graduation
?GPA
NAVY OFFICERS GET RESPONSIBILITY FAST.





16 THE EAST r.AROl IN.AN 18 September 1979
U
INTER-FRATERNITY
COUNCIL
Would like to Thank
the following Merchants for
sponsoring Our KEG RALLY
last Sunday:
HALLOW DISTRIBUTING CO.
H.L. HODGES
ATTIC w
THREE STEERS RESTAURANT
OVERTON'S SUPERMARKET
BEST VALUE MOTOR LODGE
PANTANA BOB'S
FLOYD G. ROBINSON JEWELERS
APPLE RECORDS
FAST FARE
EGGS-N-24
PIPELINE
JEFFREY'S BEER & WINE CO.
SILK SCREENS
PLAZA GULF
CAROLINA OPRY HOUSE
JOHNSON'S ANTIQUES
CRAFTMENSHIP UNLIMITED
VARSITY BARBER &
HAIRSTYLING
KING AND & QUEEN
RESTAURANT
BEEF BARN
NICHOLS DEPT. STORE
McDonalds
happy place
elbo room
california concepts
chapter x
tree house
daily reflector
stereo village
pipedreams
JASONS
PIZZA INN
U.B.E.
CROWS NEST
LARRY'S C ARPETL AND
VILLA ROMA
JOLLY ROGER
SHIRLY'S CUT & STYLE
DOMINO'S PIZZA
TRAFFIC LIGHT
CHANELO'S ITALIAN FOODS
WESTERN SIZZLIN
PARKER'S BBQ
PEACHES
ARBOR RESTAURANT
PAIR ELECTRONICS
THANKS
ALPHA SIGMA PHI
BETA THETA PI
DELTA SIGMA PHI
KAPPA ALPHA
KAPPA SIGMA
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA
PHI KAPPA TAU
PI KAPPA PHI
SIGMA NU
SIGMA PHI EPSILON
SIGMA TAU GAMMA
TAU KAPPA EPSILON
RUSH ends Friday Sept- 2l91979





Title
The East Carolinian, September 18, 1979
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 18, 1979
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.07
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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