Fountainhead, October 24, 1978






Circulation 10,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, North Carolina
Vol. No. 55 N
24 October
1978
English Exit Exam
graded incorrectly
ByRICKIGLIARMIS
News Editor
The English Exit Exam, a test given to freshmen for the
past two years, turned into an extra work load for professors
and a mix-up for the Computer Center this year.
According to Dr. James Kirkland, the co-ordinator of
the exam, several exams were graded incorrectly by the
computer However, Kirkland said that the
mix-up cannot be blamed on either the English Department
or the Computer Center
The confusion seems to be a combination of both
sources said Kirklartd. Because of the time element
involved in giving the test and the tight schedule
experienced when trying to get the tests graded and handed
back to the students could be the cause of the mix-up,
explained Kirkland.
K irkland said that the tests are graded in enough time to
be distributed to the students before the drop period ends.
Because of thishaste.it is understandable how the mistakes
took place.
K irkland continued by saying that because of the large
number of tests to be graded, this put an extra burden on
the computer center. The mistake which was committed by
the computer center was that on a few tests the scanner
neglected to score some of the questions. Instead, the
computer added questions that did not exist.
According to Kirkland. the exam consisted of 100
questions. On some of the computer print out sheets, the
scanner had scored up to 120 questions. Because of this, the
students' exams which were on the borderline of passing or
failing, we rechecked by the professors in order to properly
scoretheexam This brought some students from a failing
score to a passing score.
K irkland quickly added that there was a possibility that
the fault was that of the English Department's. Kirkland
explained that there were four different exams given. All
tests were basically the same except for the order of the
questions. Because of this, four keys had to be used.
K irkland speculated that the keys may have been mixed
up with the wrong pile of exams, thus causing the confusion
and the incorrect grading. Although Kirkland said that all
piles were checKed to be sure that the correct keys were
filed with the correct tests, he consented that there still may
have been a shuffling because of the number of exams to be
graded
In an interview with Robert Bolonde, assistant director
of Computer Center, and Bill Little, operations manager,
both men said that there had been no complaint made about
the incorrect grading of the exams. Up to the point of the
interview, neither man had heard of the complaint.
� It is very possible that it was our mistake, but if it was,
they should have brought it back and let us correct it,
Bolonde said. "This is the first we've heard about this
mix-up. If in fact there is one, why haven't we been
contacted and informed of the error continued Bolonde.
In answer to the question, which was later asked of
Kirkland, he said that since there was so much confusion
and so many rumors "floating around" he was going to try
to find the error rather than to lay the blame on anybody.
Little, during the interview, said that it is easy to blame
a computer and that everyone did it. Little explained that if
there had been a mistake on the part of the computer, they
could have run the cards back through the scanner and
corrected the mistake in thirty minutes.
Bolonde explained that the Computer Center services
every department on campus and that there is no way to call
each department whenever they have a test graded on the
computer to see that the scanner is working properly.
"It is impossible that the computer made a mistake
concluded Bolonde. "Well, it's not impossible, it's highly
improbable though. Usually, computers just don't make
mistakes
The English Exit Exam has been given to freshmen at
ECU since the 1977-78 school year. Kirkland explained that
because of the national trend for some years of declining
S.A.T. scores and the fact that high school students were
not getting the attentiopn they needed in English, the test
was started.
Kirkland said that many students come to college
ill-prepared for composition and elementary skills such as
punctuation, and subject-verb agreement. Teachers at ECU
began complaining about this lack of knowledge, calling
attention to this serious problem, said Kirkland.
Of the approximately 2500 freshmen who took the exam,
percentages are being drawn up of those students who
passed and those who failed. Those students who did not
pass the exam will be tutored in English Lab. The students
are also allowed to stay in the English 1100 class if they
wish.
When asked how the exam will affect the students'
semester grades, Kirkland explained that the scores will
not be directly used towards their final grades unless a
student is on the border-line of a grade.
The English Exit Exam is a test containing the very
basic points of grammer, said Kirkland. Some of the
exercises included in the exam are punctuation,
subject-verb agreement, sentence structure, and a
proofreading exercise, which Kirkland said gave many
students a hard time.
"We're not trying to weed out the students in English
1100 and place them into the lab said Kirkland. "We're
just trying to call attention to the serious problems with
grammer and dispense with them so we can get on with
composition
Pablo Cruise to appear
in homecoming concert
By ED WILLIAMS
Staff Writer
The Student Union
Major Attractions Commit-
tee will present Pablo
Cruise in concert in M inges
Coliseum on Nov. 9, ac-
cording to Charles Sune,
chairperson of the com-
mittee.
The special guest ap-
pearing with Pablo Cruise
will be Livingston Taylor,
James Taylor's younger
brother.
The ticket prices will be
$5 for students and $7 for
the general public, he
commented.
"Hopefully next Mon.
(Oct. 30) tickets will go on
sale at the Mendenhall
Ticket Office from 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m Monday through
Friday Sune said.
Tickets will also be sold
at Apple Records, School
Kid's Records, and the
Music Shop in Greenville
Square Mall.
Sune said, "Only public
tickets will be sold at the
door
Sune listed some of the
conditions the Major At-
tractions Committee takes
into consideration when
trying to get a group to
appear here at ECU.
The first consideration
he mentioned was "if the
group is currently touring,
then if the group is touring
in our part of the country
According to Sune, ECU
will be the first place in the
state the Pablo Cruise will
appear.
Another condition the
committee takes into con-
sideration is that of how
much money the artist will
be payed for appearing,
according to Sune.
"The cost of talent has
gone up from last year he
said.
Sune said the Major
Attractions Committee
pays for everything in
presenting the concert from
"tee-shirt give-aways to
fliers that are passed out
He listed other expen-
ses as payment of the
ushers and technicians that
work as the show is being
presented.
Another expense is the
cost of advertising, which
includes radio and news-
paper advertising, posters,
and the printing of tickets.
Sune commented that
the Major Attractions
Committee "doesn't re-
ceive a student fund sub-
sidy" and that the com-
mittee operates totally on a
break-even proceedure.
Sune concluded that
with the amount of money
the committee has, "we
want to present the best
possible concerts for the
students
THE NANCY HAUSER DANCE Company will bo porformlngIn McOlnnlaAuditorium, WodnoodoyotBp.m.
THE ECU COMPUTER Center serves the needs of faculty and students alike
Committees reviewed
SGA discusses finances
ByMARCBARNES
Assistant News Editor
The 15,000 dollar ques-
tion came before the SGA
legislature in its meeting
Monday night. The ques-
tion, which involves the use
of $15,000 to be placed in
an escrow account for use
by student organizations
during the spring semester
of next year, has been
dominating business of the
Legislature for the last two
weeks.
Last week, the bill was
tabled, following a lengthly
debate on its merits.
This week, the legisla-
tors voted to vote on the
bill.
Debate on the proposed
measure centered on whe-
ther the Legislature should
vote to place the money in
escrow, or whether it
should use the funds for
appropriations now.
The debate was led by
Lynn Calder, who was for
the escrow fund, and Brett
Melvin, who was against it.
Calder introduced the bill
last week. Melvin, who is
the Chairman of the Ap-
propriations Committee ar-
gued that passage of the
measure would make his
committee's job more dif-
ficult.
A final motion to recon-
sider the bill before open
debate was marked by
confusion as to exactly what
the question was. Several
legislators � and the parli-
mentarian � asked Spea-
ker Libby Lefler to explain
the question.
After a preliminary
vote, Ms. Lefler used her
right as speaker to vote in
case of a tie, which resulted
when one legislator changed
from "yea" to "nay
Having voted to recon-
sider the question of the
expenditure, the debate
started anew, with many of
the same points used in the
previous debate to decide
whether or not to recon-
sider the motion.
Brett Melvin made a
motion to rescind the es-
crow account. Willy Betts
spoke out against the ex-
penditure, saying that the'
Legislature needed to ap-
propriate the funds now.
Members of the Appro-
priations Committee had
mixed reactions to the
escrow account controver-
sy. Some of the members of
the committee were for it
and some were against it.
The debate was finally
ended by Lynn Calder, who
called for previous ques-
tion. The voice was divided,
and the head count vote
showed that the escrow
account measure passed by
a slim margin.
COMMITTEES
In other areas of busi-
ness before th legislature,
several committee chair-
persons reported on their
activities during the last
week. Brett Melvin, who is
chairman of the Appro-
priations Committee, said
that the business of allo-
cating funds for campus
organizations was going
slow. Melvin added that the
main figure of exactly how
much money he had to
spend had been changed
several times.
A letter reportedly sent
to the committee which
stated that the Board of
Trustees had previously
allocated $6 per student for
transit purposes, which
would mean that the Transit
Division would receive ap-
proximately S60,000.
Melvin also pointed out
that the Treasurers report
last week gave one set
amount of money that the
SGA had to spend, and this
week the figure is different.
Melvin said that the
changes in the amounts,
and other problems had
slowed down the report
from the committee. He
added that the final report
would be made available to
the full legislature on Nov.
6.
The Rules and Judiciary
Committee announced the
approval of several consti-
tutions.
The Screenings and
Appointments Committee
said that there was an
opening in Jones Dorm-
itory, and scheduled a
meeting for Wednesday at
4.
The Student Welfare
Committee did not have a
report for the legislature.
FINANCES
SGA Treasurer Bernard
Smith reported on the
financial condition of the
Student Government.
Smith said that there is a
total of $72,472.66 on hand
at this time, and another
$70,112.50 is expected to
be received in student
activity fees at the be-
ginning of both the Spring
Semester and the first
session fo summer school.
According to the report,
this would add up to ap-
proximately $142,585.16.
$25,753.16 has already
been appropriated, and an
additional $449.11 has been
previously allocated, from
outstanding debts from
years past, as well as
emergency loan monies.
Funds restricted for
first session of summer
school will equal $7000.00.
The total amount of money
available for appropriations
equals approximately
$110,281.12.
ELECTIONS
David Cartwnght.
chariman oif the elections
committee commented that
the elections had gone
quite well, and there were
no complaints, for the first
time in years. Cartwright
commented that the voter
turnout was about 13.
He went on to say that
the low voter turnout was
probably due to the fact
that there was no chairman
for the election committee,
and he cited a lack of
controversies on campus as
another reason for the low
turnout.
STUDENT FEES
Stuart Walters voiced
opinion before the legi-
slators. He advocates rais-
ing student fees to increase
the amount of money avail-
able for legislators to use in
appropriating funds on a
priority basis to the groups
on campus that had been
here the longest
He added that he had
heard a rumor that stated a
student organization has
used SGA monies to allow
non-students to travel out-
side of N.C. free
SGA Treasurer Bernard
Smith asked Walters about
recently formed organiza-
tions which might be ex-
cluded from funding under
the plan Walter replied
that the clubs could receive
money, as long as it was
ava'labie
Walters went on to say
that the campus organi-
zations should generate
more of their own money
Brett MeWin cited the
national trend to cut taxes.
not to raise them
Walters said that in-
flation has cut the spending
power of the SGA
Melvin said that the
trips and other programs
could be cut. without hav-
ing to raise student activity
fees.
HONOR COUNCIL
The Legislature also
approved of the addition of
several members of the
Honor Council. They in-
clude Sherry Smith. Missy
Aidridge. Drake Mann.
Marcia Hamilton. John Ai-
dridge and George
LaRoque
Dean Alexander ap-
peared before the group
and said that groups were
not funded until 6 years
ago He added that the
minutes for meeting for
the last sixteen years are
available in his office, and
are available for inspection.
NC
LEGISLATURE
Marc Alder, who is a
representative of the N.C.
Student Legislature an-
nounced a meeting of his
group at 7 tonight
in Mendenhall
The model UN. will
meet next Tuesday.
The meeting was then
adjourned.
What's inside
Pippin gets a good noticeSee p.6.
Cheech and Chong go Up in Smoke. See
p.6.
UP IN SMOKE, seep. 6
Pirates dump RichmondSee p.8.
Pirates finish fifth in volleyball tourna-
mentSee p.8.
Fort Dix goes coed See p. 5
' at
'�?�ryf
arm m Mmrmmammm
m
msmmmmMmmtm





SLO
Writers
ECU and the Program
for Hearing Impaired Stu-
dents will sponsor a Sign
Language Club tor students
and members ot the Green-
ville community who would
hke to meet and practice
their combined skills.
The second meeting will
be held on Wed .Oct. 25 at
6 00 p.m. m Mendenhall
221.
The Club is open to all
persons who have had sign
language or have some
ned for learning sign
Coffeehouse
There will be an impor-
tant meeting of all Coffee-
house Commi'tee members
ed Oct. 25 at 3
p m. in the committee
ling room. All mem-
ittend.
Bowling
There will be a meeting
of the ECU Writers' Guild
at 3 p.m. Wed Oct 25 in
room 207, Austin.
All persons welcome.
New Club
New organization that
meets on Tuesdays and
Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. We
meet in the lobby of
Memorial Gym. All those
interested are welcomed
and no experience is need-
ed. For more info, call
Dennis Kahn at 758-7188.
Peace Corps
Peace Corps may be the
toughest job you'll ever
love. For more information,
contact Peace Corps Rep-
resentative David Jenkins,
Room 425, Flanagan Build-
ing, or you may call
757-6586 for an appoint-
ment.
nether you'd like to
h up your game with
some steady practice or
�� �� ends along
r some friendly compe-
.ou can rent a
ane to use for one
� and it only costs $3
rentals are avail-
at the Mendenhall
Center Bowling
. Saturday from
� 6p.m.
Red Pin
Win a free game of
bowling every time you
make a strike when the red
pin is the head pin. Try
your luck at "Red Pin
Bowling" every Sunday
evening from 7 to 10 p.m.
at the Mendenhall Bowling
Center.
Flu Vaccine
Flu vaccine is available
at the ECU Student Health
Service for all full-time
students. The vaccine is
given to students under age
25 in two injections four or
more weeks apart. It is
recommended that the ser-
ies is completed by mid- '
November. Only one injec-
tion is required for students
over 25. The cost of the
vaccine for students over 25
is $1.50. The vaccine for
patients under 25 costs
$2.50 per shot - total $5.00.
The flu vaccine is recom-
mended particularly for
those students with chronic
health problems such as
heart disease, bronchopu-
Imonary diseases such as
tuberculosis, emphysema,
chronic bronchitis, asthma,
bronchietctasis, and cyctic
fibrosis, chronic renal
disease, and diabetes melli-
tus and other metabolic
disorders.
Volleyball
Male and female
students interested in re-
activiting thevolleyball club
should meet in room 105 of
Memorial Gym at 7:30 p.m.
on Thurs Oct. 26. Club
activities include play
among members and com-
petition with other univer-
sities. Further information
can be obtained from Dr.
Sayetta in Physics.
The Student Union Artists Series Committee
presents
wmm a progra
f, !k:larinet an
RlCHARBOtTZMAN, cl
IDA KAVAFIaI
THEODCAlSto
IK-WWAN BAE, viola
FRED SHERRY, cello
HENDRIX THEATRE
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
1978
8:00 P.M.
'Stolzman is an artist of indescribable genius'
- The Washington Post
Psi-Chi
Psi-Chi is having a pig
pickin' Sun Oct. 29 at the
Cherry court clubhouse.
Festivities begin at 2 p.m.
and include volleyball, your
favorite golden beverage
and all the pig and chicken
you can eat.
All psychology majors,
minors, graduate students,
faculty and interested per-
sons are invited. Tickets
may be obtained from any
Psi-Chi member, the
psychology library or the
main psychology office.
Prices are $2.50 for Psi-Chi
members, $3.50 for non-
members and $3.00 for
faculty. Come and bring a
friend.
NCSL
Pablo
The Student Union
Major Attraction Commit-
tee will present Pablo
Cruise on Thurs Nov. 9, at
8p.m. in Minges Coliseum.
Tickets will be $5 for
ECU students and $7 for
the public. All tickets are
available from the Central
Ticket Office in Menden-
hall. In addition, public
tickets can be purchased
from Apple Records. E. 5th
St School Kid's Records.
Georgetown Shoppes, The
Music Shop, Greenville
Square Mall.
Only public tickets will
be sold at the door.
The North Carolina
Student Legislature will be
meeting Tues Oct. 24 at 7
p.m. in room 248 of Mend-
enhall Student Center. All
freshman through Senior
Classes are invited to at-
tend. A student's major or
minor does not matter, just
have an interest in your
state government. On the
agenda, the matters to be
discussed are: Reports on
the Interim-Council at
Wilmington, Bill Commit-
tee assignments and Resol-
utions. The NCSL invites
alt students at attend this
meeting. For further in-
formation call Joe Tanahey
758-7968 or Marc Adler
758-9523. The North
Carolina Student Legisla-
ture educates students to
be North Carolina State
Leaders.
Officials
Episcopal
A service of Holy Com-
munion for Episcopal stud-
ents and friends will be
celebrated Tues Oct. 24 at
5 p.m. at the Methodist
Student Center (across
from Garrett Dorm). The
Rev. Bill Hadden, Jr. Chap-
lain will be the celebrant.
Supper for members
and friends of the Episcopal
Canterbury Fellowship will
be served at 6 p.m. each
Tues. at 1003 E. 5th St.
(across from the main
gate). A Bible study will
follow. Everyone welcome.
Delta Sigma
Delta Sigma Phi will be
holding a Casino Party for
all those interested in join-
ing a fraternity on Oct. 25,
at 9 p.m. at the house. For
rides call 756-4916.
Ping Pong
Cancellation
Due to the illness and
hospitalization of noted
film-maker-lecturer Doug
Jones, the Travel-Adven-
ture film "Hawaiian Ad-
venture" will not be shown
as scheduled on October
24,1978. The film has been
re-scheduled for April 4,
1979.
The remaining films in
the Travel-Adventure
Series will be shown as
scheduled. The first pro-
gram will be on November
16, 1978 at 8:00 p.m. in the
Hendrix Theatre in Men-
denhall Student Center.
Allen Hubbard will present
his film "South Africa
NYC
The Student Union's
Thanksgiving trip to New
York City has added a-
nother bus and more spaces
are available. The deadline
for reservations is Friday,
Oct. 20at 4p.m.
Rules
The organizational mee-
ting of the Greenville Offi-
cials Association will be
held on Wed Oct. 25, at 7
p.m. in the Elm St. Gym
Meeting Room.
Anyone interested in
officiating recreation, Jr.
high, or 9th grade basket-
ball please attend. For
further info, call Joe
Applegate at 756-7031 be-
fore 5 p.m. or 752-5214
after 10 p.m.
If you enjoy playing
table tennis, stop by Mend-
enhall Table Tennis Rooms
each Tuesday evening at 7
p.m. when the Table
Tennis Club meets. You
will find players of all levels
of ability participating. Var-
ious activities as ladder
tournaments are often
scheduled. All ECU stud-
ents, faculty and staff are
welcome.
Any campus group
needing a constitution ap-
proved should submit a
copy in triplicate to Libby
Lefler, speaker of the Leg-
islature, in room 230 Men-
denhall between 3-5 p.m.
weekdays or contact Jeff
Triplett, rules and Judi-
ciary Committee Chairper-
son, at 758-7956.
On Wed . Nov 8. the
MRC (Men's Residence
Council) and WRC (Wo-
men's Residence Council)
are presenting a pig pickin
and concert on the hill by
the tennis courts
The meal will be served
at 4:45 p.m and the
evening will last until 7 All
people interested in coming
must present their
MRCWRC card and may
purchase tickets for $3 from
their dorm officers
Buses will be available
to and from the women s
dorms
SOULS
Study
The Cultural Arts Com-
mittee of the Society of
United Liberal Students
will present an evening of
musical entertainment.
Sun Dec. 3rd at 7:30 p.m.
in Mendenhall Auditorium.
On the Hill, a quiet and
air-conditioned Study Area
has been set up m the Scott
Hall Basement. Anyone is
welcome to come to the
MRC meeting room on
Tuesday. Wednesday, or
Thursday Nights between
8:00and11 :00p.m.
Additional hours may
be added
East Carolina University
Student Union Major Attractions Committee
presents
CRUISE
with special gwest Livingston Taylor
Thurs Nov. 9, 1978
8 p.m.
Minges Coliseum
More FREE T-Shirts to
given away!
TICKETS:
Public $7.0�
ECU Students $5.00
Tickets go on sale
Mon Oct. 30,1978.
THIS WEEK AT THE
One of the most brilliant performances of a fine season'
- Miami Herald
TICKET PRICES: E.C.U. Students, S2.00
and Public, $5.00.
Tickets now available at the Central Ticket Office,
Mendenhall Student Center.
Tues. Mr. ECU
(King Dong) Contest
Wed. Young Democrats
Costume Party
PEACE CORPS
It offers professional development and
challenge
neoutcementac
must be a U.S. citizen
although the minimum age is 18 years, very few applicants
under 20 have the skills and experience necessary to quality
must meet medical and legal criteria
Trawling.
lasts from 4 to 14 weeks, usually in the host country
emphasizes language and cultural studies
(only public tickets will b. sold at th. door)
5SIBftj
Thurs f
1st appearance since Moslcrs Farm laM ,var
Fri. End Of Week Party
� monthly allowance for food, lodging, incidentals
� medical care
� readjustment allowance of $125 per month, set aside m the
U.S usually payable at completion of service
� optional life insurance a minimum rate
� personal satisfaction and oversea career development
or aaareee m:
J
Sun. Ladies jffte
Classifieds
$100. 758-3748
I
FOR SALE, solid
42" diameter table
chairs. Excellent
I
Maple
and 4
cond.
LOST: Saturday night on or
around Library St a Linx
Point Siamese (Looks like
part Siamese and part
Tabby) male named
Tzichgan (pron. Shigan).
Please! if you see him
anywhere call Susan or
Michelle at 758-7854 or
w
757-6366.
FOUND: Female dog.
Knows all basic dog tricks.
For descriptioni oontact
Scott Barnes 752-9115.
f
TTtTTwATJTTDTweneed
a lead vocalist (male or
female) to work on original
material for a recording in
Atlanta. Not preparing a
road band. Semi progres-
sive rock. For audition call
752-4584
HELP Desperately need
ride to and from Charlotte
N.C. on the upcoming
weekend Be happy to pay
for gas, expenses, etc. John
I
8082.
2 bdrm. apt. Call or see
Brad 103-B Eattbrook
Apts. 752-1547
l�� a
ROOMMATE NEEDED, to
I





Discusses marriage, cohabitation
Ball speaks at conference
24 October 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Peoe 3
ECU News Bureau
An approach to counsel-
ing of married or cohabiting
couples was discussed by
Wilbert Ball of the ECU
Counseling Center at a
Verona, Va meeting
Thurs Oct. 18.
Dr. Ball was a speaker
at the Southeastern Con-
ference of Counseling Cen-
ter Personnel, which was
coordinated by the Har-
risonburg, Va Counseling
Center staff.
In his presentation, Ball
discussed his own exper-
ience in couples counsel-
ing, using diagrams to
explore interpersonal
dynamics. His method is
effective in maintaining
rapport in the three-way
counselor-couple relation-
ship, he said.
By using diagrams, the
counselor is able to help
each partner evaluate the
relationship. individual
Fall at ECU
STUDENTS PAUSE AT the wall to rest and admire the
see . Photo by Steve Romero
0v� �
Jeaq &orr
111.3k,
. i �-� d'eMM � caivol
J.O-
� t mot ���
from 7 a.m.
to 11 a.m.
specializing
in large
country ham or sausage
biscuits. Hot cakes. Scrambled
eggs with country ham or
sausage. Our 14 lb. beef
burgers are ground from fresh
Western Chuck. We have pure
soft served ice cream. Also
serving ham and cheese,
chicken fillets, hot dogs, chili
and beans, french fries, apple
turnovers, and a variety of soft
drinks. Located on the corner
of Hth and Reade St. and on
Hwy. �64 in Washington.
NOW ON SALE
at
Pair Electronics
Audio Center.
needs, compatibilities and
incompatibilities, depend-
encies and "blind spots
Couples are led to an
understanding of the heed
to work toward "balance"
in their relationship and of
each partner's need for
independent growth, while
realizing that both are
"creators and sustainers of
the relationship, regardless
of its quality
Dr. Bail said he has
used this counseling model
for the past seven years in
his own counseling
practice.
Allied Health
grant to help
receives
youth
ECU News Bureau
A grant of $40,000 has
been awarded ECU'S
School of Allied Health and
Social Professions to deve-
lop a project plan for a
Family Development Cent-
er in southeastern North
Carolina.
The funds originate
from the N.C. Dept. of
Human Resources' Deve-
lopmental Disabilities
the
Council.
To be located in
Wilmington area, the pro-
posed center would serve
Brunswick, Columbus, New
Hanover and Pender Coun-
ties.
According to Dr. Ronald
Thiele, dean of the ECU
School of Allied Health and
Social Professions, the cen-
ter's primary goal is "to
provide services, otherwise
unavailable, to develop-
through the age of 21, and
their families.
Purpose of the center's
work would be to help
disabled youth "develop
their fuil potential and lead
the most useful, productive
lives possible in their home
communities said Thiele.
He is to direct the
planning project, with the
assistance of Susan Keys,
assistant professor of com-
munity health at ECU.
AN ECU COED, deep in thought, walks to class with her
arms loaded down with books and clothes
Photo by Steve Romero
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f





Senator No must go
Well, here we are at last in the final days of
one of the most boring senatorial races in
recent memory. What was originally billed as
an issues oriented campaign has degenerated
into an embarassing mudslinging contest
between the two candidates. Since the best
candidates were eliminated during the primar-
y, North Carolina voters are faced with two bad
candidates. The question facing voters now is
to decide which of the two is the least
objectionable candidate.
That candidate is clearly John Ingram,
since we would be hard-pressed to find a more
objectionable candidate than Jesse Helms.
It is interesting to note that, according to a
recent Associated Press poll, Ingram was only
seven percentage points behind his opponent.
This shows a sizeable following, considering
the vast dichotomy between the treasuries of
the candidates. Ingram's original battle cry of
fighting the two million dollar man has now
been inflated three-fold. He now faces North
Carolina's first bionic candidate, Jesse Helmc,
the six million dollar man.
And where do those six million dollars
S '
come from? Mostly from out of state right
wing groups and corporations. They are not
interested in who will best represent North
Carolina so much as who will represent their
conservative views. Senators cannot always be
bought, but they can often be rented.
Ingram's funds, such as they are, come
mostly from within the state. Despite the
massive financial differences between the two,
Ingram has shown that he can wage a
successful campaign with a meager campaign
chest, as was demonstrated in his upset victory
over Luther Hodges in the primary-run-off.
Perhaps most revolting are the intermina-
ble Helms advertisements enjoining us to
"vote for Jesse, a dedicated Christian The
man's religious beliefs should have no bearing
in a campaign. His religion is no more a
qualification for office than what school he
attended as a child. One speaker at a Helms
fund raiser once prayed for the guidance of I
"Jesus and Jesse
North Carolina can ill afford another six
years of a reactionary senator striving valiantly
to bring back the good old days of the
mugwumps.
SIX mtUON DOLLAR HOKePOWR
Commentary
Forum
How to handle a chauvinist
'Chivalry is not dying, but it is decreasing'
ToFOUNTAINHEAD:
I do not think that one
can make the generaliza-
tion that "chivalry is alive
and well at ECU I feel
chivalry is not dying but is
decreasing
Admittedly there are
individuals, both male and
ferhat. Who are courteous
to others, but I have noted
that for some reason it
seems very unpopular to be
civil and decent on this
campus. People are either
apathetic or so caught up in
their image that they often
fail to notice what goes on
around them, or worse
than that, they simply don't
care
A rule of survival: a-
round here one learns not
to expect very much help
from anyone but himself.
There are rare excep-
tions of chivalrous conduct
which should be acknow-
ledged � like late one rainy
night when a friend and I
were leaving downtown and
two gentlemen from ECU
drove us back home with no
intent but a safe delivery.
Since I believe that women
should be chivalrous to
men, I have often held
doors for men who were
precariously balancing cof-
fee with their books or who
were carrying heavy loads
of boxes.
On h�s cimptfs m�ny
people of. all ages- tail- to
take any courteous ini-
tiative whatsoever for their
fellow human beings. For
example, some students
who sit outside the narrow
halls of Austin between
classes stick their feet out
and fail to draw them in
when others try to walk
through the hall.
Other common exam-
ples � professors who call
students by their last
names without a respectful
"Mr or "Ms groups
(usually girls) talking and
walking very slowly who
crowd the sidewalk so that
no one can pass them, or
arrogant men or equally
arrogant women who walk
around as if they are God's
perfect gift to the opposite
sex.
Lack of chivalry is lack
of common respect or ap-
preciation for human dig-
nity as exemplified by the
girl who embarrasses the
man who respectfully asks
her for a date, or the guy
who laughs with his male
fneods and boasts that a
woman has had the "hots"
for him simply because she
showed some admiration.
Thus to be "cool" and
unconcerned is the great
ideal; to be spontaneous, or
responsive, or caring e-
nough to speak or lend as-
sistance or express thanks
is considered a no-no
I might sound like a
bitter misanthorpe, but 1
really am not. i think I am
only painfully honest
enough to attack indiffer-
ence, apathy, and arro-
gance and hope that with
their recognition others
might see if they are guilty.
Teresa Speight
Mother's - Brothers
review criticized
To FOUNTAINHEAD
Bisexual roommate
poses many problems
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
Please print this letter
because I feel it will help
many people in the same
situation.
Last week I found out
that my roommate is a
bisexual. When I first
found out her homosexual
tendencies, I started to
make fun of her and cut her
down.
I know now that this
made her feel very low.
Reader loves
women's
column
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
This is just to inform
you�I love Hester Petty's
articles! I hope you plan to
continue to carry her
writings.
I'm very impressed that
FOUNTAINHEAD has the
"smarts" to publish worth-
while information, such as
the issues by Ms. Petty
writes about.
Please, keep on giving
us the information we went
to know. Perhaps Ms. Petty
could be asked to write'
other articles, in addition to
her articles on the Editorial
page.
An impreeeed reader,
Wendy Qronert
When I would make fun of
her, she wouldn't respond
at all�until now.
She couldn't hold back
her hurt feelings any
longer. After fighting
orally, we settled down and
got into a deep conversa-
tion about what caused her
bisexuality.
She had good reasons as
to why she is inclined to
the same sex. Among these
reasons I found one in
particular that is quite
interesting. This reason is
her boyfriend back home.
It seems that the only
time she thinks of other
girls is when she is away
from him. When she is with
her boyfriend, she only
thinks of him. The reason
for this Is because another
male can never take her
boyfriend's place.
The reason I cut her
down was because I was
afraid she would make an
advance to me. She didn't
before I found out about
her, and she won't now.
We get along better,
now that we know end
understand each other. I no
longer out her down for her
actions because her private
life Is her own business.
If you have a problem
with your roommate, be
open and talk it out and
maybe you can solve the
problem.
Name withheld by
This article is not
intended to defend the
Brothers Johnson or to
criticize Mother's Finest.
The show itself was nothing
fantastic though it was
entertaining. A fantastic
show wasn't expected by
most, considering the at-
mosphere in which it was
performed.
The article, "Mothers
marvelous, Brothers lack-
ing" by Doug White does
deserve some criticism.
Whether the article is from
personal opinion or crowd
comments is irrelevant.
The fact that two sides to
every story should be told is
relevant. The information
exposed by Doug White or
his source shows only that
they don't have what it
takes to be critics of
musical performance.
Mother's Finest was
appealing to the audience
only because of the style of
music they offered. The
audience was filled with
rock fans. This is why
Mother's Finest was des-
cribed as having "pummel-
ed the audience with their
unrelenting brand of power
rock
Also, they were describ-
ed as having "the beet
elements from Ruf us, Parli-
ament, and virtually every
heavy metal and art rock
band This is acceptable
because they have virtually
the same style, but as far as
Joyce Kennedy and Glen
Murdock resembling "a
heavy metal Ashford ahd
Simpson there la , no
comparison. The Mother's
Finest choreography as you
called it was wild leaping,
not dancing. It drove the
rock fans into a frenzy
because you coneidV, it
"raising hetU"
The criticism of the
Brothers Johnson was un-
called for unless you 1ave
knowledge of their particu-
lar style of music and found
it lacking as compared to
other groups that perform
this style. It is obvious that
the rock fans have very
little knowledge of the
Brothers Johnson from
their behavior. Those that
are not particular fans of
rock and can enjoy a variety
of music found the Brother's
Johnson to be as appealing
to them as Mother's Finest
was to the hell raisers.
The Brothers Johnson
and their present lineup in
their backup band are a
powerful force in modern
soul and disco. Their
soundtracks also contain a
touch of jazz produced by
the well-known Quincy
Jones.
To further educate the
rock fans about soul, If
George Johnson's guitar or
that of Alex Weir's did not
seem to be plugged up it
was the fault of the technic-
ians. Of the fans that can
appreciate soul, this prob-
lem was not made aware of
because admirers of soul
prefer heavy base . sic.
instead of electrifying gui-
tar. Also, George
Johnson's singing was by
no means inadequate
croonings to admirers of
soul. Elton John, Mick
Jagger, and Rod Stewart
are excellent examples of
inadequate crooning.
A question of talent vs.
show Is not what it all
comes down to. What it all
comes down to is prefer-
ence of music. Mother's
were marvelous because of
the percentage of rock fans
in the audience, but the
Brothers Johnoen were by
no means lacking.
By HESTER PETTTY
Uppity Women of
Greenville
"Oh, so you're one of
those women's libbers
Have you ever had that
one directed at you? I have
and I always have trouble
answering it. I began to
wonder why this state-
mentquestion was so
troublesome.
"Oh, so you're one of
those women's libbers
.The main rouble with this
question is that it is dis-
honest. By using the term
"women's libbers" instead
of "feminists" the speaker
is letting you know that he
doesn't think very highly of
the women's movement.
Re-phrased, the ques-
tion would read "Oh, so
you're involved in the fri-
vilous and meaningless
women's movement In
other words, the question is
impossible to answer in a
simple manner. You'd have
to begin with a "Yes,
but or a "No, but
The question is saying
that the speaker is not
really interested in your
political beliefs, but rather
that he is interested in
telling you what his are. It
is herd to answer a question
such as this.
Another troublesome
thing about this state-
mentquestion is the cir-
cumstances that bring it
up. "Oh, so you're one of
those women's libbers"
would seem to be a logical
question following a dis-
cussion of your bra-burning
demonstrations in the '60s
or following your chast-
isement of someone for
making a sexist remark.
But it sometimes comes
up at the oddest times: like
in the middle of an intel-
ligent conversation that has
nothing to do with the
women's movement, or
right after you've asserted
yourself in some way (ask-
ing your boas for a rales). It
sort of gives you the feeling
that being Intelligent, arti-
culate, self-assured and
assertive are considered
the stuff of which "wo-
men's libbers" are made
and not the stuff of which
any woman la made. It
kind of throws you for a
minute, doeen't it?
"Oh, so you're one of
those women's libbers
You hesitate (collect
your thoughts). You're
confused (whet doee he
moan by �women'a
libber").
You've Mown It now
because your hesitation will
probably be interpreted ae
mdedetvenees (ahe doesn't
know wnef she thinks).
You're dismissed. End Of
Unless, of course, you
want to wait around for his
speech on "bra-burners"
(the only good thing libbers
ever did, heh, heh, heh).
"Oh' so you're one of
those women's libbers
You fold your arms,
tighten your lips, glare and
declare "Yeah (what do ya
wanna make of it buddy)
Well you've blown it
again because now you're
being interpreted as hard-
nosed, bitchy, and close-
minded. End Of Conver-
sation,
rights for women.
"Oh, so you're one of
those feminists
Now at least you're
dealing with an honest
and answerable question.
You can say yes or "no"
but neither predestines
End Of Conversation.
So now you have a
conversation. And here
come the questions.
What about medicaid
abortions?
What about affirmative
action programs for wo-
men?
"Your reaction is very important
in determining whether or not
the lines of communication stay-
open,
99
Unless, of course, you
want to get into a heated
debate that is destined to
solve nothing and alienate
everyone.
So it's really up to you.
Your reaction is very im-
portant in determining
whether or not the lines of
communication stay open.
A change in attitude can
occuro with an exchange of
information but this can't
happen if the lines are
down.
Question: Oh, so you're
one of those women's lib-
bers?
Answer: I am a femin-
ist.
Question: Yeah? Well
what is a feminist?"
Answer: (The "lines"
are open)
Feminist, (n.) An ad-
vocate or supporter of fem-
inism.
feminism, (n.) (1.)
The theory that women
should have political, econ-
omic, and social rights
equal to those of men. (2.)
The movement to win such
What about working
mothers? Go with what you
feel and go with what you
know. And know as much
about women's issues as
you can absorb.
Have you ever seen
Gloria Steinem field quest-
ions from an audience? It's
a thing of beauty.
She has enough pa-
tience to answer moronic
questions without grima-
cing and enough knowledge
to answer any question
well.
I think I have forgotten
what this article is about.
As a matter of fact, I have
forgotten. But I think the
story I am about to tell
relates to what I forgot I
was writing about. (It's late
folks).
About a month ago I
was sitting around a table
with several other people.
It was our lunch break and
we were talking our usual
lunch break talk when a
co-worker, a man, made the
statement that men were
superior to women.
He was completely ser-
ious. I asked him in what
respects were men superior
to women. He said in all
respects. I was beginning
to get angry.
I asked him on what
facts did he base this
opinion. Well not on any
actually, he just knew that
men were superior to wo-
men. Well if that's so, I
said, then why did it take us
inferior creatures to invent
agriculture and ceramics
among other things.
Why do women live
longer? Why do women
make better long distance
runners?
At this point I was so
angry that I forgot all the
other aspects of women
that made her different but
equal to men. And I regret
this.
I regret that I couldn't
remember my sources of
information. I could have
made a good case for the
equality of women but I
forgot the facts because I
was angry. But I don't
regret my anger
I had a damn good
reason to be angry.
So what's the point of
this story? I guess what I'm
saying is that the women's
movement will not suffer
because this man is still
convinced that men are
superior to women But I
would have suffered if I'd
taken that crap from him
without allowing myself the
right to get mad as hell,
mad enough to close the
lines of communication
Note: Many thanks to
Ellen, Marene, Pam, Inez,
Michael. Edna, Lowetta,
Teresa and Liz. You made
my dream of vast quantities
of mail come true.
(And once again, that
address is P.O. Box 1373,
Greenville, N.C. 27834)
Fountainhead
Serving the East Carolina community for over 50 years
EDITOR
Doug White
PRODUCTION MANAGER
ADVERTISING MANAGER
Leigh Coakley aews EDITORS Robwt M � Seraim
Ailie Everette
Ricki Gliarmis
SPORTS EDITOR
S�ni Rogers
FOUNTAINHEAD is the student newspaper of P
Carolina University sponsored by the MeduTTKrdni c�?f
sa�sar - "?aa
TRENDS EDITOR
Steve Bachner
MonaS. Hodgee Conversation.
Mailing address: Old South Building, Greenville
Editorial offices: 757-6366, 757-6367, 757-6300
Subscriptions: $10 annually, alumni $6 annually.
. N.C.





Drought worst sin 1925
Mountains remain dry
-E. N.C. (AP) - towns like Anrir. � � . . r
ASHEVILLE,
Several North Carolina
tarn communities are
A between a rock and a
aoa these days. The
tall colors are
ig tourists in huge
'rs. And those
sts are drinking water
- as scarce as those
s will soon be
mers are saying
he drought now fore-
mountain towns to
' to strict conservation
es is the worst since
Evidence of its sever-
- s the iact.that despite
Mux of tourists, some
towns like Andrews are
closing resturantsat 7 p.m.
Andrews Mayor Ty
Burnette said that town's
water system is at the
lowest point its ever been.
Now water is being drawn
from an old well owned by
Baker Furniture Co.
"I trust this well with
my fingers crossed. If it
goes dry, we will have to
start drilling another one
the mayor said.
And the dry weather is
not helping the forest fire
situation any . either.
Burnette said one match
could set off a fire under
the current conditions.
At Robbinsville, Mayor
Frank Rogers said Burling-
ton Industries has cut down
from 35,000 to 6,000 gal-
lons of water a day by using
creek water in its boilers.
Laundromats are closed
and car washing is forbid-
den. Robbinsville citizens
have cut back water usage
by a least a third, according
to the mayor. The town is
drawing extra water from
Long Creek, but the water
is so low that daily checks
are made to ensure that no
hazards to health are pres-
ent.
"We are playing it day
by day, and watching con-
sumption Rogers said.
"If we have to go to the
recreation center well and
private wells, there will
have to be drastic changes.
We would have to close the
schools and businesses and
hold water in storage only
for drinking and sanitary
and fire purposes
Town officials say the
situation is still critical in
Brevard, also. Mayor
Charles Campbell said the
town's water system is
being augmented by water
drawn from a nearby
stream.
Fort Dix has gone coed
DIX.N.J.(AP)-Raw
hapless, the Army
ecruits march enthusias-
along a dusty trail
i belted out the company
'ence:
Standing tall and look-
. good.
Ought to be in Holly-
� id
That's the Delta Com-
' oogie.
What a crazy song
It might have been a
cal scene out of this
itary training reservat-
ion's 61-year history, but
there was one important
difference This time wom-
en vvere striding along with

coe
Dix. a bastion of
-tough masculinity
s establishment in
i a staging area for
I troops en
� ?pe, has gone
now until April, when the
number will jump to 123 a
week.
Women are barred by
law from combat duty, but
they nevertheless are train-
ed to fight with bayonets,
rifles and grenades.
Unlike their male coun-
terparts, female "boots"
are allowed to keep their
hair, provided it doesn't
touch the collar, and are
permitted to have curlers
� th a new Army
awling cent-
military base,
es east of
a last week wel-
first group of 40
'ecruits for basic
combat training.
Officers here expected
-ess up to 73 female
soldiers, through basic
ng each week from
Deaf boy
receives
education
FUQUAY VARINA, N.C.
(AP; - New state and
federal laws stipulating
nat public schools must
offer programs for all hand-
icapped children have
made a world of difference
�he education of young
Gary Revels of Fuquay
Vanna.
The 12-year-old son of
Bobby and Ruby Revels is
deaf and suffers from cere-
bra' palsy.
Before this school year.
parents used to put him
on a bus every Sunday for a
four-hour ride to the Cent-
North Carolina School
?or the Deaf in Greensboro
here he attended classes
during the week. This
meant tears, worry and the
misery of a divided family.
And after all the trouble
and trauma. Gary wasn't
progressing in school as
well as his parents thought
ne should have been.
Last year theRevels dee-
ded to take Gary out of the
Greensboro institution and
ice him in a new program
children with hearing
impairments at nearby
:ary Elementary School.
There Gary attends
: ass with other deaf child-
ren who are taught sign
guage. His classwork
has improved and his par-
ents say he is much hap-
pier
Now the family is united
and the Revels are able to
help Gary with his home-
work and involve him in
more family activities.
He's an altogether dif-
ferent child said nis
father. "He is a contented
child. He is relaxed
Before legislation went
into effect this school year,
the Revels did not �� '�
choice of sending Gary to tne
public schools.
Now he as a c�nct j�
attend school In �� do� to
normal daaeroom settings
as possible.
and hair dryers in the
barracks.
But the Army is deter-
mined to treat women
privates the same way as it
does the men - which is to
say tough.
"Other than bras and
panties, they bring the
same things men bring i
that is. nothing said Lt.
Col. Meredith Caram.
Some of the women feel
the drill sergeants may be
treating them too equally.
"They go out of their
way to make us feel we're
like the men says Pamela
Briggs, 18, of Philadelphia.
"I don't want to be treated
special but I don't want to
be treated like a man
Socializing with male rec-
ruits or drill sergeants is
strictly forbidden. Women
are housed in the same
barracks as men, but on
different floors.
MACRAME,
VT St
WEAVING
&758-061tJ,evirV4M M
CORNER Of 0� & CLARK STREETS
IN HATTERAS HAMMOCK BUILDING
WTkE HARD TO riN D BUT WELL WORTH IT '
A I L
�cO) V�'�
fO
ffitchell s Hair Styling
.IfPitt Plaza Shopping Ccntei
XCrccnv.lk Norrh Carolina 17A
756-2950
Guy's
Permanents
regular price $35.00
Now only $17.50
including uni-perm
Offer good each Wednesday through Oct. 254978
A�mw
����1n1tn'��������"t"��������������'ltlt��tw"���
UBE
Close out
on
Washed Denim Zipper Front
Hooded Sweatshirts
12 price
Were $9.95 now $4.95
Save $5.00
�nrf m$pt
1N
�-� �"
THE FOUNTAIN IS working again, and these students are
Summer Photo by John H. Grogan)
glad to have an opportunity to cool oft in this late Indian
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Page6 FOUNTAINHEAD 24 October 1978
Playhouse opener, Pippin, 'is a success'
B) SUE ELLEN McLEOD
Staff Writer
The Drama Department's first production of the 1978
Pippin, is a delightful success. Although a few
surfaced in vocal projection, the show is
eographed by Ken Miller and executed with
te performers
m Roqer O Hirson's book, Pippin deals
with many difficult questions concerning the search for
individuality. As the character Pippin searches for
fulfillment he stumbles through many shades of good and
evil to finally find his "corner of the sky Comedy
pervades the themes, creating a light atmosphere for
serious considerations.
The production numbers carry the show in design,
choreography, and performance. The chorus players, which
at times include the entire cast, surpass their own efforts
with each succeeding number.
The opening number, "Magic to Do set the pace for
the show. In a contrast of black void and white light, the
cast appeared from the void creating their own presence
and reality on stage.
Another particularly effective number "War is a
Science is delicately staged in contrasting regimented
and free-form movement, reflecting the atmosphere of
military precision and total chaos. The chorus players'
perfect timing and their ability to work together as well as
individually created a total effect, making this number
exceptional.
The most creative and imaginatively staged production
number is entitled, "With You The female members of
the chorus render excellent performers individually by
working as a whole - seeming to move as one person in
unison. This gloriously staged number is highlighted by
two members of the chorus who begin the number with a
soft, lilting dance.
The music flows from this lilting rhythmn to a hard
gyrating, pulsing beat. The choreography moves with the
music and the dancers make the transition from lilting,
sensual movement to harsh bumps and grinds with
"The producton numbers
carry the show in design,
choreography, and
performance. The chorus
players surpass their own
efforts with each succeeding
number
,v Aubrey Barnes, Tom Boyd, Stan
row John Jeter. Jane Wilson. Kim
enniter Hammond. Holly Jereme.
David Owens: bottom row Stacey Wilkes. Kim Woolen.
Steve Williford. Michelle Mennette Photo by John H.
Grogan)
remarkable fluidity and style.
The Leading Player, Steven Williford, portrayed a
demanding role, guilding the show and players throughout.
Williford maintained the quick pace throughout the
performance, proving himself accomplished in both
movement and presentation.
Although he possesses a clear, solid voice. Williford is
unable to maintain complete control over it resulting in
making his words often indiscernible.
G. Anthony King, as Pippin, has an excellent voice,
presenting his songs clearly and beautifully. King has
problems in movement, however, seeming at a loss
whenever he has the stage to himself.
Charlemagne, performed by Tom Boyd, presents a
competent, secure presence on stage. His performance is
effective and he moved easily from a comic to serious mood,
Niven spins tales using hard science
. RREN BERGSTEIN
Assistant Trends Editor
. Boo1 the ordering coupons in the back
res Larry Niven as science fiction's
'here are many reasons for this and its true
v Niven isone of the few sf writers who still depends
the use of hard science in his stories. Hard science
rs mainly to the physical sciences such as biology.
others Larry Niven is also one of the few
's "science" fiction.
Niven broke into print with a little tidbit called "The
Coldest Place about the coldest place in the solar system
1 of the men who copes in its harsh boundaries. This
piece gave Niven the recognition he needed and magazine
editors began to look at thisexciting new talent.
.en has many collections of stories as well as a
number of novels all published by Ballantine. His
collections are Neutron Star, The Flight of the Horse, A
Hole in Space. Tales of K nown Space, All the Myriad Ways,
ar Long ARM of Gil Hamilton. His novels are
Rmgworld (which he is the best known for), A Gift From
World Out of Time, Protector, The Flying
th David Gerrold), The Mote in God's Eye
Pournelle), and most recently, Lucifer's
Han �� � ith Jerry Pournelle).
n has also created a device which most sf writers
cumbersome and confusing, as well as difficult to
te and maintain a timeline chronicling all his written
.�. rks (of sf). Niven has well succeeded with his timeline,
entering all his novels as well as short stories and
synchronizing them with major event in his "world
does Niven write?
Basica'iy. the man knows what he is talking about. The
sc which backs up and forms a background for each
one of his stories, is quite factual and very interesting.
million years When he returns to his native galaxy, he
finds a totally alien world.
Corbell must fight hostile cat-like things; a witch-like
woman who exerts upon him pain via a strange can-like
machine, and just survive in a world that is truly out of
time
Niven's best short story collections are The Flight of the
Horse, which concerns the various voyages of Svetz, a
time-travelling past stealer.and Neutron Star, which again
demonstrates Niven's ability to produce entertaining, wild
tales and form their basis and theme in believable,
humanalien environments.
Lucifer's Hammer, Niven's new novel with Jerry
Pournelle, is perhaps Niven's strangest to date; not actually
science fiction (despite the theme of a comet that strikes the
Earth and causes catastrophical occurences) but also
contemporary human frailties; the attempt to survive, and
other points that make it more of a modern disaster novel
than a sf novel.
This book has been selling tremendously, which may
prove that the public can swallow sf'swild plots anyway.
So Niven has proven himself to be an erstwhile talent in
the sf field. And with Lucifer's Hammer, he will also
establish in the modern fiction field as well.
LEFT TO RIGHT , Matthew Lenco Julian Met
standing, and Tony King Anther, - ng has
excellent voice, presenting his songs c!ear .
beautifully Photo by John H Grogar
carrying the audience with him
An engaging presence. Holly E Jereme ga�e a I
performance as the conniving mother. Fastrada Se
other characters Berthe (Hazel Stapietom ard Cath
(Julia D Metcalfe) gave smooth performances bul
unable to achieve clarity in their musical numbers
Costume Coordinator Maria Jug fan i a assen
costumes representing the contrasts of delicate ar
imagery alternating throughout the show. Not only are the
costumes effective but they also provide maxim.
for the players.
The scenery, designed by Chuck Giles see
lightweight and sparse, creating the outline of the she
provided an adequate backdrop for the rest of the cas: tt
carried the spontaneity and life of the show tt
themselves.
The orchestra, under the direction of Bar 5r
delivered a flawless performance, giving energy and v
to Stephen Schwartz's music.
Ken Miller and his assistant Pat Pertaiion have stag
an excellent production of Pippin
Miller's effective and imaginative choreography � . I
the show while the dancers excellent timing and e �
carries it to full potential. Pippin will be presented Oct
26 and 27 in McGmnis Auditorium, and promises an
evening of delightful entertainment
Cheech and Chong's Up In Smoke
'Don'tgo straight to see this movie
Books
Niven's best work to date (in addition to his
collaboration with Pournelle on The Mote in God's Eye) is
his newest novel A World Out of Time. In this, Niven still
keeps his science in check, and also creates vast and
spectacular surroundings that are provocative and
fascinating.
The main character in Jerome Corbell, a man who is
awakened from suspended animation into a world where
memories are erased and a man can assume a new identity
while at the same time obeying the strict laws of the State:
a sort of monarchy-totalitarian government that keeps
stiff checks and balances.
Corbell finds that he is in a different body; his mind
transferred to a criminal one.
Corbell is assigned to work on a probe project in deep
space. Instead he mutinies, and sets out on the Galactic
Hub, a journey whose round trip is on the order of three
By BARRY CLAYTON
Staff Writer
The advertisements advise: "Don't go straight to see
this movie
Welluse your own discretion, but if you decide to
follow Paramount Pictures' lead it won't infringe on your
enjoying the film in the least.
And, sadly, in some places it will be an enormous help.
Up In Smoke could very easily be divided into two
separate � though unequal � parts: 'before plot' and
'after plot Anyone with sense enough to wind string
knows that plot is essential to any story, no less so because
the story is a comedy.
But in this case he'd be wrong. Up In Smoke is every bit
as delightfully antic as Los Cochinos (for which Cheech
Marin and Tommy Chong won a Grammy). And anyone who
has enjoyed Cheech and Chong's zany LPs is just naturally
going to love Up In Smoke.
Or at least the before plot' part of it.
The trademark of the Third World comedy czars has
always been their brief, ludicrous skits, and the first part of
Smoke is a comical collage of just such skits artfully brought
together in a visual medium that, surprisingly, manages to
add to the essential absurdity of the film.
The first half of Smoke (which is only 90 minutes
long in all) is a clever ensemble of misfire attempts to locate
some grass, blended with hilarious close brushes with the
law and the inevitable confusion of trying to incon-
spicuously "eat the evidence" while police question them
concerning license, registration, etc.
The movie begins to weaken in the second part when a
plot is introduced, and it is here that a head full of ozone
becomes a real asset.
Having been deported as illegal aliens earlier in the
film, Cheech and his new-found friend Tommy Chong
attempt to smuggle themselves back into the States by
posing as divers for Cheech's uphoistery-baron unde but
get the factory address confused with that of a group of
narcotics smugglers.
The smugglers accept them as the drivers appointed to
transport the biggest single movement of marijuanna into
the United States, and soon our two heroes are on the road
driving a panel truch which, unbeknownst to them, is
composed entirely of reconstituted grass.
Meanwhile, also without their knowing it, they are
being followed by a team of sophomorically incompetent
narcotic agents personally trained and led by Sergeant
Stedenko (played by Stacy Keach) who is at different points
in the story unceremoniously baptised by first one then the
other of the comedy duo in a couple of imaginative mens'
room scenes.
Once again on the road, still searching for smoke but
finding instead two endowed hitch-hickers (Edie Adams
and Strother Martin), their vehide manages to ignite itself
leaving a trail of turned-on patrolmen and narcotics
officers.
Discouraged by their inability to produce the stash thay
seek, Tommy and Cheech dedde to gather their newly
assembled singing group and enter a punk rock battfe-
of-the-bands.
The competition is stiff and the audience definitely
hostile, as are Stedenko's narcs who have located the
green, fibrous panel truck parked in front of the auditorium
But before long, the fumes from the now-blazing van
manage not only to pacify the Sergeant and his crew of
imbedlic officers, but also to find their way into the
theatre's venting system mellowing out the crowd and
insuring the group's victory over the other bands.
This ought to be the funniest part of the film But it's
not. By far it isout-shined by the less complex first half of
the movie in which the gagsare bright and fast-moving
Still, the weaker 'after plot' sequence doesn't detract
too much from the rest of the film, and even has some real
gems of its ownjust not as many as the before' section
There are plenty of sight-gags and some entertaining tunes
a couple of which are from Cheech and Chong's own
comedy repertoire.
A word about the screening times, though, they are
irregular. This is a ninety minute film preceeded by fifteen
minutes of oommerdals and short subjects, so if you're ten
minutes late you won't loae by it. Again, use your own
discretion.





24 Octobf 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 7
MSC Dinner Theatre presents Peter Ott
Romantic lighting, an
elegant meal, a delightful
show are all elements of a
Mendenhall Student Center
Dinner Theatre.
The Student Center
begins its third Dinner
Theatre season on October
26, 1978, offering dinner
and a show nightly tlyough
October 29,1978. Both food
and show promise to be
outstanding.
The show is an offbeat
comedy entitled God Says
There Is No Peter Ott. See
this show and meet the
charming woman who
manages her own resort.
Meet her not-so-charming,
pregnant-but unmarried
niece.
And, of course, meet
mer? Is he the f�tMrf the
child? Whoever he la?1ter
Ott says there Is no God,
which elicits the respdna,
"God says there is no Pettr
Ott As a result, Peter Is
Drama
Peter Ott. Is he a Harvard
Ph.D? Is he a mechanic? Is
he a computer program-
simply not quite sure.
The show is directed by
Elizabeth Nicholson. Ms.
Nicholson holds a B.A. in'
drama and has many acting
and directing credits. One
of her acting assignments
was in a previous MSC
Dinner Theatre production,
A Thousand Clowns. Ms.
Nicholson has very care-
fully selected her cast and
expects a great response to
the show she has selected,
a comedy about adult hide
and seek.
The dinner accompany-
ing the show may be
either "down home" or
gourmet, depending on the
individual's preference.
Food is served buffet style.
The menu consists of
the following : Baked Ham
with Pineapple Ring, Chic-
ken Parisienne, Delmonico
Potatoes, Macedoine of
Vegetables, Sweet and
Sour Red Cabbage, Tossed
Salad, French or Thousand
Island Dressing, French
Rolls with Butter, Creme de
Menthe Parfait, Coffee and
Tea.
Serving will begin at
6:30 on Thursday, Friday,
and on Sunday at 4:30.
Tickets are $6 for ECU
students and $8.50 for the
public.
American Academy and Institute now accepting
applications for Rodgers Production Award
SEIfO QUARTZ $&
Richard Rodgers, who
has enriched the American
musical theatre for more
than a half century, is
collaborating with the
American Academy and
Institute of Arts and Letters
- of wnich he is a member -
to encc jrage young talent
who will be the Rodgers,
Hammerstem and Cole
Porter of the future.
This month more than
800 colleges, music and
irna schools and amateur
�� (�tre groups around the
ontry. will be receiving
�EASE POST notices of-
g eir students a
v. .nee to apply for the
F narj Rodgers Product-
Award to be offered
t .ery year.
Its primary purpose will
be to make possible by
suDsidy a production in
New York City of a music
play by authors and comp-
osers whose work have nor
before been professionally
performed.
Previously produced
works will be eligible if
their performances were, in
me judgement of the com-
ee, an amateur effort,
.ersity-sponsored. or
eached but a smali aud-
ience, or were incomplete
or inadequate.
,ast spring the celebra-
ted composer handed Jac-
ques Barzun, presi-
dent of the Academy-
Institute, a check for one
million dollars to establish
and administer the fund.
The award stipulated
that the winning work may
be a play with music, and
operetta, a revue, an ad-
aptation of classic or a
"typical Broadway show
It may be full-length or
several short works that
make up a theatre evening.
An important condition
attached to the million
dollars was the kind of
statement one might expect
from the composer of the
famous standard whose
opening lyric is "We'll take
Manhattan, The Bronx and
Staten Island, too
Mr. Rodgers stated,
"Because I have an abiding
love for and confidence in
my birthplace, New York
City, and a conviction that
it is the artistic center of the
nation the award product-
ion must take place in New
York City "
The nnnual productions
will be performed first in
non-profit tnsitiutions(such
as Equity Library Theatre.
Special film
deals with
alcoholism
Tfce Student Union
Films Committee will
screen The Lost Weekend
as a special film presen-
tation this Wednesday
night at 8 p.m.
This powerful drama,
one of the most famous
social problem pictures of
an time, depicts five days in
the life of Don Birnam, a
disillusioned writer with a
sarious drinking problem.
Consumed with aslf-pity,
he begins an odysaay of
barroom escapades, getting
progressively more drunk
each day untii the habit has
become an addiction.
Ray Milland givas his
finsat acraan ymmmmm
as Birnam, and tha Wi-
rium tramans aoanaa, win
their bats, white walla, and
streaks of Wood, sti" rank
among tha moat terrifying
hallucinations ever tilmad.
Julllard institute, Hudson
Guild, NY. Shakespeare,
Festival, Manhattan
Theatre Club, and num-
erous others).
They will cost between
fifty and seventy thousand
dollars and the work will
remain the property of its
creators. Neither the
Acaoamy-lnatitute nor tha
production organization
will retain any control over
any rights to the award
production.
Applications are avail-
able by writing to the
American Academy, and
Institute of Arts and Letters
633 West 155th St New
York, 10032.
The first award will be
announced at tha annual
Ceremonial distribution of
awards and fellowships In
May, 1979. Materials must
be submitted by Deo
1.
The contestants will be
judged by a committee of
eminent composers and
playwrights, members of
the Academy-Institute,
appointed by the board of
directors.
No. FL009M-$175.00.
LC Digital Quartz Thin
MonthDayDate
Continuous readout in
hours and minutes
At the push of a button.
display automatically
changes at two second
intervals to show month
and date, day of week,
and seconds Stainless
steel midnight blue
dial frame
FLOYD G. ROBINSON JEWELERS
Downtown Greenville (Beside Dak's)
iOfE . F
.V
r
10 Discount to all ECU Students- Greenville Store Only
Excluding Contact Lenses and Oscar Specials
kJC&qi- JMl
OPTICIANS
opticians
association
of arnenca
YOUR DOCTORS PRESCRIPTION
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� CONTACT LENSES HARD b SOFT)
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Page8 FOUNTAINHEAD 24 October 1978
Pirates dumpRichmond,
ECU takes 21-14 victory
. � .

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Leander Green heads upfield
CU QUARTERBACK LEANDER Green manuevers
around a Richmond defender in Saturday's Oyster Bowl
contest against the Spiders. Green carried the ball 23 times
for 102 yards in the Pirates' 21-14 victory over Richmond.
Photo by John H. Grogan
By SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
NORFOLK, Va. - Even though Richmond halfback
Jessie Williams was named the Most Valuable Player in the
annual Oyster Bowl classic, ECU head coach Pat Dye knew
exactly who the real hero was in the Pirates narrow 21-14
over the Spiders Saturday afternoon.
"The difference out there today was Leander Green
said Dye after the game. "He came up with one big play
after another and did some things we haven't gotten before
this season
The diminutive quarterback from Jacksonville engine-
ered all three Pirate scoring drives and scored the winning
touchdown himself on a nifty five yard run with just 1 :02
remaining in the game.
By the end of the afternoon, Green had totalled 102
yards on 23 carries and completed 3 of 8 passes for 64
yards, including a clutch 39 yard bomb to split end Billy Ray
Washington which set up the Bucs go-ahead touchdown in
the fourth quarter.
"It was a win that we needed badly noted Dye. "One
when we had to come back in the second half and score to
win. We didn't play well defensively, but I'm sure
Richmond had a lot to do with that. They came ready to play
today and they moved the ball against us as well as anybody
has all year
The score was tied at 7-7 entering the fourth quarter
with neither team able to mount anything resembling a
scoring drive in the second or third quarter.
The Pirates took their first possession in the final
quarter and methodically moved 57 yards in ten plays for
the touchdown.
Green hit split end Terry Gallaher for 15 yards on a
crucial third and 9 situation, and on the next play rolled
around the left side for 18 yards and another first down at
the Richmond 10
Three plays later, halfback Eddie Hicks went over the
top for the touchdown from one yard out and Bill Lamm's
first conversion pushed the Pirates ahead 14-7 with 11 :50
remaining in the game.
Richmond quarterback James Short then moved the
Spiders 73 yards in 13 plays for touchdown. Short hit Ian
Beckstead twice on third down plays, and on fourth and four
from the Pirates 12 yard line. Short turned a broken play
into a 11 yard gain which gave the Spiders a first and goal at
the ECU one.
Halfback Dimetn Kornegay scored on a one yard plunge
and Jeff Adams' conversion knotted the score for the
second time at 14-14 with 6.04 left to play.
ECU then took the kickoff and moved 77 yards in just ten
plays for the winning touchdown. Green passed to fullback
Despite numerous fumbles
ECU offense sparkles
APLESCHANDLER
Assistant Sports Editor
The ECU wishbone of-
e has performed spor-
adically all season for Pir-
ate head coach Pat Dye.
Often the offense has ap-
peared on the verge of a
major breakdown, as fum-
bles and a lack of yardage
proved fatal.
Yet at other times, as in
Pirates' big victory over
Southwestern Louisiana,
wishbone has been
most effective Inconsis-
tency has surely been the
prevelant factor in the
Pirate attack
Such was the case again
Saturday in the Pirates'
21-14 victory over Rich-
mond in the Oyster Bowl.
At times. the Pirates
flashed signs of sheer bril-
liance in their fifth victory
of the season At other
times, though, fumbles and
missed assignments dark-
ened the Pirates chances.
The Bucs fumbled ele-
ven times Saturday, bring-
ing their season total to 43,
only four short of the school
record for a single season.
On numerous occasions,
the exchange from center to
quarterback resulted in a
fumble.
Pirate quarterback Le-
ander Green has no ex-
planation for the often
unsuccessful exchanges. "I
don't understand it said
the junior from Jackson-
ville. "We'll just have to
keep working on it. It's
been a real problem
Even though the Pirates
experienced a few prob-
lems Saturday, there were
also some bright spots.
Most evident was the play
of Green.
"The big difference out
there today was the play of
Leander Green said Dye.
"He made big play after
big play. He just made
things happen that hadn't
been happening before
Green, who had rushed
very unsuccessfully all
year, totalled 102 yards on
23 carries against the Spi-
ders. Green displayed the
type of determine running
that had embarked his play
last season.
"I felt much better out
there today said the
Jacksonville native. "I just
tried to make something
happen with the football
when I had the oppor-
tunity
And Green did just that,
as he scored two of the
Pirates touchdowns, the
last one which came late in
the fourth quarter, and
proved to be the clincher
for the Pirates.
The Pirates offense tot-
alled 312 yards on the day.
Especially impressive was
the success of the outside
option plays. Due to some
changes made last week in
practice, the option proved
a vital element in the win
Saturday.
"We cut out a lot of
things in our option last
week said Green. We
have a very complicated
option. We decide it would
be best to just try and do
the basics correctly. It looks
like we made the right
decisions
The Pirate offense
looked its best in the fourth
period, scoring points and
securing the victory. Dye
was pleased that the points
came as late as they did.
"We've had problems
scoring in the second half
all year said the fifth year
Pirate coach. "But today
we stuck with our offensive
game plan throughout.
Things seemed to fall into
place in the fourth quar-
ter
Green was pleased the
Pirates scored the winning
touchdown late in the game
with the score tied 14-14.
That should give us confi-
dence noted Green.
ECU-Richmond
Stats
Rushing
ECU � Green 23-114,
Collins 6-20, Sutton 5-18,
Hicks 10-56. Harrell 5-49,
Greer 8-9. Hawkins 1-3,
Gallaher 1-(-5), Wiley 1-7;
Richmond � Short 15-27,
Williams 20-120. Kornegay
15-43, McCoig 9-20, Greg-
ory 1-(-9).
Passing
ECU � Green 3-8-2-64,
Richmond � Short 4-6-
1-32. Gregory 1-3-1-6.
Receiving
ECU � Washington 1-39,
Sutton 1-10, Gallaher 1-15;
Richmond � Williams 1-6,
Beckstead 3-29, Spriggs
1-3.
Theodore Sutton for ten yards and a first down at the Bic
26 to keep the drive going
After a nine yard run by Green, he dropped back an.
unloaded a 39 yard bomb to his old high school teammate
Billy Ray Washington which gave the Pirates possession
Richmond's four yard line. Three p'ays later Green just
made his way into the end zone from five yards out wh
sealed the victory.
"I was watching Billy Ray the whole time on that p
pattern explained Green. "I saw him get knocked
and just waited until he got back up and he was r,gh�
in the open
I just tried to make things happen today conn
Green 'I just worked on the basic th.ngs like making �
good pitch and reading the defenses better I really fee
I'm getting back to normal after all these injuries
certainly was the best performance by the offense
couple of weeks
Despite 11 fumbles by the Pirates, ECU rolled j
yards on offense including 248 rushing and 54 through
air. Hicks finished with 56 yards on 10 plays while hai?Da
Sam Harrell added 38 yards on five attempts
"From the standpoint of sticking to our offense am
doing what we wanted to do we accomplished that, sa I
Dye 'This was the best job our offense nas
particularly in the fourth quarter when he had to score
"There's no question that Richmond came ready to play
and they played well today. They really played we
deserved better today I know it's been a long seasor
coach Tait and the players, but I have a lot of 'espec I i
them
While the Pirates improved their record to 5-3 I
year. Richmond dropped to 1-7 and many insist Spider
coach Jim Tait will be fired at the end of the season
"Again we played well enough to win noted Ta;
Today was the first time we have played well m the ias:
three or four weeks. That's six tough losses that could have
been winners I just can t get used to it
"The offense still needs improvement We played
better this week than the last few. but still lacked wha I
took to win "
The loss also overshadowed a excellent performance : .
halfback Jessie Williams. The speedy 170 pour
gamed 120 yards on 20 carries and almost broe seve
long runs
"Jessie was having a good day and we tried - -
in his hands as much as possible, said Tait We felt ie
needed to do a better job in getting to Green He -anes
them go and is getting better each week after gel
his hip pointer.
N.C. State stops
ECU booters
Steve Porter field
STEVE PORTERFIELD DRIBBLES the ball down the
sidelines in last week's match against UNC-Wilmington.
Photo by John H. Grogan)
By DAVID MAREADY
Staff Writer
East Carolina's soccer
team traveled to Raleigh
Monday and were defeated
by the Wolfpack of N.C
State 4-2
Hiram King was un-
assisted as he scored
State's first goal of the day
with twelve minutes gone
in the opening half. King's
teammate. Stephen Rea,
advanced the Wolf pack's
lead to 2-0 six minutes later
on an assist by King
The remaining twenty-
seven minutes of the first
half were scoreless as the
Wolfpack held onto their
2-0 lead.
Ten minutes elapsed in
the second half before
Roger Williams reopened
the Wolfpack s scoring
assault with a goal on an
assist by Tom Fink.
Jeff Karpovich finally
broke the ice for ECU after
he scored a goal on an
assist by Brad Winchell
with seventeen minutes
gone in the half Emanuel
Koukatsikas countered for
the Pack nine minutes later
to boost them into a
comfortable 4-1 advantage.
The final goal of the day
was scored by the Pirate's
Halfback. Brad W inchell on
an assist by Duane Bai e
with fourteen minutes left
to play in the match
ECU started a weak
comeback in the latter
stages of the contest.
however, the Wolfpack
used key defensive tactics
to smother the attempt
The clock finally ran out on
the Pirates as the Wolfpack
captured a hard fought
contest by a score of 4-2
Statistics for the game
showed the Wolfpack with
a commanding lead on
shots at goal with forty
while the Pirates could only
manage five Pirate goalie
Kevin Tyus ended the oav
with seventeen saves
ECU Coach. Brad
Smith, was satisfied with
his club s performance
against the expener
Wolfpack squad He citec
several of his team mem
berswith key defensive anc
offensive play including
Andy Roman. George
Bemus. and Jeff Kluger
The loss dropped the
Pirates to 3-8-1. while the
Wolfpack advanced their
season totals to 9-3-1
The Pirates resume
soccer action Thursday at
UNC-Greensboro Game-
time is slated for 4 00 p m
Pirates finish fifth in tourney
ECU volleyball action
AN ECU VOLLEYBALL player serves in
one of the Pirates' recent matches. The
Bucs finished fifth last weekend in the
South Caroline Invitational Tournament.
By JIMMY DuPREE
Staff Writer
The ECU girl's volley-
ball team tied for fifth place
in the Appalachian State
University Tournament
held this past weekend in
Boone. The Pirates finished
deadlocked with host Ap-
palachian State in the eight
team tournament.
ECU began its tourn-
ament play in convincing
style with a crushing 15-1,
15-2 victory over Catawba
The Pirate girls next victim
was Concord from West
Virginia, 15-11, 15-9. The
girls finishes their Friday
action with a disappointing
loss at the hands of the
University of South
Carolina, 15-7, 7-15, and
6-15.
In the single elimination
portion of the tourney play-
ed on Saturday, the Pirates
lost their opening round
matchup to the College of
Charleston, 6-15, 16-14,
and 9-15.
"We didn't play too
badly said ECU coach
Alita Dillon. "We won two
matches and we lost two. In
the match against Charles-
ton we had to battle back
from way behind in the
second game. We play well
when we're ahead, but
we have trouble coming
back when we're behind
South Carolina won the
overall championship with
a decisive win over Win-
throp College in the finals.
Charleston and Louisburg
College tied for third. Ap-
palachian State lost to
Louisburg in the quarter-
finals, which placed them
in the tie with ECU.
ECU travels to Louis-
burg today where they will
face Duke as well as their
hosts. "We're at the point
where we should do well if
we can get our offense
working said Dillon.
"We have a larger number
of good players than Duke,
but they have a superstar in
spiker Leslie Lewis who lift
the rest of the team
They've had a good year
Coach Dillon praised
co-captain La Von da
Duncan, Becky Beauchant,
and spiker Linda
McClelland for their offen-
sive efforts in ECU'S recent
matches. Dillon cited co-
captain Rosie Thompson,
Joey Forbes, Phyllis
Burreil, and Ginny Rodgers
as defensive standouts for
the squad. "We have the
depth that we need and we
have not had many injuries.
We need to work on
consistency, said Dillon
This weekend the
Pirates host the ECU Invit-
ational Tournament The
teams participating ,n the
Tournament are ECU
Concord. Longwood
College, v.rg.n.a Tech
Louisburg, and
College Play on Friday will
be roundrob.n lth th
teams w.th the best record
being seeded h,gher for the
'�nal rounds on Saturday
,or Mr. second and
h.rdpeteamaMw0
h� member A�
Tournament team
t





Penn State, Terps
remain unbeaten
By
HERSHEL NISSENSON
A P Sports Writer
There are only five
college football teams left
"th perfect records and
this much is certain �
there will not be five when
the season comes to a close.
That's because second
ranked Penn State and No.
6 Maryland have a Nov. 4
date in State College, Pa
which looms as one of the
most attractive pairings in
the regular season.
That upcoming clash
took on added status over
the weekend when Penn
State throttled Syracuse
45-15 behind Chuck Fu-
sina'sfour touchdown pas-
ses, while Maryland troun-
ced Wake Forest 39-0 with
Steve Atkins scoring twice
and his backup, Alvin
Maddox. getting three
TDs.
The other unbeaten-
untied teams are top-rated
Oklahoma, which trimmed
Iowa State 34-6 as Billy
Sims rushed for a career-
high 231 yards; No. 17
Navy, a 9-0 winner over
William & Mary on Bob
Tata's 27-yard field goal
and Larry Klawinski's 33-
yard scoring dash, and
unranked Holy Cross which
was idle.
All the unbeatens have
big games left. Oklahoma
has road dates with Ne-
braska and Colorado. Penn
State closes out the regular
season with Maryland,
North Carolina State and
Pitt
Maryland must face
Clemson as well as Penn
State. Navy will find out
just how good it is the next
two weekends against Pitt
Cross lists Improving
Brown and once-beaten
Rutgers amond its six re-
maining opponents.
The ranks of the un-
beatens suffered one major
loss over the weekend when
third-ranked Arkansas lost
to No. 8 Texas 28-21 as
Randy McEachern threw
two scoring passes to Ol-
ympic sprinter Johnny Lam
Jones � including the
winner with 6:15 to play �
and one to Lawrence Sam-
pleton.
For the most part,
though, it was a form-
following weekend, in
sharp contrast to the pre-
vious week when there
were more upsets that Los
Angeles Dodgers fielding
lapses. Besides Arkansas,
the only loser among The
Associated Press Top
Twenty was 12th-ranked
Texas A&M, which bowed
to previously winless Bay-
lor 24-6.
Elsewhere, fourth-
ranked Alabama turned
back Tennessee 30-17, No.
5 Nebraska swamped Col-
orado 52-14, No. 7 Southern
California whipped Oregon
State 38-7, No. 9 Michigan
mauled Wisconsin 42-0 and
No. 10 UCLA burried Cal-
ifornia 45-0.
In the Second Ten,
11th-ranked Houston out-
lasted Southern Methodist
42-28, No. 13 Missouri
drubbed Kansas State 56-
14, No. 15 Pitt edged Flor-
ida State 7-3, No. 16
Lou9isiana State blanked
Kentucky 21-0, No. 18
Georgia defeated Vander-
built 31-10, No. 19 Purdue
beat Illinois 13-0 and No. 20
Notre Dame downed Air
Force 38-15.
24 October 1978 FOUNTA1NHEAD Pap�9
Patr
omze
Fountainhead
advertisers!
Chavis corrals Short
ECU DEFENSIVE END Fred Chavis
grabs Richmond quarterback James
Short in the Pirates' Oyster Bowl contest
Saturday in Norfolk, Va. Chavis was
Tar Heels defeat ECU
The ECU field hockey
team finished a rough
weekend, winning one
game and losing two. The
first game was played
Friday in Chapel Hill a-
gainst UNC. The Pirates
lost to the Heels 5-0.
Coach Laurie Arrants
was impressed by the way
the Pirates played, how-
ever. "We played real
well said ECU head
coach Laurie Arrants. "The
score made some good
changes at the half and
came back and scored three
quick goals before we were
able toadjust
The Pirates traveled to
High Point Saturday and
lost their second game. At
the end of regulation time,
the score was knotted at
and Notre Dame while Holv 1-1
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The rules of field hockey
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shots while the Pirates only
connected on two. ECU lost
2-1
In an afternoon match,
the Pirates defeated the
experienced North Carolina
Club team. Sue Jones, who
scored the lone ECU goal
aginst High Point, scored
again in this game. The
leading scorer for the Pir-
ates was senior Sally Birch
with two goals.
ECU enters the AIAW
State Tournament this
weekend at Boone.
credited with six tackles in ECU'S 21-14
victory. The Pirates will have the week off
before its next game Nov. 4 at home
against Appalachian State. Photo by
John H. Grogan
HAVE A "BOTTOMLESS" CUP OF
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Page 10 FOUNTAINHEAD 24 October 1973
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Make your YEARBOOK PORTRAIT
appointment NOW at:
APPOINTMENTS BEING TAKEN NOW
COME BY OR CALL THE BUC OFFICE
AT 757 6501 OR 757 6502
PICTURES WILL BE MADE FROM
MONDAY, NOV. 6
UNTIL TUESDAY, NOV. 21,
FROM 9:00 AM TILL 5:00 PM
THIS IS THE ONLY TIME
PICTURES WILL BE MADE THIS YEAR!





Title
Fountainhead, October 24, 1978
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 24, 1978
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.520
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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