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Report of the public schools of Harnett County, 1911-12

Date: 1912 | Identifier: LB2813 .H37X 1911-12
Report of the public schools of Harnett County. Sanford, N.C. : Cole Printing Co., Description based on: 1911-1912. more...
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Report
of the
Public Schools
of
Harnett County
1911-1912









REPORT
OF THE
Public Schools of Harnett County
1911-1912

AND
COMPARATIVE STATISTICS, SHOWING TEN YEARS’
GROWTH, 1902-1912
PRESSESCOLE PRINTING COMPANYSANFORD, N. C.




BUIE'S CREEK ACADEMY

This institution was established in 1887, and from the first session to the present has been a success. The work done here by the Principal, Rev. J. A. Campbell, is of lasting worth to the County and State. In December, 1900, the building was destroyed by fire, but the Principal did not permit himself and the work he had started to be swept away by one fire, but began at once, on the charred ruins of the old building, the erection of the present magnificent brick building, which was ready for use November, 1903.






[Illustration:

BUIE'S CREEK ACADEMY.
]









HARNETT COUNTY

Fifty-seven years ago (1855) the people of Harnett proposed to set up housekeeping on their own account. In fine accord with their patriotism, the new county received the name of a distinguished Revolutionary patriot (Cornelius Harnett) whose home was on the lower waters of the Cape Fear; while the capital of Harnett perpetuates the memory of a grand soldier (General Alexander Lillington) in the war of the Revolution. But although formed into a separate county, Harnett county had no separate representation in the General Assembly until 1858, continuing to vote with Cumberland until that time. Since admitted to representation, Harnett has sent to the House and to the Senate representatives of sterling worth, reflecting credit on their constituents and contributing by their actions in the Assembly to the welfare and prosperity of the people of the whole State.

The County embraces about six hundred and forty-five square miles, and bounded as follows: On the north by Wake; east by Johnston; south by Cumberland and Sampson, and west by Moore and Lee. It is divided into thirteen townships, with sixty-seven miles of railroads, practically tounching every township. The taxable valuation of property has increased in ten years from one million to about eight million dollars. The climate is mild and well adapted to the growth of various crops; free from miasma, which makes it a noted county for the health and longevity of its citizens. The western section is rapidly being developed and fruit growing becoming one of the chief industries.





PUBLIC SCHOOL DIRECTORY—1911-1012
BOARD OF EDUCATION

J. M. HODGES, ChairmanLinden
T. W. HARRINGTONBroadway, R. F. D. 1
O. BRADLEYKipling
J. D. EZZELL, County SuperintendentDunn
D. B. STEWART, TreasurerBroadway, R. F. D. 2

BOOK DEPOSITORIES

HOOD & GRANTHAMDunn
BURWELL BARGAIN HOUSELillington

FREE EXAMINATION DAYS

Second Thursday, Friday and Saturday in July and October.





MEMBERS OF BOARD OF EDUCATION
1903

LONNIE SMITH, Chairman

D. B. STEWART

J. H. WILLIAMS

(LonnieSmith resigned in 1904 and succeeded by C. D. Stewart)

(J. H. Williams resigned in 1904 and succeeded by S. H. Stephenson.)

(S. H. Stephenson died in 1905 and was succeeded by W. H. Stephenson.)

1905-1906.

C. D. STEWART, Chairman

D. B. STEWART

W. H. STEPHENSON

The Board as now constituted remained unchanged till July 5, 1909, at which time the present Board began their administration.





To the People of Harnett County:

Feeling that it is a duty we owe to the public to give an account of the progress of public education in the County, and believing that the patrons of the public schools, the school officers and the friends of education will be pleased to receive this information, and a better knowledge of what our schools are doing will tend to create more interest in them, we respectfully submit this report to you, trusting that the work done and the results of the same may meet with your approval.

Very truly yours,

J. D. EZZELL,

County Superintendent of Schools.

Dunn, N. C., June 30, 1912.










[Illustration:

OLD BUILDING, DISTRICT NO. 1, AVERASBORO TOWNSHIP, BUILT IN 1906-1907. THE FIRST PUBLIC SCHOOL BUILDING EVER BUILT IN THE TOWN OF DUNN. A LOCAL TAX WAS VOTED PRIOR TO THE ERECTION OF THE BUILDING.
]





REPORT OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS.

To the Board of Education:

I herewith respectfully submit this report of the public schools of Harnett County for the scholastic year ending June 30, 1912. In view of the fact that the success of the cause of public education depends in large measure, if not entirely, upon the attitude of the people toward the public schools, I deem an effort as greatly worth while that has for its purpose the establishment of a closer and more vital relationship between the people and their schools. And this report is submitted in the hope that it may serve in some measure to bring about this relationship.

It is hoped that the tables showing the receipts and the disbursements of the public school fund will be of interest to taxpayers generally, who have the right to know and who should know what is being done with the money which they pay for the education of their children. The tables showing the statistics of the individual schools ought to stimulate a spirit of wholesome emulation and rivalry, and thus create in each district an enthusiasm for better schools. It is also hoped that this report will be of particular value to committeemen and teachers. In it will be found the names and addresses of the committeemen of every public school district in the county, and the names and addresses of the teachers of each school for last year.

To the casual reader the pages of this report will reveal no startling or sensational outburst of progress; but to the diligent student they will show evidence of steady growth, of gradual improvement and of orderly, natural development. I desire to call your special attention to the table of comparative statistics, showing in brief summary the progress that has been made during the last decade.

I desire also to thank the board for its wise counsel and for its hearty co-operation with me in every progressive movement for the general improvement of the public schools in Harnett County.

Yours very truly,

J. D. EZZELL,

County Superintendent.





PUBLIC SCHOOLS—THE STATE'S GREATEST
ASSET

T. B. McAuley had this to say of the first common school law (1696): “By this memorable law it was in the Scotch forge statuted and ordained that every parish in the realm should provide a commodious school house and should pay a moderate stipend to a school master. The effect could not be immediately felt. But before one generation had passed away it began to be evident that the common people of Scotland were superior in intelligence to the common people of any other country of Europe. To whatever land the Scotchman might wander, to whatever calling he might betake himself, in America or India, in trade or in war, the advantage of his early training raised him above his competitors. If he was taken into a warehouse as a partner, he soon became foreman, if he enlisted in the army he soon became sargeant.

Scotland meanwhile, in spite of the barrenness of her soil and the severity of her climate, made such progress in agriculture, in manufactures, in commerce, in letters, in science, in all that constitutes civilization as the old world never saw equalled or even the new world has scarcely seen surpassed.”










[Illustration:

NEW BUILDING, DISTRICT NO. 1, AVERASBORO TOWNSHIP (DUNN GRADED SCHOOL)
]





STATISTICAL REPORT PUBLIC SCHOOL OF
HARNETT COUNTY FOR YEAR
ENDING JUNE 30, 1912

Census, Enrollment, Average Attendance, and Teachers of Each School.

WHITE RACE
ANDERSON CREEK TOWNSHIP

By Districts

Number DistrictCensusEnrollmentAv. AttendanceL'gth Term—DaysSalaryTEACHERS
MFMFMFMF
1No school, moving and build new house.
2131210810880$30 00Miss Flossie Elmore, Westville
320161381078037 50Miss Jane McCormick, Lillington, No. 2
4910410396030 00Miss Margaret Shaw, Jonesboro, No. 1
512141014467035 00Miss Flora McCormick, Lillington. No. 1
613191216478035 00Miss Margaret Shaw, Cambro





AVERASBORO TOWNSHIP

Number DistrictCensusEnrollmentAv. AttendanceL'gth Term—DaysSalaryTEACHERS
MFMFMFMF
1Dunn Graded School 278Dunn Graded School 283Dunn Graded School 183Dunn Graded School 207Dunn Graded School 124Dunn Graded School 146160$125B. P. Gentry, Supt., Dunn
75H. M. Shields, Prin., Dunn
$50Miss Lena Leggett, Dunn
50Miss Florence Caruthers, Dunn
45Miss Matilda Michaels, Dunn
50Miss Pauline Hassell, Dunn
50Miss Nellie Stephenson, Dunn
45Miss Julia Farmer, Dunn
45Miss Pauline Wade, Dunn
50Miss Rosa Thomas, Dunn
50Miss Sallie Thomas, Dunn
55Miss Jeannette Rudisell, Dunn
22536352027138035Miss Cleva Godwin, Godwin
33143271620126330Matt E. Holley, Benson, No. 2
44859463919168030L. V. Parker, Dunn, No. 5
55740513347388045J. L. Johnson, Dunn
30W. P. Reaves, Dunn, No. 5
63624292423208030Miss Lizzie Dorman, Dunn, No. 4
73534333116148035Miss Lorena Bland, Cooper
8New District, no house
920181311558035Miss Annie McMillan, L. R. Acad'y
103224302213128040Miss Mamie Pierce, Mt. Olive
112325232513178035Mrs. Esther Butler, Dunn





BARBECUE TOWNSHIP

No. DistrictCensusEnrollmentAv. AttendanceL'gth Term—DaysSalaryTEACHERS
MFMFMFMF
19116115780$30Mrs. Mack Cameron, Broadway
2161728248030Miss Katie Withers, Broadway, No.1
32110126458030Mrs. Mildred Swann, Jonesboro, 3
530252423182080$50Guy Cox, Jonesboro, No. 3

BLACK RIVER TOWNSHIP

131302523131680$35Chas. P. Partin, Angier
2272021236687$25 00Miss Lottie Daniel, Henderson
33526231717116935I. J. Stephenson, Angier
474957495384216040 00Miss Bessie E. Deans, Pikeville
31 25Miss Mattie Draughon, Rowland
513161316698030W. T. Campbell, Cardenas

ANGIER PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL

19161010160$100Rev. Frank Hare, Prin., Angier

BUCKHORN TOWNSHIP

15051353123218045J. D. Champion, Fuquay Sp'gs, No 1
30Miss Madge Cade, Kipling, No. 1
25847494524288045J. E. Holt, Fuquay Springs, No. 1
30Miss Nannie Templeton, Holly Sp'gs
34132372324208035Miss Mamie Stuart, Willow Sp'gs





DUKE TOWNSHIP

No. DistrictCensusEnrollmentAv. AttendanceL'gth Term—DaysSalaryTEACHERS
MFMFMFMF
1*23923023017712285140$75 00Miss Jessie Smith, Principal, Duke
45 00Miss Flora Smith, Duke
40 00Miss Minnie Cannady, Duke
40 00Miss Mary Broom, Duke
32 50Miss Berta Davis, Duke
35 00Miss Mary Bostian, Duke
236303531171280$40 00R. McLeod, Duke, No. 2

[note]GROVE TOWNSHIP

14020332417980$35 00Miss Rossie Dorman, Dunn, No. 4
24723332516126935 00Miss Beulah Young, Angier
399103901084758140$75Owen Odum, Coats
35 00Miss Miriam Jones, Durham
30 00Miss Ida Coats, Coats
25 00Miss Edith Fuquay, Coats
4383428201588030J. L. Norris, Duke
53627262115148035 00Miss Dora Creel, Dunn
64747393622218040 00Miss Callie Page, Buie's Creek
25 00Miss Mollie O'Quinn, Buie's Creek
736273331181740O. M. Johnson, Dunn





HECTOR'S CREEK TOWNSHIP

No. DistrictCensusEnrollmentAv. AttendanceL'gth Term—DaysSalaryTEACHERS
MFMFMFMF
140453742283280$45Miss Mamie Collier, Buie's Creek
30Miss Rachel Smith, Chalybeate Sps.
2455053503533120$65J. A. McLeod, Buie's Creek
35Miss Earnestine Hayes, Louisburg.
32822171811108640L. M. Chaffin, Jr., Kipling
44439No report3040Miss Katie C. Sessoms, Raleigh
52830222317188030Miss Nannie Utley, Holly Sp'gs, 1
6161914177127035Miss Iola Upchurch, Lillington, 1

JOHNSONVILLE TOWNSHIP

1262826281824105$50D. P. McDonald, Rock Branch
26126125880$30Mrs. Jettie Smith, Jonesboro, No. 1
36666446030G. C. McClung, Mt. Lookout, W. Va.
418231411856030Miss Mary McDonald, Pineview

LILLINGTON TOWNSHIP

1515638491731170$45Miss Emma Pegram, Stedman
45Miss Vivian Douglas, Mt. Mourne
22224171612128035Miss Mary McMillan, Parkton
318171817878030Miss Mary McLauchlin, Elease





LILLINGTON PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL

Number DistrictCensusEnrollmentAv. AttendanceL'gth Term—DaysSalaryTFACHERS
MFMFMF
10119170$100J. F. Thompson, Prin., Faison

NEILL'S CREEK TOWNSHIP

The Public School is run in connection with Buie's Creek Academy

193999498758080$145Rev. J. A. Campbell, Prin., Bule's Creek
238372639202710040Oscar S. Young, Angier, No. 2
$30Miss Essie Parker, Manly
345494627312910075J. M. Page, Kipling
30Miss Mittie Holland, Buie's Creek

STEWART'S CREEK TOWNSHIP

197978580$45 00Miss M. L. Fredericks, Knoxville, Tenn.
2526044502535120$80Rev. L. L. Hudson, Bunnlevel
35 00Miss Vestal Nixon, Topsail
32 00Miss Eliza Lindsay, Raleigh





UPPER LITTLE RIVER TOWNSHIP

Number DistrictCensusEnrollmentAv. AttendanceL'gth Term—DaysSalaryTEACHERS
MFMFMFMF
139461723101280$35T. A. Harrington, Broadway, No. 1
2223114289128525J. C. Cummings, Broadway, No. 1
323202217141380$30Miss Bessie Davis, Lillington, No. 3
446563342222110040H. Y. Smith, Broadway, No. 2
30Miss Clara Buchanan, Broadway, 2
533412639142710050Miss Mary Thompson, Snow Camp
30Miss Maude Harrington, Broadway 1
65848533930268035Miss Florence Buchan, Lumberton 2
30Miss Mary B. Ray, Lillington, 3
710202131118030Miss Carrie Caddell, Carthage
83837334320298035Miss Clyde Bryan, Wade, No. 1
25Luther Starling, Wade, No. 1
93240253418198040Mrs. J. H. Withers, Broadway, 1
103431312515138040Mrs. Paul McKay, Lillington, 3





STATISTICS BY TOWNSHIPS—WHITE

TOWNSHIPSDistrictsCensusEnrolledAttendancePollsAssessed Valuation of Real and Personal PropertyLocal Tax Schools
Anderson Creek61641056880$ 160 312
Averasboro1111718986006181 370 7001
Barbecue41399265101158 616
Black River5367330164196316 4241
Buckhorn3279218140144195 603
Duke25354732362671 074 783
Grove7624547289284426 4102
Hector's Creek6406293203133249 2671
Johnsonville41251097648106 1111
Lillington318815587154436 0281
Neill's Creek3361330262167292 0901
Stewart's Creek21281107395266 1351
Upper Little River10705559336324473 7282
665192421925992611$5 526 20711










[Illustration:

BEFORE LOCAL TAX
COATS, DISTRICT NO 3, GROVE TOWNSHIP

]


[Illustration:

AFTER LOCAL TAX
COATS, DISTRICT NO. 3, GROVE TOWNSHIP, ERECTED 1906.

]





STATISTICAL REPORT PUBLIC SCHOOL OF
HARNETT COUNTY FOR YEAR
ENDING JUNE 30, 1912

Census, Enrollment, Average Attendance, and Teachers of Each School.

COLORED RACE
ANDERSON CREEK TOWNSHIP

By Districts.

Number DistrictCensusEnrollmentAv. AttendanceL'th Term—DaysSalaryTEACHERS
MFMFMFMF
11618101781480$17Annie B. Roan, Spout Springs
22643192618168017Lara J. McNeill, Duke, No. 1
33633101710138017Lou Ella Smith, Duke, No. 1.
42312171016580$17C. L. Walker, Broadway
5101957576017Hattie McLean. Argo

AVERASBORO TOWNSHIP

1145147651013046160$35W. S. King, Selma
$25Mrs. W. S. King, Selma
22515191713118017Hattie Williams, Fayetteville





BARBECUE TOWNSHIP

Number DistrictCensusEnrollmentAv. AttendanceL'gth Term—DaysSalaryTEACHERS
MFMFMFMF
130232121111160$17W. H. Best, Broadway, No. 1
23035122782148$17Lillian Massey, Barclayville

BLACK RIVER

117132018171280$17Almira Massey, Barclayville

BUCKHORN TOWNSHIP

12723231912880$18Isabella McLean, Buie's Creek

DUKE TOWNSHIP

135313040202580$18Dockery Shaw, Dunn, No. 4
21624102191080$17Lauretta Massie, Duke

GROVE TOWNSHIP

119211517121580$17Brazilla Stuart, Angier
22545No School—Building House
320301825101469$17B. J. Walker, Dunn
420121010948017Missie E. McKay, Lillington





HECTOR'S CREEK TOWNSHIP

Number DistrictCensusEnrollmentAv. AttendanceL'gth Term—DaysSalaryTEACHERS
MFMFMFMF
131322624202580$20Mary H. Bailey, Lillington
2913913478017Ida D. Matthews, Lillington,

JOHNSONVILLE TOWNSHIP

121241924131868$17Maude Mallett, Pineview
24035No School—Building House

LILLINGTON TOWNSHIP

160605656384480$30Eloise E. Hunter, Raleigh
20Maggie E. Street, Lillington
23446272820226720Bettie E. McKay, Lillington

NEILL'S CREEK TOWNSHIP

185874053243680$37Henry M. Stewart, Buie's Creek
18S. P. McLean, Buie's Creek

STEWART'S CREEK TOWNSHIP

187905459253380$25P. G. Harrington, Jonesboro
$20E. J. McDougald, Duke
2272315181286017Rebecca Smith, Duke, No. 1
34656265719278018Metta McKella, Linden
43236192310126017Josephene McLean, Duke





UPPER LITTLE RIVER TOWNSHIP

Number DistrictCensusEnrollmentAv. AttendanceL'gth Term—DaysSalaryTEACHERS
MFMFMFMF
127332013151380$17Carrie B. McKay, Lillington, No. 3
21729202215198016Elsie Gilmore, Broadway
316248176148017Sadie Mallett, Pineview
459585557414480$25William J. Campbell, Lillington 3
20Mary C. Campbell, Lillington 3
528362836182612030H. E. King, Sanford










[Illustration:

OLD BUILDING DISTRICT NO 4, BLACK RIVER TOWNSHIP, BEFORE LOCAL TAX WAS VOTED.
NOW ANGIER HIGH SCHOOL.

]





STATISTICS BY TOWNSHIPS—COLORED

TOWNSHIPSDistrictsCensusEnrolledAttendancePollsAssessed Valuation of Real and Personal PropertyLocal Tax Schools
Anderson Creek523613812250$ 19,5190
Averasboro233220210019226,0750
Barbecue211881514416,4730
Black River1303829259,1020
Buckhorn1504220288,0320
Duke210610164487,6930
Grove419295645522,7910
Hector's Creek2857256284,8980
Johnsonville212043313013,1360
Lillington22001671248437,6700
Neill's Creek117293605010,1240
Stewart's Creek439727114614042,6090
Upper Little River53272762117545,7270
33236516191078849$263,8490





Buildings Erected, Name of Contractor and Contract Price.
Number DistrictNumber RoomsTOWNSHIPCONTRACTORPrice of BuildingDate
6One roomUpper Little RiverMcD. Withers$ 475.001903
6One roomAverasboroM. G. Lee160.001904
1Two roomsBuckhornL. S. Mann425.001904
2One roomGrovePope & Beasley271.001904
5Two roomsBarbecue and Upper Little R.C. R. Lassiter560.001905
4Two roomsBlack RiverM. W. Denning759.001905
2Two roomsBuckhornT. W. Austin215.001905
1One roomHector's CreekL. D. Matthews440.001905
2One roomUpper Little RiverJ. L. A. Brown223.001905
1Ten rooms, Auditorium, Cloak roomsAverasboroPope & Beasley8,000.001906
2One roomAverasboroW. M. Munds250.001906
3Three roomsGrovePope & Beasley650.001906
1Three roomsLillingtonJohnson & Shaw1,162.001906
3One roomLillingtonJohnson & Shaw442.001906
7One roomUpper Little RiverA. McD. Withers470.001906
2*One roomUpper Little RiverJ. B. Rosser150.001906
3*One roomUpper Little RiverA. McD. Withers140.001906
2One room Cloak roomsDukePope & Beasley700.001907
3*One roomGroveW. G. Turner97.001907
6One roomHector's CreekH. S. Holloway314.001907

[note]



3One room burnt 1908Neill's CreekNeill McLeod525.001907
9One roomUpper Little RiverW. K. Black450.901907
1*One roomAverasboroCore & Phillips183.001908
3One roomAnderson CreekW. E. Lucas248.001908
5*One roomAnderson CreekJ. E. Holmes122.001908
2One roomBlack RiverA. E. Flowers254.001908
3Two roomsBuckhornT. W. Churchill761.001908
4One roomJohnsonvilleD. J. Monroe270.001908
1*Three roomsNeill's CreekH. M. Stewart650.001908
3One roomUpper Little RiverJ. B. Rosser192.001908
1*Two roomsStewart's CreekC. M. Byrd178.001909
5One roomAverasboroS. E. Williams155.001909
2Two roomsHectro's CreekC. M. Byrd1,105.001909
1One roomJohnsonvilleW. N. McClung150.001909
2Three roomsStewart's CreekC. M. Byrd1,100.001910
2*One roomStewart's CreekSam Williams147.001911
7One roomAverasboroW. M. Munds390.001911
3Two roomsNeill's CreekJ. M. Shaw1,162.001911
3One roomBlack RiverD. W. Price600.001912

[note][note]



LOCAL TAXATION

The first election held in Harnett County for the establishment of a local tax school district was held at Dunu on September 12, 1905. On October 10, 1905, District No. 8 voted local tax, and on the recommendation of the County Superintendent, this district was consolidated with the Dunn district.

At this time there was no public school building in the Dunn district. The building that had been used prior to this time was a wretched makeshift with no equipment and very inferior light. Immediately after the election the Board of Education and the new Board of Committeemen, or Trustees, took steps to have a new building erected. With the aid of the regular apportionment, which the County Superintendent would not agree to be used further to run the school in the old building, and in this way saved $1,407; this, with the local tax and the loan fund, a new brick school house was built and equipped which is valued at twice the total county school funds in 1902.

The following table shows the local tax districts in the county, the date on which the election was held in each, and the amount received from local tax for the school year 1910-1911.










[Illustration:

ANGIER-DISTRICT NO. 4, BLACK RIVER TOWNSHIP, ERECTED 1905-LOCAL TAX DISTRICT.
]





TOWNSHIPDate of ElectionNumber DistrictAmount of Local Tax Received for School Year 1910-1911.Rate on $100 Valuation of Property
Averasboro ConsolidatedSeptember 12, 19051$3,189.8530
Averasboro ConsolidatedOctober 10, 19058$3,189.8530
Black RiverOctober 23, 19054492.6730
GroveMay 19, 19063444.4630
LillingtonJune 16, 19061749.6530
Barbecue and Upper Little Riv'rJune 5, 1907567.0515
Hector's CreekAugust 10, 19072254.8730
Stewart's CreekSeptember 5, 19072313.5630
Upper Little RiverSeptember 10, 1907449.7315
Neill's CreekApril 12, 19103159.0230
JohnsonvilleMay 19, 19101387.5030
GroveJune 6, 19117Not listed10





Amount charged in Local Tax Districts under the new assessment for school year 1911-1912.
TOWNSHIPAmount of Local Tax Charged for School Year 1911-1912.Number district.
Averasboro$3,938.061
Averasboro (col.)159.371
Black River798.364
Grove852.603
Lillington1,154.371
Barbecue and Upper Little River113.115
Hector's Creek344.282
Stewart's Creek469.662
Upper Little River85.844
Neill's Creek209.003
Johnsonville494.371
GroveNot Listed7

In the eleven local tax districts the valuation of school property is $20,000, before the tax was voted the school property was valued at $1,000. The length of the school term before local tax was 78 days, now an average of 127½ days. This shows an increase in the length of the school term of about 63½ per cent. The average attendance as compared with the census population was 34 per cent, whereas now in these districts it is 76 per cent.

We have now reached an era in the progress of our schools when the people in any district who want a good school must vote the local tax, because all the best teachers are seeking employment in the local tax districts, where the pay is better, the interest alive and the term is longer.





THE LOAN FUND

In districts where the necessary amount cannot be raised by private donation, the State Loan Fund is applied to for help. Loans from this fund are granted on notes, made payable in ten annual installments, with interest at four per cent. While this method of getting money for buildings shortens the term slightly, yet it does not materially interfere with the school, and it has proven a blessing in many districts in our county.

Up to this date the following districts have availed themselves of the advantages of this fund:

1903.Upper Little River, District No. 6$ 250.00
1904.Hector's Creek, District No. 1250.00
1904.Black River, District No. 4250.00
1904.Upper Little River, District No. 2100.00
1904.Lillington, District No. 1250.00
1905.Upper Little River, District No. 5375.00
1905.Upper Little River, District No. 7300.00
1906.Averasboro, District No. 13,000.00
1909.Hector's Creek, District No. 2450.00
1911.Neill's Creek, District No. 3500.00
1911.Stewart's Creek, District No. 2900.00

In District No. 1, Averasboro, the trustees arranged to take up the notes and pay the entire indebtedness. The County Superintendent was requested by the trustees to take proper steps in taking up these notes, the last of which was not due until 1916. On February 10, 1909, the notes were cancelled by paying amount due, $2,832.00.





Report of Treasurer for School Year Ending June 30, 1903
RECEIPTS

Balance June 30, 1902, brought forward$ 1,352.86
State and County poll tax2,755.84
Property Tax (18c)3,561.45
Local property tax
Local poll tax
Fines, forfeitures and penalties124.00
Liquor Licenses350.00
From State Treasurer3,205.65
From other sources38.95
Total funds$11,388.75

DISBURSEMENTS

County Superintendent$ 405.00
White teachers5,841.56
Colored teachers1,465.64
School-houses and sites (white)2,117.34
School-houses and sites (colored)197.99
Teachers’ Institutes, (white)40.00
Teachers’ Institutes, (colored)24.00
Treasurer 2 per cent. on $10,321.00206.42
Mileage and per diem of board94.70
Expenses of board21.78
Taking census62.46
Other expenses51.00
Total expenditures$10,527.89
Balance on hand July 1, 1903860.86





Report of Treasurer for School Year Ending June 30, 1904
RECEIPTS

Balance June 30, 1903, brought forward$ 860.86
State and County poll tax2,956.00
Property tax (18c)5,206.02
Fines, forfeitures and penalties251.93
From first $100,000892.71
From second $100,0002,012.65
From State Loan Fund250.00
From State for Library10.00
Private donations for Libraries10.00
Sale of old school building4.00
Other sources62.50
Total funds$12,516.67

DISBURSEMENTS

County Superintendent$ 426.00
White teachers7,762.28
Colored teachers1,536.12
School-houses and sites (white)1,498.48
School-houses and sites (colored)32.50
Installment on Loan Fund30.00
Treasurer 2 per cent. on $11,524230.48
Mileage and per diem of board74.10
Expenses of board47.50
Census and Committee277.82
Libraries30.00
Insurance11.00
Fuel7.62
Total expenditures$11,964.90
Balance on hand July 1, 1904551.77





Report of Treasurer for School Year Ending June 30, 1905
RECEIPTS

Balance June 30, 1904, brought forward$ 657.67
State and County poll tax3,067.50
General property tax5,664.32
Fines, forfeitures and penalties106.51
From first $100,000922.53
From second $100,0001,925.06
From other sources84.42
From State Loan Fund850.00
Total school funds$13,278.01

DISBURSEMENTS

County Superintendent$ 515.00
White teachers7,121.30
Colored teachers1,632.75
Institutes133.09
Treas_rer 2 per cent. on $12,089.42241.78
Mileage and per diem of board86.70
Other expenses of board27.50
Taking census127.44
Fuel52.71
School furniture80.75
Other school supplies108.45
New houses and sites (white)1,768.48
New houses and sites (colored)
Repair of old houses (white)163.15
Repair of old houses (colored)42.30
Installment on loan Fund34.00
All other expenses195.80
Total disbursements$12,331.20
Balance on hand June 30, 1905946.81





Report of Treasurer for School Year Ending June 30, 1906
RECEIPTS

Balance June 30, 1905, brought forward$ 948.23
General State and County poll tax4,078.00
General property tax (18c)5,422.00
Fines, forfeitures and penalties2,151.74
From first $100,000916.83
From second $100,0001,527.98
From State Loan Fund675.00
From State for Libraries50.00
For Libraries, private donations40.00
From other sources114.97
Total fund$15,924.75

DISBURSEMENTS

County Superintendent$ 677.20
White teachers7,918.15
Colored teachers1,643.98
County Treasurer, 2 per cent. on $14,068.09281.36
Mileage and per diem of board153.40
Expenses of County Board34.75
Taking school census113.24
School Committeemen16.00
Expenses of County Superintendent17.80
Surveying and registering deeds10.25
Postage, printing and stationery74.10
Desks, black boards and furniture73.29
Stoves and other supplies125.20
Libraries150.00
Installment on loan fund167.11
New houses and sites (white)2,537.06
Repair of old houses (white)208.33
New houses and sites (colored)
Repair of old houses (colored)83.78
Fuel64.45
Total disbursements$14,349.45
Balance on hand June 30, 19061,575.30





Report of Treasurer for School Year Ending June 30, 1907
RECEIPTS

Balance June 30, brought forward$ 1,576.51
State and County poll tax3,802.50
Property tax (18c)6,316.07
Fines, forfeitures and penalties1,600.11
From other sources43.75
Balance from taxes, 1905439.28
Local property tax2,686.01
Local poll tax392.40
From first $100,000973.79
From second $100,0001,820.95
From Loan Fund3,000.00
Total funds$22,651.37

DISBURSEMENTS

County Superintendent$ 682.80
White teachers8,333.84
Colored teachers1,527.28
Fuel and Janitor87.92
Desk, stoves, blackboards, etc.423.79
Insurance and rent94.00
Installment on loan fund623.35
New building, repairs and sites (white)9,809.87
New building, repairs and sites (colored)250.04
Treasurer 2 per cent. commission443.91
Mileage and per diem of Board123.15
Expenses of Board46.15
Census and committeemen133.92
Errors, overcharges1.80
All other expenses57.97
Total expenditures$22,639.79
Balance on hand July 1, 190711.58










[Illustration:

OLD BUILDING, DISTRICT NO. 6, UPPER LITTLE RIVER TOWNSHIP.
]


[Illustration:

NEW BUILDING, DISTRICT NO. 6, UPPER LITTLE RIVER TOWNSHIP. ERECTED IN 1903. THE FIRST DISTRICT THAT APPLIED FOR STATE LOAN FUND.
]





Report of Treasurer for School Year Ending June 30, 1908
RECEIPTS

Balance, June 30, 1907, brought forward$ 11.58
State and County poll tax4,300.00
Property tax (18c)8,500.00
Fines, forfeitures and penalties849.50
Dispensary proceeds9,500.00
From other sources66.00
Local property tax2,084.00
Local poll tax416.00
From first $100,000976.38
From State for High Schools500.00
From State for Libraries20.00
Private donations for Libraries15.00
Total funds$27,238.46

DISBURSEMENTS

County Superintendent$ 913.39
White teachers13,893.61
Colored teachers1,580.78
Fuel and janitors246.86
Desk, stoves, blackboards, etc.1,814.56
Libraries75.00
Insurance and rent11.00
Installment on Loan Fund643.00
New building, repairs and sites (white)3,783.06
New building, repairs and sites (colored)421.65
Treasurer 2 per cent. commission520.56
Mileage and per diem of Board161.80
Expenses of Board148.39
Census and committeemen132.95
Errors, overcharges, borrowed money2,017.37
All other expenses184.60
Total expenditures$26,548.58
To balance on hand July 1, 1908689.88





Report of Treasurer for School Year Ending June 30, 1909

Balance, June 30, 1908, brought forward$ 689.88
State and County poll tax3,736.66
Property tax (18c)7,463.34
Fines, forfeitures and penalties1,151.10
Dispensary proceeds9,128.16
Balance on taxes, 19071,222.31
From other sources63.61
Local property tax3,000.00
Local poll tax1,000.00
From first $100,000
From second $100,000779.16
From State Loan Fund450.00
From State for Library15.00
From State for High Schools500.00
Private donations for Libraries15.00
Total funds$29,257.49

DISBURSEMENTS

County Superintendent$ 1021.61
White teachers14,593.91
Colored teachers1,491.49
Fuel and janitors345.60
Desk, stoves, blackboards, etc.358.44
Supplies—brooms, buckets, etc.41.58
Libraries45.00
Insurance and rent245.20
Installment and Loan Fund2,723.90
New buildings, repairs and sites (white)2,468.55
New building, repairs and sites (colored)785.59
Treasurer 2 per cent. commission548.14
Mileage and per diem of Board142.00
Expenses of Board389.03
Census and committeemen143.24
All other expenses209.32
Borrowed money repaid1,310.55
County apportionment to High Schools500.00
To High Schools from local tax92.00
From State for High Schools500.00
Total expenditures$27,955.15
Balance on hand July 1, 19091,302.34





Report of Treasurer for School Year Ending June 30, 1910
RECEIPTS

Balance June 30, 1909, brought forward$ 1,302.34
State and County poll tax9,074.70
Property tax (18c)4,537.34
Fines, forfeitures and penalties1,053.85
Sale of old school building82.25
Errors in last year's report1.24
Other sources126.00
From first $100,000 not paid in 19091,052.79
Balance County tax 19081,415.84
Local property tax1,025.31
Local poll tax512.65
From first $100,0001,224.65
From second $100,000911.18
From State for Libraries30.00
From State for High Schools500.00
Private donations for Libraries15.00
Private donations increasing term27.20
Total funds$22,892.34

DISBURSEMENTS

County Superintendent$ 982.00
White teachers10,678.71
Colored teachers1,844.21
Fuel and janitor119.49
Desk, stoves, blackboards, etc.552.00
Supplies—brooms, buckets, etc.22.71
Libraries30.00
Insurance and rent11.00
Installment on Loan Fund282.90
New buildings, repairs and sites (white)2,084.00
New buildings, repairs and sites (colored)395.94
Treasurer 2 per cent. commission426.71
Mileage and per diem of Board135.80
Expenses of Board68.00
Census and committeemen106.02
Other expenses65.33
To High Schools from local tax829.71
To High Schools from State500.00
Paid Dunn Schools2,627.95
Total expenditures$21,762.48
Balance on hand July 1, 19101,129.86





Report of Treasurer for School Year Ending June 30, 1911
RECEIPTS

Balance June 30, 1910, brought forward$ 1,129.86
State and County poll tax3,624.98
Property tax (20c)5,849.69
Special County poll tax416.70
Special County property tax2,530.55
Fines, forfeitures and penalties145.00
Sale of school property152.20
From other sources90.64
Private donations to lengthen school term50.16
From ex-Treasurer J. H. Williams649.98
Local property tax4,391.06
Local poll tax1,650.25
From $125,000 State appropriation1,322.95
From second $100,000800.08
From Loan Fund900.00
From State for Libraries10.00
From State for High Schools500.00
Private donation for Libraries10.00
Total funds$24,224.10

DISBURSEMENTS

County Superintendent$ 1,005.00
White teachers12,427.19
Colored teachers1,961.91
Fuel and janitor192.66
Desk, stoves, blackboards, etc.1,440.41
Supplies—brooms, buckets, etc.39.66
Libraries45.00
Installment on Loan274.90
New buildings, repairs, sites, etc. (white)2,512.95
New buildings, repairs, sites, etc. (colored)343.46
Treasurer 2 per cent. commission451.93
Mileage and per diem of Board112.30
Expenses of Board63.60
Census and committeemen137.98
Other expenses243.35
To High Schools from local tax826.25
To High Schools from State500.00
Paid Dunn Schools1,200.00
Total expenses$23,778.55
Balance on hand July 1, 1911445,55










[Illustration:

MOUNT PISGAH, DISTRICT NO. 5, BARBECUE AND UPPER LITTLE RIVER TOWNSHIPS. BEFORE CONSOLIDATION AND LOCAL TAX.
]


[Illustration:

MOUNT PISGAH, DISTRICT NO. 5, BARBECUE AND UPPER LITTLE RIVER TOWNSHIPS. AFTER CONSOLIDATION AND LOCAL TAX. ERECTED 1905.
]





Report of Treasurer for School Year Ending June 30, 1912
RECEIPTS

Balance June 30, 1911, brought forward$ 445.55
State and County poll tax4,320.00
Property tax (20c)13,016.26
Special County property tax1,385.65
Fines, forfeitures and penalties9.50
From State214.32
From Wake County39.75
From Lee County64.64
Special local property tax2,511.96
Special local poll tax1,255.98
From $125,000 State appropriation1,414.54
From second $100,0001,059.15
From Loan Fund500.00
From State for Libraries50.00
From State for High Schools500.00
Private donations for Libraries40.00
Private donations for increasing term21.60
Total funds$26,848.91

DISBURSEMENTS

County Superintendent$ 1,200.00
White teachers14,710.14
Colored teachers2,510.28
Fuel and janitors211.40
Desk, stoves, blackboards, etc.255.31
Supplies—brooms, buckets, etc.54.85
Libraries60.00
Insurance and rent7.00
Installment on Loan Fund392.00
New buildings, repairs and sites (white)1,209.50
New buildings, repairs and sites (colored227.01
Treasurer 2 per cent. commission507.63
Mileage and per diem of Board111.60
Census and committeemen6.48
Other expenses238.81
To High Schools from County82.40
To High Schools from local tax1,615.13
To High Schools from State500.00
Paid Dunn Schools1,989.95
Total expenses$25,889.49
Balance July 1, 1912959.42





Comparative Statistics of the County Superintendent, Showing Ten Years’ Growth.
19021912
Total school funds from all sources$11,388.75$30,23072.
Total expenditures$10,527.89$29,127.94
Special county school taxes on property$1,470.00
Special local school tax6,100.00
Private donations to school fund574.90
Paid city schools$2,000.00
Paid to high schools$1,650.00
Number of rural libraries126
Number of local tax districts11
Value of school property, white$7,063,00$60,000.00
Value of school property, colored$2,392.00$5,000.00
Average length of term in days, white57.5084
Average length of term in days, colored55.0073
Rural school census, white4,2435,192
Rural enrollment, white3,3034,219
Rural average daily attendance, white2,2082,599
Rural school census, colored1,8162,365
Rural enrollment, colored1,3481,619
Rural average daily attendance, colored8061,078
Average salary of teachers per month, white$27.73$37.99
Average salary of teachers per month, colored$19.31$22.66
Assessed value of property, white$1,650,212.00$7,083,176.00
Number of polls, white1,8332,694
Assessed value of property, colored$65,944.00$269,022.00
Number of polls, colored545868
Amount actually paid by white on property and polls$6,379.00$19,624.00
Amount actually paid by colored on property and polls933.00$1,904.00





Statistical Report of the County Superintendent for the School Year, Ending June 30, 1903.
WhiteColored
School census4,2431,816
Enrollment3,3031,348
Average attendance2,208806
Average length of term in days57.555
Average salary of teachers per month$27.73$19.31
Number of local tax districtsnonenone
Number of libraries1
Value of libraries$40.00
Value of school property$7,063.00$2,392
Special County taxesnonenone

Statistical Report of the County Superintendent for the School Year, Ending June 30, 1904.
WhiteColored
School census4,3831,947
Enrollment2,9711,316
Average attendance1,900829
Average length of term in days7768
Average salary of teachers per month$27.85$17.03
Number of local tax districts,nonenone
Number of libraries4
Value of libraries$120.00
Value of school property$5,875.00$1,646.00
Special County taxes





Statistical Report of the County Superintendent for the School Year, Ending June 30, 1905
WhiteColored
School census4,3961,994
Enrollment3,1271,161
Average attendance2,155858
Average length of term in days7968
Average salary of teachers per month$27.21$16.07
Number of local tax districtsnonenone
Number of libraries6none
Value of libraries$200.00
Value of school property$7,415.00$1,295.00
Special County taxesnonenone

Statistical Report of the County Superintendent for the School Year, Ending June 30, 1906.
WhiteColored
School census4,8432,064
Enrollment3,0651,441
Average attendance1,959907
Average length of term in days8073
Average salary of teachers per month$29.00$16.58
Number of local tax districts4
Number of libraries11
Value of libraries$330.00
Value of school property$12,978.00$1,720.00
Special County taxesnonenone










[Illustration:

CHALYBEATE SPRINGS, DISTRICT NO. 2, HECTOR'S GREEK TOWNSHIP, BEFORE LOCAL TAX.
]


[Illustration:

CHALYBEATE SPRINGS, DISTRICT NO. 2, HECTOR'S GREEK TOWNSHIP, AFTER LOCAL TAX, ERECTED 1908.
]





Statistical Report of the County Superintendent for the School Year, Ending June 30, 1907
WhiteColored
School census4,9162,061
Enrollment3,0651,441
Average attendance1,959838
Average length of term in days7970
Average term in local tax districts134
Average salary of teachers per month$34.20$16.70
Number of local tax districts7
Number of libraries14
Value of libraries$435.00
Value of school property$25,955.00$2,215.00
2,215.00
Total value of school property$28,170.00
Special County taxesnonenone

Statistical Report of the County Superintendent for the School Year, Ending June 30, 1908
WhiteColored
School census4,8792,131
Enrollment3,7581,312
Average attendance2,173807
Average length of term in days79½70 4/13
Average term in local tax districts154
Average salary of teachers per month$36.82$16.74
Number of local tax districts7
Number of libraries15
Value of libraries$460.00
Value of school property$33,320.00$3,055.00
3,055.00
Total value of school property$36,375.00
Special County taxesnonenone





Statistical Report of the County Superintendent for the School Year, Ending June 30, 1909.
WhiteColored
School census4,9302,215
Enrollment3,6041,159
Average attendance2,257693
Average length of term in days8170
Average term in local tax districts128
Average salary of teachers per month$36.82$16.84
Number of local tax districts7
Number of libraries17
Value of sehool property$525.00
Value of libraries$38,075.00$3,255.00
3,255.00
Total value of school property$41,330.00
Special County taxesnonenone

Statistical Report of the County Superintendent for the School Year, Ending June 30, 1910.
WhiteColored
School census5,1692,336
Enrollment3,6061,437
Average attendance2,321908
Average length of term in days7971
Average term in local tax districts118
Average salary of teachers per month$36.92$17.00
Number of local tax districts10
Number of libraries17
Value of libraries$525.00
Value of school property$43,030.00$4,375.00
4,375.00
Total value of school property$47,405.00
Special County taxesnonenone





Statistical Report of the County Superintendent for the School Year, Ending June 30, 1911.
WhiteColored
School census5,3452,375
Enrollment3,7121,443
Average attendance2,421910
Average length of term in days8072
Average term in local tax districts118
Average salary of teachers per month$37.00$17.00
Number of local tax districts10
Number of libraries18
Value of libraries555.00
Value of school property$54,125.00$4,555.00
4,555.00
Total value of School property$58,680.00
Special County taxes$2,142.00$805.00

Statistical Report of the County Superintendent for the School Year, Ending June 30, 1912.
WhiteColored
School census5,3912,390
Enrollment4,2361,616
Average attendance2,6311,067
Average length of term in days82 4/779
Average length in local tax districts117½
Average salary of teachers per month$37.16$17.02
Number of local tax districts11
Number of libraries26
Value of libraries$795.00
Value of school property$60,000.00$5,000.00
5,000.00
Total value of school property$65,000.00
Special County taxes$1,416.0054.00





THE CHARACTER OF THE SCHOOL HOUSE.

At the very foundation of every successful school system lies the practical problem of necessary physical equipment in houses, furniture and grounds. * * * This question of the character of our public school houses is a far more serious one than many people think. Nobody has any respect for any thing that is not respectable. A respectable school house, then, is not only necessary for conducting successfully the business of public education, but is absolutely essential for commanding the respect of the community for that business. The character of the business must, to some extent, determine the character of the place of business.

What, then, should be the character of the public school houses where the business of educating nine out of ten of the State's children for citizenship and social service is carried on? * * *

Within, shall it be a hovel or a home; a place of beauty or a place of ugliness; a place of comfort or a place of discomfort; a place of cleanness or a place of uncleanness? Without, shall the grass grow green and the sun shine bright, and the flowers bloom and the birds sing, and the trees wave their long arms; or shall it be bleak and bare and barren, where Nature, God's great teacher, never whispers to the children her messages of peace and love and beauty from the Master?”—J. Y. Joyner, Superintendent of Public Instruction.

SPECIAL LEVY BY THE COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS

The estimated amount necessary in the County for a four-months’ school was made and submitted to the Commissioners, and they having made the special levy, there is no doubt as to the length of term in every district.

We feel that the Commissioners deserve commendation for their action in this matter. This harmony existing between the Commissioners and the Board of Education on educational matters means much for the schools of Harnett County.










[Illustration:

DISTRICT NO. 1—LILLINGTON TOWNSHIP, ERECTED 1906. LOCAL TAX DISTRICT.
]





OUR COUNTY EDITORS

In behalf of the teachers and friends of education of the County, we desire to express gratitude to the editors of both the County papers for their co-operation in the work of the Board and Superintendent, by granting free of charge space in their papers, devoted to the progress of education in the County. This is a commendable spirit, and we feel sure that the people of the County appreciate it, as well as the Board of Education.

OUR PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOLS

The schools were located by the Board of Education in July, 1907, at Angier and Lillington. As to locations geographically convenient to all parts of the County, no better places could have been selected. Already these villages were included in large special tax districts and provided with ample school buildings. Since the establishment of these schools, the building at Angier has been enlarged, and now there is in course of erection a large dormitory for the convenience and growing demand of boarding pupils.

These schools are free and open to every pupil sufficiently advanced to take the high school studies, which begin with eight grade work.





CIRCULAR LETTERS OF THE COUNTY SUPERINTENDENT

JULY 1, 1911, TO JUNE 30, 1912.

Since a part of the work of the County Superintendent is carried on through correspondence, a few of the circular letters sent out during the year are submitted below, selected as being most pertinent to this report because of the light they throw upon the general character of the year's work. They are placed here in permanent form, in the hope that their publication may serve to further their original purpose.

DUNN, N. C., September 26, 1911.

To the School Committeemen and Public School Teachers of Harnett County:

I have been thinking for some time as to the advisability of holding a joint conference of school committeemen and teachers, just prior to the opening of the schools. The more I study the situation, coupled with experience, the more I am becoming convinced that a great power for good, now almost dormant, resides in the school committeemen.

If we can get the committeemen organized and actively co-oporating with us, we will have a strong right arm in making the schools of the county far more efficient.

I would suggest before we hold our meeting that you think about the following subjects, jot down your thoughts, and come to the meeting prepared to give your fellow committeemen the benefit of your carefully thought-out suggestions in from five to ten minutes.

First. What definite things have you a right as a school committeeman, to expect of the teacher in your district?

Second. In what definite ways has your teacher a right to expect your co-operation?

Third. In what definite ways can you, by virtue of your office as a school commiteeman, increase and improve the educational advantages of the children in your district, as well as in your County as a whole?

This plan can no doubt be improved upon the more we work at it. What do you think of the plan? Do you not think you would like to meet with the committeemen and teachers of the County? Those two classes upon which the success of our schools very largely depend. I will take the liberty to call our first meeting on Saturday, October 21st, 1911, at 10:30 A. M. at Lillington. I hope to see, if not all, a large majority of the school committeemen and teachers present.

Very truly yours,

J. D. EZZELL,





DUNN, N. C., November 17, 1911.

Dear Madam:—

I am writing you, asking your services in a work that means everything for our County. May I ask you to join with us in bettering the educational conditions in the County?

If every woman in Harnett should feel called from her little isle of safety to the larger ways of service for the children's sake, the good done would be beyond our reckoning.

Now, you have a public school building and grounds in your community, let us make it the most important place, next to the church, in your neighborhood. Well, you ask me how shall we do it?

I have a plan—it is this: Send word by the school children to your lady friends and neighbors to meet you at the school building Friday, November 30th, at 2 o'clock and organize, by merely talking over the following questions:

What can we do to make the school more attractive?

What can we do toward getting some pictures on the walls?

What can we do to get the parents, especially the mothers, to take more interest in the school?

Get all the mothers and young ladies interested and talking about our school, showing that they are proud of it.

I have an abiding faith in the womanhood of Harnett, and I know they can do almost anything they want to. If you learn that certain children in your school district are not in school, make it a point to visit the home, talk with the mother and encourage her about the importance of her children attending school every day during the term. Tell her that her life is being spent for them, and in old age her greatest source of happiness will be in her children, who have grown to be honorable and intelligent men and women through her influence.

If you should know of any children in your district kept out of school because they are not able to get books, will you please let me know who they are, and you and I together will see to it that they have them.

It will be a great pleasure to me as well as encouraging to get a letter from you along any line of school work. I am sending more than five hundred copies of this letter to the mothers.

With best wishes,

Very truly,

J. D. EZZELL.





DUNN, N. C., October 12, 1911.

To the Teachers:

Will you not do your very best this year in every phase of work pertaining to your school?

I want to ask you to get the names of every boy and girl between the ages of six and twenty-one years old in the district school you teach. I also want you to send me the names of the parents and the correct address of each. If you will do this it will be very beneficial to you and to me.

I will be glad to have this information no later than December 10th.

We must take advantage of every means possible to make the attendance better in our schools. When you have done your full duty you feel easy of conscience, but if you drag along in a don't-care sort of way, you lose your appetite, sweet sleep has left you, your health is gone, you are down and out.

Let's not have such a ghost-like picture haunting us, but rather, we will do our full duty and never drive from our cheeks the roses of youth and that vigorous and happy life that comes to every one who labors well in his or her chosen field.

As soon as you have engaged to teach, let me know where and when your school will begin. I can help you and want to do so.

You should hate to see things done by halves. If it be right, do it boldly; if it be wrong, leave it undone.

Very truly,

J. D. EZZELL.

Dunn, N. C., January 17, 1912.

To the Teachers:

The Harnett County Teachers’ Association will meet in the school building in Lillington at 10:30 A. M. Saturday, January 27, 1912.

We hope to have a full attendance at this meeting. There will be before the Association several questions, as follows: The advantages, if any, of a school with more than one teacher.

Should we have fewer districts and establish public conveyances to take the children to and from school? Other questions will also be heard.

I want to say to you this: Pay special attention to common and decimal fractions, and simple interest. I find in the public examinations of teachers that many of them are deficient in their knowledge of decimal fractions. Drill your pupils well along this line.

Do not go about your work in a mechanical way, but rather move along with your pupils in an inventive way, studying the best way to get the pupil to understand what he does not know by what he does know. Your pupils will make remarkably slow progress if you follow any one particular plan. Conditions and circumstances are such, sometimes










[Illustration:

OLD BUILDING, BUNN LEVEL, DISTRICT NO. 2, STEWART'S CREEK TOWNSHIP. BEFORE CONSOLIDATION AND LOCAL TAX.
]


[Illustration:

NEW BUILDING, BUNN LEVEL, DISTRICT NO. 2, STEWART'S CREEK TOWNSHIP, AFTER CONSOLIDATION AND LOCAL TAX. ERECTED IN 1910
]





that we must get out of the groove of the theorist and try an unbeaten path. Learn to be a teacher from the various branches of knowledge.

Ask yourself this question: In what does a child differ from a man? As the child is immature in all its powers, it is the first business of education, to cultivate those, by giving to each regular exercise in its own proper sphere, till, through exercise and growth, they come to their full strength and skill.

Let me append to this letter some of the things that have come to me in my experience as a teacher:

1. Help the pupil to form a clear idea of the work to be done, in its several parts and stages.

2. Show him that there are always more things implied than are said in any lesson.

3. Ask him to express, in simple words of his own, the meaning as he understands it, and to persist till he has the whole thought.

4. Aim to make the pupil an independent investigator. Cultivate in him a fixed and constant habit of research.

5. Make the most of the pupil's knowledge. Let him feel its extent and value as a means of learning more.

6. Teach the pupil to hate all falsehoods and shams as things that are odious, hurtful, dishonoring, shameful, cowardly and intensely mean and wicked. Make him to dread a false answer to a problem as a falsehood from the lips.

Very truly,

J. D. EZZELL.

DUNN, N. C., December 2, 1911.

To the Teachers:

As previously announced, the next meeting of the County Association of Teachers will be held in Lillington Saturday, December 16th, at 10:30 in the school building.

In this meeting we hope to have discussed the school register, its uses and benefits. Bring your register with you and tell us how you keep it. Let us discuss at this meeting also time-saving devices and system in school work.

The one teacher school through lack of system is woefully inefficient. System will do much towards redeeming it. Come, let us reason together about this and thus help one another.

Very truly,

J. D. EZZELL.





DUNN, N. C., November 2, 1911.

To the Teachers of Harnett County:

Saturday, November 18th, as previously announced, the Harnett County Teachers’ Association will be held in the school building in Lillington at 10.30 A. M.

This meeting will be mainly for organization, electing officers and perfecting the roll. Short talks will be given on:

a. Problems of Supervision and School Management.

b. A Model Lesson.

c. The Reading Circle.

d. How to Use the Library.

It is my earnest desire that the teachers make these monthly meetings their own, and that they will feel free at all times to make suggestions, to ask questions pertaining to the advancement of our work. I am looking forward with much pleasure to meeting you all Saturday, November 18th. Come and let us plan together larger and greater things for the children of our beloved and historic county. I shall be greatly disappointed if a single teacher fails to be present, and thereby imposing upon me the unpleasant duty of investigating the reason.

With best wishes.

Very truly yours,

J. D. EZZELL,

County Superintendent.





This oration of Dr. Thompson is republished in this report for its educational value.

J. D. EZZELL,

County Superintendent.

WASTE*

BY CYRUS THOMPSON, M. D., JACKSONVILLE, N. C.

If the art of living is the finest of all the fine arts—and who that dreams of a perfect life shall doubt it!—then the saddest thing in life is man's slowness in learning to live it. The world is so beautiful, so beneficent, so abundant. The order of nature is so frugal and so conservative. In the stars of the firmament, there is no lost motion; no planet swerves from its helpful path; there is no dissipation of energy but is conserved in some useful form. If human economy is negligent, destructive, and wasteful, the divine order is contructive and saving. Out of the void and darkness, the spirit of God created all that is, preserves it all, and destroys nothing. Out of the abundance of man's heritage, over which he holds rightful dominion, behold the waste of life, the waste of opportunity, the stupendous waste of material!

Just one old Book contains the wisdom of the ages—written by the best of their times about the best when at their best. As a scheme of life the world's literature has nothing comparable to it. It makes record of the one perfect life, the one universal man, the measure of all men. In Palestine one afternoon, this Galilean had been teaching a vast multitude. “When the day began to wear away, then came the twelve and said unto him ‘Send the multitude away, that they may go into the town and country round about, and lodge and get victuals; for we are in a desert place.’ But he said unto them, ‘Give ye them to eat.’ And they said, ‘We have no more but five loaves and two fishes, except we should go and buy meat for all this people.’ For they were about five thousand men. And he said to his disciples, ‘Make them sit down.’ Then he took the five loaves and two fishes, and

[note]



looking up to heaven he blessed and brake and gave to the disciples to set before the multitude. And they did eat and were all filled.” When they were filled”—with food and no less with wonder—when the multitude and the disciples of the Master were satisfied and ready to go away, then came to his disciples this command out of the carefulness of God, “Gather up the fragments that remain, that nothing be lost.” A desert place, to be sure—a multitude to be fed, only five loaves and two fishes; but the Lord of Life, the master of the feast, the divine economy of saving, and the fragments more than they had at the beginning!

With the savage man, all is waste; as civilization advances, something is saved, though much is lost.

In a material way, we are saving much. The cotton of the South not long ago was valuable only for the lint, but now a very considerable part of the value of the crop is contained in the seed. Thirty years ago, a seedless lint seemed desirable; today the cotton-grower would almost welcome a lintless seed. Olives do not grow in the cotton belt, nor cows and hogs on cotton stalks; but from cotton seed we get lard made in Chicago, butter churned in Indiana, and olive oil pressed in sunny Italy. Petroleum gives us everything from axle-grease for an ox-cart to gasoline for an aeroplane; and the profits of the Standard Oil Company are largely made from the waste of twenty-five years ago. Armour has learned the saving principle of the whole hog or none; and he puts on the market everything from the ham to the internal secretion of the suprarenal gland. It used to be a problem with our sawmills what to do with the sawdust. Invention found a way to throw it into the furnace for fuel, and later invention converts it into wood alcohol. On farm and in factory, improved implements, methods, and machinery make impossible and ridiculous the slow and wastful methods of other days. Vast areas of waste lands we are reclaiming by drainage, and by irrigation we are forcing the desert places to blossom like the rose. The stage-coach is a memory, and railroads are everywhere; and the wastefulness of bad country roads is preached at every turn by the makers of automobiles and gasoline. The waste power





of turbulent waters is converted into productive energy. Steam and electricity, telegraph and telephone, are crowding the world together and wiping out time and distance; and still, finding it too far withal to steam around Cape Horn, we are spending our millions to save time, and cut across at Panama.

And in a social way, we are becoming conscious of our wastefulness, and are turning our minds to the principles that underlie conservation. I believe that I am right when I say that all social waste is due to the assertion of individual rights, and all social conservation is founded upon a denial of them. And I believe that the best government for any man is that which is best suited to develop the best possibilities that are in him. The form of government, in other words, must be determined by the matter of development.

All government is a denial of natural rights and the substitution of duties for the good of the individual in the common good. The fullest exercise of natural rights is found in a state of savagery; the highest conservation of rights is found in a state of civilization—in that civilization which makes fullest denial of natural rights for the well-being of society.

The State exists for the individual, and the individual must exist and be fitted to exist for the State. No personal right can stand in the way of the individual and social good. The doctrine of right’ must yield to the doctrine of duty; in the higher civilization, the sense of selfishness must give place to the sense of service.

The law of eminent domain holds true not only in lands and material things; it is operative as well over men. The State may tax for the preservation of order and compel for the public service. It may fine and imprison for crime; for the safety of society, it may take away all rights for a time or a lifetime; nay, it may take even life itself when the individual so misuses his rights that his death, better than his life, subserves the public good.

Preventive medicine, than which there is no finer fruit of civilization, is founded upon a denial of rights. Compulsory vaccination is primarily for the safety of the individual, but





mainly for public protection. Quarantine against acute, contagious and communicable diseases is prevention of waste through denial of personal rights. We may not allow a man to exercise a right when he exercises it to his own hurt and to the injury of his neighbors. The right is taken from him for his own and the public good, so to conserve best his best rights in the health of his community.

These principles we are steadily learning men to appreciate, and when we come to the full appreciation of the divine economy of service and saving, pestilence will not walk in darkness, nor destruction waste at noonday.

A dairyman's cows are his own, to be sure; but he may not sell infected milk to waste the health and life of his neighbors’ children.

A butcher's meat is his own; but, if unfit for human food, he may not offer it at the market-places.

A patent nostrum is its maker's own; but let him warn the purchaser of its narcotic content.

A manufacturer's money is his own; but he may not spend it for the cheaper labor of the undeveloped child, or require of a man for a day's labor toil beyond a definite number of hours.

A man's child is his own; but he may not waste its growth and health and life in hazardous labors.

A man may not waste his own child nor his neighbor's child, nor claim any right of person or property that hinders the aggregate development and safety of his community.

On every hand out of the mouths of frauds, ignorance and politicians, we hear enough of the rights of men; let us hear more rather of their duties. We have had enough of waste; it is time we had more of conservation. To love our neighbor as ourself is but to see ourself in our neighbor and to find our safety everlastingly involved in his welfare. From rights, then, to duties; so lead the way from waste to permanent wealth and happiness.

Think for a moment of the stupendous waste in an uneducated and untrained child, the countless untrained, undeveloped, uneducated children of the past. You desire wealth,





but intrinsic value resides only in man; the value of things is derived from man; and the greater or less value of things is dependent upon the character, the quality of man. A lively consciousness of this fact is the motive of all progress in education.

Our system of public education is founded upon a denial of rights and a material consciousness of duties—a denial of the right of the child to himself, of the right of the parent to his child, of the right of even the childless man to so much of his money as may be necessary for the child's education. To conserve, to construct, this is the mark and work of civilization; to tear down, to hinder, let that be of the past: it is diabolical. To build, to prevent waste, this embodies the whole duty of civilized man. The State is endeavoring to build for the sake of the individual and itself, and the individual must be fitted to fulfil his duty to the State.

To prevent waste, therefore, we have everywhere our common schools, our graded schools, our colleges and our universities; our technical schools for the education of men, and our normals for the training of women. For the same reason we shall come everywhere to a system of compulsory education. Recognizing already the defects and consequent waste of our methods, we are coming even now to the study of exceptional and nervous children and to the medical inspection of the school children in general.

To prevent waste, the State, the churches, and fraternal orders establish and maintain orphanages. These are not mere charities, not matters of sentiment only; they are makers of men and women—they make them, alas! far better than the average home!

To prevent waste, we teach the deaf and dumb and the blind, and make them self-sustaining members of society.

To prevent waste, we care for the insane and the epileptic, and restore many of these unfortunates to happy and useful life.

To prevent waste, gathering up hitherto neglected fragments, the State of North Carolina leads among Southern States in the establishment of a school for the teaching of the feeble-minded. The motive originated in this society, and





stands as one of its glories forever. The Commonwealth of Virginia is urged to follow in this constructive work; and Virginia cannot lag behind.

To prevent waste, everywhere there is better care of the criminal classes. The old misanthropy did not seek to reform and save; the old misanthropy imprisoned in noisome jails without hope of health or reformation, at the offender's cost and wretchedness. No prouder name stands in English history than the name of John Howard, the humane country gentleman, high sheriff of Bedfordshire, the father of modern prison reform. Begun in sentiments of humanity, the new philanthropy leads the State to take account of the offender and forces the offender to take account of the State. We punish the criminal not for the sole purpose of punishing, but for the protection and progress of society, to deter others from the commission of crime and to reform or improve the offender and send him home a useful member of society. If we deprive him of liberty and his rights, it is to make of him a better citizen. We work him and care for him; we feed him, clothe and shelter him; we make him profitable to himself and useful to the State, even against his will.

To prevent waste, we have juvenile courts that consider the defects and possibilities of the criminal; and we build reformatories for young criminals, lest the hope of reformation to useful life be lost by association with the irretrievably bad.

To prevent waste, the physician has ceased to be the mere giver of drugs to them that are sick; he is become the peripathetic teacher of sanitation and hygiene, the guardian of individual and public, the apostle of the gospel of health. Having fought against death at close quarters and failed, he warns all men everywhere to fortify against his approach. And so he adds to the years of human life. If he carries no more of us beyond the limit of three score years and ten, he leads more lives more nearly to this limit. Oh! the waste of life in its prime, the slaughter of the innocents from mothers’ arms, the untimely tears of broken hearts, before the physician glimpsed the fulness of his mission and began to rouse the State to the duty of preventative medicine! You've seen










[Illustration:

DISTRICT NO. 3, NcNEILL'S CREEK TOWNSHIP. AFTER LOCAL TAX WAS VOTED.
]





the tumorous scars, in every city, hamlet, and churchyard, that made prematurely leprous the beautiful face of mother earth.

Not that our work is yet fully comprehended or perfected; but this one thing we do, forgetting the things that are behind, we press forward, proud that on stepping-stones of our dead selves we are rising with better conscience to higher things.

To prevent waste, the manufacturer begins to look after the sanitation of premises and the health of his operatives. He finds that he can save life and time and money.

To prevent waste, great insurance corporations are organizing health departments, issuing health bulletins, and teaching their policyholders and the public how to live.

And to prevent the waste of war, this relic of barbarism, the verity of hell—the dream of poet and seer through centuries from Isaiah to the latest soul that sang in sight of things—to beat our swords into ploughshares and our spears into purning-hooks—the greater nations of the earth now seek to adjust their disputes by arbitration. May our young Nation lead the world in this joyous laugh in the face of Death! Oh, it will come some time, and nations will learn war no more! Did you ask when? I know not the day; but when man is wise enough to exercise his duty to his fellow as he would now assert his right in his face, we shall not be far from the

  • “One far-off divine event,
  • Toward which the whole creation moves.”

For the world, despite all its evil and waste, is growing better; but from wild grapes to grapes is a long way, a slow and halting evolution.

But there is more of high ideal and noble purpose in the world than ever before; knowledge is being diffued as never before, and we are growing more humane. But if we are on the Appian way, in sight of the Three Taverns, let us thank God, take courage, and go on: we are not yet in Rome.

* * * * * * *

So with all our increase of knowledge and growth of humane sentiment, our utilization of natural resources and





prevention of material waste, our marvelous National progress, the thoughtful man cannot fail to inquire if we are building character, making men and women, as well as we builded in former days. After all, are we not tithing mint and anise and cummin and forgetting the weightier matters of the law? Are we as law-abiding as we used to be; have we the old-time reverence for sacred things; do we reverence God and the State as our conscience, and our conscience as the State and God? By the assertion of rights, are we not following the way of the prodigal who spent his substance in riotous living and would fain, at last, have filled his belly with the husks which the swine did eat?

If my son have not respect for my authority and the authority of the State; if he reverence not God and holy things; if he have not faith and hope and love abiding in him; if he have not respect for the rights of others and respect for himself; if he have not character; no wealth or knowledge of his can tell me that he is not a dangerous derelict without anchor, and I shall know that he is the heaviness of his father.

I am not preaching you a sermon—I am not cut out for that—but whatever of good there is in me comes, I know, from that mature sentiment, which, when the Sabbath dawns for man's rest, says “Come, let us go up in the house of the Lord;” and, when I have entered, “The Lord is in his holy temple; let all the earth keep silence before him!”

* * * * * * *

It used to be said that the parent controlled the child; it is now a common saying that the child controls the parent. That the parent does not control the child is too grievously true. Parental authority in no sense depends upon the consent of the governed. It is inherent in parenthood; it is a duty which the parent has no right to disregard, whether for himself, for his child, or the State. For the family is the indispensable social unit. The purpose of the family is the training of children to orderly life and citizenship. More and more the family is failing of its purpose. I must train my child in





the way he should go for the child's sake and for society's sake. It is not a work which I have a right to do or not to do: it is my inalienable duty to him, to the State, and to God. I may not relinquish my work any more than the Creator of all things may abdicate His throne upon the circle of the heavens. So only can come among men the doing of justice and judgment. The Puritan may have been unduly austere, but the Puritan made men and women. To spare the rod even and so spoil the child, what is it but to take out of my child the best that is in him along with all his best possibilities? I, his king, will have robbed my subject and wasted the substance of the State.

Patriot and demagogue rant about rights of local self-government—let them descant less upon the beauties of it to the thoughtless, unbridled multitude; but rather, as fathers, let them teach it to their children—teach them obedience to divinely constituted authority and obedience to self. For “he that ruleth his spirit is better than he that taketh a city.” So may crime be lessened and more surely punished; so may juries look up to God and care well for the State; these new mad-storms of reckless brains be lulled ere they rise; the company of the insane will grow smaller, and the number of hysteric women and psychasthentic men will grow less.

In the building of character, the right attitude of the soul of man, a work of early years, nothing can take the place of the family. The schools are only supplementary. And I pray you, O schoolmaster, teach my child both obedience and books if you can; but if you can teach him no books, teach him obedience to you and and control of himself—teach him this form of local self-government, this most vital, embryonic form of democracy.

It is said that “when the court chaplain of Frederick the Great was asked by that gruff monarch for a concise summary of the argument in support of the truths of Scripture, he instantly replied, with a force to which nothing could be added: ‘The Jews, your Majesty, the Jews!’ ”—a people enduring, law-abiding, not much given to crime.

“And the Lord said, Shall I withhold from Abraham





that thing which I do, seeing that Abraham shall surely become a great and mighty nation, and all the nations of the earth shall be blessed in him? For I know him, that he will command his children and his household after him, and they shall keep the ways of the Lord, to do justice and judgment, that the Lord may bring upon Abraham that thing which he hath spoken of him.” It would come in no other way; not even the Lord could bring it any other way!

Therefore, whoso shall rouse the heads of American families to resume their rightful sway, to discharge to their children, the State, and to God their inalienable duty, he shall preserve our rights and prevent the waste of the Nation.

RECOMMENDATIONS

The minimum length of school term of four months provided in the Constitution should not be made the maximum length of term. To stop here is to shut off hope of progress. The door of hope for education should be open to the child in every rural district. The general school fund, supplemented by a local tax, would give a six months’ school to the rural districts, as an average.

(1) That every rural district in the County vote a local tax of the maximum rate of 30c on the $100 valuation of property and 90c on the poll. The aim should be for not less than six months’ school in the rural districts.

(2) That our citizens, school officers, teachers and legislators all co-operate in making the rural schools better, and thus solve the most vital question before our county.





PUBLIC SCHOOL COMMITTEEMEN—WHITE.
ANDERSON CREEK TOWNSHIP

John M. Stone, Spout SpringsJohn S. Johnson, Spout Springs
R. L. McRae, Spout SpringsMoses Elmore, Westville
Alex West, WestvilleJohn McArten, Little River Acad'y
Joseph Hubbart, Little River Acad'yDaniel Ray, Little River Academy
H. D. McDonald, WestvilleD. H. Bain, Westville
J. A. Stephens, WestvilleA. E. McRae, Westville
J. McC. Rae, WestvilleR. L. McRae, Westville
J. A. Clark, WestvilleD. R. West, Westville
A. A. Shaw, Westville

AVERASBORO TOWNSHIP.

C. Hodges, Dunn, No. 2R. G. Allen, Dunn, No. 5
A. B. Weaver, Dunn, No. 5J. S. Neighbors, Dunn, No. 5
John B. Young, Dunn, No. 5W. R. Denning, Dunn, No. 5
J. B. R. Jernigan, DunnJohn Norris, Dunn
Walter Parker, Dunn, No. 5J. V. Barefoot, Dunn, No. 5
Jonas Reaves, Dunn, No. 5T. C. Miller, Benson, No. 3
Blany Lee, DunnFrank Butler, Dunn
J. L. Lee, DunnM. W. Barefoot, Dunn
W. M. Munds, DunnJessie Tart, Dunn
J. L. Hodges, DunnJ. H. Sorrell, Dunn
G. F. Norris, DunnG. L. W. Jackson, Dunn
J. C. Pope, DunnW. F. Wade, Dunn.
James McPhail, DunnGeorge Hemmingway, Dunn
Thomas Royall, DunnB. H. Jernigan, Dunn
L. W. Tart, DunnT. S. Jones, Dunn

BARBECUE TOWNSHIP

H. D. Cameron, Rock BranchJohn Darroch, Jonesboro, No. 3
John S. Harrington, Broadway, No. 1

BLACK RIVER TOWNSHIP

G. W. Partin, AngierAndrew Parrish, Angier
A. B. Currin, BarclayvilleN. A. Barnes, Barclayville
Benton Matthews, CardenasW. F. Ogbern, Cardenas
L. B. Barber, CardenasB. F. Williams, Angier
C. S. Adams, AngierJ. A. Hockaday, Angier
J. T. Nordon, AngierJ. R. Young, Angier
B. C. Hockaday, AngierJ. F. Jones, Lillington, No. 1
E. E. Matthews, Lillington, No. 1.





BUCKHORN TOWNSHIP

J. M. Cade, KiplingR. S. Abernathy, Kipling
A. V. Dewar, KiplingJ. W. Stephenson, Holly Sp'gs, No. 2
H. O. Austin, Holly Springs, No. 2J. D. Weathers, Holly Spring, No. 2
Edward Prince, KiplingE. M. Blanchard, Kipling
A. Y. Tudor, Kipling.

DUKE TOWNSHIP

T. H. Webb, DukeArthur Fowler, Duke
W. M. Crawford, DukeW. D. Barnes, Dunn, No. 4
Hannibal Pope, Dunn, No. 4C. C. Colville, Dunn, No. 3

GROVE TOWNSHIP

C. L. Bailey, Benson, No. 3C. D. Stewart, Benson, No. 3
James Ennis, Benson, No. 3J. M. Langdon, Benson, No. 3
C. P. Matthews, Benson, No. 3Andrew Cobb, Benson, No. 3
B. F. Parrish, CoatsR. M. Coats, Coats
P. F. Pope, CoatsR. M. Canaday, Duke, No. 2
W. T. Avery, Dunn, No. 3B. F. McLeod, Duke, No. 2
L. L. Turlington, Duke, No. 2Stewart Turlington, Dunn, No. 3
G. M. Stewart, Dunn, No. 3I. M. Avery, Duke, No. 2
A. C. Snipes, Dunn, No. 3Z. E. Byrd, Duke, No. 2
Marshal Ennis, Duke, No. 2J. M. Pleasant, Duke, No. 2
Richard Sorrell, Duke, No. 2

HECTOR'S CREEK TOWNSHIP

W. L. Senter, KiplingL. O. Senter, Kipling
W. C. Marrshburn, KiplingA. A. Johnson, Chalybeate Springs
R. E. Smith, Chalybeate SpringsW. N. Bradley, Chalybeate Springs
H. S. Holloway, CardenasP. R. Adams, Cardenas
David E. Smith, CardenasL. F. Arnold, Fuquay Springs
W. H. Lee, Fuquay SpringsJ. A. Gilbert, Fuquay Springs
Duncan Rollins, Fuquay SpringsR. H. Holland, Fuquay Springs
J. D. Betts, Fuquay SpringsT. B. Brinnett, Fuquay Springs
W. H. Rawls, Fuquay SpringsAndrew Johnson, Fuquay Springs

JOHNSONVILLE TOWNSHIP

J. J. Spivey, Cameron, No. 3J. L. Marks, Spout Springs
J. J. Parker, Cameron, No. 3D. M. Buie, Cameron, No. 3
C. A. Cameron, PineviewT. M. Cameron, Pineview
Raford Gilham, Spout Springs





LILLINGTON TOWNSHIP

H. T. Spears, LillingtonE. S. Smith, Lillington
J. E. Caviness, LillingtonW. F. Hockaday, Lillington
James Bryan, LillingtonGus Byrd, Duke, No. 1
James Byrd, Duke, No. 1G. A. Wicker, Lillington
Chas. Rich, Lillington, No. 2N. McKay Murchison, Lillington, 2
Hector McLean, Lillington, No. 2.

NEILL'S CREEK TOWNSHIP

John Collier, Buie's CreekR. B. Crowder, Buie's Creek
Archie Johnson, Lillington, No. 1J. C. Upchurch, Lillington, No. 1
M. B. McKinnie, Lillington, No. 1J. L. Wilborn, Lillington, No. 1
E. B. Johnson, Lillington, No. 1Walter Johnson, Lillington, No. 1
Burwell Coats, Lillington, No. 1.

STEWART'S CREEK TOWNSHIP

G. D. Elliot, Duke, No. 1J. H. Williams, Duke, No. 1
Dr. C. W. Melvin, LindenC. M. Allen, Duke. No. 1
F. D. Byrd, Duke, No. 1Lonnie Byrd, Duke, No. 1

UPPER LITTLE RIVER TOWNSHIP

W. R. Gilchrist, LillingtonCharles Ross, Lillington
W. M. Hawley, LillingtonD. A. Patterson, Broadway, No. 2
J. A. Griffin, Lillington, No. 3J. W. McLean, Broadway, No. 2
R. M. Griffin, Jonesboro, No. 2William Douglas, Broadway No. 2
T. B. Buchanan, Broadway, No. 2N. A. Patterson, Broadway, No. 2
John A. Buchanan, Broadway, No. 2J. A. Byrd, Broadway, No. 2
John McLeod, Broadway, No. 1W. T. Sloan, Broadway, No. 1
A Frank Holder, Broadway, No. 2S. A. Harrington, Broadway, No. 2
D. R. Stewart, Broadway, No. 2D. A. Cameron, Broadway, No. 2
Malcom J. Butler, Broadway, No. 2M. S. Holder, Broadway, No. 2
N. A. Morrison, Broadway, No. 2N. A. Mason, Lillington, No. 2
Edgar S. Smith, Lillington, No. 2A. B. Wade, Lillington, No. 2
W. H. Rogers, Lillington, No. 3J. R. Patterson, Lillington, No. 3
Geo. W. O'Quinn, Lillington, No. 3John Blue McDonald, Lillington, 2
H. J. McDonald, Lillington, No. 2N. A. McLean, Lillington, No. 3
H. B. Page, Lillington, No. 3J. W. Byrd, Lillington, No. 3
W. J. Brown, Lillington, No. 3T. R. Rosser, Jonesboro, No. 3
A. H. Gross, Jonesboro, No. 3W. J. McDonald, Jonesboro, No. 3
By a special act, district No. 1, Averasboro, (the Dunn Graded School) has a board of trustees elected by the town Commissioners:
K. L. Howard, DunnS. J. Hooks, Dunn
R. G. Taylor, DunnT. C. Young, Dunn
G. F. Pope, DunnS. Cooper, Dunn
A. F. Surles, Dunn, elected to fill unexpired term of H. L. Godwin.





The School Committee of Angier and Lillington Public High Schools are appointed by the County Board of Education. The powers, duties and qualifications are similar to those of other public school committeemen.

They are appointed for a term of two years, for a term of four years, and a term of six years.

ANGIER HIGH SCHOOL

B. F. Williams, two years, AngierC. S. Adams, four years, Angier
J. A. Hockaday, Six years, Angier.

LILLINGTON HIGH SCHOOL

Dr. J. E. Caviness, two years, Lillington E. S. Smith, four years, Lillington H. T. Spears, six years, Lillington.










[Illustration:

ROCK BRANCH, DISTRICT NO 1, JOHNSONVILLE AND BARBECUE TOWNSHIPS. THE FIRST PUBLIC SCHOOL HOUSE EVER ERECTED IN THIS IMMEDIATE SECTION. THEY HAVE LOCAL TAX.
]





COLORED SCHOOLS.
A VERASBORO TOWNSHIP

The school in Dunn is under the management of the same board of trustees as the Dunn Graded School for the whites.

H. H. Hartfield, Dunn, No. 5J. A. Burnett, Dunn, No. 5

ANDERSON CREEK TOWNSHIP

A. B. Brinkley, ManchesterTobie McNeill, Spout Springs
H. W. Washington, Spout SpringsCurtis Elliot, Thornwall
Isaiah Barney, WestvilleJohn McGregor, Westville
G. W. Mayner, L. R. Academy, No. 1Jacob Furgison, L. R. Academy, 1
S. G. Williams, L. R. Academy, No. 1George Ray, Westville
R. S. Ray, WestvilleHenry Ray, Westville
Sandy McLean, WestvilleC. F. McLean, Lillington, No. 2
Joe Harris, Lillington.

BARBECUE TOWNSHIP

Managed by the White committee, given in the list of white committeemen.

BLACK RIVER TOWNSHIP

Jim McKay, AngierKelly Cutts, AngierAd. Matthews, Angier.

BUCKHORN TOWNSHIP

Matthew Williams, Kipling.

DUKE TOWNSHIP

Duncan Range, Dunn, No. 4Sam Draughon, Dunn, No. 4
Lewis Williams, Dunn, No. 4Henry Wall, Duke
Stephen McKay, DukeSam McNeill, Duke.

GROVE TOWNSHIP

George Cofield, CoatsHilairy Stewart, Coats
Wesley Johnson, CoatsWilliam Shaw, Dunn, No. 3
D. J. Ryals, Dunn, No. 3L. N. McKay, Dunn, No. 3
Neill Massey, Dunn, No. 2Haywood Sanders, Dunn, No. 2
J. A. Ryals, Dunn, No. 2Robert Rowland, Coats
Alex James, CoatsWalter Matthews, Coats.

HECTOR'S CREEK TOWNSHIP

Freeman Blalock, Kipling, No. 1W. H. Cofield, Kipling, No. 1
Charles Hicks, Kipling, No. 1Hubbart Judd, Chalybeate Spring.
Lewis Stewart, Chalybeate SpringsEdward Major, Chalybeate Springs.

JOHNSONVILLE TOWNSHIP

A. A. Rone, Spout SpringsD. J. McGregor, Spout Springs
Stephen McRae, Spout SpringsBoston Chalmers, Pineview
Nathan Mallett, PineviewBill Hailey, Pineview.





LILLINGTON TOWNSHIP

Anson Bailey, LillingtonGus McLean, Lillington
J. H. MeLean, LillingtonJoe McNeill, Lillington, No. 2
Stephen McKay, Lillington, No. 2Mack McDougald, Harnett.

NEILL'S CREEK TOWNSHIP

Managed by the white committee, given in the list of white committeemen.

STEWART'S CREEK TOWNSHIP

James McNeill, Duke, No. 1Sonnie Smith, Duke, No. 1
R. B. Smith, Duke, No. 1Robert Harris, Linden
Robert Maynor, LindenFrench Williams, Linden
Parker Covington, Duke, No. 1Gus McNeill, Duke, No. 1
George Smith, Duke, No. 1Sandy McDougald, Duke, No. 1
George Hill McLean, Duke, No. 1Jack McLean, Duke, No. 1

UPPER LITTLE RIVER TOWNSHIP

Sam McLean, Lillington, No. 3Jim McLean, Lillington, No. 3
Sam McKay, Broadway, No. 2Sandy Douglas, Broadway, No. 2
Jno. Brewington, Broadway, No. 2L. C. Harrington, Broadway, No. 2
B. F. Buie, Broadway, No. 2N. A. McLean, Lillington, No. 2
Sam McDougald, Lillington, No. 2J. A. G. McNeill, Lillington, No. 2
J. A. Yarboro, Broadway, No. 2Sandy Smith, Broadway, No. 2
Sandy Minter, Broadway, No. 2.

CONCLUSION

Considerable progress has been made in the County in the improvement of educational conditions, but there is a great deal yet to be done. A few more school houses need to be built, more school rooms furnished with the equipment necessary for successful work, more consolidations of districts made, more local tax districts established, a better average school attendance secured, and a library of select reference books for teachers purchased. By the hearty co-operation of the parents, the teachers, the school committee and the other school officials, these necessary improvements can soon be attained.

I believe that there is more of the Declaration of Independence expressed in the common school system than in any other of our institutions; there is more of equal opportunity, more of the even chance, more of the square deal, more of the recognition of the individual merits than in any other institution. At the door of the public school all social, political and religious distinctions disappear, all external marks of rank and classification are laid aside, and the children enter the public schools as the sons and daughters of American citizens, and as children of the Republic.









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