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Facts about Columbus County

Date: 1945 | Identifier: NC 975.631 F
Facts about Columbus County / [by B. Gordon Lewis]. 1945 ed. Chadbourn, N.C. : Columbus County News, [1945?] iv, 74 p. : ill., map ; 21 cm. Author statement from p. [1] of cover. Includes index. Original held by New Hanover County Public Library, Wilmington, N.C. more...
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Facts About
Columbus County

By B. Gordon Lewis

PUBLISHED BY
THE COLUMBUS COUNTY NEWSCHADBOURN, N. C.



Progress . . .

When the Chadbourn Potato Storage Company was established five years ago, potatoes were bringing around 50 cents per bushel. Last year, they brought about $1.40 per bushel. We do not attempt to take all the credit for this advance but we do believe we are offering the farmers of this section a potato market second to none in the country.

Our washing and waxing machinery is of the most modern design, and we have the largest potato house in this section of the country, with a capacity of 50,000 bushels, and capable of handling 150,000 bushels a year.

Chadbourn Potato Storage Co., Inc.

F R. MANAHAN — W. E. BAILEY — B. W. PEAL M. H. ADAMS — B. F. HARTMAN — R. A. CANNON

Owners and Directors

Chadbourn, North Carolina













Facts About
Columbus County

PUBLISHED BY

THE COLUMBUS COUNTY NEWS

CHADBOURN, N. C.





1945 EDITION

Facts About Columbus County

COMPILED BY GORDON LEWIS

THE COLUMBUS COUNTY NEWS





TABLE OF CONTENTS

I—History of County1
II—County Government15
III—The County17
IV—Columbus Crops19
V—Public Utilities23
VI—County Organizations27
VII—Natural Resources51
VIII—County Industry53
IX—Mayors and Municipalities59
X—Directory61
XI—Statistics65
Index74





County As Formed and Annexations


[Illustration:

Map of Columbus County showing
original area and later annexations.
Shaded area represents county as originally
formed, and lighter areas are
annexations.

]





Chapter I
HISTORY OF COUNTY

Columbus County, named for the discoverer of America, was formed from Bladen and Brunswick in 1808. The courthouse was erected the following year in Whiteville, which was chosen as the county seat. The Revolutionary and Colonial history of the county is connected with that of Bladen and Brunswick counties.

The act providing for the creation of Columbus county stipulated “that all that part of Bladen and Brunswick, beginning in the Waccamaw river, where the dividing line between North and South Carolina crosses the same, then up said river to the White Marsh Branch, then up the same to the Western Prong and to the head of it, then a direct line to the Rough Horn Branch or Swamp; then down Rough Horn to Drowning Creek (Lumber River) thence down the same to the State line, thence with the same to the beginning—shall be and is hereby established into a separate and distinct county, by the name of Columbus”.

Later, in 1810, another part of Bladen was annexed to Columbus: “ . . . the boundary-line between the Counties of Bladen and Columbus, shall begin in the Brunswick line, two miles to the east of the Waggamaw Lake, and run thence a direct line to Slade Swamp, so as to include Henry Swindle's plantation, thence down Slade Swamp to the Brown Marsh Swamp, thence down the same to the Western Prong, thence up the same to the mouth of Green's Mill Branch, then up the said Branch to the head, and then a direct line to the mouth of the Horse-pen Branch at the Big Swamp, thence down the Big Swamp and Drowning Creek to the Columbus line. And the boundary herein mentioned and described, shall be the dividing line between the said counties of Bladen and Columbus.”

A dividing line between Brunswick and Columbus was authorized to be established in 1810: “ . . . That Waccamaw River, from the South Carolina line to the Stake, shall be considered as the true and established boundary between the said counties; and that the county courts of Columbus and Brunswick shall, together or separately, have the power and authority to order the said river, from bank to bank, cleared out and to enforce the working thereupon on the inhabitants of their own counties respectively, whenever they, or either of them, think proper.”

In 1811, the act of 1809 which added part of Bladen to





Columbus, was amended by adding new commissioners to extend and mark the dividing line between the said counties. No description is given in the law.

Again in 1811, still another part of Brunswick was annexed to Columbus as follows: “All that part of Brunswick county bounded as follows to-wit — Beginning at Waccamaw river, at the mouth of Juniper Creek, on the Columbus line and running up Juniper Creek to a swamp called Big Swamp, and the Big Swamp to a branch called Clear Branch and up the Clear Branch to the head, then a direct course to the Waccamaw river, at the mouth of a large creek, thence to join the Columbus line or River to the beginning —- be, and the same is hereby annexed to the county of Columbus”.

In 1820, the boundary-line between Bladen and Columbus was authorized to be extended and marked as before directed by law. No description is given in the law.

A year later, or in 1821, another portion of Bladen county was annexed to Columbus, the act providing “ . . that all that part of the county of Bladen which lies south west of the line hereafter to be run, beginning on the Brunswick line where the Lake Road leading to Wilmington crosses, thence on the north side of said road to the drain of Buckhead Bay, thence a direct line to where the road leading from Manly Westbrook's to Gabriel Holmes’ crosses Saspan drain, thence a direct line to where the line that divides Bladen and Columbus Counties is supposed to run, thence along said line to Samuel Swindol's plantation, and thence on the southwest side of said plantation to the mouth of Slade Swamp — - be and the same is hereby annext to and shall hereafter form a part of Columbus County; and all that part of the county lying north east of the said line shall form a part of Bladen.”

In 1827 the boundary line between Bladen and Columbus was again authorized to be run and marked, and in 1832, the act concerning the Bladen and Columbus boundary line was repealed.

Even as late of 1877, more of Brunswick county was being annexed to Columbus: the act described the territory annexed as follows: “Commencing at the point where the counties of Bladen, Brunswick and Columbus now join, running thence with said Bladen Line to northwest Cape Fear River; thence down the said river to the point where Hood's Creek empties in the same; thence with the run of said creek to its source in Little Green Swamp, thence a direct line to the source of Clear Branch and to the present Brunswick and Columbus line; thence with the line of said counties to the beginning; and all that portion of Brunswick county, embraced within the boundary above described, shall be and is hereby transferred to, and constitutes a part of the county of Columbus’.

The eastern boundary line between the counties of Brunswick





and Columbus was authorized to be established in 1879: “Beginning at a point on Cape Fear River immediately below Fowl Food plantation, the property of John M. Sikes, from thence an air-line to the head of Livingston Creek; from thence a due south course to Clear Branch, in Green Swamp; from thence with old line as now established.”

The dividing line between Bladen and Columbus was authorized to be changed in 1883: “That the dividing line between the counties of Bladen and Columbus be and the same is hereby changed as follows to-wit: beginning at a point where the county line comes to the Whiteville and Wilmington Road, thence with the south edge of said road for a distance of two and one-half miles, thence across said road to its north edge, thence with Bladen county line as it now stands.”

An act was passed in 1915 which provided for locating and defining the boundary line between Columbus and Brunswick, as confusion had arisen because the line was inadequately established and marked, especially through Green Swamp.

In 1808, Thomas Frink and James Stevens were appointed by the General Assembly of North Carolina, in the act creating Columbus county, “to fix a site for a courthouse and jail,” and it was suggested that until the courthouse was ready for use, that courts should be held in the home of Steven Barfield.

PIERCE & COMPANY

Hallsboro, N. C.

General Merchants

Lumber Manufacturers





What is now the county seat of Columbus county was originally Whites’ Crossing. In 1810, however Whitesville was laid out on James B. White's land, and public buildings were ordered erected there. Later, the county seat became known as Whiteville.

Of the Colonial and Revolutionary history of Columbus county, not a great deal is known.

During the War of the Revolution, what is now Columbus county was the scene of two skirmishes between the patriots and British soldiers — - one at what is now Pireway, and one in the Welches Creek section.

General Rutherford, one of North Carolina's outstanding leaders in the American Revolution, had his army in the vicinity of Columbus county when he was informed of the surrender of Lord Cornwallis at Yorktown. Then after the British forces had left Wilmington, General Rutherford sent part of the American army back through Columbus county, enroute to the Pee Dee, where the troops were to be discharged. On the way west, these troops under the direction of Gen. Joseph Graham, stopped for a time at Marsh Castle, the home of Col. James B. White, just east of the present town of Whiteville. Previously, American forces had stopped there in anticipation of an engagement with Col. Gainey, leader of the Tory forces in upper Eastern South Carolina.

Facts relating to the activities of the American Revolutionary forces in Columbus county are brought out in the papers of Gen. Joseph Graham, collected in a volume by Major William A. Graham:

“Colonel Gainey, who commanded the Tories in South Carolina between the Waccamaw, Pee Dee and Drowning Creek (Lumber River) and who was at this time under a truce with General Marion, by some means or other had notice of a party of the North Carolina Whigs being so near his district, and had collected about eighty of his adherents.

“We had one man killed — - Lieutenant Clark — - and three others wounded; four horses were killed, two of which were shot down under the dragoons which they charged, and several horses wounded. Only one of the enemy was killed. After burying the soldier and fixing the wounded for traveling, the party marched up to the White Marsh and encamped at Marsh Castle. It was believed Colonel Gainey might be reinforced and make another attack at this place. Considerable defences were made with fence rails, in such a manner that if the enemy had come, he would have been under a cross fire in all directions. Gaps were made in the enclosure for the cavalry to move whenever wanted.

“On the next day we marched by Waccamaw Lake and joined Colonel Smith above Livingston Creek. On the succeeding day we heard considerable firing of small arms in the direction where General Rutherford lay. In the evening





BEYOND THE PRESENT

Tomorrow's leaders in every field are already looking and planning beyond the uncertain present.

With the increasing emphasis on the development of native raw materials you will find Columbus County a fertile field for expansion. Varied resources—a sound, progressive population, established furniture hardwoods, North Carolina pines, pulp wood, vegetables, resorts, and unsurpassed natural advantages for dairying and livestock.

Let us help you make or develop contacts in this area. Write to any office.

WACCAMAW

Bank and Trust Company

WHITEVILLE

FAIRMONT

CHADBOURN

TABOR CITY

SOUTHPORT

CLARKTON

ROSE HILL

KENANSVILLE

HOLLY RIDGE

K. Clyde Council, Pres. Dr. R. C. Sadler, Vice-Pres. J. N. Coburn, Executive Vice-Pres. Glenn F. Strole, Vice-Pres. C. L. Tate, Vice-Pres.

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation





Lieutenant Colonel Lee, of the United States Legion arrived. He had come by way of General Rutherford's camp from American headquarters in Virginia, and brought intelligence that Lord Cornwallis and the British army were captured on the 19th of October, and that General Rutherford, on receiving the news, had drawn up his army and fired a “feu de joie” which was the firing we had heard.

“Colonel Lee moved to the South to join General Greene, and in the evening several gentlemen from Wilmington came to us and informed us the British were evacuating that place. On the next day we moved to Shaw's Plantation, within four miles of the town; heard that the whole British troops were on board, and the vessels falling down the river. Two vessels were procured and manned, and we went down the river from Shaw's to town. The enemy's vessels were out of sight”:

General Rutherford, from Wilmington on November 10, 1781 issued an order to Major Joseph Graham, directing him to take command of “the whole of the dragoon and mounted infantry of Col. Smith's Corps which were to the leftward of the Northeast River, to join Col. Leonard in controlling the territory to the west “then march your company home, not suffering them to disperse until you may have crossed the Great Pee Dee”.

Major Graham took charge of the troops and marched them through Columbus county. On November 21, he issued a marching order from Marsh Castle, insisting that “the most profound silence and the greatest order is observed on the march through the whole of this route”.

The next day, Major Graham issued marching orders again from Camp Emory's Bridge. The third day orders were issued from Camp Barnes’ plantation, Ashpole (Fairmont) this order carrying instructions not “to fire a gun if it can be avoided”

CORNWALLIS IN COUNTY

For years, it was popular legend that Lord Cornwallis, after his defeat of General Nathaniel Greene's forces at the Battle of Guilford Courthouse, in which he lost so many troops that he was forced to back up as far as Wilmington, in his retreat to the New Hanover capital blazed the first trail across the White Marsh for what is now a widely travelled U. S. Highway dividing Columbus county practically in half. The State Historical Commission has never been able to find any substantiation for this claim, and it is now accepted as pure fiction.

However, history does record that Lord Cornwallis, on that historic retreat that eventually led him to the surrender at Yorktown, traversed the northeastern tip of what is now Columbus county, and a marker commemorating this fact has been erected near historic Wayman church near Delco.

Before the coming of the white men—largely English people from New England—what is now Columbus county was





inhabited by the Waccamaw Indian tribe. Watcoosa was king of the tribe at the time the white people began settling this area, roughly about 1663. Many Indian names still remain in Columbus county, as for example: Lake Waccamaw, Wananish, Nakina and others.

After the formation of Columbus county, James B. White was a member of the General Assembly in 1809, while Wynn Nance and Thomas Frink sat in the House of Commons.

In the soil of this county rest the last remains of one famous Revolutionary general, Robert Howe, whose body is interred near Wayman church on the northeastern outskirts of the county. Two other noble patriots in the fight for American Independence, Ensign Shadrach Wooten and Captain Absalom Powell are buried at Western Pong and Lake Waccamaw, respectively. Fitting markers to the memory of these three patriots have been erected in recent years.

Columbus County was originally a part of old Bath precinct, organized under the English Crown in 1696. This Precinct extended from Albemarle County to the Cape Fear river and beyond. In 1729, the southern part of this precinct was erected into the precinct of New Hanover. In 1734, Bladen was formed from New Hanover, and in 1764, Brunswick was formed from New Hanover. What is now Columbus County, has therefore been a part of Bath, New Hanover, Bladen and Brunswick counties.

TABOR CITY LUMBER CO.

Manufacturers and Wholesalers

— of —

Lumber and Lumber

Products





Marsh Castle is mentioned several times in Colonial records and by Revolutionary historians later. It was built on White Marsh just east of Whiteville by General Hugh Waddell, who also owned a home near Belfont (Elizabethtown).

“We know that Indians once roamed this territory” Mrs. J. A. Brown writes in her history of the county. “When the first settlers from the Barbadoes came up the Cape Fear they called them the Cape Fear Indians—Waccamaw and Saponas. The Waccamaws were a peaceful tribe, and when the whites began coming in, rather than have any unpleasantness, they are supposed to have voluntarily withdrawn and joined the Catawbas further west, and some at least, the Seminoles in Florida. It is said that the celebrated chief of the Seminoles, Osceola, was born on Waccamaw river, and tradition says that his father was one John Powell, a white man living there”.

COUNTY SCHOOLS

From the time of the first settlements of Columbus county until just before the outbreak of the War Between the States, private schools supplied Columbus county with all of its educational facilities. Scattering and fragmentary documentary evidence indicates there may have been as many as seven public schools in the county about the time the war closed.

Although North Carolina passed its first state-wide school law as early as 1839, the first references to any schools in Columbus county in connection with the state-wide development came in 1864. Four years after this date the county commissioners, as shown in official records, ordered that Haynes Lennon, Calvin C. Gore, Jackson Powell, and Isaac Powell “former” county superintendents of common schools, file a report including “a specific statement under oath of the funds and security which have been and are now in their hands as the chairmen of said board”.

At the next meeting of the board, the report was filed and showed “that we, the undersigned, superintendents of common schools for Columbus county, North Carolina, hereby certify that there is in the hands of our chairman, Haynes Lennon, a state draft issued August 27, 1864, for eight hundred and eighty-four and 89-100 dollars, and confederate funds amounting to $4,600 amounting in all to $5,553.00. In 1868 the county had 49 school districts, but the commissioners appointed committees to lay off school districts in the several townships “taking care to use as many of the school houses now in existance as may be practicable”.

By act of the legislature of 1868 the county commissioners appointed A. I. Butner as “county examiner of schools”. Mr. Butner served only a short time, being succeeded by Col. T. F. Toon, who served until 1873.

In 1869, the schools of Columbus county received a total of $1,697 for public funds for operating purposes. In 1870, county taxes for schools were levied by townships as follows:





Royster's

Field Tested Fertilizer

FARM SUPPLIES


[Illustration:


hand drawing farmer chickens]

GENERAL MERCHANTS

COLUMBUS TRADING CO.

Whiteville Chadbourn

Tabor City





Bogue: $1.12; Welches Creek: $1.88; Whiteville: $1.28; Tatums: $2.93; Fair Bluff: $1.06; Williams: $4.93; Bug Hill: $2.12; and Lees: $2.00.

The Legislature of 1872 abolished the office of “county examiner” and ordered the appointment of three residents of the county of “good moral character and suitable attainments” to be known as a “board of examiners. In 1877, the Columbus county board of commissioners named a board composed of Dr. C. G. Wyche, John Morrison and W. C. Powell, with Dr. Wyche as chairman. Others who served on this board soon afterwards were H. B. Short. Melton Campbell, and Alexander Kirkland.

In 1881, the county commissioners, serving as a board of education, awarded a scholarship at the University of North Carolina to a young man who was later to play an important role in the county educational history—James Bion Schulken.

With the changing of the law, J. W. Ellis was elected as the first county superintendent of public instruction. By 1885, the county had 121 schools, with an average of nine and one half weeks of instruction for the year, and a total cost of $7,219.07.

After training at the state university, James Bion Schulken returned to Columbus county in 1884 to become county superintendent of schools at a salary of $3.00 a day The same year the first board of education was elected as follows: Rev. H. Lennon, Samuel F. McDaniel, and H. A. McEachern, and Mr. McDaniel became chairman. The total school enrollment for the year was 2,284 whites and 1,414 negroes.

In 1886, Mr. Schulken resigned as head of the school system to enter the legal profession, and Pearson Ellis was appointed in his stead. A teacher institute was held in Whiteville in 1887, with $75 appropriated to meet the expenses.

Establishment of school libraries was begun in 1901, and in 1902 Rev. F. T. Wooten succeeded L. W. Stanley as superintendent. Mr. Wooten has been aptly called “the father of education in Columbus county”. He continued in office until 1921. When he began, there was a total school fund amounting to $10,875, school property was valued at $9,151, school terms averaged two and a half months a year.

When Mr. Wooten resigned in 1921, school property was valued at $238,930, school terms had advanced to an average of six months, fifty school libraries had been installed, consolidation of schools had begun, health clinics had been introduced, and enrollment for Columbus county had jumped to 7,911.

During the period from 1931 to 1933, many new agriculture, home economics and commercial departments were added to the schools of the county. A report in 1934 showed the following as some of the interesting facts and figures of that date:





There were 16 brick and 32 frame school buildings in Columbus county. The value of school property was set at more than $700,000. There were 26 libraries, with 23,261 volumes of books. Nearly 4,000 students were being transported daily by trucks, and the school enrollment was 11,344, with 160 day term for the year. There were 300 teachers employed in the schools.

Today, the county has more than 12,000 students enrolled in the schools approximately half of them being transported to school by school busses. The length of the term has been extended to 180 days, and there are some 360 teachers engaged in the schools of the county.

HISTORY OF SUNNY SOUTH COLONY OF CHDBAOURN

Following the activities of turpentine workers and lumber companies some 8000 acres of virgin forest lands around Chadbourn were denuded and left as cut-over lands. In 1895 Joseph A. Brown, then a young man who had recently moved to Chadbourn from Whiteville, recognized that the land was good farm land, and that the need was for energetic farmers to clear and till it.

He heard that Howard and Wilson, editors and publishers of “Farm, Field and Fireside”, of Chicago, leading agricultural journal of the northwest, were interested in bringing farmers from that section to the balmier climate of

COLLIERS LEADING JEWELERS WHITEVILLE, N. C.

Fine Diamonds by Keepsake and Columbia


[Illustration:

Genuine Registered Keepsake Diamond Rings
]


[Illustration:


jewelery]


[Illustration:


jewelery]

Elgin, Hamilton, Bulova, Gruen and O her Nationally Advertised Watches

STERLING SILVER by Gorham, International, Towle

Shaeffer Pens and Pencils

Watch and Jewelry Repairing





the South. He at once went to Chicago, interviewed these editors, presenting to them the advantages of eastern North Carolina and Columbus county in particular. They were convinced. He returned, secured an option on several hundred acres adjacent to Chadbourn, made a second trip to Chicago, arranged for financing and advertising the project and was named manager. The land was surveyed, drained, partly cleared and laid out in lots (farms) of from ten to sixty acres, the majority ranging around forty acres.

In April, 1895 the first excursion was run from Chicago to Chadbourn, filled with interested men, fleeing the rigorous winters of the northwest and attracted by the climate and the reasonable land prices.

Among these very first comers were Byron W. (“Pop”) Moors and his son, Rufus King Moors, who came fully determined to stay, for they brought their household goods, cattle and feed with them. The other men came to look and decide. Some remained and sent for their families; some returned west, sold out their holdings there and returned, bringing their families. The Ramsbottoms, Porters and Parmelees were among these. Other families coming that first year were Howes, Cases, Leonharts, Crawfords, Hortons, Harnleys and many others.

In that same year, 1895, Joseph A. Brown made a successful experiment of growing strawberries for market on his farm near Chadbourn. He encouraged the colonists to plant berries that year as a money crop, and the enterprise was a success from the beginning. This industry had much to do with the early success of the Sunny South Colony,—but tha tis another story.

Pleased first settlers spread the news of the colony through the press and letters back home, so that between 1895 and 1898 one hundred and sixty families from Michigan, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Nebraska, South Dakota, Colorada, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Ohio, Missouri, Pennsylvania, New Mexico and New York came to buy and settle. Three families made a romantic journey of more than 2,000 miles in covered wagons,—the “prairie schooner” of the west.

A map of the Sunny South Colony still preserved, printed in 1897 stated that all the lts (farms) shown north of the Railroad except two had been sold, and about half of those south of the Railroad, but that more good farm land was being added to the colony land. The price of the land was stated to be from $5.00 to $30.00 per acre, on easy payment terms.

Many of these 160 families in course of time drifted back, but a much larger number remained to become permanent and successful residents of the county. They brought energy and intelligence to their farming, and the land yielded her increase. Their children and grand children are today leading citizens of Chadbourn and Columbus county.

Recognized names among us include Moors, Lowe, Boughner,





Miller, Koons, Leonhart, Strole, Newland, Penn. Wilkes, Thompson, Bailey, Lewis, Horton, Tipton, Crawford, Marshall, Boege and others.

(EDITOR'S NOTE: We are deeply indebted to Mrs. J. A. Brown, of Chadbourn, and the county's leading historian, for many of the facts which we have included in this sketch of the history of Columbus County).

When It's FURNITURE SEE US


[Illustration:


chair]

JONES-GOLD Furniture Co.

WHITEVILLE

W. B. HOBBS

BRICK COAL FERTILIZER ROOFING TERRA COTTA PIPE

CEMENT AND BRIXMENT

PHONE 35, WHITEVILLE

Serving—FAIR BLUFF AND ENVIRONS


[Illustration:


hand drawing man on phone]

SERVICE TELEPHONE COMPANY

Fair Bluff, N. C.





Columbus County Courthouse


[Illustration:

ERECTED IN 1914 AT A COST OF $50,000
]

Columbus County Jail


[Illustration:

ERECTED IN 1912 AT A COST OF $12,000
]





Chapter II
COUNTY GOVERNMENT

For the fiscal year, 1944-45, Columbus county is operating on a budget of $495,983.58. In the county, there are 16,000 taxpayers, and a total valuation of approximately $22,000,000, real and personal property. The county wide tax rate in $1.34.

The board of commissioners consisting of five members, acts as the governing body over county affairs. Constitutional officers include the sheriff, clerk of court, and register of deeds.

The outstanding indebtedness of Columbus county amounts as of June 3 to $1,234,243.13 which consists of money spent for the courthouse, road and bridge construction, school buildings, state literary loans and county notes.

The courthouse in Whiteville was erected in 1914 at an approximate cost of $50,000, including furniture, heating and lighting. This is the third courthouse in the county since it was founded in 1808. Within the past year, the last of the 30-year notes on the courthouse have been paid off, so that this building is now entirely debt free.

Built in 1937, at an approximate cost of $55,000.00, the Columbus county home is located a mile west of Whiteville on a 140 acre tract of land, upon which sufficient supplies for the needs of the inmates are raised each year. The inmates are amply provided for at all times. The keeping of the home is in the capable hands of Mrs. Annie Lou Cowan.

Three miles southeast of Whiteville, near the town of Brunswick, is situated State Prison Camp 303, a modern structure built entirely from state funds in 1938. Taking the average, about 100 prisoners are usually incarcerated in this camp. They are used to work state-maintained roads of the county.

The county jail, sitting on property near the courthouse, was built in 1908, at an approximate cost of $12,000. An interesting fact in this regard is that the jail was built from money in the treasury, no money being borrowed for the purpose.

Another county-owned institution of which the people of Columbus are justly proud is the $100,000 Columbus County Hospital, located on the eastern outskirts of Whiteville. This hospital, opened in 1939, is one of the best equipped institutions in this section of the country, and annually ehas thousands of patients.

The county is divided up into fifteen townships, and there are 22 voting precincts. Each township is entitled to





a township constable, and may also have a deputy sheriff.

Taking the aggregate, the county each year has 12 weeks of court, in January, February, May, June, September, October and November. The presiding judge and solicitor are paid out of state funds, but the county is responsible for the pay of the jury and court officers. Witness’ fees in insolvent cases are paid by the county on a basis of one half in all except capital offenses.

Something over 2,000 miles of state maintained roads lie in Columbus county, and approximately 150 miles of it paved.

The Home of

Better Entertainment

ALWAYS

COLUMBUS AND MADISON

THEATRES

Whiteville





Chapter III
THE COUNTY

AREA—In Columbus county, the third largest in the State of North Carolina, there are 933 square miles and 386,865 acres of land. The general topography of the area is flat, as would naturally be expected in the Southeastern coastal plain section.

SOIL—The soil contains a loamy, sometimes sandy surface. Rich and fertile, in many places the use of commercial fertilizer is practically unnecessary. Lowlands are subject to overflow in particularly rainy weather.

CLIMATE—Generally mild, but often subject to violent fluctuations, the climate of the county may be generally considered moderate. Seldom during winter months does the temperature descend below the freezing point. The lowest record in recent years was 4 above zero.

WATER—The water here contains such a large amount of mineral deposit that it is unusually hard. Far below the earth's surface there are minerals which have this hardening effect upon the water. Subterranean water streams are profuse, no difficulty being often encountered in sinking pumps or digging open wells to find sufficient water available. None of the large towns find it necessary to pipe water from nearby streams, but simply bore into the ground. The water contains a quantity of alkaline.

MINERALS—Although Columbus county can be considered rich in minerals, mining has never been a profitable industry. A quantity of sandstone in the area contains an iron deposit, too small ever to be profitably mined. Many years ago an attempt to mine this iron proved to be too expensive a proposition to be profitable. Moreover, in the county there are rich veins of talc, aften made into talcum powder. Particularly near Boardman are these veins found, and despite extensive plans from time to time to mine it, none of them has ever materialized. Scattered over Columbus county are limestone pits, and large quantities of marl. In the unexplored depths below what is Columbus county, lies a wealth of minerals of yet undetermined nature. Their presence there is unquestioned, water coming from the depths reflecting association with mineral deposits.





Columbus County Hospital


[Illustration:

The Columbus County Hospital at Whiteville, was erected
ed in 1939 at a cost of $125,000, and is one of the best
equipped in this section.

]

Beautiful Lake Waccamaw


[Illustration:

This beautiful body of water, 5 miles by 7 miles, located
in the center of Columbus County, is one of the popular
resorts of Eastern North Carolina.

]





Chapter IV
COLUMBUS CROPS

A wounderful system of diversified farming has been developed in Columbus county, whereby growers have three or even four crops bringing in money at various intervals during the year. The principal commodities raised strictly for their monetary value are strawberries, cotton, tobacco, beans. Irish potatoes, sweet potatoes, and truck crops. Most of them are marketed at different intervals during the year, and are the source of much money being brought into the county perhaps which otherwise might not come.

A survey shows that in the year 1944, there were a total of 129,900 acres of land under cultiva‘ion in the county. The same year, 3,000 acres were lying idle, against 6,700 acres in the year preceding. Also, 179,080 acres were covered with usable sized trees and 6,000 were in plowable pasture cleared land.

TOBACCO

The county lies in the South Carolina tobacco belt, and has four active, thriving markets at Whiteville, Chadbourn, Fair Bluff and Tabor City. During the 1944 season, there were 21,500 acres of land utilized for the cultivation of tobacco, which figures represented an increase over the year preceding. In 1943 there were 19,459.7 acres of tobacco under cultivation.

The tobacco crop brings in more money to this county than any other industary. During 1943 the four markets of the county sold a total of 20,432,680 pounds for a total of $8,097,471.08, or an average of $39.63 per hundred-weight.

The tobacco industry was first introduced into the county about 1896, but was not successfully grown or marketed until about 1914. Fair Bluff was the first town in the county to have a market.

Whiteville did not have a successful market until about 1914, the next year or two witnessing the birth of the Tabor City and Chadbourn markets.

Since that time the four markets of the county have grown by leaps and bounds until they represent today a veritable stronghold in the Bright Leaf Border Belt. Whiteville has six warehouses and a redrying plant. Chadbourn has three warehouses, Fair Bluff four, and Tabor City three. These markets together have a total capacity of between two and three million pounds, and floor space of something near three-quarters of a million square feet.

STRAWBERRIES

The third largest money crop in the county is strawberries, bringing around $761,210.00 into Columbus during





the 1944 season. There are two markets in the county, at Chadbourn and Tabor City, the former being one of the leading markets in the United States.

During the 1944 season Chadbourn sold a total of 49,498 crates for a total of approximately $494,980.00, while Tabor City sold approximately 26,623 crates for a total of approximately $266,230.00.

The specie of berry which has made this county famous is the palatable Klondyke, which is particularly adapted to this area. Chadbourn was at one time the largest strawberry market in the world.

Strawberry shipments from this county began about 1897, and from that date the crop increased to such an extent that in 1906 more than $600.000 worth of berries were shipped from the county. The greatest strawberry year in the history of our county was 1907 when more than 1,600 cars moved out from county markets. The largest single day's shipment of which there is record was made during this season when a total of 180 carloads moved out in a day.

COTTON

Whereas cotton was once the principal money crop in Columbus county, the advent of the Boll Weevil more than two decades ago forced this crop into the background. Although a slight increase could be noted in the acreage and production in 1944 over the preceding year, the crop can by no means compare with the pinnacle of production achieved


[Illustration:


profile of horse mule cow]

ROLAND

BALDWIN

Tabor City, N. C.

Dealer In

Horses - Mules - Wagons

and Milk Cows





before the Boll Weevil struck the county.

Statistics show that in 1944, 5,000 acres of land were devoted to the production of cotton, as compared with 4,470 acres for the preceding year. During the year 1943, a total of 4,300 bales of cotton were ginned in the county, over a total of 4,500 bales for the year before.

The first available record indicates that a Dr. Formy Duval in 1815 raised the first bale of cotton to be shipped from Columbus county. It was skidded to White Hall, and shipped by pole boat to Wilmington. It is tradition that it was hand-seeded and pressed in Jonathan Pierce's cider press.

In 1900, Columbus county produced about 6,000 bales of cotton. This crop continued to increase, until the annual production reached 12,000 bales, which computed at $100 a bale, brought to the county a total annual income of $1,200,000 from this source.

BEANS

During the year 1944, Tabor City's bean market enjoyed a successful season, selling thousands of hampers. The marketing of beans in the border town has become an industry rivaling the strawberry and tobacco crops in Columbus, offering the fifth money crop for its farmers.

OTHERS CROPS

Figures show that during the year 1944, a total of 49,200 acres of land in Columbus county were devoted to

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Tabor City, N. C.

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the production of corn. Some 4,600 acres were sown in wheat, 5,400 acres in oats, no acres in rye, 4,800 acres in peanuts, 600 acres in barley, 1,500 acres in lespedeza. Further, 100 acres of cowpeas were grown alone.

Acres of cowpeas devoted to hay numbered 5,420, while 6,850 acres were devoted to growing soybeans with hay. Mixed hays covered a total area of 13,900 acres. Some 2,000 acres of small grain were cut for hay.

Some 3,910 were devoted to the production of Irish potatoes this year, and 5,500 acres to sweet potatoes.

Truck crops covered 2,525 acres, while home gardens covered a total of 3,210 acres.

FORESTRY

By all odds the most regulated crop in Columbus county is its 179,080 acres of farm woodland and a total of 451,640 acres covered with various size trees.

Over one-half of all land owned by farmers is woodland, and during 1944 farmers of Columbus county received in cash for forest products over $1,250,000.00.

While the woods give us a sizeable income ranking next to tobacco in farm income, with proper care and management this figure would increase to over $3,000,000 annually to farmers of Columbus county.

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CHADBOURN, N. C.





Chapter V
PUBLIC UTILITIES

This area is served by the Tide Water Power Company in the distribution of electric current. The principal office of this company is in Wilmington, but it maintains a branch office in Whiteville, where H. M. Leaman is the manager.

It serves approximately 2,698 families in this area, embracing Whiteville, Chadbourn, Tabor City, Evergreen, Fair Bluff, Cerro Gordo, Hallsboro, Bolton, Lake Waccamaw and outlying territory.

The Tide Water Power Company acquired this property in Columbus county in August, 1924, and since that time the cost of service to the electric customer has been reduced at various times to a point where the average rate is approximately 11c per KWH lower than at the time of acquisition.

At the time of acquisition, service was rendered on a dusk to dawn basis only.

Serving much of the rural area of Columbus county is the Brunswick Electric Membership Corporation, with home

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Whiteville, N. C.





office at Shallotte. This organization has a total of 950 subscribers in Columbus county, with 300 miles of line in the county.

The Brunswick Electric Membership Corporation rates are as follows: $2.00 minimum for 25 kilowatt hours; 6 cents per kilowatt for the next 25 kilowatts; 3 1-2 cents for the next 50; 2 1-2 cents for the next 100; and all over that at 1 3-4 cents per kilowatt. On range and water heater rates, there is a rate of 1.2 cents on the first 200 KWH.

TELEPHONES

Around 1,250 Columbus county homes are equipped with telephones, though many more would be so equipped if it were not for the limitations imposed by the war. The county has two telephone exchanges: The Columbus Telephone Company of Whiteville, which serves Whiteville, Tabor City and Chadbourn, as well as outlying areas, and The Service Telephone Company, of Fair Bluff, which serves that town and its immediate environs.

The Columbus Telephone Company has been operating in this vicinity for a great many years. It is owned by H. R. Cook, of Charlotte, who purchased it about 15 years ago. R. R. Cook is manager, and the exchange serves about 1,000 subscribers throughout this section of the county. Chadbourn and Tabor City have the dial system.

The Columbus Telephone Company's rates are $2.00 for a residential party line, $2.50 for a private residential line.

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Rates on a business phone run $3.50, and $3.75 for a hand telephone.

The Service Telephone Company of Fair Bluff, which has been in operation there since about 1936, is owned by the State Blind Commission. It was purchased by the Commission from the Scott Brothers in 1942, and W. H. Hawkins is manager of the exchange. To begin with, the exchange served 52 subscribers in 1942, and now has 83 patrons. Rates run $2.00 for a residential party line, and $2.50 for a private residential line. Business telephone rates are $3.00 and $3.50.

RAILROADS

Columbus is served by two main railroad lines: The Atlantic Coast Line and the Seaboard Air Line. Together they have a total of 84.16 miles of track in the county. The Coast Line, with a line running from Wilmington to Augusta, and another from Elrod to Coway, has a total of 75.31 miles of track in Columbus, while the Wilmington-Charlotte-Rutherford branch of the Seaboard has 8.85 miles in the county.

JOLLY

BROTHERS

Dealers In


[Illustration:


profile of horse mule cow]

Horses, Mules and Cows

Chadbourn, N. C.





Serving

Eastern North Carolina

— with —

Electricity

Gas

Water

Transportation

TIDE WATER POWER COMPANY





Chapter VI
COUNTY ORGANIZATIONS

JEFFERSON DAVIS CHAPTER U. D. C.

Prompted by a very noble purpose, a number of Whiteville's loyal daughters of the South, held a meeting in the month of March, 1903, to organize a chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy. The gathering took place in the little schoolhouse which stood at that time on a hillside where the homes of Major R. J. Lamb and John Carter now stand on Jefferson Street.

Mrs. Henry A. London, of Pittsboro, an invited guest, was present, and gave an enthusiastic talk concerning the objects of the organization. Responsive chords were touched, and from this meeting came into existance for the first time the Jefferson Davis Chapter, United Daughters of the Confederacy of Whiteville. The choice of the name for the chapter was unanimous—they remembered that—“Whatever record leaped to light—this name could not be shamed”.

Twenty charter members were enrolled. The following were the first officers: President, Mrs. Isaac Jackson First-Vice-President,

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TABOR CITY, N. C.





Mrs. A. F. Powell; Second Vice-President, Mrs. V. V. Richardson; Third Vice-President; Mrs. D. J. Lewis; Corresponding Secretary, Mrs. F. A. Bizzelle; Registrar, Mrs. W. G. Burkhead; Recording Secretary, Mrs. Lee E. Powell; Historian, Mrs. Sallie McDaniel; Assistant Historian, Miss Mary Rockwell; Treasurer, Miss Etta Richardson.

One of the oldest organizations for women in Columbus county, the records for forty-one years show loving, loyal devotion in fulfilling its sacred duty. The membership today represents nearly every section of the county. The chapter has gained recognition in the state for distinctive services rendered.

WHITEVILLE CIVITAN CLUB

The Whiteville Civitan Club was organized in 1937, and now has an active membership of 30 members, along with 17 members in the armed services. John M. Barkley is president of the club, John W. Mooney, vice-president, William G. Bradshaw, secretary, and Eugene Porter, treasurer. The board of directors is composed of the following: Rev. S. N. Lamb, Rev. J. R. Kennedy, Joe D. Sikes, Richard E. Weaver, and F. M. White Jr.

The Civitan club has been instrumental in many worthwhile projects in Whiteville since it was organized, and has contributed much to the cultural and progressive life of the community.

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WHITEVILLE ROTARY CLUB

Over 20 years ago, or in 1924, the Whiteville Rotary Club had its beginning. Will W. Schulken was the first president, and J. H. McIver the first secretary.

Officers of the club today, which has a total of 42 members, are: D. L. Love, president, F. B. Foster, vice-president, F. M. Smith, secretary and treasurer. Directors are: D. L. Love, F. B. Foster, Rufus Marks, Dr. T. Formy Duval, F. M. Smith, J. S. Mann.

CHADBOURN ROTARY CLUB

The Chadbourn Rotary Club was organized in 1938, and today has a total of 32 members. Frank T. Wooten is president of the club, W. N. Peal is vice-president, and W. L. Albright is secretary-treasurer. Directors are: Frank T. Wooten, W. N. Peal, W. L. Albright, C. L. Tate, T. O. Goodman, J. H. Bullock, and B. Gordon Lewis.

First president of the club was Lester V. Lowe, who is now serving with the Army of the United States.

MAJOR GENERAL ROBERT HOWE CHAPTER D. A. R.

The Major General Robert Howe chapter of the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution will celebrate its 10th Anniversary in 1945, having been organized in Chadbourn at the home of Mrs. Joseph A. Brown November 26, 1935, with 14 organizing members and 22 charter members. Mrs. W. H. Belk, state regent, had

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appointed Mrs. W. B. Carson, Acme, as organizing regent for a chapter in Columbus county.

At the organization meeting the following officers were named: Regent, Mrs. W. B. Carson; Vice Regent, Mrs. J. A. Brown; Recording Secretary, Mrs. J. H. Land; Corresponding Secretary, Mrs. B. F. Applewhite; Treasurer, Mrs. T. V. Moore; Registrar, Mrs. S. L. Smith; Historian, Mrs. H. L. Stevens, Jr., Warsaw; Chaplain, Mrs. W. L. Wilson.

The chapter was named for North Carolina's only Major General of the Continental Army of the Revolution, a distinguished son of Eastern Carolina, whose grave is in Columbus county.

The objects of the Society are patriotic, historical and educational. It is concerned with locating, preserving and marking historical spots and graves of Revolutionary soldiers; in finding and preserving historical documents and data, and geneological records; in promoting patriotism in every way possible, notably by celebration of all patriotic anniversaries, teaching reverence for the flag, its history and correct use, and in promoting the study of our nation's early history and its founders, by young and old.

The chapter has rescued and preserved the grave of Elizabeth Hooper Watters, only daughter of William Hooper, North Carolina signer of the Declaration of Independence; established the authenticity of Cornwallis’ route through the county over Highway 87 by Weyman Church, and on April

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LEDER BROTHERS

Whiteville, N. C.





30, 1941 secured and dedicated with appropriate ceremonies, markers on the highway near these spots.

Mrs. S. L. Smith, chairman of Markers for Patriots, has collected this year authentic data on James B. White, Columbus county's first senator for whom the county seat is named. After the war the chapter will erect a suitable memorial to his memory.

The chapter historian has collected the war service records of all close relatives of chapter members of World War II.

The chapter has brought distinguished speakers to the county, among them Dr. C. C. Crittenden, secretary of the N. C. Historical Commission; Miss Gertrude Carraway, distinguished newspaper woman and active in many patriotic organizations; Bishop Thomas C. Darst of Eastern Diocese, and state and national D. A. R. officers.

The chapter has furnished to the state organization a District Director, Mrs. J. H. Land, two state chairmen, Mrs. W. B. Carson and Mrs. S. L. Smith. It has won several state and national prizes for patriotic work in the schools.

The following have served as chapter regents: Mrs. W. B. Carson, Mrs. S. L. Smith, Mrs. J. A. Brown, Mrs. H. L. Lyon and Mrs. A. E. Powell, present encumbent.

WHITEVILLE BUSINESS WOMAN'S CLUB

In September, 1939, Mrs. David Smith, then president of

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Whiteville, N. C.





the Whiteville Woman's club invited some of the business women of the town to meet to discuss possibilities of organization of a new department for their club. The Business Women's department was the result, and the first meeting was held in October 1939.

Many worthwhile activities have been sponsored by the club, including installation of a watering system in the Whiteville cemetery, all-time support of the children's ward at the Columbus County Hospital; bandage rolling, knitting and other Red Cross activities; contributions to the Service Center, Civilian Defense, War Bond Activities, Community Chest.

Mrs. W. T. Mottinger is the present president of the club. The special project for this year is placing a set of Encyclopedia Brittanica in the library of the Whiteville High school. This has been ordered and will be donated soon. The club is now planning to federate with the National Organization of the Business and Professional Woman's Clubs. There are 36 members of the club at this time.

TABOR CITY LEGION POST

Tabor City Post No. 101 of American Legion is one of the oldest in the county, having been organized in 1922, with 15 charter members. For a while after organization, the hall downtown was used by the post, but in 1934 the Legionnaires bought a lot near the school house and erected

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a hut and community house.

There are now 35 members of the Post. R. C. Harrelson is commander, C. H. Pinner, adjutant; R. T. Bruton, finance officer, and G. L. Dorman, vice-commander.

The post has engaged in many worthwhile activities during the year. At present it is attempting to maintain standard service to disabled veterans, and widows and orphans of veterans, furnish transportation to the hospital when hospitalization is needed, and aiding returning veterans of World War II in any way and every way possible.

WACCAMAW BOOK CLUB

The Waccamaw Book Club was organized about 12 years ago with ladies of Hallsboro. Lake Waccamaw and intervening vicinity as members.

Mrs. G. E. Dorward is president of the club, Mrs. R. G. Lytton, secretary, Mrs. K. C. Council, treasurer, and Mrs. Edison Council is program chairman.

The organization holds meetings monthly—every third Tuesday afternoon in the homes of the members. The club has 20 members and has a club room, which is at the present time being used by the Red Cross.

Outstanding among its activities have been participating in various civic activities, bond drives and the like. It is a member of the General Federation and State Federation of Woman's Clubs. Mrs. J. M. Council, of Lake Waccamaw,

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a member of the club, is a district officer.

HALLSBORO WOMAN'S CLUB

The Hallsboro Woman's Club is a member of the State Federation, and has about 14 active members at the present time. It was organized 15 years ago, having first been operated as a home demonstration club.

One of its major projects during the past few years has been the creation of a community center in the old Baptist church building in Hallsboro, which is now being used extensively.

Mrs. John W. Hall is the president of the club, and Mrs. A. Q. Dew is the incoming president. Mrs. W. A. Thompson is secretary and treasurer, and Mrs. J. A. Wyche is program chairman.

The club has done much useful work in Hallsboro, having built a lunch room for the school, and has done an outstanding work for the Red Cross.

PIONEER STUDY CLUB

The Pioneer Study Club of Tabor City was organized on January 8, 1936, at the home of Mrs. Dewey H. Bell. Originally the membership was limited to 16, but the club now has a total of 25 members.

Mrs. Raymond B. Mallard is president of the club, having succeeded Mrs. J. F. Butler when the latter recently resigned. Miss Butler is secretary.


[Illustration:

Ritz
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RITZ THEATRE

Tabor City, N. C.





WHITEVILLE GARDEN CLUB

The organization meeting of the Whiteville Garden Club was held September 29, 1939, with 13 charter members. The object of the organization was to “stimulate and unite the efforts of the women of Whiteville in making our town more beautiful.” “Whiteville Beautiful” was the motto chosen.

Interesting events sponsored by the club have been the very successful flower show in the armory May 8-9, 1940, and other smaller ones; a visit by the club to Brooksgreen Gardens, S. C., Orton Plantation, Airlee and other Wilmington gardens.

Outstanding achievement of the club to date is the plan to make a “Memorial Garden” of the Columbus County Hospital grounds.

Mrs. B. S. Thompson is president of the club, Mrs. W. M. Boice is vice-president, and Mrs. G. R. McNeill secretary and treasurer.

KLONDYKE POST OF AMERICAN LEGION

The Klondyke Post of American Legion, at Chadbourn, was organized in 1931 with John V. Strole as commander. The hut was built the following year. The first year the post had 40 members, and 86 the second year.

At the present time the commander of the post is E. L. Derrick, and there are 54 members.

A unique feature of the post's activities has been the


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Telephone 363-J

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fact that the hut was built and paid for without any member ever having had to pay a cent from his pocket. The money for the lot and building came out of proceeds from the strawberry festival and square dances which were sponsored by the Klondyke post.

The berry festival, which was an annual event until the war came, was outstanding throughout this entire section of the state, and featured such nationally known dance bands as Guy Lombardo, Jan Garber, Jimmy Dorsay, Bob Chester, and a great many others.

Another very worthwhile project of the Klondyke post was out on during the days of depression when tonsil clinics were conducted in Chadbourn—about 300 operations having been performed over a two year period of time.

Besides Mr. Derrick as commander, other officers at present are: R. R. Koons, finance officer; C. L. Tate, service officer; F. T. Wooten, adjutant.

Up until this year, Mr. Strole had served successively as commander of the post with the exception of one year—that being the year he was elected and served as district American Legion commander.

FAIR BLUFF CIVITAN CLUB

The Fair Bluff Civitan club, the first such club to be organized in Columbus County, was organized in 1938. At that time, Andrew Joyner, then district Civitan Governor,

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of Greensboro, came down for the organization meeting. Since that time the club has continued a steady growth and has offered much to the Fair Bluff community in the way of worthwhile projects.

Officers of the club recently elected include. Ellis Divine Meares, president; Bob King, vice-president; Jesse Taylor, secretary; and E. A. Waller, treasurer. Rev. E. N. Johnson was the retiring president.

TABOR CITY CIVITAN CLUB

The Tabor City Civitan Club received its charter on the night of October 31st, 1937, with James W. Peay as first president of the club.

In the years that have followed the club has continued to grow and now is an integral part of that town and community, having enjoyed a steadily growing membership.

WHITEVILLE WOMAN'S CLUB

The Whiteville Woman's Club, originally known as The Civic League, was organized in March, 1909, with Mrs. A. E. Powell, president, Mrs. D. J. Lewis, vice-president, Mrs. H. F. Schulken, treasurer, and Mrs. P. G. Hufford, secretary.

Mrs. W. R. Davis, a charter member, has maintained a continuous membership since organization of the club, and is an active member now. In 1914 the name was officially changed to The Woman's Club, thus becoming the first in the county.

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WHITEVILLE CHADBOURN TABOR CITY





Mrs. Powell served as president until 1921. This administration laid the foundation for many of the civic advantages Whiteville has today.

Other president have included Mrs. F. M. Hester, Mrs. J. B. Schulken, Mrs. W. F. Spears, Mrs. E. K. Proctor, Mrs. S. L. Smith, Mrs. N. B. Chesnutt, Mrs. R. C. Wells, Mrs. R. L. Sholar, Mrs. R. M. Lewis and Mrs. David Smith, and Mrs. G. O. Rogers, the last named being president now.

The club has, through its 36 years since organization, accomplished much in the town of Whiteville.

Numbered among its outstanding activities have been the development of fine arts programs, continuation of child welfare, and closer cooperation with other civic organizations in bettering the town and community; creation of a recreational program, sponsoring a Girl Scout troop, and cooperating with the Junior Woman's Club purchasing a lot for a club house, planting of the courthouse grounds and plazas on Madison Street with grass and shrubs, development of music appreciation, planting of a living Christmas tree on the courthouse square.

HOME DEMONSTRATION CLUBS

In Columbus county there are 12 Home Demonstration Clubs, with a total of 256 members. Clubs are located at Bethel, Bolton, Cerro Gordo, Clarendon, Crusoe, Fair Bluff, Hallsboro, Livingston Chapel, Mishop Springs, Nakina, Pireway

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and South Whiteville.

The first was organized at Mishop Springs about 18 months ago. Bolton has the largest club.

The clubs meet each month in the homes of members, and discuss various phases of home-making.

4-H CLUBS

There are three active 4-H Clubs in Columbus County for boys and girls at the present time, with a total of 102 members. These are located at South Whiteville, Bolton, and Mishop Springs.

BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA

The four white and six colored troops of the Boy Scouts of America in Columbus County comprise the South Central District of the Cape Fear Council. W. N. Peal, of Chadbourn, is chairman of the South Central District, and J. A. Maultsby, of Whiteville, is president of the Cape Fear Council.

A total of 162 Scouts are members of the 10 troops in the county.

FAIR BLUFF LEGION POST

The Fair Bluff Post of American Legion was organized about 1927 and at the present time has a total of 21 members. J. A. Turner is commander, Dr. M. A. Waddell, vice-commander, E. A. Waller, adjutant, and J. M. Turner, finance officer.

The Legion owns its own hut which serves as a meeting

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place and community center, which was built about 1932.

The Post has an active Auxiliary as well.

EVERGREEN WOMAN'S CLUB

One of the oldest and most active Women's Clubs in Columbus County is at Evergreen. This organization is a member of both State and National Federations, and has been ever since its organization 21 years ago.

Mrs. R. F. Benton is president, Mrs. W. D. Brooks, secretary and treasurer.

There are 14 members at present. Activities of the club have been widespread. On two successive occasions it took state prizes for the most tree setting, and has copped many other district and state prizes as well.

At the present time, the club is engaged in the Cancer Drive and the gathering of clothing for the United National Clothing Collection.

MAIDS AND MATRONS CLUB

The Maids and Matrons club of Chadbourn was organized first as the Chadbourn Study Club in 1901 with both men and women as members, continuing thus until 1906. At this time, the men having withdrawn, re-organization as the Young Matrons Club left a membership of twelve women.

The name of the club was changed in 1923 to Maids and Matrons Club, and membership has gradually enlarged

YOUR AUTHORIZED

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FOR WHITEVILLE AND VICINITY

FORD — MERCURY — LINCOLN


[Illustration:

Ford
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DAVID BULLARD, JR., Manager

WHITEVILLE, N. C.





Service . . .

It is service that counts when you lose a loved one in death.

In such a time of bereavement, your funeral director proves an immeasurable comfort to you by taking from you many of the exacting details which would otherwise fall on your shoulders.

Our Service Is Entirely Complete

Peacock Funeral Home

Chadbourn, N. C.

A. D. Peacock J. R. Worthington

Owner Funeral Director





to thirty-two.

The prime movers in the early organization and work of the club were Miss Lily Wheeler, Miss Estelle Newland, Mrs. J. B. Chadbourn, Mrs. J. A. Brown and B. H. Harnley. The subject of the first year's study was “American Authors and Composers.” The leading purpose of the club in the beginning was study, developing later into wider service through its various departments, particularly those of Literature, Civics and Education.

Perhaps the most important accomplishment has been the establishment of the Educational Loan Fund, whereby high school graduates may obtain loans for college education. Other projects sponsored by the club have been street beautification by planting shrubs and trees; bringing cultural entertainment to the town; supporting health and social service causes, and the organization of a Junior club which later developed into the Sorosis club.

The club has furnished to the State Federation the following officers: State chairman of Music, Mrs. J. A. Brown; three district presidents. Mrs. J. B. Bardin, Mrs. J. A. Brown and Mrs. J. B. Elliott; one National officer, District Contact Chairman for the General Federation, Mrs. J. H. Land.

Recognition of literary merit has come to the club through the award of State Federation prizes to Mrs. J. B. Barden for a short story, and to Mrs. Lucy Thompson for a narrative poem.

It is interesting to note that Mrs. J. A. Brown who was first president of the Young Matrons club in 1906 is acting in the same capacity in the Maid and Matrons club at the present time, 1945.

The Maids and Matrons club of Chadbourn is the oldest cultural club in the county.

WHITEVILLE JUNIOR WOMAN'S CLUB

In January 1938 a group of ambitious and energetic young women met for the purpose of discussing the organization of a civic club for the young women of Whiteville. Mrs. John Council, of Lake Waccamaw, was instrumental in organizing this group, and Mrs. R. C. Wells was chosen as sponsor. In March of that year, the club joined the National Federation of Woman's Clubs.

Succeeding years have witnessed many worthwhile projects for Whiteville under the sponsorship of this enterprising group of women, to mention only a few of these activities: sponsorship of a children's shelf at the library, first aid classes, publication of cook-book of tried recipes, raised $250.00 for nurses scholarships, and donated to innumerable fund raising drives.

One of the notable achievements of the club was last year when the club made an outstanding record in the Tobacco Warehouse Bond program, Columbus being the first county





TRADE IN WHITEVILLE

— THE FARMER'S TOWN —

Trading Center of Columbus County

WHITEVILLE MERCHANTS ASSOCIATION, Inc.





in the state to start this program.

The present goal of the club is to have the club members 100 percent informed voters, to see that the women of the county are informed of their duties and vote as intelligent citizens.

WHITEVILLE LEGION POST

By Glenn F. Strole

The Whiteville Post of American Legion, now listed as Post 137, was first organized in 1922 and revived in 1930. After the formation of posts at Chadbourn, Fair Bluff and Tabor City, the name was changed to the Whiteville post in 1934.

Emphasis has always been placed on service to the veterans of World War I and their dependents, and now it includes those of the present war, J. S. Mann, of Whiteville, is one of the outstanding service officers in the State and has helped hundreds of veterans to get hospitalization, compensation and discharge pay.

In 1941 a handsome and commodious brick hut was built, which is a community center for Whiteville. Thousands of soldiers have been entertained there over weekends, and since they come from all over the United States, the Whiteville Post has received, wide and favorable publicity. The following have served as commanders of the Whiteville post: Richard M. Lewis, Ben Elliott, Glenn F. Strole, D. L. Gore, W. M. Parker, R. L. Sholar, A. J. Krahnke, J. S. Mann, R. J. Lamb, Chester A. Farley, J. A. Maultsby and C. D. Henderson.

TABOR CITY ROTARY CLUB

The Tabor City Rotary Club, which now has a total membership of 25 was first organized about February, 1937, and has had a record of constant growth and advancement since that time.

The club has as its president Dr. Grover S. Cox. Other officers include: Jack McGougan, vice-president, Rev. Winfrey Davis, secretary, Jimmy Hufham, treasurer, and Tom Rosser, sergeant-at-arms. Directors include these officers and Carlton Westmoreland and Jesse Baxter. Rev. Joseph Coble is editor of the Tabor City Rotary News, a bulletin published each week by the club, which proves both interesting and instructive to the club members.

Columbus Churches

There are eleven denominations represented in the church affiliates of Columbus county, including Missionary Baptist, Free Will Baptist, Primitive Baptist, Methodist, Presbyterian, Pentecostal Holiness, Pentecostal Fire-Baptised Holiness, Morman, Catholic, Episcopal, and Jewish.

Missionary Baptists are predominating in the county, having a little more than twice as many members as all other





of the churches combined. Methodists are second, and Free Will Baptists coming third.

Figures available on the church population of Columbus county contained in a survey made in 1933, showed the county had a total of 91 churches, with a total of 8,953 members. Of these, the Missionary Baptists had 39 churches and 5,079 members. The Methodist had 25 churches and 2,478 members.

Other denominations were as follows: Free Will Baptist, 6 churches and 487 members; Primitive Baptist, 3 churches and 96 members; Presbyterian, 6 churches and 472 members; Pentecostal Holiness, 2 churches and 37 members; Pentecostal Fire Baptised Holiness, 7 churches and 154 members; Morman, 1 church and 10 members; Catholic, 1 church and 65 members (Note: The Catholics now have six churches in the county). Episcopal, 1 church and 35 members; Jewish, no church and 40 members.

Among the oldest churches in the county were the First Presbyterian church which was recently town down, and the Presbyterian church in Whiteville was recently torn down, and the White Marsh and Mount Zion Baptist churches in Welches Creek township.

Some idea of the increase in church membership during the past 11 years can be gained from this partial 1944 survey made of the 11 denominations in the county:

WHITE CHURCH POPULATION, 1944

DenominationNo. ChurchesMembers
Missionary Baptist408,043
Free Will Baptist6228
Primitive Baptist
Methodist182,556
Presbyterian6690
Pentecostal Holiness244
Fire Baptized Holiness8152
Morman110
Catholic6150
Episcopal134
Jewish028






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REA
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Owned By Those It Serves

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Shallotte, N. C.





Chapter VII
NATURAL RESOURCES

Columbus County, with its broad expanses of virgin forests, seething rivers, natural water power, and thousands of acres of fertile, cultivated soil, contains a wealth of natural resources. For that reason, farming and lumber manufacture have become the principal industries in this area.

The rich timberlands are noted not only for their natural scenic beauty, but also for their wealth of many different sorts of timber. At least two dozen larger and smaller lumber manufacturing plants have sprung up in the county and are operating with profit at the present time. An industry also associated with the timber manufacture is the veneer mill located in Hallsboro, which each year offers a ready market for much Columbus County gum and poplar.

Moreover, the county's two crate factories use quantities of Columbus hardwood in the manufacture of bean crates, strawberry cups and crates. One plant is situated in Tabor City, and another at Chadbourn.

While the Long Leaf Pine which once abounded in this county has been largely eradicated by manufacturing plants finishing lumber, nevertheless there is some of this native pine to be found in the county at the present time. The Short Leaf Pine is to be found still in great quantities.

In the swampy lowlands of the county can be found an abundance of Gum and Poplar, which finds a ready market with hardwood manufacturers. Oak can be found in quantities, as well as Cypress, the latter being harvested in quantity lots for use in lumber manufacture. By far the most prolific tree in this section, and one which can be found in greatest quantities, is the Pine of the short leaf variety. Lumber manufacturers find a ready market for this timber, and cut more of it than any other.

Natural water power of the rivers and streams in the county has been utilized for a long time in turning the wheels of corn mills, but generally speaking, that is the principal use to which the abundance of water power has been put up to the present.

In the lakes and streams of Columbus many varieties of fish are to be found. Lake Wacamaw, a broad expanse of water 5 by 7 miles in dimensions, furnishes a veritable paradise for the fisherman. In the waters of this lake are to be found perch, goggle-eye, cats, black fish, jacks, trout and some few shad have been caught from the lake.

In the other streams of the county, red-breasts, trout, perch, goggle-eye, black fish, pikes, jacks and others abound.

The principal body of water in this county is Lake





Wacamaw. The county has two principal rivers, the Waccamaw and the Lumber, the former being designated in the New York World Book of Facts as one of the 40 principal rivers of the United States. It is 550 miles long, has its origin on the Southern side of Lake Wacamaw and flows into the Greater Pedee river at a point below Georgetown near th Atlantic Ocean. Lumber river, which follows the Western boundary line of the county, enters the county at a point above old Boardman, and proceeds on a southerly course to a point below Georgetown, S. C., where it flows into the Atlantic Ocean. It leaves this county a short distance from Fair Bluff, which town was built on its beautiful moss covered banks.

Lake Waccamaw is a fastly growing pleasure resort. It furnishes an ideal place for bathing, boating and fishing. During the winter months duck hunting along the banks of this sheet of water is a popular pastime, enticing sportsmen from all sections of the state.

The principal natural resource of Columbus County is the fertile soil which lies within its bounds. As a result of this fact, farming is by all odds the principal industry of the county, and in which more than 15,000 people are engaged.

COLUMBUS COUNTY FARM BUREAU

The Columbus County Farm Bureau, a member of the State and National Federations, was first organized a decade ago, and reorganized in 1940. The Columbus Bureau, with a total of 2,472 members, stands second only to Pitt County in membership, and is one of the most active such organizations in the State.

V. C. Arnette, of Chadbourn, is president of the Bureau, B. C. Wright, of Tabor City, is vice-president, and Locke Byrd, of Whiteville, secretary-treasurer.

The Farm Bureau has been instrumental in bringing about much legislation favorable to the farmers, and recently in Columbus County is sponsoring a campaign for the growth of a better strain of sweet potatoes. To that end, each member of the Bureau was given seed potatoes of good strain, with the request that they be planted.





Chapter VIII
COUNTY INDUSTRY

The industrial life of Columbus county is closely related to agriculture, its chief enterprise. From the products of its rich, fertile soil, have sprung a number of kindred industries.

Agriculture has long been the mainstay in the economic life of this county, and today nets the farmers of this county millions of dollars.

Columbus county's second biggest industry, however, is the manufacture of lumber, and farmers, contrary to the generally accepted belief, receive more money from the sale of forest products than any other source of revenue, and furnish one of the county's chief sources of livelihood.

The larger lumber manufacturing plants in Columbus county today are: The North Carolina Lumber Co., the J. E. Thompson Lumber Co. and Pierce and Co., all at Hallsboro; Sledge & Sons of Whiteville and Brunswick; Tupelo Dimension Manufacturing Co., at Brunswick; the Elrod Lumber Co., at Fair Bluff; the Georgia Hardwood Lumber Co., and The Tabor City Lumber Co., at Tabor City. In addition to these large concerns, there are dozens of smaller mills scattered over the county.

A number of paper companies and outside lumber mills have extensive holdings among the thousands of acres of rich, virgin pine timber which reproduces so bountifully in Columbus county. Riegel Paper Co., of New York, and Southern Kraft Corporation of Georgetown, S. C., both own thousands of acres of untouched forest. Riegel Paper Co. has for years been planning the construction of a pulp mill at Acme, but the plans are being held in abeyance until after the war.

Columbus county is the home of the Council Tool Company, which manufactures all kinds of farm and turpentine tools for shipment here and abroad. The plant, located at Wananish, has built up a reputation for fine products all over the country.

All these industries pale in the shadow of the great agricultural empire which has been responsible for the steady growth and progress of Columbus county during the past quarter of a century.

Some idea of the mammoth proportions to which Columbus county has grown as an agricultural empire in recent years may be found in the report of Charles D. Raper, farm demonstration agent, recently, showing that farmers of this county during the year 1943 had a gross income of approimately $22,000,000. These figures included a large amount of money which Columbus farmers realized from





When Civilian Goods of Quality

Are Back On the Market For Civilians

We expect to again make our Store Headquarters for:

Frigidaire Electric Stoves and Refrigerators

Essotane Gas Stoves and Gas for Cooking and Heating Zenith Radios and Television B.P.S. Paints, Varnishes & Enamels

A Full Line of Sporting Goods Fostoria Crystal and Glassware The Better Lines of Cooking Utensils

At the present time we are doing all in our power to keep our stock so we can furnish you the merchandise you need to do your part on the home front in winning the war.

SCHULKEN'S HARDWARE

Opposite Depot Phone 123

Whiteville





the sale of pulpwood.

Tobacco is king in Columbus. Twenty million pounds of the bright golden weed were produced by Columbus farmers in 1943, metting them approximately $8,562,268. Timber products furnished the second crop in Columbus county, with strawberries third, according to C. D. Raper, County Farm Agent.

Strawberry auction markets are at Chadbourn and Tabor City, which each have live and growing bean markets. Both also sell large quantities of sweet potatoes, and Irish potatoes, Buyers and processors of sweet potatoes in the county are: The Chadbourn Potato Storage Co., and Sam C. Carter, of Chadbourn: B. A. Garrell, E. W. Fonvielle, M. C. Sarvis, Corbett Packing Co., I. H. Cribb & Co., all of Tabor City, and Mrs. W. M. Stephens & Sons of Clarendon.

Cotton which once occupied No. 1 position as Columbus county's leading crop, now is running third, and gives birth two seasonable industries.

One of the most ambitious programs ever undertaken in Columbus County has resulted during the past year in bringing in 500 head of midwestern cattle to built up the stock of milk cows. From the drought-stricken areas of Mississippi, and Alabama have come fine, blooded stock, including both Jerseys and Guernseys. This program, sponsored by the Waccamaw Bank & Trust Co., in cooperation with business houses of the various towns, and the county extension service, is already producing results, so that Columbus County can now count a total of 4,473 milk cows and a large quantity of beef cattle.

A total of $5,150 was estimated to have been realized by the farmers of this county from livestock alone, last year. The county has two abba‘oirs. The Chadbourn Wholesale Packing Co., and the North Carolina Lumber Co. at Hallsboro has recently erected one in the Honey Hill section of the county.

Assistant County Agent J. P. Quinerly is working in close cooperation with the farmers of the county in an effore to built up a milk market, and not without some very good results. Many farmers are taking advantage of the close proximity of such defense centers as Wilmington and Fayetteville to build up a milk route, and the program is attracting more and more dairymen all the time.

Processing plants for Columbus county's many and varied agricultural products have sprung up during the past few years thick and fast. Cotton gins at Chadbourn, Tabor City and Fair Bluff are to be found.

A flour mill, the Waccamaw Milling Co., has been in operation in Whiteville for the past several years to grind the county's ever-increasing wheat crop.

The Columbus Manufacturing Co., and the D. J. Hughes Company at Chadbourn and Tabor City respectively, are devoted to making crates and cups in which to ship the





Pulpwood —- A War Material

The present emergency demands a large production of pulpwood and lumber. This necessarily has created a heavy drain in our timber resources.

We would like to urge all timberland owners to cut their timber wisely and after the cutting operation is over, to put forth every effort to cooperate with his County Forest Warden in the prevention and suppression of forest fires.

This is more essential now than ever before as some preparation must be made for the growing of additional crops of timber.

RIEGEL PAPER CORPORATION

Bolton, North Carolina





county's strawberries to the Northern markets.

The Acme Manufacturing Co. at Acme, and the Reliance Guano Co. of Whiteville, supply some of the commercial fertilizer used in producing the crops of Columbus county.

Right now a program is in progress for the construction of cooperative canners at seven of the county's high schools, in an attempt to salvage some of the large amount of produce wasted each year for the lack of proper canning and preserving facilities.

Moreover, Columbus county's newest enterprise is the Columbus Cold Storage Co., of Whiteville, which is now in full operation, containing hundreds of freezer lockers where perishables may be kept the year around, and providing an adequate meat curing and storage plant besides.

Columbus county has three ice plants: The Columbus Ice and Fuel Company has plants at Chadbourn and Tabor City, and The Vineland Ice Co., at Whiteville. The Columbus Ice and Fuel Co. at Chadbourn has adequate meat storage facilities, and a number of freezer lockers.

CHADBOUURN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

The Chadbourn Chamber of Commerce has been in operation for the past several years, and has been the impetus for many worth-while achievements in the town during that time. E. L. Derrick is president of the organization, F. T. Wooten, Jr., secretary, and the following are directors: D. M. Carter, G. H. Boughner, S. W. Johnson, Foster C. Hughes, B. Gordon Lewis, F. T. Wooten and E. L. Derrick

TABOR CITY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

The Tabor City Chamber of Commerce is a very active organization. S. T. Rogers is president, Lewis E. Gore vice-president, and Mrs. J. P. Brown, secretary and treasurer. Other directors include: B. A. Garrell, R. C. Coleman, and James W. Peay. The oganization has 48 members.

WHITEVILLE MERCHANTS ASSOCIATION

The Whiteville Merchants Association was organized in 1937, and has been growing ever since. There are now 52 members. G. W. Gold is president, H. B. Gurganus, vice-president; J. A. Maultsby, treasurer, and M. B. Kibler, Jr., secretary. Directors are: C. D. Henderson, Lloyd Collier, S. L. Braxton, L. S. Thompson, J. N. Coburn, J. Herman Leder, R. L. Sholar, and J. R. Marks.





DIGNITY . . .

There come times when dignity is to be desired almost above everything else.

When a loved-one has passed on, you want a funeral of dignity as a final tribute to the departed.

A McKENZIE funeral is always a funeral of dignity, where we strive to take as much of of the burden of detail off the bereaved as is humanly possible.

McKenzie's

FUNERAL DIRECTORS

WHITEVILLE





Chapter IX
MAYORS AND MUNICIPALITIES

INFORMATION FROM REPORT DATED SEPT. 1, 1943

Published By N. C. League Of Municipalities, Raleigh, N. C.

CHADBOURN

Population: 1,576Comm.: J. T. Wooten
Mayor: G. M. BlakeClerk and Treas.: T. S. Lewis
Comm.: D. D. BrutonAccountant: R. H. Theiling
Comm.: F. C. HughesFire Chief: Forest Strole

Superintendent of Waterworks: J. M. Hinson

Chief of Police: Robert E. Boswell

Attorney: A. B. Brady

FAIR BLUFF

Population: 970Comm.: H. E. Floyd
Mayor: C. A. SmallComm.: R. P. King
Comm.: E. P. BassComm.: E. D. Mears
Comm.: Spruill BrittChief of Police: W. R. Lewis

Clerk and Treasurer: Mrs. D. E. Parrish

Attorney: J. K. Powell, Whiteville

TABOR CITY

Population: 1,552
Mayor: J. M. McGouganClerk: J. P. Brown
Comm.: Jas. W. PeayChief of Police: J. F. Boswell
Comm.: B. L. Nesmith, Jr.Fire Chief: B. F. Young
Comm.: R. R. RogersAttorney: R. B. Mallard

Superintendent of Waterworks: H. B. Bruton

WHITEVILLE

Population: 3,011
Mayor: Jackson Greer, Jr.Comm.: Lloyd Collier
Comm.: Dr. S. A. SmithClerk and Treas.: Jack Hayes
Comm.: C. D. HendersonFire Chief: A. A. Rushing
Comm.: F. G. MemoryAttorney: I. B. Tucker, Sr.
Comm.: John M. BarkleyComm: D. D. Bruton

Superintendent of Waterworks: J. L. Carnes

Superintendent of Streets: R. B. Sanderson

Chief of Police: W. B. Coleman





Always First . . .

“YOUR COUNTY PAPER”

Always First In Disseminating The News!

Following the columns of The Columbus County News from week to week is the most effective means of keeping up with what is going on in Columbus County. This paper spares neither time nor expense in the business of getting the news to its readers.

Always First In Getting Your Message To The People!

Your county paper. The Columbus County News, is the most effective medium of reaching Columbus people. Let it deliver your message. Advertising rates are reasonable, but you will realize a harvest of results.

The Columbus County News

Printers and Publishers

CHADBOURN, N. C.





Chapter X
DIRECTORY

BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS—A. W. Williamson, Cerro Gordo; W. L. Hobbs, Delco; Jimsey L. Robinson, Whiteville, Chairman; Leman P. Ward, Clarendon; J. A. Hooks, Whiteville.

BOARD OF EDUCATION—Chairman, R. L. Lamb, Whiteville; Albert Williams. Tabor City; J. T. Wooten, Jr., Chadbourn, I. C. Gore, Jr., Bug Hill: F. B. Gault, Lake Waccamaw.

BOARD OF ELECTIONS—Chairman, A. E. Powell, Jr., Whiteville; James W. Peay, Tabor City; Clarence Thompson, Whiteville.

REPRESENTATIVE—J. Percy Brown, Tabor City.

CLERK SUPERIOR COURT—D. L. Gore, Whiteville.

GAME WARDEN—Deck Hewett, Nakina.

REGISTER OF DEEDS—Leo L. Fisher, Whiteville.

SHERIFF—H. D. Stanley, Whiteville.

AUDITOR—Manley K. Fuller, Whiteville.

FOREST WARDEN—B. Frank Batten, Chadbourn.

TAX COLLECTOR—B. L. Martin, Whiteville.

TAX SUPERVISOR—Venie Harrelson, Cerro Gordo.

RECORDER—W. Ernest Harrelson, Whiteville, RFD 4.

CORONER—H. Hugh Nance, Cerro Gordo (Acting Coroner: Paul Avant, Chadbourn).

SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION—H. D. Browning, Jr., Whiteville.

SOLICITOR—J. W. Brown, Whiteville.

COUNTY ATTORNEY—E. K. Proctor, Whiteville.

SURVEYOR—Forney Gore, Lake Waccamaw.

HEALTH OFFICER—Dr. Floyd Johnson, Whiteville.

FARM DEMONSTRATION AGENT—C. D. Raper, Whiteville.

HOME DEMONSTRATION AGENT—Geneveive Eakes, Whiteville.

SUPT. OF PUBLIC WELFARE—Mrs. Johnsie R. Nunn, Whiteville.

BOARD OF HEALTH—Arthur W. Williamson, Cerro Gordo; H. D. Browning, Whiteville; Dr. S. A. Smith, Whiteville; J. N. Dawson, M. D., G. S. Cox, M. D., J. B. Bardin, DDS.

BOARD OF WELFARE—Chairman, K. Clyde Council, Wananishl—

BOARD OF WELFARE—Chairman, K. Clyde Council, Wananish, Dr. R. C. Sadler, Whiteville, Mrs. M. A. Waddell, Fair Bluff.

COUNTY DEPOSITORY—Waccamaw Bank & Trust Company, Whiteville.





DEPUTY SHERIFFS

W. H. Bullard, Chadbourn.Tucker Coleman, Tabor City.
H. L. Shaw, Whiteville.J. M. Hinson, Chadbourn.
L. R. Wayne, Lake Waccamaw.Carver Best, Tabor City.
Bud Stephens, Boardman.George Brown, Bolton.
Jinx Harper, Nakina.D. H. Bowen, Boardman.
Mack Canady, Nakina.J. C. Cribb, Clarendon.

ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW

WHITEVILLEPowell, Walter H.
Brown, Joseph W.Thompson, Walter D.
Burns, Robert Henry, Sr.Toon, E. Manley.
Burns, Robert Henry, Jr.Weaver, Richard E.
Eure, J. Bruce.
Lyon, H. L. Sr.TABOR CITY
Lyon, H. L., Jr.Mallard, R. B. (In Service)
Powell, Junius K.CHADBOURN
Brady, A. B.

PRACTICING PHYSICIANS

WHITEVILLEMickley, Jack.
Johnson, Floyd.Borop, A. Niles.
Muldrow, Miriam Naomi
Whitaker, Richard B.CHADBOURN
Smith, S. A.Blake, J. F.
Formy Duval, Thurston.Smith, W. F.
Sadler, R. C.Walton, George B.
Greene, W. A. (In Service)
Floyd, A. G. (In Army)FAIR BLUFF
Easley, W. V.Floyd, L. D.
Carnes, G. W.Elliott, George D.
TABOR CITYLAKE WACCAMAW
Cox, Grover S.Dawson, James N.

COLUMBUS DRUGGISTS

Bailey, Guy M., Fair Bluff.Owens, T. Q., Whiteville.
Guiton, J. A., Whiteville.Smith, E. B. Chadbourn.
Holroyd, R. M., Whiteville.Mills, J. A., Tabor City.
Harrelson, R. C., Tabor City.Rogers, Frank, Fair Bluff.
Koonce, T. R., Fair Bluff.McNeill, William C., Whiteville.
Koonce, John Edward, Chadbourn.McNeill, George R., Whiteville.
Jenkins, L. W. Tabor City.

LICENSED EMBALMERS

L. E. Wiggins, Whiteville.James R. Worthington, Chadbourn.
L. A. Meares, Whiteville.
Arnold Jessup, Tabor City.John Willis Mooney, Chadbourn.
H. E. Curtis, Tabor City.
A. D. Peacock, Chadbourn.Robert A. Meares, Chadbourn.





POST OFFICES AND POSTMASTERS

Acme: Ruth R. ButlerEvergreen: R. F. Benton
Armour: (Vacant)Fair Bluff: A. E. Waller
Boardman: Onnie M. Hill.Hallsboro: Mrs. W. A. Thompson
Bolton: Stella M. Blue
Brunswick: Redden GaskinLake Waccamaw: Kittie Wayne
Cerro Gordo: Katie E. KellihanNakina: Leamon C. Ward
Olyphic: Harvey L. Smith
Chadbourn: Estelle I. BaldwinTabor City: Duncan F. McGougan
Clarendon: Maude H. Pittman
Delco: Lorenzo R. HobbsWananish: Carlotta W. Flynn
Whiteville: A. E. Powell

PRACTICING DENTISTS

WHITEVILLETABOR CITY
Davis, W. R.Currie, Neill K.
Wooten, C. L.FAIR BLUFF
Johnson, M. L.Waddell, M. A.

VETERINARIANS

Dr. D. W. Pittman, WhitevilleDr. J. S. Smith, Tabor City

SCHOOLS AND PRINCIPALS

Whiteville: G. O. RogersPiney Forest: Pecolia G. Lennon
New Hope: Miss Pearl Eichelberger
Evergreen: Rosa McDougald
Chadbourn: John W. WashburnBoardman: Bettie F. Lennon
Rose Hill: Bessie G. Lennon
Cerro Gordo: L. M. AdcockBrowns Chapel: Greta McLean Sears
Fair Bluff: E. L. Derrick
Evergreen: E. E. KingFarmers Union: Shepard S. Moore
Hallsboro: B. F. Kendall
Bolton: Miss Pearl Williamson, actingArtesia: Herbert F. Williams
Lake Waccamaw: Sarah E. Freeman
Old Dock-Nakina: C. A. Elmore
Christian Plains: L. L. Spaulding
Guideway: F. F. Thompson
Tabor City: C. H. PinnerLiberty Hill: Celia J. Moore
Williams Township: F. A. FicquettHallsboro: Virginia M. Corbett
Honey Hill: Harriett R. Spaulding
Acme-Delco: I. A. Wortman Colored
coloredBolton: Frank I. McDougald
Whiteville: J. O. HarrisOld Dock: Cora Belle Singletary
Spring Hill: Etta White Ingram
Dothan: Martha Singletary
Diamond Branch: Booker B. BrooksBug Hill: Maggie C. Boone
Tabor City: J. D. Pridgen
Chadbourn: A. L. WilliamsClarendon: Sarah M. Harris
Cerro Gordo: Hazel McNeillArmour: Grayer Powell
Mt. Mariah: Ezra LennonAcme: Annie S. Henry
Fair Bluff: Henry PowellFreeman: Annie R. Mitchell
Mt. Olive: Fred J. CorbettDelco: Geo. W. Jones





Lewis Funeral Home

Tabor City, N. C. Phone 28-1

Night 69-6 — 12-6

Ambulance Service

Day or Night

“Serving This Community for Over

Thirty-Five Years”

Sponsors of

Tabor City Mutual Funeral

Association, Inc.

ARNOLD T. JESSUP

MORTICIAN

“We Serve Not for Gold But By the Golden Rule”





Chapter XI
STATISTICS

19401930
Columbus county45,66337,720

POPULATION BY TOWNS

TOWNS
Bolton760976
Cerro Gordo379325
Chadbourn1,5761,311
Fair Bluff970806
Acme196237
Delco263180
Tabor City1,5521,165
Evergreen279189
Lake Waccamaw429405
Brunswick227416
Whiteville3,0082,203

Total Population Columbus county in 192030,124
Total Population Columbus county in 193037,720
Total Population Columbus county in 194045,663
Total White Population, 194030,988
Total Negro Population, 194014,317
Other Races (Indian)358
Total Farms in Columbus county, 19304,301
Total Farms in Columbus county, 19354,826
Total Farms in Columbus county, 19405,429

POPULATION BY TOWNSHIPS

19301940
Bogue2,8372,381
Bolton1,5661,671
Bug Hill1,7611,770
Chadbourn4,6323,922
Fair Bluff2,4361,496
Lees2,8782,316
Ransom2,7322,396
South Williams3,8812,875
Tatums3,4752,992
Waccamaw9281,176
Welches Creek1,5691,231
Western Prong1,103906
Whiteville8,9476,726
Williams4,2843,175

* * * * *

POPULATION BREAKDOWN, 1940

Total Population45,663






[Illustration:


Farmall tractor]

FARMALL TRACTORS

INTERNATIONAL TRUCKS

McCORMICK-DEERING FARM MACHINES

Sales and Service

MARKS TRUCK & TRACTOR CO.

Your International Harvester Dealer

WHITEVILLE, N. C.





Male23,085
Female22,578
Native (all races45,606
Male23,046
Female22,560
Foreign-Born (all races)57
Male39
Female18

(The foreign-born in Columbus county are divided as follows: England 3, Norway 1, Sweden 1, Netherlands 1, Switzerland 2, France 1, Germany 8, Poland 2, Austria 5, Hungary 2, Yugoslavia 3, Russia 2, Lithuania 4, Rumania 1, Greece 4, Palestine and Syria 4, Asia 2, French Canada 2, Other Canada 9, Central and South America 1.)

White30,988
Native30,931
Foreign-born57
Negro14,317
Other races (Indian)358
Percent Native White67.7
Percent Foreign-Born White.1
Percent Negro31.4

SCHOOL POPULATION

CensusEnrolmentTeachers Buses No.
Elem.H.S.(total personnel includes prins.)transported daily
School
Whiteville17051035339408724
New Hope36529871103
Chadbourn1030681142246493
Cerro Gordo70549888185376
Fair Bluff44035879153222
Evergreen644487112176412
Hallsboro944567146219539
Bolton1321003115
Old Dock-Nakina678472116325
Guideway468488125356
Tabor City1334833171306718
Williams Township1200921115268783
Acme-Delco53733273134226
Total White1018270701265237685292
Whiteville45234859141125
Spring Hill1661073
Diamond Branch1341323
Chadbourn50337492151108
Cerro Gordo100822
Mt. Mariah189833
Fair Bluff3882486
Mt. Olive55032778153220
Piney Forest68381
Evergreen107852






[Illustration:

Collins Dept. Store
]

“CHADBOURN'S LEADING TRADE CENTER”

COLLINS DEPARTMENT STORE

J. M. JACKSON, Mgr. CHADBOURN, N. C.

All Roads Leads to Collins’ . . .

“Your Convenient Trading Center”

Ladies’ and Men's Ready-to-Wear

Children's and Infants’ Wear

Visit Our Bargain Counter

COLLINS DEPARTMENT STORE

C. G. WISHART, Manager

WHITEVILLE, N. C.





Boardman120592
Rose Hill163812
Browns Chapel39341
Farmers Union27511410682105
Artesia239934
Lake Waccamaw90592
Christian Plains119722
Liberty Hill85772
Hallsboro2461283
Honey Hill71711
Hickory Hill78593
Bolton2691835
Old Dock46381
Dothan72512
Bug Hill36331
Tabor City414283178169
Clarendon101762
Armour291163457274
Acme67301
Freeman49271
Delco129953
Total Colered5656365039712510701

Births, Deaths and Marriages

BIRTHSDEATHSMarriages
19141038435
19151019463228
19161167406275
19171055431296
19181023574246
19191066427323
19201105460345
19211200400257
19221246414176
19231287472204
19241248471171
1925104138761
1926112146158
1927112238269
1928116150354
1929106746739
1930116945941
1931122746647
1932151658435
19331009325146
19341124397163
19351147374171
19361074439168
19371571480195
19381279452163





1939129038957
1940130538528
1941135640651
1942135837235
1943149054940

No. of Contagious Diseases, 1943

Diphtheria57
Meningitis3
Poliomyelitis1
Scarlet Fever46
Tuberculosis12
Typhoid1
Whooping Cough17
Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever1

NUMBER OF DEATHS CAUSED FROM CONTAGIOUS DISEASES:

Meningitis2
Tuberculosis4

NUMBER VACCINATED AGAINST CONTAGIOUS DISEASES:

Smallpox89
Diphtheria1281
Typhoid307
Whooping Cough2

Number of Farms by Minor Civil
Divisions

Census of Agriculture, 1940

(Data Furnished by U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of The Census, Washington, D. C.)

M. C. D.Number of Farms
Columbus County, total5,426
Bogue Township287
Bolton Township143
Bug Hill Township293
Cerro Gordo Township325
Chadbourn Township424
Fair Bluff Township248
Lees Township486
Ransom Township393
South Williams Township307
Tatums Township540
Waccamaw Township97
Welches Creek Township282
Western Prong Township157
Whiteville Township736
Williams Township708





Livestock In County, 1944

ANIMALNUMBERValuation
Horses513$ 50,345
Mules5892661,089
Sheep154313
Goats4601,097
Hogs34,472192,235
Milk Cows3,204158,103
Other Cattle321962,696
Poultry186,175143,200
Female Dogs631
Male Dogs3,078

Persons of Voting Age, 1940

Male (21 years of age and older)11,322
Female (21 years of age and older)10,978
Total22,300

Population by Ages, 1940

Under 5 years5,84340 to 44 years2,072
5 to 9 years5,77245 to 49 years1,908
10 to 14 years5,56550 to 54 years1,668
15 to 19 years5,21555 to 59 years1,296
20 to 24 years4,46860 to 64 years966
25 to 29 years3,76365 to 69 years821
30 to 34 years3,00470 to 74 years395
35 to 39 years2,46675 years and over441

Population by Square Mile

Columbus county, with a population of 45,663, and an area of 939 square miles, has a total of 48.6 inhabitants per square mile. Of the total population, 42,652 are classed by the Bureau of Census as rural, and 3,011 as urban.

Manufacturer's Census, 1939

Number of Establishments: 36.

Wage Earners (yearly average): 813.

Annual Wages: $363,634.

Cost of Materials, supplies, fuel, purchased electric energy and contract work: $1,179,272.





Chadbourn—

A Good Place to Live

A Good Place to Work

A Good Place to Do Business

IT HAS

A Large Strawberry Market

A Large Tobacco Market

A Large Potato Market

Also, A Peanut, Grape, Cucumber, and General Produce Market

This Advertisement Sponsored By

TOWN OF CHADBOURN





Value of products $2,156,327

Value added by manufacture $977,055

Literacy In County

MALE
Male, 25 years old and over9,632
No school years completed (and thus classed as illiterate)892
Grade school
1 to 4 years2,545
5 or 6 years1,816
7 or 8 years1,972
High School
1 to 3 years1,207
4 years520
College
1 to 3 years251
4 years or more219
Not Reported210

FEMALE
Female, 25 years old and older9,168
No school years completed736
Grade school
1 to 4 years1,948
5 or 6 years1,727
7 or 8 years1,965
High School
1 to 3 years1,273
4 years687
College
1 to 3 years403
4 years or more273
Not Reported156
Mdian school years completed7.1

Make

E. W. Fonvielle and Son

Your Headquarters for

POULTRY and SEEDS





INDEX

Area17Marriages69
Assessed Valuation15Minerals17
Beans21Mayors59
Births69Municipalities59
Budget15Officers, County61
Climate17Physicians62
Constables62Population65
Cotton20Population, School67
Contagious Diseases70Population, Church49
Civitan Clubs28Postmasters63
Court, Terms of16Post Offices63
Courthouse14Precincts15
County Home15Principals, High School63
Cultivated Land19Prison Camp15
Confederate Daughters27Railroads25
Dentists63Rivers52
Deputy Sheriffs62Roads16
Druggists62Rotary Clubs29
Deaths69Schools8
Elections, Board of61Soil17
Electric Current23Strawberries19
Forests22Sweet Potatoes22
Farms, Number of70Sunny South Colony11
Fish51Taxes and Tax Rate15
Health, Board of61Teachers and Pupils67
History1Telephones, Number of24
Industry53Timberlands51
Irish Potatoes22Tobacco19
Jail14Townships15
Lawyers62Vaccinations70
Livestock71Water17
Lake Waccamaw18Water Power17
Manufacturer's Census71Wheat22





Compliments

— of —

North Carolina

Lumber and Veneer

Company

Hallsboro, North Carolina





FORD

Cars, Trucks and Tractors

Genuine

FORD PARTS

GOOD USED CARS

Expert

REPAIR SERVICE


[Illustration:

Ford
]

WOOTEN MOTORS, Inc.

[illegible text] Wooten, Owner-Mgr..

[illegible text] N. C.

















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