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Housed on the third floor; being a collection of North Caroliniana

Date: 1941 | Identifier: Z1319 .C68 1941
Housed on the third floor; being a collection of North Caroliniana / formed by Bruce Cotten. With some facsimile impressions of titles. Baltimore : Horn Shafer, 1941. 65, viii p., c leaves of plates : ill. ; 24 cm. more...
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Compliments of Mr. Bruce Cotten. Cylburn.


























[Illustration:

Ex Libris Bruce Cotten Collection of North Caroliniana
]





THE BOOK-PLATE DESIGNED FOR THIS COLLECTION IS MADE UP OF THE OBVERSE SIDE OF THE SEAL OF THE LORDS PROPRIETORS OF CAROLINA, WITH A Tarred-Heel IN PLACE OF A STAG AS A CREST. THE REVERSE SIDE OF THE SEAL, THE COATS-OF-ARMS OF THE EIGHT PROPRIETORS, IS USED AS ORNAMENTS ACROSS THE BASE AND THE INSERT IS THE EAST PORTICO OF THE PRESENT STATE CAPITOL AT RALEIGH.









HOUSED ON THE THIRD FLOOR









HOUSED ON THE THIRD FLOOR
being
A Collection of North Caroliniana




[Illustration:


decoration]


formed by
BRUCE COTTEN
With some Facsimile Impressions of Titles

BALTIMORE
1941








TO THE MEMORY OF MY MOTHER, SALLIE SOUTHALL COTTEN, WHO FIRST PROPOSED AND ALWAYS ENCOURAGED ME IN THIS GENTLE PASTIME.









HOUSED ON THE THIRD FLOOR

I

IN complying with repeated requests of many book friends, that I write something descriptive of the collection of North Carolina books and pamphlets that I have formed over a period of years, I realize that it would be much more useful if I would publish a descriptive catalogue of the whole collection. But this would be a large undertaking and require very heavy editorial work and larger research to finish than I can at present undertake.

I am neither a scholar nor a real bibliographer and this collection of books is merely incidental to the major matters of life—a creation solely of leisure hours that elsewise might have been much less pleasantly spent.

Book collecting, whether an acquired taste or an acquired nuisance, is in either case acquired. It develops by degrees and passes through numerous forms and phases, rather curious to look back upon. At first you only want certain sorts and kinds of books and reject





innumerable volumes that in after years you are violently seeking. You only by degrees overcome your own prejudices and dislikes and gradually find yourself including and exploring in ever larger fields. Then there is always, and for a long time, a struggle, when you realize that the disease has really gripped you; and numerous determinations are made to stop the thing entirely and not to permit yourself to be classed with those mildly deranged people who collect things.

There are collectors of buttons, tobacco tags, boxes, ink stands, clocks, corks, pins, paperweights, dog collars and almost everything else on the face of the earth, and as a collector of North Carolina books I have been looked at with shocked amazement by many of these very same people and made to feel inferior.

Notwithstanding, I have persevered and have insisted that book collecting is superior to all other forms of the disease. I even agreed with Dr. Rosenbach when he said that “after love, book collecting is the most exhilarating sport of all,” though I was shocked and had some misgivings one day upon being introduced to a man in New York who collected only books written by one-eyed men.

Finally, having passed through all the awkward stages and embarrassments that a collector experiences, I arrived at a stage where I was willing to proclaim my deformity and to admit that it has afforded me the keenest sort of pleasure and pastime. I even maintain that it is the duty of every person to have some sort of a hobby, to become highly proficient or informed about something, but it must be something intellectual—something that can be carried on in old age when a person has outlived his future.





The desire to collect North Carolina books first took root in my system back in 1891, when I was about eighteen years of age. The World's Fair at Chicago was about to take place; and my mother, as one of the Lady Managers from North Carolina, was much interested and occupied in forming the State exhibit which was to be displayed there. She conceived the idea of forming a collection of North Carolina books to be included in that exhibit.

Few, if any at that time, knew anything at all about North Carolina books, or whether there were any such things or not. Nothing had ever been published on the subject, and the best informed people could not recall half a dozen books published in North Carolina or by North Carolina authors. There were few libraries in the State; I recall none east of Raleigh, and no collection of North Caroliniana existed, barring the mass of uncatalogued material that lay in the old library at Chapel Hill and some miscellaneous stuff that was held in the State Library at Raleigh.

However, we persisted in mother's determination and felt really proud when we got together some twenty volumes, including agricultural reports, some half dozen volumes of Christian Reid's works and an odd volume of Hawks’ “History of North Carolina.” This conglomeration was actually sent out to Chicago where, of course, it must have made a sorry showing.

This experience planted the germ and desire in me to know and to possess something of the books and literature that had been published in and about my native State—that good earth of which my ancestors are a part. Strange to look back upon, it never occurred to me that





a fine opportunity lay immediately around me; for there were, within driving distance of our home, a number of old houses whose attics were full of papers and books, much of which if preserved would unquestionably be of surpassing interest and rarity today.

But these buildings and their contents have long since gone, and it was not until I entered the Army and became acquainted with old bookstores that I began with some earnestness to look for and to inquire for North Carolina items. My accumulation grew very slowly, for both money and knowledge were entirely lacking; yet in the latter years of my service in the Army I packed around with me, at Government expense, some two hundred volumes of North Carolina material. My great pride and thrill of that period was a shabby copy of Lawson's “History of Carolina,” the Perry reprint, published at Raleigh in 1860. I secured this imaginary gem in Salt Lake City.

I had in the meantime heard of Dr. Stephen B. Weeks and the great collection he was forming, so one of the first things I did after resigning from the Army and locating in Baltimore, was to call upon Dr. Weeks in Washington, where he resided and was employed in the Department of Education. Dr. Weeks was the pioneer bibliographer and book collector of North Carolina, and we owe him a great debt of gratitude for the stupendous work he did in this field and he will, I think, always remain our greatest bibliographer.

Our friendship started immediately and lasted until his death, indeed, the real birth of my collection can be dated from the beginning of this friendship. Dr. Weeks not only filled me with North Carolina book lore, but





he opened up to me vast new fields in book collecting: a study of the physical book itself, the causes of its publication, its influence, the press it came from, as well, of course, as its author and substance. Without these things interest in collecting stops with possession; with them interest continues indefinitely and so defines the difference between a mere accumulator and a collector of books.

Vastly encouraged by this contact and intimacy with Dr. Weeks, and with a growing knowledge of the field that I was covering, I now began collecting North Caroliniana quite strenuously, though I have never tried to cover the field so completely as Dr. Weeks did. He not only included everything that had the slightest reference to North Carolina but much that seemed so far afield that any idea of limitation seemed abandoned. I recall finding several lives of General William T. Sherman on his shelves, placed there because General Sherman commanded the Army that marched through North Carolina during our Civil War.

There were also any number of books and sets of books on the South in general included, because North Carolina is a part of the South. To this I contended that North Carolina is also a part of America and, indeed, of the World; and under such interpretation the Library of Congress could be considered a collection of North Caroliniana—which was, in fact, precisely what I think Dr. Weeks considered it to be.

On this perplexing question, the question of limitation, Dr. Weeks and I had numerous discussions. The difference between us was that Dr. Weeks was a real State bibliographer while I was, and have remained, a





private collector. For me to have done otherwise would have required much more time than I could devote to the subject and would have rendered my collection quite unmanageable in a private home; for, after all, a fellow has to limit his collection to something that his wife will consent to live with.

My idea has been, and still is, to form a private, cleancut, purely North Carolina collection, embracing everything of major interest that has been published about our State in every field. But notwithstanding all rules and ideas formed on the subject, this problem of limitation remains the most perplexing problem that a collector has to deal with; for there are not only hundreds of borderline items that he has to pass upon, but he has to decide, as well, which are worth while, or are really collectors’ pieces among those that are decidely within his field. Of the Laws I include, with few exceptions, only those printed in the State prior to 1800; I do not include folio newspapers at all, and have few legislative documents, school catalogues, agricultural, institutional and other sorts of reports. I am very partial to items of some interest large enough to stand in their own binding and have never outgrown my dislike of purely political speeches and memorial addresses, though my early prejudice against government imprints has considerably abated in recent years.

These documents very often carry only caption titles, such as Pub. Doc. No. so and so and are not attractive as imprints; but many of them are highly interesting and of great importance. The difficulty is that no proper bibilography of our public documents has ever been prepared, and students and collectors can not discover





what documents have been published on their subjects. Dealers also let public documents strictly alone—finding no sale for them.

My interest in this field was greatly stimulated a few years ago by visiting a warehouse in Washington where a dealer held some tons of them in storage. Almost the first piece I picked up was “Ex. Doc. No. 78. 30th Congress. 1st. Session.” It was a 238-page proceedings of a Court of Inquiry held at Saltillo, Mexico, in 1848, to inquire into an alleged mutiny in the North Carolina Volunteers and the facts connected with the dishonorable discharge of certain officers of that regiment. I had never heard of it.

North Carolina is not a big literary field, nothing comparable to Virginia or to Maryland, yet much of our stuff is most difficult to find and many of our choicest pieces are only known by the existence of a single copy. I suppose I have glanced over half a million pages of old book catalogues in my time, and have maintained for years close contact with many dealers and book-scouts all over the country.

I have listened also to many fascinating yarns by book-scouts, yarns of their wonderful experiences and finds in old attics and outhouses and how easy it all is if one has really a nose for books. These tales are curiously similar in detail and usually center about the attic of some old farmhouse, where after being admitted by an always beautiful daughter, the mother of course protesting but the always beautiful daughter insisting that there is something up there. Finally—an old hair trunk, or is it a chest of drawers this time, anyway there are two volumes from Gen. George Washington's own library





with some papers of Mr. Thomas Jefferson, a set of David Copperfield in pamphlet form and the tallest and cleanest copy of Dana's “Two Years Before the Mast” that was ever found, and so forth and so on.

I even fell for a lot of this stuff myself in my incubator days and have scouted considerably in eastern Carolina looking for books, and while I admit that extraordinary and incredible things do sometimes happen in book-scouting, have in fact happened to me, yet I do not seem to have the same nose for books afield as I am thought to have among shelves, and farmers’ daughters pay me scant attention. So I have had to purchase most of my books from dealers and book-scouts, many of whom are my good friends; though I wish to acknowledge with gratitude that many friends in North Carolina and elsewhere have contributed items of varied interest to this collection, and some indeed items of very considerable interest.

In other words, as a book-scout I am something of a failure; but I continue it occasionally as a social recreation and for whatever entertainment I may encounter. My failure in this respect may be due to my inability to adjust myself to certain ethics necessary for success. I find it difficult, after being received by a lady or gentleman, to stalk over the house asking what they will take for this or that book, and I just can not do it. With another class of people I have none of this feeling at all, but the trouble with these people is that if you offer them a fair price for a book, you just do not get it. You have to become an ordinary sneak thief in order to do any business with them.

I recall, years ago, scouting along the Roanoke River,





coming upon a fine old place, much dilapidated and occupied by a tenant farmer. I asked him if there were any books in the house and he answered: “No—none at all.” I pushed my way in, however, and on up the stairway. Finally, I came upon a drawer containing several books, one of which was a good copy of a book I had long been looking for.

The book was worth $20.00; any dealer would have charged me that or more. I was very willing to pay that price, so why come in this man's house and walk off with a twenty dollar bill? Thus I reflected as I held it in my hand and offered him twenty dollars for it. Instantly his whole manner changed. He quickly took the book from my hands and said: “If it is worth twenty dollars to you it is worth a hundred to someone else.” Had I offered him fifty cents or a dollar for the book it would have been mine.

However, on that same day my heart hardened, and I committed the only theft I have ever been guilty of in this business. I came upon a poor copy of Swann's “Revisal,” published in Newbern in 1752, in the hands of an infidel, a rude fellow who was uncivil to his wife in my presence. I decided that to rob him was a virtue, so I offered him fifty cents for it and he said: “Take it along—it's nothing to me.”

Later, when I had an opportunity and had secured a good copy of this work, I sold this copy for seventy-five dollars. But the Lord punished me well for that thievery. I paid for that book over and over again, for whenever afterwards listed items appeared priced too high I consoled myself with the thought that I had just made seventy-five dollars on the sale of a book. I spent





that seventy-five dollars more lavishly and more often than money was ever spent before, and the incident is not entirely cased on my conscience to this day.

Nor can I boast of my successes in the auction rooms of New York. I am convinced that the people who attend those sales are, for the most part, disguised millionaires out merely to humiliate humble folk like myself. A few winters ago a copy of “The Discoveries of John Leaderer, In Three Several Marches from Virginia to the West of Carolina,” printed in London in 1672, was offered in the Goelet sale. I was intensely keen about this little item and consulted with several book friends as to the probable price it would fetch. We looked up the few previous sales on record in England and America during the last fifty years, and considering that the depression was at its height we decided that $600.00 would certainly get it. So I decided to buy it in at $600.00—a good price for so small a thing; but had I not just made seventy-five dollars on the sale of a book, which would bring it down to about $500.00.

It was a cold, snowy night, a good night for good books to go cheaply, I thought; and on the way down I decided that it would be good strategy not to bid up the price by degrees but to floor my competitors at once by bidding $600.00 to commence with.

When the little piece was finally reached I immediately bid $600.00. Before I could turn to note the effect of this stunning blow, $900.00 was bid then $1,200.00 and on to $1,450.00. I passed through a similar sad experience in an effort to purchase a copy of “A Brief Description of the Province of Carolina and More Particularly of a New-Plantation Begun by the English at Cape Fear,” printed in





London in 1688. This little twelve-page pamphlet brought $1,150.00. So book collecting is like everything else worth while; it has its disappointments and sad moments, but through it all I have had as great good luck and more fortunate breaks than anyone I know.





II

THE published literature pertaining to the state of North Carolina falls naturally into several different periods, the first of which is the period prior to the establishment of a press in the colony itself. It so happens that the very earliest piece of real English-speaking Americana pertains entirely to what is now North Carolina, but I can never hope to own a copy of this rare little gem. I refer to “A Brief and True Report of the Newfoundland of Virginia,” or the “Quarto Hariot” as it is affectionately called, by Thomas Hariot and imprinted at London in 1588. Only five perfect copies have been located, and should a good copy be offered today it would cause unprecedented excitement and interest in the book world.

This work was republished at Frankford on Main in 1590 “At Theodore DeBry's own cost and charge.” It was printed in English, French, German and Latin as part one of DeBry's “Grand Voyages,” and rendered doubly attractive by the inclusion of twenty-three plates of natives drawn by John White while with Raleigh's second expedition at Roanoke Island in 1585. But the English edition of this work is likewise hopelessly rare, though I have a nice copy of the Latin edition printed the same year. This Latin edition continued to appear from the same press for years after 1590 without any change of date on title, so that the greatest confusion exists among bibliographers as to what year located copies were really printed, for almost every copy found differs from others in some respect. My own copy has





two of the “Garden of Eden” plates and one of LeMoyne's plates, made at Fort Carolina, now Florida, in 1583, bound in with the “Ould Virginia” plates. This LeMoyne plate properly belongs to Laudonnier's “Florida,” which comprises part two of DeBry's “Grand Voyages,” first published at Frankford in 1591. The presence of this plate along with other things seems to identify my copy as the second edition, printed supposedly in 1608.

It is interesting to note that for over two centuries these twenty-three plates, as reproduced by DeBry, were supposed to be all of the pictures made by White while with Raleigh's expedition at Roanoke; and even after the additional plates were discovered they remained entirely unnoticed for another fifty years.

In June 1865 the library of Lord Charlemont, an Irish peer, was consigned to Sotheby's in London for the purpose of being sold at auction. Among these books was a bound volume of water-color drawings with the following title-page: “The Pictures of Sundry Things; collected and counterfeited, according to the truth. In the Voige made by Sir Walter Raleigh, Knight, for the Discovery of La Virginia. In the 27th year of the Most Happy Reign of Our Sovereign Queen Elizabeth and in the year of Our Lord God 1585.”

Because of DeBry's engravings, that eccentric wizard of old book lore, Henry Stevens of Vermont, immediately recognized this volume as the drawings of John White; indeed it was the identical volume that White had drawn up and bound for Raleigh himself while residing on one of Raleigh's estates in Ireland, immediately after his return from Virginia, and it contained seventy-six





drawings instead of the twenty-three that had always been supposed to be the full number. Before they were sold, Sotheby suffered a devastating fire, and this volume lay for three weeks soaked with water under a heap of brick and debris. When recovered, it was found that the pictures were not damaged by fire, but that by reason of the moisture and pressure the drawings had printed off on the opposite blank pages, with the result that there were now two sets of drawings, one the original and the other the off-sets.

Both were sold at public auction and both purchased by Mr. Stevens. The original went for two hundred guineas and the off-sets for twenty-five guineas. It is to be forever regretted that Mr. Stevens’ great patron in America, Mr. Lenox, because of conditions at the close of our Civil War, did not come in on the bidding; so Mr. Stevens re-sold them to Mr. Panizzi, who placed them with the British Museum. Even here they were lost for another half century, for they were placed in the Grenville Library, because that library contains the famous “Grenville-DeBry;” and it was not until rather recently that they were re-discovered and transferred to the Department of Prints, from which they have been exhibited. It is expected that they will some day be reproduced in full.

However, it is not intended further to discuss material not in my own collection and all books referred to in this essay are on my shelves, unless otherwise specifically stated.

My two earliest pieces in English were both printed in 1682 and represent efforts of the Lords Proprietors to create interest in their lately acquired Province of Carolina.





One is “An Account of the Province of Carolina in America,” by Samuel Wilson, London 1682. The folding map in this is of special interest, being the second map to show the coast line of Carolina and the first to undertake to show a dividing line between Carolina and Virginia. Samuel Wilson was secretary to the Proprietors and the work is dedicated to The Right Honorable William, Earl Craven, Palatine. The other piece is “Carolina; or A Description of the Present State of that Country,” by T. A., printed at London 1682. This is a charming little black-letter imprint written by Thomas Ash, “Clerk on Board His Majesty's Ship the Richmond sent out with instructions to inquire into the state of that Country.” My copy of “The Two Charters Granted by King Charles II, to the Proprietors of Carolina,” London 1704 (?) is not only in very beautiful condition but is the best possible copy for a Carolina collector, for it was the personal copy of Lord Craven, our Palatine Proprietor and carries his handsome bookplate. It was secured directly from Coombe Abby, a seat of the Craven family, where it was found in a box together with Lord Craven's marriage certificate and other intimate papers.

Then there is a copy of Lawson's “History of Carolina,” first edition published in London in 1709, which will always be regarded as a foundation piece of any good Carolina collection and the second edition published in 1714, and the two German editions printed in Hamburg in 1712 and 1722. Since this last was published some ten years after the death of Mr. Lawson at the hands of Indians in eastern Carolina, I had the preface translated, hoping therein to discover some reference to that melancholy incident. To my surprise I discovered that Mr.





Lawson was still alive and could be seen at his house in London.

“A Description of the English Province of Carolana, by the Spaniards called Florida, and by the French LaLouisiane;” by Daniel Coxe, Esq., London 1722, is a highly entertaining work with no particular reference to what is now Carolina. However, the book has a fascinating background, and is a reminder that in a grant by Charles I to Sir Robert Heath in 1629, we were christened Carolana in an effort, it is thought, to convert an honor that had been bestowed upon a French king to an English king of the same name. The book, also, has the distinction of being the first to suggest that the English Provinces in America unite for mutual benefit and protection. Other editions were published in England in 1726, 1727 and 1741, and two American reprints have appeared since.

Brickell's “The Natural History of North Carolina,” Dublin 1737, is a worth-while and attractive piece in spite of the fact that it is a rather shameful plagiarism of Lawson's “History of Carolina.” I have even seen it catalogued for sale as a “Plagiarized Lawson.” “An Act for the Establishing an Agreement with Seven of the Lords Proprietors of Carolina for the Surrender of their Title and Interest in that Province to His Majesty,” London, printed by the Assigns of His Majesty's Printer, 1729, is a very attractive folio black-letter excerpt of twenty pages.

Some later English works are “The Natural History of Carolina, Florida and the Bahama Islands,” by Mark Catesby, London 1771. This is not the first edition of this work but is by far the best and handsomest. It is in two volumes, elephant folio with two hundred and twenty handpainted plates, with text in French and





English. Catesby spent nearly twenty years in Virginia and the Carolinas engaged in this undertaking, and the famous botanist Peter Collison wrote of his work: “It does great honor to him and his country and is perhaps the most curious and elegant performance, of its kind, that has anywhere appeared in Europe.”

“A Tour in the United States of America,” by J. F. D. Smyth in two volumes, London 1784, is a highly entertaining work with about one-fourth of the text pertaining to North Carolina.

I also have, as associated books, two volumes by Arthur Dobbs, Esq., who was for ten years a Royal Governor of the Province and who died at Brunswick in 1764.

Lieutenant Colonel Sir Banastre Tarleton, after much service in America during our Revolutionary War, wrote “A History of the Campaigns of 1780-1781in the Southern Provinces of North America,” London 1787; also the famous “Pirate Press” of Dublin printed a poor edition the same year. Colonel Tarleton, after the war in America, lived for many years on terms of intimacy with “Persita” (Mary Robinson), a well-known author and actress of that day; and some bibliographers profess to be able to detect her influence and assistance in the preparation of this work. Then there is Lieut. MacKenzie's “Strictures on Lieut. Col. Tarleton's History,” London 1787; and the Honorable Major George Hanger's “Reply to the Strictures of Lieut. MacKenzie,” London 1789; both of which are very rare and cast some light on the British campaign in North Carolina.

Altogether there are twenty-six pieces in this collection that were printed in England prior to eighteen





hundred, which is all I know of, save some half dozen unprocurable items, including those two that those millionaires so cruelly deprived me of at the Anderson Galleries.





III

In June 1749, Mr. James Davis established at Newbern the first printing press ever to be assembled in North Carolina, and thereby started the North Carolina eighteenth century press. The first publications were the Journals of the Senate and the House of Burgesses and the laws of the sessions of the General Assembly.

The earliest located North Carolina imprint is a copy of “The Journal of the House of Burgesses, of the Province of North Carolina ... In the Nineteenth Year of the Reign of our Sovereign Lord George the Second, by the Grace of God, of Great Britain, France and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, etc.” Newbern 1749. The only known copy of this journal is held in the Public Records Office, London, along with thirty-seven other early laws and North Carolina imprints, none of which, amazing to relate, are found in any other library or collection in the world. Certainly Mother England preserved the history of her children much better than we have done since we left her.

The urgent necessity of codifying and printing the laws was the incentive of the first press in all of our original states, and except for this government work it is doubtful if any press at all would have been established in North Carolina during the Colonial period. This matter of printing the laws was a question of grave concern and frequently discussed for years before any real action was taken. Governor Johnston in 1736 spoke feelingly on this subject when in an address to the General Assembly he said, concerning the laws: “Upon the strictest inquiry I can't find that there is one complete





copy of them in any one place, neither have I seen any two copies of them that perfectly agree. . . . Most of them either appear under ridiculous titles, are full of contradictions or their language and style is childish, ridiculous and against the common rules of grammar. As the happiness of every private man depends upon the law, I think it is a grievance that can never too soon be redressed.”

It would, indeed, be interesting to discover some of the old “goose quill” volumes of manuscript laws that were used in the Province before the introduction of the printing press, but they all seem to have disappeared; only I have heard that Governor Henry Toole Clark once possessed such a volume, that it was bound in coonskin and carried the bookplate of Edward Moseley. Such a volume would indeed be a prize today and choice reading, no doubt, for much later than this the General Assembly very solemnly enacted “That Two Hundred and Fifty pounds shall be a barrel of Tar in North Carolina.”

This period of the eighteenth century press in North Carolina has been subjected to intense study and research, so that we know much more about it than we do about the press of the first half of the nineteenth century. Dr. Weeks did valuable pioneer work in this field, and Mr. Douglas C. McMurtrie has completed and published his “Eighteenth Century North Carolina Imprints. 1749-1800.”

So painstaking and complete is this work that it is safe to say that it will never be enlarged to any appreciable extent, yet it is disappointing in that it is almost entirely made up of laws and sermons. Not one located





item of history, poetry or literature proper, though there are two pieces on military science, one on medicine, one geography, a veterinary manual and several polilitical tracts. Mr. McMurtrie's work was in the press for several years, during which time I did not report my additions, with the result that this collection is credited with only twenty-nine pieces, while as a matter of fact, at this writing, I have forty-four of the items listed there.

My earliest North Carolina imprint is a copy of Swann's “Revisal of the Laws,” printed by James Davis, Newbern 1752.

This first revisal of the laws of the Province is also the first bound book to be published in North Carolina, and as such is much sought after and prized in any collection. In a North Carolina collection it ranks as a field marshal, and some short description should be given here.

Yielding finally to the repeated demands of Gov. Johnston, the Assembly in March 1746 appointed four commissioners “to revise and print the several Acts of the Assembly in force in this Province” and provided that it should be paid for out of the duty on wines, rum, distilled liquors and rice.

The work was finished in 1749 and submitted to the Assembly by Samuel Swann, one of the commissioners. Gov. Johnston, writing to the Board of Trade under date of December 21, 1749, says that the revised laws “are now in press and I expect to send your Lordship a copy by June next;” however, it was still to be two years before the code came off the press.

The first imprint was made in 1751 and was published prior to November 15, 1751, as it was advertised on that





date as “lately published and for sale.” After the Assembly of March 1752, the laws of that session were added, the title changed to read 1752 and the table of contents changed so as to include the new laws. There seems to be a period of only about five months between these two imprints, during which time there appears to have been four different issues of the two, each differing slightly from the other.

The work as it is, is a small folio of 353 or 371 pages, depending upon the issue considered and is dedicated to “His Excellency Gabriel Johnston, Esq., Captain, General, Governor and Commander in Chief in and over His Majesty's Province of North Carolina.” Being bound in leather that was imperfectly tanned, it turned a curious yellow shade, for which reason it has been popularly known as “The Yellow Jacket” for over a hundred and fifty years now.

Among other Law Revisals of an early date my copy of Davis’ “Revisal of 1773” carries the signature of Thomas Burke, a Revolutionary Governor of North Carolina, the same who had the great misfortune of being captured at Hillsborough and taken to Charleston as a prisoner of that active Loyalist Col. David Fanning. Peculiar among Law Revisals, but not of this period, is a copy of the revisal made by Nash, Iredell and Battle and published in Raleigh in 1837. This copy is made up of the original printed chapters as submitted to the Assembly to be voted upon. A thoughtful member of the House of Commons, having retained his copies, had them bound into a folio volume, along with the printed report of the Commission, and left it to find its way, a hundred years later, to this collection.





Other eighteenth century imprints made at Newbern are from the press of Francis Xavier Martin and are all laws or pertaining to the law. Rare and interesting among them are “A Collection of the Private Acts of the General Assembly, . . . from 1715 to the year 1790.” Newbern 1794; “The Acts of the General Assembly for the years 1791, 1792, 1793 and 1794,” Newbern 1795; and “The Office and Authority of a Justice of the Peace,” Newbern 1791, which has on its title-page the impressive words: “Happy the Country where Law is not a Science.” My copy of “Notes of a Few Decisions in the Superior Courts and the Circuit Courts of North Carolina,” Francis X. Martin, Newbern 1797, was presented to this collection by the family of the late Judge Henry Groves Connor, and is highly prized and appreciated. It is so rare that I have never known a copy to be on sale.

While I am on the laws, I can not help mentioning “Cases Determined in the Court of King's Bench, during the I, II and III years of Charles I. . . . First published in Norman-French (1661) and now Translated into the English language, by Francis Xavier Martin.” Newbern 1793. It would be difficult to discover why it was ever translated and published in North Carolina, only the translator explains in the preface: “A desire of preventing the waste of a few leisure hours, alone induced me to undertake the publication of these cases.” The work has several physical points interesting to a collector.

My earliest Edenton imprint is “Proceedings and Debates of the Convention of North Carolina, Convened at Hillsborough . . . 1787.” Edenton 1789. This convention, after rejecting the Constitution of the United States, adjourned with much ill-feeling and failed to provide for





the publication of its proceedings. A small edition, however, was printed at the private expense of a few gentlemen, and the debates as published were reported by Davis Robertson of Petersburg, Va. Shorthand reporting was novel and unprecedented in North Carolina assemblies at that time, and Mr. Robertson was treated with no consideration, was forbidden the floor of the Convention and had to be content with “a very inconvenient seat in the gallery.” Another exceedingly rare and interesting imprint, made either at Edenton or at Halifax, is “Regulations for the Order and Discipline of the Troops of the United States,” printed by Hodge & Wills 1794. “Agreeable to an Act of the Assembly of the State of North Carolina.”

My earliest Halifax imprint is “A Charity Sermon,” by Rev. Samuel E. McCorkle DD. Halifax 1795. Besides laws printed in Halifax, I also have a fine copy of “Instructions to be Observed for the Formation and Movements of the Cavalry,” by William Richardson Davie, Esquire. Halifax 1799.

The press in Salisbury was established in 1797 and is represented by “Every Man his Own Doctor; or the Poor Man's Family Physician,” by Thomas Johnson, Salisbury 1798. This curious little piece is one of only two copies located. It would be interesting to know what relationship, if any, exists between this Salisbury imprint and “Every Man His Own Doctor, or The Poor Planter's Physician,” several editions of which were printed at Annapolis and at Williamsburg, Va., about the middle of the eighteenth century. Another Salisbury imprint of this period is: “An Introduction to the Knowledge of the Christian Religion. Published for the Use of the Protestant Episcopal Church of Whitehaven Parish,”





by Robert Johnston Miller, R. P. Salisbury 1799. This is the only copy of this work located and is highly regarded for itself and because of its author's extraordinary career as a man and a churchman.

I have also several of the religious “Discourses” published by the Rev. Samuel E. McCorkle at Salisbury before the close of the century and there were German imprints published in Salisbury during this period, but I have been unable to procure any.

Wilmington was the seat of the second press operated in the state, but eighteenth century imprints made at Wilmington are excessively rare. This collection has none, and I believe only eleven pieces have been located in all the libraries and collections in the country. A very choice Wilmington imprint is the Session Laws of 1764, printed in Wilmington in 1765 by Andrew Steuart, “Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.” This titlepage aroused considerable resentment and the Assembly asserted that “No such title as Printer to His Majesty the King exists in this Province.” The people as well must have held it in small esteem; at least they took no pains to preserve it, for it is only known by the preservation of two copies—one with the Archives of the Moravian Church at Winston-Salem, N. C., and the other with the New York Historical Society.

Presses were also operated in Fayetteville, Hillsborough, Lincolnton and Raleigh prior to the close of the century, but practically no imprints from these presses have been preserved. The press at Raleigh was not established until late in 1799, and the earliest imprint I have is “A Manual of Laws” by John Haywood,





Esq., Raleigh 1801, which I feel sure was the first bound book to be printed in our capitol city.

Fully eighty per cent of all the printing done in North Carolina during the eighteenth century came from the presses of Davis, Martin and Hodge and none of them were natives of the state. James Davis was born in Virginia and came to North Carolina in 1749 when twenty-eight years of age. He was State Printer for over thirty years and died in Newbern in 1785, leaving a will, a large family and a good estate. He was a man of standing, and his services as first printer under very trying conditions entitles him to be remembered among those who have performed high service among us.

Francis X. Martin was a Frenchman rather curiously cast upon our shores, a penniless lad. He became a printer's assistant at Newbern and shortly proprietor of the press. He was also a lawyer and a citizen of high standing. After twenty years in North Carolina he was appointed a judge of Mississippi Territory and spent the remainder of a long life in New Orleans, where he became eminent as a jurist and author. He never married, was a man of enormous industry and published in New Orleans in 1829 a two-volume history of North Carolina.

Abraham Hodge was a native of the State of New York and was trained from youth to the printers trade. He operated a press in the city of New York and is said to have conducted Washington's traveling press during the darker days of the Revolution. About 1785 he was induced to come to North Carolina “by a group of distinguished gentlemen” for the purpose of establishing a Federalist paper and was given the public printing. During his twenty years in the State he operated, at





times, besides his main press at Halifax, presses at Newbern, Edenton, Fayetteville and Raleigh. His nephew, William Boyland, was associated with him in these enterprises and located the first press to be operated in Raleigh, where he continued to reside as a printer and book dealer and where he died at an advanced age, highly regarded. Hodge never married and died at Halifax on August 3, 1805, where he was buried and where his tomb can still be seen in an excellent state of preservation.





IV

WITH the advent of the nineteenth century the printing press began to extend itself throughout the State. There was a press at Warrenton in 1804, at Washington in 1806, at Elizabeth City in 1807, at Murfreesboro in 1812 and shortly afterwards in a number of other places.

The South, without being really religious, has always been church-ridden, in certain ways, and in nothing has this reflected itself more positively than in our produced and imported literature. It would almost appear that Mr. Martin, being a Frenchman and about to depart the State, was vexed at this situation and determined to give our people a somewhat more spicy type of reading than we had heretofore had access to. Anyway at the very beginning of the nineteenth century he translated a number of little French novels and caused them to be published in most attractive form, at Newbern.

These translations, while tame enough today, were vastly more exciting than Mr. Pattillo's sermons; but judging from their rarity these little books must have had a very limited circulation. They were immediately followed by “Letters on the Improvement of the Mind, Addressed to A Young Lady” by Mrs. Chapone, two volumes printed by John S. Pasteur, Newbern 1802, and “The Dying Thoughts of the Reverend, Learned and Holy Mr. Richard Baxter” which was printed for William Glendinning of Raleigh, but printed at Newbern in 1805. Both of these works are reprints of English editions and are excessively rare and dull.





Of the French translations made in Newbern there were two laws, seven novels, a volume of poetry, and a history of Louisiana. This collection contains the laws and the poems but only three of the seven novels, the most attractive of which is “Letters of Adelide de Sancerre, to Count deNance,” Newbern, N. C., 1801. The didactic poem “L'Homme des Champs” was printed in Newbern in 1804 as “The Rural Philosopher or French Georgice” by John Maude. It does not appear to have been translated at Newbern and is perhaps a reprint of an earlier English translation.

The “Account of Louisiana,” printed at Newbern in 1804 by Franklin & Garrow, of which this collection has no copy, is an abridged translation of Le Page dePratz’ “Histoire de La Louisiane,” first printed in Paris in 1758. It is excessively rare and much sought after by Louisiana collectors.

“The Ahiman Rezon and Masonic Ritual. Published by the Grand Lodge of North Carolina and Tennessee,” Newbern 1805, is one of the rarest and most beautiful imprints in the collection and is otherwise of great interest, as it contains several addresses and funeral orations delivered in North Carolina prior to 1800, which are no where else preserved. Subscriptions were advertised for and plans begun for the publication of this work as early as 1791.

“A Series of Letters” by Philanthropos (Rev. Charles Pettigrew), printed at Edenton in 1807, is a scarce little book. It is controversial-religious, of which there are a grievous number in this collection.

“Experimental Reflections” by a North Carolinian, printed at Nashville, Tenn., in 1817, is a highly interesting little volume of 147 pages. This is the only





copy known and is much coveted by the Tennessee Historical Society and by the Lawson McGee Library at Knoxville. It bears internal evidence of having been written by our own Judge John Haywood, and it is thought besides that he was the only man in Tennessee at that time who could have written such a book. By 1819 Judge Haywood considered himself a Tennessean and wrote “The Christian Advocate” by a Tennesseean, a highly-entertaining book of 357 pages and not at all what its title implies. Dr. Wilberforce Eames held a very high opinion of this book and told me that he had read it several times which is worth recording on account of his preeminence as a bookman and one of the five best educated men in the world.

With the development of Raleigh as the capitol of the State and the placing of the public printing there, the presses in the eastern towns began to decline in the output of books and confine themselves to the publication of newspapers. Newbern continued to turn out a book occasionally, and Abraham Hodge at Halifax continued quite active until his death. He printed in 1803 “A Concise History of the Kehukee Baptist Association,” by Elders Lemuel Burkett and Jesse Reed, which is the first purely historical work published in the State; also, the first I have discovered to carry a copyright notice. This history of the Kehukee Baptist Association was revised and brought up to date, first by Elder Joseph Biggs and published at Tarborough, N. C., in 1834 and again, under the impressive title of “History of the Church of God, From the Creation to A. D. 1885; Includeing Especially the History of the Kehukee Primitive Baptist Association,” by Elders Cushing Biggs Hassell and





Sylvester Hassell, Middletown, N. Y., 1886. This latter volume is the result of enormous research and labor and contains what is said to be the longest sentence ever published in the English language. This sentence is contained on pages 580 to 587, inclusive, and is a review of religious conditions during the nineteenth century. Hodge's last publications were, “A Defence of the Baptist, against the Aspersions and Misrepresentations of Mr. Peter Edwards,” by Joseph Jenkins, and “A Spiritual Song Book,” by Davis S. Mintz; both of which were published in Halifax in 1805, the year that Mr. Hodge died, and neither have been located except in this collection. The rare two-volume work, “An Abridgment of an Exposition of The Book of the Prophet Isaiah,” by John Gill, DD., was published in Halifax at the office of the North Carolina Journal in 1806. It is a good piece of workmanship and was probably supervised through the press by William Winston Seaton, who soon was to become a son-in-law of Gales and commence his distinguished journalistic and political career in Washington. Altogether I have seventeen imprints made at Halifax between the years 1795 and 1805.

Early in the century the printing house of Joseph Gales, at Raleigh, became and remained for many years the leading printers in the State. Joseph Gales enjoyed a high reputation as a printer and a man, and his home in Raleigh was for three decades a cultural and social center rarely equaled in the annals of our State. Mrs. Gales wrote several books, one of which, “Matilda Berkely, or Family Anecdotes,” was published in Raleigh in 1804. It is a readable book to this day, is very rare and highly prized by North Carolina collectors.





Thomas Henderson commenced printing in Raleigh in 1808 and was for some years State Printer. He ornamentd his title-pages and used tail-pieces, so that the many little items that came from his press are both desirable and attractive.

Dennis Heartt revived the press at Hillsborough in 1820, and I wish I had more samples of his excellent work. My earliest Hillsborough imprint is 1823. Charlotte appears quite late in establishing a press (1824) for a town so old and progressive, and my earliest Charlotte imprint is dated 1826. Greensborough was also printing in 1826, and with the advent of Hale at Fayetteville in 1825 that town became quite a printing center.

During this entire period, as since, most of the literature pertaining to North Carolina was printed out of the State. The distinction of being the first native-born North Carolinian to publish a book seems to belong to Lemuel Sawyer, a native of Camden County and for six terms a Member of Congress from that district. No copy of his first book, however, has been located and it is only known from the following extract from a letter of a “Gentleman of Raleigh,” dated February 24, 1806. This letter undertakes to list the original works published in the State and the second item reads: “A Journey to Lake Drummond, by Lemuel Sawyer. Published eight or ten years ago.” Sawyer was also our first playwright, having published his “Blackbeard. A Comedy in Four Acts,” in Washington in 1824. This play was undoubtedly put on at some place, for my copy is a prompter's copy and came from the collection of Mr. David Belasco, where it was found bound in with several contemporary English plays. Sawyer says of this little





comedy, that Henry Clay, then Speaker of the House, encouraged him to publish it and gave it a motion through the House by which means he sold seventy copies at 37½ cents each, which just paid the cost of publication, leaving him a clear gain of about four hundred copies. From which it is clear that no more than five hundred copies were printed.

Sawyer's “Auto-Biography” was not published until 1844, and a curious, frank and decidedly outrageous confession it is. In 1805 the Raleigh Register proposed to publish Sawyer's “Essays, Literary, Political and Dramatic,” and had it appeared we would know much more than we do about this eccentric and most peculiar person, who at no time in his career seems to have enjoyed an unblemished reputation and who has been suspected by some as being too intimate with the notorious Mrs. Annie Royall and of having encouraged her in her scurrilous attacks upon public men. Sawyer's brother, Dr. M. E. Sawyer, was a leading physician in Edenton for many years and published an early piece on medicine, “A Treatise on Primitive and Secondary Disguised or Misplaced Fever,” New York 1831, a very handsome little volume.

The first volume of poetry by a native of the State, appears to be, “A Poetical Descant on the Present State of Mankind, or the Pilgrim's Muse,” by Joseph Thomas, and published at Winchester, Va., in 1816. This is a descant on the wars of mankind and the author devotes two pages to the passage of Cornwallis through North Carolina. Thomas was born in Orange County, N. C., in 1791, and spent most of his short life preaching in Virginia, North Carolina and other states. He appears





to have written five books, four of which are on my shelves.

The first book to be published by a woman, native of the State, appears to be “Wood Notes; or Carolina Carols. A Collection of North Carolina Poetry,” by Tenella in two volumes, Raleigh 1854. Tenella was Mrs. Mary Bayard Clark, a talented woman who wrote several other volumes of poems, all of which are on my shelves.

A very curious little book was published by J. Stanton at James Town, N. C., in 1836, “The Advantages and Disadvantages of the Married State . . . Versified by Refine Weeks.” The publisher states that “coming from so respectable a source as the female pen, the sentiment is very chaste.” However, it is not difficult to establish that Refine Weeks was a man, a traveling preacher and that he first published this work at Stamford, Conn., in 1805. I once thought that I had in this the first production by a woman native of the State.

There were a few other volumes of poetry published in North Carolina prior to 1860, among them “A Collection of Various Pieces of Poetry,” by James Gay of Iredell County, N. C., Raleigh 1810. “The Hope of Liberty,” by George M. Horton, Raleigh 1829. “Attempts at Rhyming,” by Old Field Teacher, Raleigh 1839; and “A Collection of Poems,” by Incog. Newbern 1845. James Gay was a native of Ireland who, after serving in the Revolutionary War, settled in Iredell County. George Horton was a slave of Mr. James Horton of Chatham County, N. C., and the copy of his poems in this collection is the second edition published in Philadelphia in 1837. The identity of Old Field Teacher and Incog remain concealed in spite of painstaking research.





Mrs. Mary Mason's “A Wreath from The Woods of Carolina,” appeared in 1859. It is illustrated by nine beautiful plates all done by Mrs. Mason herself. This is one of my earliest pieces, and I hold for it peculiar veneration. Mrs. Mason was a daughter of John Councile Bryan of New Bern and the wife of a highly regarded Episcopal minister. She was a gifted painter, sculptor and musician and a letter I have from Capt. Samuel A. Ashe, pertaining to her, closes with these words: “All in all she was the most talented lady ever born in this State.”

Several years ago Mr. W. W. Fuller asked me to show him my copy of Mrs. Mason's “Wreath.” He took a great fancy to it and said that he would like to get six or eight copies to distribute among some friends. I told him it would take six or eight years to do that. Immediately upon his return to New York he gave an order to an old bookstore to find him six copies and to send them around to his house. He had them within a week to his great joy and to my everlasting amazement and as I told him—my regret that so fine a man should have wasted his life on the American Tobacco Company when he would have been a success as an old book dealer.

The first novel with a North Carolina background seems to be “Eoneguski, or The Cherokee Chief,” by an American. Two volumes, Washington 1839. This work is by Robert Strange, a Senator from North Carolina, in the Congress of the United States. It is an exceptionally attractive imprint, having been supervised through the press by Mr. Peter Force and is far better reading than most novels of that day. Because it criticized the conduct of certain men of influence residing in the western





part of the State and because it carried, it was charged, some anti-slavery sentiment, it was suppressed, but the few copies that got abroad were sufficient to completely ruin the political fortunes of the author, a highly capable and deserving man.

During this period three two-volume histories of the State appeared and were received with faint applause. Williamson's “History of North Carolina,” Philadelphia 1812; Martin's “History of North Carolina,” New Orleans 1829; and Hawks’ “History of North Carolina,” Fayetteville, N. C., 1857 and 1858. These works are all now somewhat rare and are regarded principally as collectors pieces, though Dr. Hawks’ history is a superior work and remarkably modern in method for its day. John H. Wheeler published his “Historical Sketches of North Carolina,” in 1851, and the edition of eleven thousand was immediately sold. This work is usually found in two volumes bound as one, and on account of the genealogical and personal notes and references found under county headings, it has retained a certain popularity to this day.

“Revolutionary Incidents and Sketches of Character, Chiefly in the Old North State,” by Rev. E. W. Caruthers, was published in Philadelphia, in two series in 1854 and 1856. The author collected a mass of traditions and rural gossip and produced an entertaining work, which must, however, be used with great care.

“Sketches of North Carolina, Historical and Biographical,” New York 1846, by Rev. William Henry Foote, is a very worth-while book; but without question the most valuable contribution made to our historical literature during this period is “Life and Correspondence of James





Iredell,” edited by Griffith J. McRee and published in New York, Volume I in 1857, and Volume II in 1858. The work is splendidly edited but woefully lacking in annotation. It is understood that Mr. McRee withheld about one half of the material available out of deference to the feelings of persons living at that time, but it is hoped that this material will yet be gathered and published in some suitable form. This work was published in an edition of 550 copies of Vol. I and only 450 copies of Vol. II, which accounts for the fact that copies of Volume I are not infrequently found without its mate.

There are many other interesting books pertaining to the State that were published during the five decades 1800 to 1860; yet the output seems surprisingly small when compared to other states and considering the population and number of presses operated in the State during those years.

During the ante-bellum period no books of a purely scientific nature or on the fine arts or sports came from our press, though our Geological Surveys are creditable and date from 1824. There is one book on farming, “A Series of Essays on Agriculture and Rural Affairs,” by Agricola (George W. Jeffreys), Raleigh 1819; and one, “A Treatise on Turpentine Farming,” by G. W. Perry, Newbern, N. C., 1859; and the Rev. Edgar L. Perkins of Cromartie's Bladen County, N. C., gave us a charming little volume, “Ready Wisdom. Being a collection of the Moral, Intelligent and Refined Sayings of All Ages,” Raleigh 1848.

Humor is represented by only a few pieces. “The Mammouth Humbug, or the Adventures of Shocco Jones in Mississippi in the Summer of 1839,” Memphis, Tenn. 1842,





is a brilliant satire on our Shocco Jones and well founded on truth, I fear. “Life as it is, or the Writings of Our Mose,” Raleigh 1858, is an example of the homely humor of that period and were it as good as it is rare it would be a gem indeed. “Fisher's River North Carolina, Scenes and Characters,” by “Skitt,” New York 1859, is a high-grade book of humorous sketches by H. E. Taliaferro “who was raised thar.” It is attractively illustrated by John McLenan, was well received and had an extensive sale in its day. I can not discover that the highly praised “Cousin Sally Dillard,” a humorous sketch by Hamilton C. Jones of Salisbury, was ever published as a separate.

I have found no book by a North Carolinian written in defence of the institution of slavery but have a number of anti-slavery books of considerable interest. These vary from rank propaganda to serious analysis and honestly held opposition to the system. In this latter class may be placed “An Address on the Evils of Slavery,” by William Swain, Greensboro, N. C., 1830; and Helpers’ “Impending Crisis,” published in 1859, which was a best seller in its day and more widely read and discussed than any other book ever written by a North Carolinian though its sale was forbidden in the South. “The Reminiscences of Levi Coffin,” published in Cincinnati in 1876, is a powerful anti-slavery book by a citizen of Guilford County, N. C., who became the reputed president of the underground railway. A considerable portion of the book relates to matters in North Carolina.

“The Narrative of Lunsford Lane,” a slave of the Haywood family in Raleigh and published in Boston in 1848, is especially well known; but of even more interest, it





seems to me, is “The Narrative of the Life of Moses Grandy,” a slave of Elizabeth City and Camden County, which was published in Boston in 1844. “The Life of Thomas H. Jones,” a slave of Wilmington, N. C., is largely propaganda, while the highly romantic and extraordinary “Life of Julius Melbourn,” published at Syracuse, New York, in 1847, must be classed as pure fiction. Melbourn is represented as a negro of Raleigh, but indications are that no such person ever existed.

Dr. Francis L. Hawks was by far the most prolific and versatile writer that North Carolina produced during this period. His writings include the Law, History, Religion and many sciences. He was a brilliant orator, a man of scientific eminence and is regarded by many people as North Carolina's most gifted son. Besides the books published under his own name he published several books under the name of “Lambert Lilly, Schoolmaster.” No effort has been made here to gather his complete writings, only those pertaining to North Carolina, but I have a copy of his “Poems Hitherto Uncollected,” New York 1873, of which there were only fifty copies struck off.

Dr. Calvin H. Wiley was also a prolific writer of this period. His “Almanac: or the Great and Final Experiment,” New York 1847, seems to be the first novel written by a native of the State, and his “North Carolina Readers” were published in large editions and used in our public schools from 1851 until after the Civil War. Dr. Wiley also has the curious distinction of having published a book under three separate titles: “Life in The South. A Companion to Uncle Tom's Cabin,” Philadelphia 1852; “Adventures of Old Dan Tucker and his Son Walter,”





Roanoke, or Where is Utopia,” Philadelphia 1866. All of which are similar in text and in illustrations, that were made by Darley, and I suspect that there is one other not yet located.





V

WITH the outbreak of the Civil War and the establishment of the Confederate States of America, a third period of printing in North Carolina commenced. This period was not destined to last long or to produce much beyond the curious, yet it is a period that is attracting wide attention now and Confederate imprints will continue to be sought after with increasing zeal.

Other than Laws and Legislative documents, I have located some one hundred and twenty-five North Carolina Confederate imprints but have succeeded in acquiring only about half of this number. Twenty of these are textbooks printed in the State during the War for use in the State schools. All of these are of interest at this time, but of especial interest is “The Geographical Reader for Dixie Children,” by Mrs. Marinda Branson Moore, Raleigh 1863; also “The Dixie Reader” and “The Dixie Primer,” published in Raleigh in 1864. Many of the other readers and arithmetics are almost as interesting, while William Bingham's “A Grammar of the Latin Tongue” and his “Caesar's Commentaries on the Gallic War,” are evidence that classic culture did not entirely depart under the administration of Mr. Jefferson Davis. Besides the “Dixie Series” there was another series of textbooks published at Raleigh and Greensboro and known as “Our Own Series.” These are, as a rule, better printed than the “Dixie Series” but not so interesting in illustrations.

These textbooks have been violently criticized by northern observers as containing propaganda of a sort unfitted for school and tending to instill falsehoods and





bitterness in the minds of the young. Mrs. Moore in her geography treats the United States as a foreign country of low culture and says that the people of the Southern Confederacy are “noted for being high-minded and courteous though suffering from an unlawful blockade by the miserable and hellish Yankee Nation.” Many of the readers contain lengthy quotations tending to show Biblical sanction of the institution of slavery, while the arithmetics contain such examples as “If one Confederate soldier can whip 7 Yankees, how many soldiers can whip 49 Yankees?”

There is no question but that Confederate textbooks are heavily charged with southern propaganda, but the Southerners defended it as being merely the truth—especially those mathematical calculations as to how many Yankees a Southerner could whip. The only map I have published in the State during this period is likewise not free of propaganda. “The Only Correct and Reliable Map of the Battle of Bethel. From a Survey and Drawing made by Lieut. W. G. Lewis.” Published by Wm. B. Smith at Tarboro, N. C., 1861. It shows a considerable space marked “Yankee Grave-Yard, or Virginia Farms allotted them.”

More attractive imprints of this period are a series of little novelettes, such as: “Castine. A Charming Romance” and “The Deserter's Daughter,” issued by William B. Smith & Company at Raleigh 1863 and 1864. Branson & Farrar also published a number of interesting little books during this period, such as “Mary Barker, A Thrilling Narrative of Early Life in North Carolina;” “Myrtle Leaves, A Book Peculiarly Adapted to the Times;” and “Songs of Love and Liberty,” by a North Carolina Lady.





I have almost a complete set of the Laws and of the Ordinances of the Convention as published during the period of the Civil War; but the paper used is so inferior, as well as the ink and the press work, that the collection is not appealing though of historical importance. The most substantial books published in North Carolina during the period of the Civil War were “Hesper and Other Poems,” by Theo. H. Hill; “Scriptural Views of National Trial,” by Calvin H. Wiley; and Dr. Edward Warren's “An Epitome of Practical Surgery.” This latter carries the imprint of West & Johnson, Richmond, Va., but was really printed by Strother and Marcom at Raleigh, and carries the copyright of the District of Pamlico. Dr. Warren says that “all the men being in the Army it was printed by some boys at Raleigh.”

Recently there was discovered at New Bern the copyright records of the Confederate District of Pamlico. It carries some half dozen items that have not been located, while a large number of other items carrying this copyright are not entered at all. Since New Bern was occupied by the Federal forces during most of this period it is not understood where the record was kept during that time, and there may be another volume that will yet come to light. A few items carry the copyright of The District of Cape Fear, but very many books printed in the State during this period carry no copyright at all.

This collection also contains samples of the Federal Press, operated at New Bern during the Federal occupation. “The Great Epidemic in New Bern and Vicinity, September and October 1864,” is the first imprint I have where New Bern is spelled as two words. “Ll Recruto, A Comic Opera. Produced in Barracks at New Bern in the





Presence of Major General Foster, his family and Staff,” is a spritely little opera of four acts, scenes laid in New Bern and Plymouth, N. C. There are also a considerable number of books written by Federal officers, concerning their service in eastern North Carolina, twenty altogether, and in addition I have all of the ten “Personal Narratives” prepared for the Rhode Island Soldiers and Sailors Historical Society that pertain to service in North Carolina.

These are many times more than the contemporary literature produced by the entire population of North Carolina pertaining to the Civil War. There is in fact no contemporary Confederate literature pertaining to the Federal occupation of the towns and rivers of eastern North Carolina—not a single book of personal experiences or extensive diary or journal by a native so far as I have been able to discover. During the Revolutionary War the State was invaded and twice crossed by a hostile Army, yet no North Carolinian thought to make the slightest record of those momentous times; only the “Narrative” of the Loyalist Colonel David Fanning remains to us and he was born in Virginia. The Mexican War came and went, and to this day we can not discover for sure where the North Carolina Regiment was or what it did. During the Reconstruction period amazing and extraordinary occurrences took place in all parts of the State and again our citizens remained completely silent. Certainly it was a duty of those better equipped to leave some record of these happenings of a century, but they did not and the neglect is so striking and unaccountable that it suggests that some vast conspiracy of silence existed; this may be particularly suspected of the Reconstruction period.





VI

MANY efforts were made in North Carolina, prior to 1860, to establish literary, historical and other sorts of magazines and periodicals, but they were in most cases of short duration and the existence of most of them is only known by contemporary reference or by a few numbers being preserved in libraries here and there.

The first of such publications was the “North Carolina Magazine, Political, Historical and Miscellaneous,” which was undertaken by Cowper and Krider at Salisbury in 1813. I have seen only a single number of this and will confine myself here to such periodical publications as I have complete, or nearly complete files on my shelves. “The Carolina Law Repository,” published by Joseph Gales at Raleigh, also had its beginning in 1813. Its principal object was to report for the convenience of the bar the cases adjudged in the Supreme Court of North Carolina, but it carried also a considerable amount of biographical sketches of English jurists. It discontinued after reporting cases of the January term of 1817. Two volumes and one number.

“The Man of Business, or Every Man's Law Book,” was a small monthly published by Benjamin Swaim at Greensborough and New Salem. It also ran through two volumes, October 1833, to October 1835. It was reprinted in part and bound in volumes, for collectors to marvel at, for it contains more different sorts and kinds of errors than any other publication known.

“Steadman's Salem Magazine,” edited by Andrew J. Steadman at Salem, N. C., was purely a literary venture,





but No. 1 of Volume 1, January, 1858, is the only number located, though there is contemporary reference to a second number being issued from Raleigh.

“The Farmers Journal,” edited by Dr. John F. Thompkins, was published at Bath and later at Raleigh 1851 to 1854, two volumes and nine numbers and is the earliest agricultural periodical I have.

Religious publications also made their appearance fairly early. “The North Carolina Baptist Interpreter,” a monthly edited by T. Meredith and published at Edenton in 1833 but removed to Newbern in 1834, ran through two volumes before changing its name to “The Biblical Recorder,” under which name it continues to be published.

A puzzling peculiarity of these religious publications, as well, indeed, as of the newspapers of that period, is the frequency in which they changed their name. Change of name suggests bankruptcy or change of editors, but often it appears to have been done merely to satisfy the whims of the editor or someone associated with the paper. Dr. John T. Walsh at Wilson started the publication of the “Christian Friend” in 1853 and by 1860 had changed its name seven times, while in a single month during 1850, as Mrs. Johnson states, the Raleigh Star changed its name three times. It has been stated that the North Carolina Journal of Halifax once had its name changed to the North Carolina Democrat, by a typesetter without consulting the proprietor, because all the big J's used in Journal were worn out. Governor Holden states that there was a paper called the “Halifax Compiler” and that some wag altered the head so as to read “Helfire Compilax” and that one entire issue was printed with that sulphurous title. He also relates how





Mr. B. F. Moore, a leading Whig, offered an article to the Tarborough Free Press and how Mr. George Howard, owner and editor of the Democratic Free Press, declined to publish it. Whereupon Mr. Moore asked him why he called his paper “The Free Press.” Mr. Howard said that the name would be changed and so the next issue appeared as the Tarborough Press.

“The Primitive Baptist,” printed at Tarborough 1835-1847, was an exception to this and ran through eleven volumes without once changing its name.

The “University Magazine” was for many years practically the only magazine of local expression and of historic interest published in the State, and its volumes are filled with articles of value. It has had many vicissitudes and sore tribulations and has also changed its name several times. This collection contains a complete set, mostly in wrappers, of all the numbers published from the first volume in 1844 to volume twenty-seven, new series, 1909-1910, or forty volumes altogether. This in itself is an achievement, as anyone will admit who knows what it is to chase so considerable a lot of back volumes and numbers. Many of these volumes are exceedingly rare, especially Volume 1 of 1844, and the two volumes of the second revival published in 1878. I know of no other set, except at the University of North Carolina.

The girls of The Chowan Female Collegiate Institute at Murfreesboro, N. C., not to be outdone by the young blades of the Hill, themselves launched a college periodical in 1853. It was called “The Casket” and was edited by the young ladies under the direction of Miss E. deLancey Fory, Associate Principal. No substantial





file is known to exist, but it is not thought to have finished more than two volumes.

Later periodicals, of which this collection has complete sets, are “The Land We Love,” Charlotte, N. C., 1866-1869, five volumes, and six numbers before it was consolidated with “The New Eclectic Magazine” of Baltimore; “Our Living and Our Dead,” Raleigh, N. C., 1874-1876, three volumes and one number; “North Carolina Historical and Genealogical Register,” Edenton, N. C., 1900-1903, two volumes and three numbers; “North Carolina Baptist Historical Papers,” Henderson, N. C., 1896-1900, three volumes, and the valuable “North Carolina Booklet,” Raleigh, N. C., 1901-1926, twenty-three volumes. I have only been able to secure volume one of “At Home and Abroad,” a magazine published in Wilmington, N. C., in 1881, and also I have only part of volume one of “Nowitzky's Monthly, Tar-Heel Magazine,” published in Raleigh in 1884, nor can I discover how many volumes of these publications were issued. “Southland,” a monthly devoted to the cause of the Confederate veterans, was published at Greenville, N. C., in 1897, but was discontinued, for lack of support with the August number of 1898. “Carolina and Southern Cross” was another monthly magazine devoted to local Confederate history. It appeared at Kinston in 1912 and discontinued in 1914 after issuing eighteen numbers.

The “Sprunt Monographs” and “Sprunt Historical Papers,” edited and published at the University through the interest and generosity of the late James Sprunt, Esq., of Wilmington, are a highly valuable set of publications. They were published between the years 1900 and 1940, and consist of twenty-four volumes. The “Trinity College Historical Papers 1897-1940,”





is another valuable collection of historical material and has published twenty-three series to date.

I also have all of the numbers of “The North Carolina Review. Literary and Historical,” which was published as a supplement to the Sunday News and Observer, from October 3, 1909 to April 6, 1913. They contain many highly interesting articles and much material of real value and were presented to this collection by Dr. Archibald Henderson.

The “North Carolina Historical Review” is a current magazine of great worth published by the North Carolina Historical Commision and now in its eighteenth volume. “The State,” published by Carl Goerch, at Raleigh, is the latest venture in this field; it is now in its eighth volume and has attained a popularity and far greater support among Tar-Heels than any previous publication of its sort.

The run of almanacs in this collection is quite exceptional. There is, at least, one North Carolina almanac for every year from 1797 to 1835, and broken files up to 1900. They were published in Halifax, Newbern, Raleigh and Salem. A number of the more interesting were presented to this collection by Judge Frank M. Wooten of Greenville, N. C., which presentation is very highly appreciated. Almanacs were of enormous literary importance for many decades and throw much light on the period that they cover.

The number of separately printed maps of North Carolina number fifty-two and were published between the years 1757 and 1875. Very many of them are of great interest and they form an important adjunct to a





collection such as this. Maps, however, are much more difficult to handle and preserve than books are and require a different sort of knowledge to appreciate. Map making is a very different art from book making and no standard system of cataloging measurements and description has been adopted, which makes it exceedingly difficult to order from catalogues. Of special interest among the colonial maps is the “Map of North Carolina from Actual Survey by Capt. Collet, Governor of Fort Johnston.” It was ordered by act of Parliament in 1770, was engraved in London and is dedicated to His Majesty King George III. The large map of North and South Carolina by Henry Mouzon, published in London and Philadelphia in 1775, is likewise of great interest.

Books by North Carolina Negroes form an interesting group in themselves. They have written mostly poetry, history and on religious matters. I have thirty-eight volumes by North Carolina Negroes but only one by a slave. A little volume of poems by Mamie Faithful of Tarboro is the only piece by a Negro woman, and a very creditable production it is.

North Carolina has several interesting controversial matters that, perhaps, will never be settled to the satisfaction of all parties and which add, in a degree, to the interest of book collecting. First among these is the Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence, supposed to have been adopted on May 20, 1775, by the citizens of Mecklenburg County. This has been a spirited controversy for a hundred years now, during which charges of fraud, theft and forgery have been freely made. This collection has seventeen pieces wholly devoted to this subject. The apostasy at Rome in 1852 of Levi Stillman





Ives, Bishop of the Protestant Episcopal Church of North Carolina occasioned an ecclesiastical controversy of national attention. Bishop Ives had been Bishop of North Carolina for twenty-one years and his action started a flow of books, pamphlets and articles that continued for several years.

The fate of Raleigh's Lost Colony has excited much interest for many years, but the literature pertaining to this mystery is mostly in small pamphlets or scattered through digested histories and other general works. Three sizable books and many articles have been written in an effort to prove that Peter S. Ney, a schoolmaster who died in Rowan County in 1846, was in reality none other than Michel Ney, the renowned soldier and field marshal of France. There have also appeared two books tending to show that Abraham Lincoln was born in North Carolina.

Very few dime novels with a North Carolina background have appeared. “Adeline Desmond, or The Spy of Newbern” is a profusely illustrated story of love and war, with scenes laid around Newbern and among the swamps of Tar River. It was published in Boston in 1863. “The Entwined Lives of Miss Gabrieulle Austin and Redmond, the Outlaw Moonshiner of North Carolina” appeared in 1885 and is a thrilling story with revolting illustrations. A few others of this type could be cited.

The two pieces concerning the operations of the “Lowrie Gang” of outlaws in Roberson County, published in New York and Philadelphia respectively, in 1872, while catering to the dime novel taste were written by experienced reporters after visits to the





locality and contain much real information of interest concerning the progress and final destruction of this band. They also carry interesting illustrations and are exceedingly rare.

Books pertaining to the Dismal Swamp, the larger part of which is within the bounds of North Carolina, are included in this collection and I have six separate publications pertaining to that once mysterious and romantic section.

Nat Turner's slave insurrection of 1831, in Southampton County, Virginia, occurring on the border line of North Carolina and producing marked effect and great activity in eastern Carolina. I include the two contemporary pamphlets pertaining to that incident: “Authentic and Impartial Narrative of the Tragical Scene, which was Witnessed in Southampton County, Virginia, on Monday the 22nd of August Last,” New York 1831, with extraordinary folding woodcut; and “The Confessions of Nat Turner as Voluntarily made to Thomas R. Gray,” Baltimore 1831, which is exceedingly rare; also the more extensive and highly exciting study “The Southampton Insurrection,” by William Sidney Drewry, published in 1900 at Washington.

I also include items pertaining to Chang and Eng (Left and Right), the world-renowned Siamese Twins who, having become citizens of North Carolina and taken the name of Buncker by special act of the legislature, married in North Carolina and resided in Stokes and Wilkes Counties for thirty years, where they died in 1874, leaving large families.





VII

AFTER the Civil War the printing of books by the presses of North Carolina almost ceased, though an English novel was published in Raleigh in 1865; and Mrs. Mary Bayard Clarke's “Mosses from a Rolling Stone” came from a Raleigh press in 1866. Notwithstanding, for the next thirty-five years, State imprints, were very largely confined to public documents, pamphlets and school addresses.

Hunter's “Sketches of Western North Carolina,” was published in 1877, and Moore's two-volume “History of North Carolina,” in 1880; both were printed in Raleigh and are now rare and hard to find.

Of North Carolina books published out of the State, during this period John H. Wheeler's “Reminiscences and Memories” is the most sought after. It was published at Columbus, Ohio, in 1884 and has, for long, enjoyed a wide popularity in spite of serious inaccuracies and severe criticism by our younger historians.

“A Fool's Errand, by One of the Fools” attracted national attention about the close of the Reconstruction period. It is a tale of Reconstruction in North Carolina and was written by Albion W. Tourgee, a clever Carpetbagger and politician who was active in North Carolina for several years. It was first printed in New York in 1880 and over 200,000 copies were sold. Two foreign translations have also been located but are not in this collection.

“Sea Gift, a Novel,” by Edward W. Fuller, was published in New York in 1873. With a plot laid entirely within the bounds of the State it attained a popularity





in North Carolina far greater than any other novel ever written by a native of the State. It was extensively read for a quarter of a century, especially by the University people; and at Chapel Hill for two decades it was known as the “Freshman's Bible.” Being printed on poor paper and loosely bound, it is now very rare, Dr. Weeks never being able to secure a copy. Fuller's poem “Angel in The Cloud,” New York 1871, also received wide acclaim and several editions have appeared since. The first volume of our “Colonial and State Records” came off the press in 1886, and the last volume in 1905. These were followed by four volumes of Index by Dr. Stephen B. Weeks, which together make a monumental work of thirty volumes containing 28,840 pages. “King's Mountain and Its Heroes,” by Dr. Lyman C. Draper, was published in Cincinnati in 1881 and republished in New York in 1929. It is an excellent and exhaustive work, but notwithstanding these honorable mentions few books of this period will ever be sought by collectors with any degree of enthusiasm.

During this eclipse of the pen following Reconstruction, Dr. Kemp P. Battle, sometime President of our University, struggled with enormous industry to preserve at least something of the history of the State. He published many interesting pamphlets and addresses and in 1912 finished his two-volume “History of the University of North Carolina.” Dr. Battle was also a collector, throughout his long and useful life and left a large library, the North Carolina material of which went to the University Library at his death.

Captain Samuel A. Ashe, attorney and editor, also contributed handsomely to the cause, and besides innumerable





articles and addresses completed an excellent two-volume “History of North Carolina.” These two men were justly appraised during their lifetime and will be especially remembered among the outstanding citizens of their generation.

With the beginning of the twentieth century vast changes began to take place in North Carolina, and printing became more and more concentrated in the larger towns. Books from small-town presses rarely appeared, yet in spite of the vastly improved press-work and the high literary merit of the production, books from the large, modern presses are curiously lacking in appeal to collectors. For one thing we are too near the present day production to feel such an appeal and miss, perhaps, a certain atmosphere produced by the old-type local book, with its errors, signatures and tail-pieces. A vast amount of printing has for years now been turned out by the presses of Raleigh, Durham, Greensboro and Charlotte, so that only select works can be considered as suitable for a collection such as I am forming.

I have thought that I ought to stop with the nineteenth century, but such a stream of valuable works are continuing to appear that I have been entirely unwilling to do so. The output of the North Carolina press during the first quarter of the twentieth century must far exceed the entire output of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries combined, and very many of them have such a bearing on what has gone before that it is impossible to exclude them from any collection of North Caroliniana.

The establishment of the North Carolina Historical Commission, early in the century, was a great step forward—no State agency has more splendidly justified





itself then our Historical Commission. It has not only collected, preserved and classified vast amounts of historical and reference material, but it has stimulated State interest in all such things, has promoted reading, authorship and book collecting as well. A noteworthy group of younger historians, educators and students in many fields have come to the front, and the old State has leaped forward with such enormous strides that it seems an Empire today to what I once knew.

By far the oldest and greatest of all North Carolina collections is contained in the library of the University of North Carolina. It is separately housed in the North Carolina Room under the very competent care of Miss Mary Thornton, whose knowledge of the subject and courteous assistance to visitors has rendered both herself and the collection renown.

In 1844, Gov. David L. Swain, then President of the University, organized the North Carolina Historical Society, and in connection therewith undertook the formation of a North Carolina collection. This collection became large; but interest in the Society having vanished with the outbreak of the Civil War, the collection found its way into the library of the University, where it became the nucleus of the present collection. Dr. Louis R. Wilson, Librarian, organized the collection in its present form, and to his long and zealous interest may be attributed much of its present imposing size and excellence. It was also during his regime in 1918 that the Weeks Collection was acquired, and along with it went Weeks, “Bibliography of North Caroliniana,” a mammoth work in manuscript, full of valuable notes on publications up to about 1910.





The Duke University Library is already one of the greatest libraries in the country but North Carolina material here is placed with the Southern Collection and is not so impressive as at the University. The George Washington Flowers Southern Collection is an enormous and rapidly growing institution in itself and under the capable management of the late Dr. William K. Boyd and now under the equally capable management of Dr. Robert H. Woody, North Carolina imprints and material are receiving full attention and consideration. Unfortunately, for me, I have not had opportunity to know this collection at Duke so well as I know the collection at the University.

Eminent among collections held by institutions must be mentioned The Sondley Library, now a part of the Public Library of Asheville, N. C. This immense and valuable library was formed by the late Dr. F. A. Sondley of Asheville and is reported exceedingly strong in North Carolina material and imprints. It has not been my good fortune to visit this collection, nor have I visited the rapidly growing “Historical Foundation of the Presbyterian and Reformed Churches” located at Montreat, N. C.

Unique as to origin among all North Carolina collections is the Lanier Collection at the Pennsylvania Historical Society in Philadelphia. This collection was founded by the Will of William Lanier, dated February 10, 1894, wherein he set aside $3,000.00 “to be held in trust by the said Society and the income from the same applied to the purchase of books relating to the history of North Carolina and each book so purchased to be labeled The William Lanier Collection. I make this





bequest as a token of my regard for the State in which I was born.” He further states that he was born in Washington, North Carolina, a son of William Lanier and wife Betsy Westcott, but beyond the fact that he was an humble man and a small truck farmer near Philadelphia, I can discover nothing about him. Certainly his was a collector's spirit nowhere else equaled in our annals and I am glad to state that the Society has most faithfully abided by the trust. The collection, while not large, contains a number of items, some unique and others superbly rare indeed; there is not an ordinary piece in the collection.

Of private collectors, North Carolina has produced surprisingly few, none that I can find trace of prior to Dr. Weeks. There were, of course, a number of interesting private libraries in the State, even in the early days, such as the Johnston Library at Hayes, the Burgwyn Library at the Hermitage, the Library of Willie Jones at The Grove, the Blount Library at Blount Hall, and the Collins and Pettigrew Libraries on Lake Phelps. John Thompson of Halifax, whoever he was, must also have had a very considerable library, for I have seen entire shelves of his books and though he had a bookplate he was addicted to the ugly custom of writing his name on the title-page.

Governor Henry Toole Clark of Edgecombe County also possessed a large library and possessed something of a collector's taste, with a strong partiality for North Carolina imprints. Mr. Weldon N. Edwards of Warren County also possessed a very large number of North Carolina books and pamphlets which in later years went to Duke University. But these gentlemen were not collectors,





in the proper sense of the word. They merely possessed an interest in such things and took pains to preserve whatever came their way.

The Rt. Rev. Joseph Blount Cheshire, Bishop of North Carolina, not only had a collector's taste, but accumulated a superb, though small number, of North Carolina books during his lifetime; also Col. J. Bryan Grimes of Raleigh owned a considerable collection of North Caroliniana which he took much pride in and loved.

The late Judge Thomas M. Pittman of Henderson, formed a very notable and large collection and possessed as well a very fine knowledge of the subject. His collection has gone to Wake Forest College, which places that college library high among those which may take pride in their North Carolina material. Many other libraries in North Carolina also contain small collections or single pieces of worth and in most cases they are alive with interest in the subject and endeavoring to enlarge their collections pertaining to the State. The Public Library of Wilmington is especially active in this field and has a considerable collection and a Librarian, Miss Emma Woodward, full of zeal and highly capable.

Marshall DeLancey Haywood, while more of a student than a collector, accumulated a large number of North Carolina books, but will be especially remembered by the number of books and excellent historical studies that came from his pen.

Dr. Charles Lee Smith of Raleigh has a large and beautiful library not confined to North Carolina; and my friend A. B. Andrews, also of Raleigh, has the commendable habit of collecting books for the purpose of giving them away. Dr. Richard Dillard of Edenton





was both a collector and a student and contributed many articles and pamphlets of historic worth. His nephew Mr. Richard D. Dixon is carrying on the interest and pastime with credit and zeal, and the library at Beverly Hall remains one of the most attractive rooms in the State.

Mr. Samuel W. Worthington of Wilson, N. C., while disclaiming the title of Collector, has, notwithstanding, a large number of books and pamphlets relating especially to the eastern part of the State, and has besides an unsurpassed love and enthusiasm for the subject.

Mr. C. C. Ware, also of Wilson, besides being the author of two excellent historical works, has formed an exceedingly large and interesting collection pertaining to the Christian Church in North Carolina, of which he is an ordained minister. Mr. Ware with a natural taste for books has developed a fine capacity as a collector and his interest in my collection, and assistance, has been considerable and appreciated. Judge Romulus N. Nunn of New Bern has a number of worth-while imprints and is especially interested in the early press of New Bern.

Dr. Archibald Henderson of the University of North Carolina, has a great assortment of North Carolina books sandwiched in with his thousands of other works and Dr. Henderson has besides, an excellent head and nose for books and a fine knowledge of the entire field.

Mr. Burton Craige of Winston-Salem has for some years shown much interest in this field and has already formed the largest and most interesting private collection that I know of in the State. With his fine intelligence and discerning judgement we may expect his collection to grow great. There must be many others, as





well, who unknown to me are collecting in this field, and certainly from letters I sometime receive there are a number of young men aspiring and capable who will be heard from in time.

It may be that in this I have painted a too brilliant picture of a collection of North Caroliniana and a visitor to my “Third Floor” might be surprised at the smallness of my accumulation. To this I can only say that North Carolina is not a literary State, has produced most sparingly in the field of letters and I do not profess to have anything near all—even of that which is worth while.

Disregarding laws and public documents I would say that two thousand selected items would cover the entire field of North Caroliniana and embrace everything strictly pertaining to the State of any real interest to a private collector. But in this I am exclusive in my taste and ideas. Some other person, more inclusive, might easily add an additional two thousand items; while if you are to take everything that has the slighest contact or makes the slightest reference to the State then you must prepare for many thousands more and become institutional in size.

This collection to date has eighteen hundred and thirty-nine catalogued items, the largest of which is the thirty volumes comprising the Colonial and State Records. The smallest is the four-page “Epistle to Friends in Great Britain,” published by Thomas Nicholson of Little River in North Carolina on the fifteenth of the ninth month 1762. (McMurtrie's No. 37). Among these I must confess, are many of very small interest. But this is true of any State collection; besides, the





question of the interest and worth of an item is largely a question of personal taste and an item regarded as of no interest today may be of surpassing interest tomorrow.

As I have stated, I am neither a scholar nor a real bibliographer. I am merely a hobbiest who has followed this urge through some leisure hours, with love and affection, and in spite of the fact that I have not been a resident of North Carolina for forty-three years. During this period these shelves have been frequently closed, often for prolonged periods, by my absence in distant places and by the necessity of full time application to other things.

Whatever it was that caused me to persist and to retain this interest under these circumstances, I can not precisely say; it was something in my soul that I can not define, something sentimental perhaps, but whatever it was it is about over now for the late Mr. J. H. Slater, who was Editor of the English “Book Price Current,” and a correct observer of many things, recently said that “the life of a private collection is not fifty years, nor forty, but thirty, perhaps, in a majority of cases.” Which reminds me that it has been some years since that motley little bunch of books went out from Raleigh, with my mother, to the World's Fair at Chicago. So, gentle reader —in the words of Ralph Lane, our first Governor—I “wisheth all happines in the Lord”

Cylburn House,

Baltimore, Maryland,

March 3rd, 1941.





ILLUSTRATIONS

PLATE
FRONTISPIECE BOOKPLATE
Acts, A Collection of all the Public, of the Assembly. Newbern, 1752. (Reduced.) (Swann's Revisal.)IX
Acts, of the General Assembly for the years 1791-1792-1793 and 1794. Newbern, 1795. (Reduced.)XVII
Acts, Private of the General Assembly, 1715-1790. Newbern, 1794. (Reduced.)XV
Acts of the General Assembly relating to the Town of Tarboro and the Ordinances of Said Town. Tarboro, N. C., 1860. (Reduced.)LXXVIII
Ahiman Rezon and Masonic Ritual. Newbern, 5805XXXI
Anderson, A. Questions on the Assembly's Shorter Catechism. Charlotte, N. C., 1826LIV
Anderson, Micajah. The Life of, By himself. Tarboro, N. C., 1870. (Reduced.)XCIII
(Arnett, Thomas.) A Solemn Address to Youth. Hillsborough, 1823XLIX





PLATE
Bingham, William. A Grammar of the Latin Language. Greensboro, N. C., 1863LXXXVII
Blair, Rev. David. First Catechism for Children. Raleigh, 1826LV
Brickell, John. The Natural History of North Carolina. Dublin, 1737VIII
Burkitt, Lemuel and Read, Jesse. A Concise History of the Kehukee Baptist Association. Halifax, 1803XXVIII
Byrd, William. The History of the Dividing Line between Virginia and North Carolina as Run in 1728-29. Richmond, Va., 1866. (Reduced.)XCII
(Caldwell, Joseph.) Letters on Popular Education. Hillsborough, 1832. (Reduced.)LVIII
Catalogus Universitatis Carolinae. Raleigh, 1817. (The second catalogue of the University of North Carolina. All in Latin.)XLIV
Chapone, Mrs. Letters on the Improvement of the Mind, Addressed to a Young Lady. Newbern, 1802XXVII
Charters, The Two Granted to the Proprietors of Carolina. With the First and Last Constitutions. London, n. d. (1704?), (Reduced.)IV
(Clarke, Mrs. Mary Bayard.) Wood-Notes; or Carolina Carols; A Collection of North Carolina Poetry. Raleigh, 1854LXXIV
Clemmons, Peter. Poor Peter's Call to His Children. Salisbury, 1812XLI
Colton, Rev. Simeon. Documents Connected with the Trial of, With An Appendix. Fayetteville, N. C., 1839. (Reduced.)LXII





PLATE
Coxe, Daniel. A Description of the English Province of Carolana, etc. London, 1722. (Reduced.)VII
Davis, James. The Office and Authority of a Justice of the Peace. Newbern, 1774X
Davie, William Richardson. Instructions for the Formation and Movements of the Cavalry. Halifax, 1799. (Reduced.)XXII
Debates on the Bill Directing a Prosecution of the Banks of the State. Raleigh, 1829. (Reduced.)LVI
Debates on the Convention Question. Raleigh, 1822XLVIII
Deems, Charles F. Speech of, on the Trial of Rev. Wm. A. Smith, to which is prefixed Historical Sketches. Wilmington, N. C., 1858. (Reduced.)LXXVI
Discipline of Friends, Revised and Approved. Hillsborough, N. C., 1823L
Dow, Loranzo. The Yankee Spy. Raleigh, 1814XLIII
Dying Thoughts of the Reverend, Learned and Holy Mr. Richard Baxter, n. p. (Newbern), 1805XXXIII
Edgeville, Edward. Castine. Raleigh, 1865. (Reduced.)LXXXIX
Fanning, Colonel David. The Narrative of, Giving an Account of his Adventures in North Carolina. Richmond, Va., 1861. (Reduced.)LXXIX
Faust, Doctor. The Catechism of Health. Raleigh, N. C., 1812XLII
Female Foundling. A Novel. Newbern, 1802XXVI
Fuller, Edwin W. Sea-Gift. A Novel. New York, 1873XCIV
Fulton, Hamilton. Report of Sundry Surveys. Raleigh, N. C., 1819. (Reduced.)XLVII





PLATE
Gay, James. A Collection of Various Pieces of Poetry. Raleigh, N. C., 1810XXXIX
Gill, John. An Abridgment of an Exposition of The Book of the Prophet Isaiah. Halifax, 1806. (Reduced.)XXXIV
Hariot, Thomas, Admiranda Narratio Fida Tamen, De Commodiset Incolarum Ritivus Virginia. Francoforti ad Moenvm, 1590. (DeBry's Hariot in Latin. Frankford on Main, 1590.)I
Herrington, W. D. The Deserter's Daughter. Raleigh, N. C., 1865. (Reduced.)XC
Hawkins, Rush C. An Account of the Assassination of Loyal Citizens of North Carolina. New York, 1897. (Reduced.)XCIX
Haywood, John. A Manual of the Laws of North Carolina. Raleigh, 1801. (Reduced.)XXIV
Hodge's North Carolina Almanack for the Year 1799. Halifax, 1798XVIII
Howell, Peter. The Life and Travels of, Newbern, n. d. (1849)LXXI
Incog. A Collection of Poems. Newbern, 1845LXVIII
Jackson, James. The Most Useful and Pleasing Hymns. Raleigh, N. C., 1809XXXVII
Johnson, L. An Elementary Arithmetic for Beginners. Raleigh, N. C., 1864LXXXIII
Johnson, Thomas. Every Man His Own Doctor. Salisbury, 1798XX
(Jones, J. Seawell). The Mammoth Humbug or the Adventures of Shocco Jones in Mississippi. Memphis, 1842. (Reduced.)LXV





PLATE
Jones, J. Seawell. Memorials of North Carolina. New York, 1838. (Reduced.)LXI
Journal of the Convention, Called by the Freemen of North Carolina. In the City of Raleigh, 1835. Raleigh, 1835. (Reduced.)LIX
Lane, Lunsford. The Narrative of, Published by himself. Boston, 1848LXIX
Latch, John. Cases Determined in the Court of King's Bench. Translated from the Norman-French by Francois Xavier Martin. Newbern, 1793XIV
Lawson, John. A New Voyage to Carolina. London, 1709. (Lawson's History of Carolina. First Edition.), (Reduced.)V
Lawson, John. Mr. Lawson's Allerneueste Beschreibung der Provintz Carolina in West-Indien. Hamburg, 1722. (Lawson's History of Carolina, German Edition.)VI
Letters of Adelaide De Sancerre to Count De Nance. Newbern, 1801XXIII
Lewis, Capt. Geo. C. The Soldier's Companion; Containing an Abridgment of Herdee's Infantry Tactics. Raleigh, N. C., 1863LXXXIV
Lord Rivers. A Novel. Newbern, 1802XXV
Mangum, Rev. Adolphus W. Myrtle Leaves or Tokens at the Tomb. Raleigh, N. C., 1864LXXXVI
Martin, Francois X. History of North Carolina. New Orleans, 1829. (Reduced.)LVII
Martin, Francois X. The Office and Authority of a Justice of the Peace. Newbern, 1791. (Reduced.)XIII
Martin, Francois X. Notes of a Few Decisions. Newbern, 1797XIX





PLATE
Mary Barker. By Charles Vernon. Raleigh, 1865 (By the Rev. Braxton Craven.)XCI
Matilda Berkely or Family Anecdotes. Raleigh, 1804. (By Mrs. Joseph Gales.)XXX
McRee, Griffith J. Life and Correspondence of James Iredell. New York, 1857. (Reduced.)LXXV
Michaux, R. R. Sketches of Life in North Carolina. Culler, N. C., 1894XCVIII
Miller, Robert Johnston. An Introduction to the Knowledge of the Christian Religion. Salisbury, 1799XXI
Mintz, David B. Spiritual Song Book. Halifax, 1805XXXII
Moore, Mrs. M. B. The Geographical Reader for the Dixie Children. Raleigh. N.C., 1863. (Reduced.)LXXXI
Moore, Mrs. M. B. The First Dixie Reader. Raleigh, 1863LXXXII
(Moore, Mrs. M. B.) Songs of Love and Liberty by a North Carolina Lady. Raleigh, N. C., 1864LXXXV
(Murphey, Archibald DeBow) Memoir on the Internal Improvements Contemplated by the Legislature. Raleigh, N. C., 1819. (Reduced.)XLVI
Murray, Lindley. English Grammar, with an Appendix. Raleigh, 1811XL
North Carolina Author. Experimental Reflections. Nashville T., 1817XLV
Olmsted, Denison. Report on the Geology of North Carolina, n. p. (Raleigh), 1824. (Reduced.)LII
Osbourn, James. North Carolina Sonnets. Baltimore, 1844LXVII





PLATE
Owen, John. The Trial of, Charged with Murder. Raleigh, N. C., 1810XXXVIII
Old Field Teacher. Attempts at Rhyming. Raleigh, 1839LXIV
Pattillo, Henry. Sermons, etc. Wilmington, 1788XI
Perry, G. W. A Treatise on Turpentine Farming. Newbern, N. C., 1859LXXVII
Philanthropos. A Series of Letters. Edenton, 1807. (By Rev. Charles Pettigrew.)XXXV
Proceedings of the Court of Inquiry, convened at Saltillo, Mexico, January, 1848, n. p. n. d. (Washington, 1848), (Reduced.)LXX
Proceedings and Debates of the Convention of North Carolina. Convened at Hillsborough, 1788. Edenton, 1789. (Reduced.)XII
Ravenscroft, Right Rev. John S. The Doctrines of the Church Vindicated from the Misrepresentations of Dr. John Rice. Raleigh, N. C., 1826LIII
Regulations for the Order and Discipline of the Troops, n. p. Hodge & Wills Printer to the State, 1794XVI
Ruddiman, Thomas. The Rudiments of the Latin Tongue. Raleigh, N. C., 1809XXXVI
Rumple, Rev. Jethro. A History of Rowan County, North Carolina. Containing Sketches of Prominent Families. Salisbury, 1881XCV
Rural Philosopher or French Georgics. A Didactic Poem. Newbern, N. C., 1804XXIX
Sawyer, Lemuel. Blackbeard. A Comedy in Four Acts. Washington, 1824LI





PLATE
Sawyer, Lemuel. Auto-Biography. New York, 1844. (Reduced.)LXVI
(Strange, Hon. Robert). Eoneguski, or The Cherokee Chief. Washington, 1839LXIII
T. A. (Thomas Ash.). Carolina or a Description of That Country. London, 1682. (Reduced.)II
(Tarbox, Rev. Increase N.). Sir Walter Raleigh and his Colony in America. Boston, 1884. (Reduced.)XCVII
Thorne, Jack. Hanover or the Persecution of the Lowly, n. p. n. d. (1900)C
Tyson, Bryan. A Ray of Light, or Treatise on the Sectional Troubles. Brower's Mills, N. C., 1862LXXX
Weekes, Refine. The Advantages and Disadvantages of the Marriage State. James Town, N. C., 1836LX
Wheeler, John H. Reminiscences and Memoirs of North Carolina and Eminent North Carolinians. Columbus, Ohio, 1884. (Reduced.)XCVI
Wiley, C. H. Life in the South. Philadelphia, n. d. (1852), (Reduced.)LXXII
Wiley, C. H. Scriptural Views of National Trials. Greensboro, N. C., 1863LXXXVIII
(Wilson, Samuel.). An Account of the Province of Carolina. London, 1682. (Reduced.)III
Zion's Hymns. For the Use of the Original Free-Will Baptist Church. Falkland. Pitt County, N. C., 1854LXXIII





ILLUSTRATIONS









[Illustration:

Admiranda Narratio Fida Tamen, De Commodis Et Incolarvm Ritibvs Virginiæ, Nvper Admodvm Ab Anglis, Qvi A Dn. Richardo Greinvile Eqvestris Ordinis Viro Eò In Coloniam Anno.M.D.LXXXC.Dedvcti Svnt Inventæ, Svmtvs Faciente Dn. Vvaltero Raleigh Eqvestris Ordinis Viro Fodinarv Stanni Præfecto Ex Avctoritate Serenissimæ Reginæ Angliæ. Anglico Scripta Sermone A Thoma Hariot, Eivsdem Wateri Domesti Co, In Eam Coloniam Misso Vt Regionis Si Tvm Diligenter Observaret Nvnc Avtem Primvm Latio Donata À C. C. A. Cvm Gratia Et Privilegio Cæs. Matis Spec[illegible text] Ad Qvadriennivm Francofortt Ad Muenvm Typis Joannis Wecheli, Svmtibvs Vero Theodo De Bry Anno CD D Xc. Fenales Reperivntvr In Officina Sígismvndi Feirabene
]





CAROLINA;
OR A
DESCRIPTION
Of the PRESENT STATE of that
COUNTRY

AND

The Natural Excellencies thereof, viz. The Healthfulness of the Air, Pleasantness of the Place, Advantage and Usefulness of those Rich Commodities there plentifully abounding, which much encrease and flourish by the Industry of the Planters that daily enlarge that Colony.

Published by T. A. Gent.

Clerk on Board his Majesties Ship the Richmond, which was sent out in the Year 1680. with particular Instructions to enquire into the State of that Country, by His Majesties Special Command, and Return'd this Present Year, 1682.

LONDON,

Printed for W.C. and to be Sold by Mrs. Grover in Pelican Court in Little Britain, 1682.





AN
ACCOUNT
OF THE
Province
OF
CAROLINA
IN
AMERICA.

TOGETHER WITH An Abstract of the PATENT, and several other Necessary and Useful Particulars, to such as have thoughts of Transporting themselves thither.

Published for their Information.

LONDON:

Printed by G. Larkin for Francis Smith, at the Elephant and Castle in Cornhil. 1682.





THE TWO
CHARTERS
Granted by
King CHARLES IId.
TO THE
PROPRIETORS
OF
CAROLINA.

With the First and Last

FUNDAMENTAL CONSTITUTIONS OF THAT COLONY.

LONDON: Printed, and are to be Sold by Richard Parker, at the Unicorn, under the Piazza of the Royal Exchange.





A NEW
VOYAGE
TO
CAROLINA

CONTAINING THE Exact Description and Natural History OF THAT COUNTRY: Together with the Present State thereof. AND A JOURNAL Of a Thousand Miles, Travel'd thro’ several Nations of INDIANS.

Giving a particular Account of their Customs, Manners, &c.

BY JOHN LAWSON, Gent. Surveyor General of North-Carolina.

LONDON:

Printed in the Year 1709.





Mr. LAWSON's
Werneueste Beschreibung
der Allerneueste - Britannischen Provintz
CAROLINA
in West-Indien.

Samt einem Reise - JOURNAL von mehr als Lausend Meilen unter afterhand Indianifchen Nationen.

Such accuraten Land - Charte und Rupfer - Gtichen.

Zwente Sufflage/ mit einem curieusen Unhang after ubrigen Bross-Britannischen Colonien in Umerica vermehret.

HAMBURG, Gedrucht und verlegt, durch feel. Thomas von Wierings Erben, bey der Bork, im guildnen A, B, C, 1733.





A
DESCRIPTION
Of the ENGLISH PROVINCE of
CAROLANA

By the Spaniards call'd FLORIDA, And by the French La LOUISIANE.

As also of the Great and Famous River MESCHACEBE or MISSISIPI, The Five vast Navigable Lakes of Fresh Water, and the Parts Adjacent.

TOGETHER With an Account of the Commodities of the Growth and Production of the said Province. And a PREFACE containing some Considerations on the Consequences of the French making Settlements there.

By DANIEL COXE, Esq;

Non minor est Virtus quam quœrere parta tueri.

LONDON;

Printed for B. COWSE, at the Rose and Crown i’; St. Paul's Church-Yard. M DCC XXII.





The NATURAL
HISTORY
OF
North - Carolina.

WITH AN ACCOUNT OF THE

Trade, Manners, and Customs of the CHRISTIAN and INDIAN Inhabitants. Illustrated with Copper - Plates, whereon are curiously Engraved the Map of the Country, several strange Beasts, Birds, Fisbes, Snakes, Insects, Trees, and Plants, &c.

By JOHN BRICKELL, M. D.

Nostra nos in urbe peregrinamur.

CIC.

DUBLIN: Printed by JAMES CARSON, in Coghill's-Court, Damestreet, opposits to the Castle-Market. For the AUTHOR, 1737.





A
COLLECTION
OF
All the PUBLIC
ACTS OF ASSEMBLY,
OF
The PROVINCE of
NORTH - CAROLINA:

Now in FORCE and USE.

Together with the TITLES of all such LAWS as are Obsolete, Expir'd, or Repeal'd.

And also, an exact TABLE of the Titles of the ACTS in Force.

REVISED by Commissioners appointed by an Act of the GENERAL ASSEMBLY of the said Province, for that Purpose; and Examined with the Records, and Confirmed in full Assembly.


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decoration]

NEWBERN: Printed by JAMES DAVIS, M,DCC,LII.





THE
OFFICE and AUTHORITY
OF A
JUSTICE of PEACE.

AND ALSO,

The Duty of SHERIFFS, CORONERS, CONSTABLES, CHURCHWARD NS, OVERSEERS of ROADS, and other Officers.

TOGETHER WITH

PRECEDENTS OF WARRANTS, JUDGMENTS, EXECUTIONS, and other legal PROCESS, issuable by Magistrates within their several Jurisdictions, in Cases Civil and Grimmal, with the Method of Judicial Proceedings before Justices of the Peace out of Sessions. Also some Directions for their Conduct within their County Courts.

To which is added, An APPENDIX.

Containing many useful PRECEDENTS, and Directions for the Execution of them.

Collected from the Common and Statute Laws of England, and the Acts of Assembly of this Province, and adapted to our Constitution and Practice.

By J. DAVIS, Esq: one of his Majesty's Justices of the Peace for the County of Craven.

NEWBERN:

Printed by JAMES DAVIS. M,DCC,LXXIV.





SERMONS, &c.

I. On the Divisions among Christians.

II. On the Necessity of Regeneration to future Happiness.

III. The Scripture Doctrine of Election.

IV. Extract of a Letter from Mr. Whitefield to Mr. Wesley.

V. An Address to the Deists.

By HENRY PATTILLO, A. M. of Granville, NORTH-CAROLINA.

In necessariis unitas; in non-necessariis lenitas; in omnibus charitas.——

ANON.

WILMINGTON,

Printed by JAMES ADAMS, for the AUTHOR, 1788.





PROCEEDINGS
AND
DEBATES
OF THE
CONVENTION
OF
NORTH-CAROLINA

Convened at Hillsborough, on Monday the 21st Day of July, 1788, for the Purpose of deliberating and determining on the CONSTITUTION recommended by the General Convention at Philadelphia, the 17th Day of September, 1787.

TO WHICH IS PREFIXED

The Said CONSTITUTION.

EDENTON

PRINTED BY HODGE & WILLS, Printers to the State.

M,DCC,LXXXIX.





THE
OFFICE AND AUTHORITY
OF A
Justice of the Peace,
AND OF
Sheriffs, Coroners, &c.

ACCORDING TO THE LAWS OF THE STATE OF NORTH-CAROLINA,

BY FRANCOIS-XAVIER MARTIN, ESQUIRE, ATTORNEY AT LAW.

Happy the Country where LAW is not a Science!

NEWBERN:

FRANCOIS-XAVIER MARTIN:

1791.





CASES
DETERMINED IN THE
COURT OF KING's BENCH;
DURING THE
I, II & III YEARS OF CHARLES I.

COLLECTED BY JOHN LATCH, OF THE MIDDLE TEMPLE, ESQUIRE, FIRST PUBLISHED, IN NORMAN-FRENCH, [1661,] BY EDWARD WALPOOLE, OF GRAY'S INN, ESQUIRE.

TRANSLATED INTO THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE, BY FRANCOIS-XAVIER MARTIN.

NEWBERN:

FROM THE TRANSLATOR's PRESS.

1793.





A
COLLECTION
OF THE
PRIVATE ACTS
OF THE
GENERAL ASSEMBLY
OF THE
STATE OF NORTH-CAROLINA

FROM THE YEAR 1715, TO THE YEAR 1790, INCLUSIVE, NOW IN FORCE AND USE.


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decoration]

NEWBERN:

FRANCOIS-XAVIER MARTIN.

1794.





REGULATIONS
FOR THE
Order and Discipline
OF THE
TROOPS
OF THE
UNITED STATES.

To which is added:

RULES and ARTICLES for the better Government of the TROOPS, raised, or to be raised, and kept in pay, by and at the Expence of the UNITED STATES of AMERICA.

Printed and published agreeable to an Act of Assembly of the State of North-Carolina,

By HODGE & WILLS, Printers to the State, 1794.





THE
ACTS
OF THE
GENERAL ASSEMBLY
OF THE
STATE OF NORTH-CAROLINA,

PASSED DURING THE SESSIONS HELD IN THE YEARS 1791, 1792, 1793 AND 1794.


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NEWBERN:

FRANCOISX MARTIN.

1795.





HODGE’ &
NORTH-CAROLINA ALMANACK,

For the Year of our LORD 1799; Being the Third after Bissextile or Leap-Year, And the 23d—24th of AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE.

CONTAINING

The Lunations, Rising and Secting of the Sun, Moon and Seven Stars, Solar and Lunar Eclipses, Remarkable Days, Festivals, &c. &c.

ALSO, A variety of useful and amusing Articles.

Calculated for the State of NORTH-CAROLINA, being precisely adapted to the Meridian and Latitude of the City of RALEIGH, but will serve without sensible error for any of the states adjacent.

BY WILLIAM THOMAS, Ast.

HALIFAX:

PRINTED and SOLD by ABRAHAM HODGF





NOTES
OF A FEW
DECISIONS
IN THE
SUPERIOR COURTS
OF THE
STATE OF NORTH-CAROLINA,
AND IN THE
CIRCUIT COURT OF THE U. STATES,
FOR
NORTH-CAROLINA DISTRICT.


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decoration]

NEWBERN:

FRANCOIS-XAVIER MARTIN.

1797.





Every Man his own
DOCTOR;
OR THE
POOR MAN's FAMILY PHYSICIAN.

PRESCRIBING

Plain, safe, and easy means to cure themselves, of the most disorders incident to this climate; with very little charge, the medicines being the growth of this country, and about almost every man's PLANTATION.

BY THOMAS JOHNSON:

SALISBURY:

PRINTED FOR THE AUTHOR 1798.





AN
INTRODUCTION
TO THE
KNOWLEDGE
OF THE
CHRISTIAN RELIGION.

PUBLISHED for the Use of the Protestant Episco-

pal Church of Whitehaven Parish.

By ROBERT JOHNSTON MILLER, R. P.

SALISBURY:

PRINTED, by JOHN M. SLUMP, at MICHAEL BROWN'S Printing-Office.

MDCCXCIX.





INSTRUCTIONS
TO BE OBSERVED FOR THE
FORMATIONS AND MOVEMENTS
OF THE
CAVALRY.

Published agreeably to a Resolution of the Legislature of North-Carolina.

By WILLIAM RICHARDSON DAVIE, ESQUIRE.

Governor, Captain-General and Commander in Chief of the Militia of the State of NORTH-CAROLINA.

HALIFAX:

PRINTED by ABRAHAM HODGE.

M.DCC.XCIX.





LETTERS
OF
ADELAIDE DE SANCERRE.
TO
COUNT DE NANCE.

Devoting All to love, each was to each a dearer self; Supremely happy in th’ awakened power, Of giving joy.


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decoration]

NEWBERN, N. C.

1801.





A
MANUAL
OF THE
LAWS OF NORTH-CAROLINA,

ARRANGED UNDER

DISTINCT HEADS IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER.

WITH REFERENCES FROM ONE HEAD TO ANOTHER, WHEN A SUBJECT IS MENTIONED IN ANY OTHER PART OF THE BOOK THAN UNDER THE DISTINCT HEAD WHERE IT IS PLACED.

BY JOHN HAYWOOD, ESQ.

LATE ONE OF THE JUDGES OF THE SUPREME COURTS OF LAW AND EQUITY.

Raleigh:

PRINTED AND SOLD BY J. GALES,

Printer to the State.

1801.





LORD RIVERS.

A NOVEL.

  • She felt his flame; but deep within her breast,
  • In bashful coyness, or in maiden pride,
  • The soft return concealed.


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decoration]

NEWBERN, N. C.

1802.





THE
FEMALE FOUNDLING.

A NOVEL,

IN A SERIES OF LETTERS FROM ELIZABETH-SOPHIA DE VALLIERE, TO LOUISA-HORTENSIA DE CANTELEU.


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decoration]

NEWBERN: (N. C.)

1802.





LETTERS
ON THE
IMPROVEMENT
OF THE
MIND

ADDRESSED TO A YOUNG LADY.

I consider a Human Soul without Education, like Marble in the Quarry, which shews none of its inherent Beauties till the skill of the polisher fetches out the colours, makes the surface shine, and discovers every ornamental cloud, spot, and vein that runs through the body of it. Education, after the same manner, when it works upon a noble mind, draws out to view every latent virtue and perfection, which without such helps are never able to make their appearance.

ADDISON.

IN TWO VOLUMES.

By Mrs. CHAPONE.

A NEW EDITION.

VOL. I.

NEWBERN

PRINTED BY JOHN S. PASTEUR.

——1802.——





A
CONCISE
HISTORY
OF THE
Kehukee Baptist Association

From its original rise to the present time.

Wherein are shewn its first Constitution, Increase. Numbers, Principles, Form of Government, Decorum, Revolutions that Association has passed through, Revivals, Ministers, Churches, Confession of Faith, Times and Places when and where Associations have been holden, Queries and their Answers; and all other useful Articles relative to Church History.

By Elders LEMUEL BURKITT and JESSE READ, Ministers of the Gospel in Northampton & Halifax counties, North-Carolina.

Psal. CII. 16—18. When the Lord shall build up Zion, he shall appear in his glory.—This shall be written for the generation to come; and the people which shall be created shall praise the Lord.

HALIFAX: PRINTED BY A. HODGE, 1803.

[COPY RIGHT SECURED ACCORDING TO LAW.]





THE
RURAL PHILOSOPHER:
OR,
FRENCH GEORGICS.

A DIDACTIC POEM. TRANSLATED FROM THE ORIGINAL OF THE ABBE DELILLE; ENTITLED L'HOMME DES CHAMPS.

BY JOHN MAUNDE.

NEWBERN:

FRANKLIN AND GARROW.

1804.





MATILDA BERKELY,
OR,
FAMILY ANECDOTES;

By the Author of the History of Lady Emma Melcombe and her Family, &c.

RALEIGH, (N. C.)

PRINTED BY J. GALES, PRINTER TO THE STATE

1804.





THE
AHIMAN REZON
AND
MASONIC RITUAL.

PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF THE GRAND LODGE, OF NORTH-CAROLINA AND TENNESSEE.

PART I.

NEWBERN:

JOHN C. SIMS AND EDWARD G. MOSS.

5805.





THE
Spiritual Song Book,
DESIGNED
AS AN ASSISTANT
FOR THE
PIOUS of all Denominations.

BY DAVID B. MINTZ.

Gather up the fragments that remain, that nothing be lost. John vi. 12.

HALIFAX:

PRINTED BY ABRAHAM HODGE.

1805.





THE
DYING THOUGHTS
OF THE
Reverend, Learned and Holy
Mr. RICHARD BAXTER;

VIZ.

I. What there is desirable in the present life.

II. The reasonableness and necessity of believing that pious separate spirits are with Christ.

III. What is to depart, and to be with Christ.

IV. Why it is far better to be with Christ.

V. The author breathes after willingness to depart.

ABRIDGED

By BENJAMIN FAWCETT, M. A.

FIRST AMERICAN EDITION.

PRINTED FOR AND SOLD BY WILLIAM GLENDINNING, Newbern-Street, near the State-House, Raleigh, N. C.

1805.





AN
ABRIDGMENT
OF AN
EXPOSITION
OF
THE BOOK
OF THE
PROPHET ISAIAH.

BY JOHN GILL, D. D.


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[UNK] It may be necessary to observe, that in abridging this work, nothing has been omitted, except the summary of the chapters, marginal notes, and Hebrew characters.

HALIFAX:

PRINTED AT THE OFFICE OF THE NORTH-CAROLINA JOURNAL,; FOR RICHARD POINDEXTER AND JESSE READ.

1806.





A
SERIES OF LETTERS,

In which an attentive perusal of Mr. Edwards's candid reasons for renouncing the principles of Antipaedobaptism is seriously recommended—and the right of infants to membership in the Church of God is also pleaded.

THE LETTERS Being first published by the Author, in the EDENTON GAZETTE—

The first five were addressed to Mess. BURKITT, REED, and the other MINISTERS of the BAPTIST KEHUKEE ASSOCIATION.

The subsequent five, were addressed TO THE PEOPLE, as being the most worthy.

A reply to the first Letter by Mr. Burkitt, and to the third by a Mr. Poindexter, are annexed, as they have been answered

BY PHILANTHROPOS.

Suffer the little children to come unto me and forbid them not—for of such is the kingdom of God. Take heed that ye despise not one of these little ones—for I say unto you, that in Heaven, their Angels do always behold the face of my father who is in Heaven.

JESUS CHRIST.

EDENTON:

PRINTED BY JAMES WILLS.

1807.





THE RUDIMENTS
OF
THE LATIN TONGUE,
OR,
A PLAIN AND EASY INTRODUCTION
TO
LATIN GRAMMAR

WHEREIN THE PRINCIPLES OF THE LANGUAGE ARE METHODICALLY DIGESTED,

BOTH IN ENGLISH AND LATIN.

WITH USEFUL NOTES AND OBSERVATIONS, EXPLAINING THE TERMS OF GRAMMAR, AND FURTHER IMPROVING ITS RULES.

BY THOMAS RUDDIMAN, M. A.

THE TWENTY-FIFTH GENUINE EDITION, CAREFULLY CORRECTED AND IMPROVED.

RALEIGH:

PRINTED AT THE STAR OFFICE, BY THOMAS HENDERSON, jr.

1809.





THE MOST USEFUL AND PLEASING
HYMNS
AND
SPIRITUAL SONGS

COLLECTED FROM BOOKS, WITH THE ADDITION OF SEVERAL NEVER BEFORE PUBLISHED.

AMONGST WHICH ARE SOME SUITABLE FOR ALL PROFESSORS OF CHRISTIANITY.

BY JAMES JACKSON, A member of the Christian Church,

RALEIGH,

PRINTED BY WM. BOTLAN

1809.





TRIAL
OF
John Owen,
CHARGED WITH THE MURDER
OF
PATRICK CONWAY

BEFORE THE SUPERIOR COURT OF WAKE, APRIL SESSION, 1810; WITH REMARKS.

HIS HONOUR JOHN HALL, JUDGE.


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decoration]

RALEIGH:

PRINTED BY THOMAS HENDERSON, Junior.

1810.





COLLECTION
OF VARIOUS
PIECES OF POETRY,
CHIEFLY PATRIOTIC.

PUBLISHED AT THE EARNEST REQUEST OF A NUMBER OF GOOD CITIZENS FOR THE IMPROVEMENT OF PATRIOTIC MINDS.

BY JAMES GAY, Of Iredell County, N. C.

  • May truth and freedom still prevail,
  • O'er all the powers of Earth and Hell;
  • May Independence be renown'd,
  • Columbia's lands with glory crown'd;
  • May union, peace and love combine,
  • Then will our land in lustre shine,
  • And foreign nations wond'ring stand,
  • Not dating to invade our land.

RALEIGH:

Printed by WM. BOYLAW.

1810.





ENGLISH GRAMMAR,
ADAPTED TO THE
DIFFERENT CLASSES OF LEARNERS;
WITH AN
APPENDIX,
CONTAINING
RULES AND OBSERVATIONS

FOR ASSISTING THE MORE ADVANCED STUDENTS TO WRITE WITH PERSPICUITY AND ACCURACY.

“They who are learning to compote and arrange their sentences with accuracy and order, are learning at the same time, to think with accuracy and order.” Blair.

BY LINDLEY MURRAY.

FROM THE LATEST IMPROVED LONDON EDITION.

Raleigh:

PRINTED BY GALES & SEATON.

1811.





POOR PETER's
CALL
TO HIS
CHILDREN,
AND TO ALL OTHERS WHO CAN HEAR
AND BELIEVE.

BY PETER CLEMMONS, Senr.

SALISBURY, (N. C.)

PRINTED BY COUPEE AND CRIDER.

1812.





THE
CATECHISM
OF
HEALTH

TRANSLATED FROM THE GERMAN OF DOCTOR FAUST; AND CAREFULLY IMPROVED BY DR. GREGORY, OF EDENBURG.

THIRD AMERICAN EDITION.


[Illustration:


decoration]

RALEIGH:

PRINTED AT THE STAR-OFFICE, BY THO: HENDERSON,

1812.





THE
Yankee Spy;
OR
COSMOPOLITE'S
INTERESTING ANALECTS
OF
COMMON SENSE;
UPON
NATURAL, SOCIAL AND MORAL
PHILOSOPHY.

EMBRACING

THE RIGHTS OF MAN.

BY LORENZO DOW.

“This seems to be the Age of Wonders.”

GEN. WASHINGTON.

FIFTH EDITION—IMPROVED.

RALEIGH:

PRINTED AT THE MINERVA PRESS By Alex, Lucas.

1814.





CATALOGUS
UNIVERSITATIS
CAROLINÆ SEPTENTRIONALIS.

RALEIGH:

E TYPIS J. GALES,

1817.





EXPERIMENTAL
REFLECTIONS.

BY A North Carolinian Author.

NASHVILLE, T.

Printed and Sold by T. G. Bradford,

1817.





MEMOIR
ON THE
INTERNAL IMPROVEMENTS CONTEMPLATED BY
THE LEGISLATURE OF
NORTH-CAROLINA;
AND ON THE
RESOURCES AND FINANCES
OF THAT STATE.

RALEIGH:

PRINTED BY J. GALES:

1819.





REPORT
OF
SUNDRY SURVEYS

MADE BY HAMILTON FULTON, ESQ. State Engineer, AGREEABLY TO CERTAIN INSTRUCTIONS FROM JUDGE MURPHEY, CHAIRMAN, &c. AND Submitted to the General Assembly, at their Session in 1819.

RALEIGH:

Printed by Thomas Henderson, 1849.

1819.





DEBATE
ON THE
CONVENTION QUESTION,
IN THE
House of Commons
OF THE
LEGISLATURE OF NORTH-CAROLINA

Dec. 18 & 19, 1821.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOSEPH GALES.

RALEIGH:

PRINTED BY J. GALES & SON

1822.





A SOLEMN
ADDRESS TO YOUTH,
WITH
SERIOUS REFLECTIONS AND REMARKS

Tending to show the vanity of Human Acquirements,

And pointing out to the youthful mind the way of instruction in that Knowledge which never needs to be repented of.

ALSO, AN EPISTLE,

DEDICATED TO EVERY YOUNG PERSON WHO READS THE PRECEDING ADDRESS.

BEING

An Allegorical Representation of the Walks of Youth, particularly with respect to Marriage.

HILLSBOROUGH, N.C.

Printed and published by D. Heartt:

1823.





THE
DISCIPLINE
OF
FRIENDS

REVISED AND APPROVED BY THE YEARLY MEETING,

Held at New-Garden, in Guilford County, North-Carolina, from the 4th to the 7th of the 11th month, inclusive, 1822.

HILLSBOROUGH:

PRINTED BY DENNIS HEARTT.

1823.





BLACKBEARD.

A Comedy, in Four Acts.

FOUNDED ON FACT.

BY LEMUEL SAWYER.

WASHINGTON:

PRINTED BY DAVIS AND FORCE (FRANKLIN'S HEAD) PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE.

1824.





REPORT
ON THE GEOLOGY OF NORTH-CAROLINA,

Conducted under the direction of the Board of Agriculture.

PART I.

BY DENISON OLMSTED, Professor of Chemistry and Mineralogy in the University of North-Carolina.

NOVEMBER, 1824.





THE
DOCTRINES OF THE CHURCH
VINDICATED

FROM THE MISREPRESENTATIONS OF DR. JOHN RICE; AND THE Integrity of Revealed Religion DEFENDED AGAINST THE “No Comment Principle” OF PROMISCUOUS BIBLE SOCIETIES.

BY THE RIGHT REVEREND JOHN S. RAVENSCROFT, D. D.

Bishop of the Diocese of North-Carolina.

RALEIGH:

PRINTED BY J. GALES & SON.

1826.





QUESTIONS
ON THE
Assembly's
SHORTER CATECHISM,

DESIGNED TO ASSIST THE YOUTH IN ACQUIRING A KNOWLEDGE OF THE DOCTRINES TAUGHT IN THAT COMPEND.

BY A. ANDERSON.

CHARLOTTE:

PRINTED BY L. BINGHAM.

1826.





THE
FIRST CATECHISM
FOR
CHILDREN;

CONTAINING COMMON THINGS

NECESSARY TO BE KNOWN AT AN EARLY AGE.

A NEW EDITION, WITH IMPROVEMENTS.

BY REV. DAVID BLAIR, Author of the Class Book, Reading Exercises. Grammar of Philosophy, &c. &c.

RALEIGH:

PRINTED BY J. GALES & SON

1826.





DEBATE
ON THE
BILL DIRECTING A PROSECUTION
AGAINST THE
SEVERAL BANKS OF THE STATE,
AND TO
RESTORE AND PRESERVE THE CHARACTER
OF THE
CIRCULATING MEDIUM,
WHICH TOOK PLACE IN THE
HOUSE OF COMMONS
OF
NORTH-CAROLINA.

From December 29th, 1828, to January 6th, 1829

RALEIGH:

PRINTED BY J. GALES & SON.

1829.





THE
HISTORY
OF
NORTH CAROLINA,

FROM THE EARLIEST PERIOD.

BY FRANCOIS-XAVIER MARTIN

Coloniœ autem jura, institutaque populi Romani, non sui arbitrii habebant.

GEL. lib. 16, cap. 23.

VOLUME I.

NEW-ORLEANS:

PRINTED BY A. T. PENNIMAN & CO.

Corner of Chartres aud Bienville Streets.

1829.





LETTERS
ON
POPULAR EDUCATION,
ADDRESSED
TO THE PEOPLE
OF
NORTH-CAROLINA.

  • How can he rule well in a commonwealth
  • Who knoweth not himself in rule to frame?
  • How should he rule himself in mental health
  • Who never learned one lesson for the same?
  • If such catch harm, their parents are to blame:
  • For needs must they be blind, and blindly led,
  • Where no good lesson can be taught or read.

CAV. IN MIR. FOR MAG.

HILLSBOROUGH:

PRINTED BY DENNIS HEARTT.

1832.





JOURNAL
OF
THE CONVENTION,
CALLED
By the Freemen of North-Carolina,
TO AMEND
THE CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE,
WHICH ASSEMBLED
In the City of Raleigh, on the 4th of June, 1835,
AND CONTINUED IN SESSION
Until the 11th day of July thereafter.

Raleigh:

PRINTED BY J. GALES & SON, PRINTERS TO THE CONVENTION.

1835.





THE
ADVANTAGES
AND
DISADVANTAGE
OF THE
MARRIAGE
STATE

AS ENTERED INTO WITH RELIGIOUS OR IRRELIGIOUS

PERSONS; Represented UNDER THE Similitude OF A DREAM.

VERSIFIED BY REFINE WEEKES.

J.STANTON, Printer, JAMES TOWN, N.C.

1836.

PRICE:—10cts. Single, or $1.00 per Doz.





MEMORIALS
OF
NORTH CAROLINA.

BY J. SEAWELL JONES, OF SHOCCO.

NEW-YORK:

1838.





DOCUMENTS
CONNECTED WITH THE TRIAL
OF THE
REV. SIMEON COLTON.

PRINTED BY ORDER OF FAYETTEVILLE PRESBYTERY, FOR THE USE OF THE SYNOD OF NORTH CAROLINA, At their ensuing Sessions; WITH AN APPENDIX CONTAINING MR. COLTON'S DEFENCE, &c.

FAYETTEVILLE:

PRINTED BY EDWARD J. HALE.

1839.





EONEGUSKI,
OR,
THE CHEROKEE CHIEF:

A TALE OF PAST WARS.

BY AN AMERICAN.

  • BUT HERE (METHINKS) MIGHT INDIA'S SONS EXPLORE
  • THEIR FATHER'S DUST, OR LIFT, PERCHANCE OF YORE
  • THEIR VOICE TO THE GREAT SPIRIT:—

Gertrude of Wyoming.

IN TWO VOLUMES.

VOL. I.

Washington:

FRANCK TAYLOR.

1839.





Attempts at Rhyming,
BY
AN OLD FIELD TEACHER.

NOBILITAS SOLA EST ATQUE UNICA VIRTUS.

Sat. Juv. viii. 20.

RALEIGH, N. C.

PRINTED FOR THE AUTHOR BY THOMAS J. LEMAY.

1839.





THE
MAMMOTH HUMBUG:
OR, THE ADVENTURES OF
SHOCCO JONES,

IN MISSISSIPPI, IN THE SUMMER OF 1839,

INCLUDING

The history of his visit to Alabama, and “the way he come it over” certain members of its Legislature, &c. &c.

MEMPHIS, TEN.

1842.





AUTO-BIOGRAPHY
OF
LEMUEL SAWYER

FORMERLY MEMBER OF CONGRESS FROM NORTH CAROLINA, AUTHOR OF The Biography of John Randolph.

NEW YORK.

PUBLISHED FOR THE AUTHOR,

1844.





NORTH CAROLINA
SONNETS,
OR A
SELECTION OF CHOICE HYMNS,
FOR THE USE OF THE
OLD SCHOOL BAPTISTS

COMPILED BY THE RECOMMENDATION OF THE KEHUKEE ASSOCIATION.

BY JAMES OSBOURN, V.D.M. OF BALTIMORE CITY.

Let the inhabitants of the rock sing.—ISA. xiii. 11.

BALTIMORE:

PUBLISHED BY JAMES OSBOURN.

1844.





A
COLLECTION
OF
POEMS

BY INCOG.

NEWBERN:

PRINTED AT THE NEWBERNIAN OFFICE.

1845.





THE
NARRATIVE
OF
LUNSFORD LANE,
FORMERLY OF
RALEIGH, N. C.

EMBRACING AN ACCOUNT OF HIS EARLY LIFE, THE REDEMPTION, BY PORCHASE OF HIMSELF AND FAMILY FROM SLAVERY, AND HIS BANISHMENT FROM THE PLACE OF HIS BIRTH FOR THE CRIME OF WEARING A COLORED SKIN.

PUBLISHED BY HIMSELF.

FOURTH EDITION.

BOSTON:

PRINTED FOR THE PUBLISHER

HEWES AND WATSON'S PRINT. No. 60....Congress St.

1848.





PROCEEDINGS
OF THE
COURT OF INQUIRY

WHICH CONVENED AT SALTILLO, MEXICO, JANUARY 12, 1848.

Instituted for the purpose of obtaining full information relative to an alleged mutiny in the camp at Buena Vista, which led to the death of one of the soldiers by the hands of Colonel Paine, of the North Carolina volunteers, and to investigate the facts connected with the dishonorable discharge of certain officers of North Carolina volunteers.





THE
LIFE AND TRAVELS
OF
PETER HOWELL,

WRITTEN BY HIMSELF;

IN WHICH WILL BE SEEN SOME MARVELLOUS INSTANCES OF THE GRACIOUS PROVIDENCE OF GOD.

NEWBERN, N. C.

Published by W. H. Mayhew, for the Author, at the Newbernian Office.





LIFE IN THE SOUTH.
A COMPANION TO
UNCLE TOM'S CABIN.

BY C. H. WILEY, (OF NORTH CAROLINA.)

AUTHOR OF “ALAMANCE,” ETC., ETC.

EMBELLISHED WITH FOURTEEN BEAUTIFUL ILLUSTRATIONS.

From original designs drawn expressly for this work, BY DARLEY, AND ENGRAVED BY LESLIE & TRAVERS.

Philadelphia:

T. B. PETERSON No. 98 CHESNUT STREET.





ZION'S HYMNS,
FOR THE USE OF
THE ORIGINAL FREE-WILL BAPTIST CHURCH
OF NORTH CAROLINA,
AND FOR SAINTS OF ALL DENOMINATIONS.

COMPILED FROM VARIOUS AUTHORS

BY RUFUS K. HEARN, JOSEPH S. BELL, AND JESSE RANDOLPH.

  • “Sing praises to the righteous Lord,
  • Who dwells on Zion's hills.”—Watts.

FOR SALE BY THE COMPILERS.

FALKLAND:

PITT COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA.

1854.





WOOD-NOTES;
OR,
Carolina Carols:
A COLLECTION OF
NORTH CAROLINA POETRY.

COMPILED BY TENELLA.

IN TWO VOLUMES.

VOL. I.

RALEIGH:

WARREN L. POMEROY.

M.DCCC.LIV.





LIFE AND CORRESPONDENCE
OF
JAMES IREDELL,

ONE OF THE ASSOCIATE JUSTICES OF THE SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES.

BY GRIFFITH J. McREE.

“Hereditary honor is accounted the most worthy; but reason speaketh in the cause of him who bath acquired it.”—Dean Bolton.

VOL. I.

NEW YORK:

D. APPLETON AND COMPANY, B46 & S48 BROADWAY.

M.DCCC.LVII.





SPEECH
OF THE
REV. C. F. DEEMS, D. D.

ON THE TRIAL OF REV. WM. A. SMITH, D. D., FOR IMMORALITY, BEFORE THE VIRGINIA CONFERENCE, DECEMBER, 1855; WITH THE MOST IMPORTANT DOCUMENTS CONNECTED WITH THAT TRIAL.

TO WHICH ARE PREFIXED HISTORICAL SKETCHES, WITH OTHER MATTER NEVER BEFORE PUBLISHED.

“Audi alteram partem.”

WILMINGTON, N. C.:

FULTON & PRICE, STEAM POWER PRESS PRINTERS.

1858.





A TREATISE
ON
TURPENTINE FARMING

BEING A REVIEW OF NATURAL AND ARTIFICIAL OBSTRUCTIONS, WITH THEIR RESULTS, IN WHICH MANY ERRONEOUS IDEAS ARE EXPLODED: WITH REMARKS ON THE Best Method of Making Turpentine.

BY G. W. PERRY,

OF CRAVEN COUNTY, N.C.

NEWBERN, N.C.

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED BY MUSE & DAVIES,

AT THE ‘NEW ERA’ OFFICE.

1859.





ACTS
OF THE
GENERAL ASSEMBLY
IN RELATION TO THE
TOWN OF TARBORO’,
AND
THE ORDINANCES
OF
SAID TOWN.

TARBORO, N. C.:

WM. BENJAMIN SMITH, PRINTER;

AT THE OFFICE OF THE “TARBORO’ MERCURY,”

1860.





THE
NARRATIVE
OF
COLONEL DAVID FANNING

(A TORY IN THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR WITH GREAT BRITAIN;)

GIVING AN ACCOUNT OF HIS ADVENTURES IN NORTH CAROLINA. From 1775 to 1783, AS WRITTEN BY HIMSELF, WITH AN INTRODUCTION AND EXPLANATORY NOTES.

Richmond, Va.

PRINTED FOR PRIVATE DISTRIBUTION ONLY.

1861.

IN THE FIRST YEAR OF THE INDEPENDENCE OF THE

CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA.





A RAY OF LIGHT;
OR,
A TREATISE ON THE SECTIONAL TROUBLES,
RELIGIOUSLY AND MORALLY CONSIDERED.

BY

BRYAN TYSON.

BROWER'S MILLS, N. C.:

PUBLISHED BY THE AUTHOR.

1862.





THE
GEOGRAPHICAL READER,
FOR THE
DIXIE CHILDREN.

BY

MRS. M. B. MOORE.

RALEIGH:

BRANSON, FARRAR & CO., PUBLISHERS.

BIBLICAL RECORDER PRINT.

1863.





THE
First Dixie Reader;

DESIGNED TO FOLLOW THE DIXIE PRIMER.

BY

MRS. M. B. MOORE.

RALEIGH:

BRANSON, FARRAR & CO.

1863.





AN
ELEMENTARY
ARITHMETIC,

DESIGNED FOR BEGINNERS: EMBRACING THE FIRST PRINCIPLES OF THE SCIENCE.

By L. JOHNSON, A. M.,

PROFESSOR OF MATHEMATICS IN TRINITY COLLEGE.

RALEIGH, N. C.,

BRANSON & FARRAR,

FAYETTEVILLE STREET.

1864.





THE
SOLDIER'S COMPANION:

CONTAINING AN ABRIDGEMENT OF HARDEE'S INFANTRY TACTICS; WITH THE HEAVY INFANTRY AND RIFLE MANUALS, SKIRMISH DRILL AND BAYONET EXERCISE, FIELD FORTIFICATION, PICKET AND OUTPOST DUTY, WITH VARIOUS REGULATIONS, FORMS, &C., THAT WILL BE FOUND USEFUL TO THE SOLDIER IN CAMP AND ON THE MARCH; WITH AN APPENDIX CONTAINING FANCY MOVEMENTS FOR VOLUNTEER COMPANIES, UNIFORM AND DRESS OF THE ARMY, &C.

By Capt. GEO. C. LEWIS,

PROVISIONAL ARMY OF THE CONFEDERATE STATES.

RALEIGH, N. C.:

JOHN SPELMAN, PRINTER, OFFICE STATE JOURNAL.

1863.





SONGS
OF
LOVE AND LIBERTY.

COMPILED BY

A NORTH CAROLINA LADY

RALEIGH, N. C.,

BRANSON & FARRAR,

FAYETTEVILLE STREET,

1864.





MYRTLE LEAVES,
A
BOOK
PECULIARLY ADAPTED
TO THE
TIMES.

BY

Rev. A. W. MANGUM.

SECOND EDITION.

(Revised and Enlarged.)

RALEIGH, N. C.:

BRANSON & FARRAR,

Fayetteville Street.

1864.





A GRAMMAR
OF THE
LATIN LANGUAGE

FOR THE USE OF SCHOOLS, WITH EXERCISES AND VOCABULARIES.

By Wm. BINGHAM, A. M.,

OF THE BINGHAM SCHOOL.

GREENSBORO, N. C.:

PUBLISHED BY STERLING, CAMPBELL & ALBRIGHT

RICHMOND, VA., W. Hargrave White.

1863.





SCRIPTURAL VIEWS
OF
NATIONAL TRIALS:
OR
THE TRUE ROAD
TO
THE INDEPENDENCE AND PEACE
OF THE
CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA.

BY

REV. C. H. WILEY,

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF NORTH CAROLINA.

“As for us, our eyes as yet failed for our vain help: in our watching we have watched for a nation that could not save us.”—Lam. IV: 17.

“Come, let us return unto the Lord: for He hath tern, and He will heal us: He hath emitten, and He will bind us up.”—Hosea, VI: 1.

GREENSBORO, N. C.:

STERLING, CAMPBELL & ALBRIGHT.

1863.





CASTINE.


[Illustration:


Soldier surrounded by human skulls on stakes]

BY EDWARD EDGEVILLE.

Southern Field and Fireside Novelette No 2—New Series.

RALEIGH:

WM. B. SMITH & CO.

1865.





THE
DESERTER'S DAUGHTER.

BY

W. D. HERRINGTON, 3D N. C. CAV.,

AUTHOR OF

“The Captain's Bride,” “The Refugee's Niece,” etc.

Southern Field and Fireside Novelette, No. 3.

NEW SERIES.

RALEIGH:

WM. B. SMITH & CO.

1865.





MARY BARKER,
A
THRILLING NARRATIVE
OF
EARLY LIFE
IN
NORTH CAROLINA.

CHARACTERS:

MARY BARKER; TONLIN, the Chief's Son;

VELNA, the Chief's Daughter; GATLIN, the Renegade.

BY

CHARLIE VERNON.

(SECOND EDITION.)

RALEIGH, N. C.

BRANSON & FAREAR, FAYETTEVILLE ST.,

1865.





THE History of the Dividing Line,
BETWEEN
VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA
AS RUN IN 1728-29.

BY

WILLIAM BYRD,

OF WESTOVER, IN VIRGINIA, ESQUIRE,

Printed from the Original Manuscript.

Richmond, Va.:

1866.





THE LIFE
— OF —
MICAJAH ANDERSON,
OF EDGECOMBE COUNTY.

BY HIMSELF

Written from Dictation,

BY BENJAMIN JOHNSON, COLORED,

OF LOGSBORO TOWNSHIP.

JARBORO, N. C.:

From Wm. A. Hearne's Printing and Publishing House, Main Street.

1870.





SEA-GIFT.

A NOVEL.

BY

EDWIN W. FULLER,

Author of “THE ANGEL IN THE CLOUD.”

NEW YORK:

E. J. HALE & SON, PUBLISHERS,

MURRAY STREET.

1873.





A HISTORY
OF
ROWAN COUNTY,
North Carolina.

CONTAINING SKETCHES OF PROMINENT FAMILIES AND DISTINGUISHED MEN, WITH AN APPENDIX.

BY

REV. JETHRO RUMPLE.

PUBLISHED BY J. J. BRUNER,

SALISBURY, N. C.

1881.





REMINISCENCES AND MEMOIRS
OF
NORTH CAROLINA
AND
EMINENT NORTH CAROLINIANS

BY JOHN H. WHEELER,

AUTHOR OF THE HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA, AND MEMBER OF THE HISTORICAL SOCIETIES OF NORTH CAROLINA, VIRGINIA, GEORGIA, AND PENNSYLVANIA.

“’Tis well that a State should often be reminded of her great citizens.”

COLUMBUS, OHIO:

COLUMBUS PRINTING WORKS,

1884.





THE
Publications of the Prince Society.

Established May 25th, 1858.

SIR WALTER RALEGH AND HIS COLONY IN AMERICA.


[Illustration:

Org. 1858 Prince Society Inc 1874
]

Boston:

PRINTED FOR THE SOCIETY, BY JOHN WILSON AND SON.

1884.





SKETCHES OF LIFE
IN
NORTH CAROLINA

Embracing Incidents and Narratives, and Personal Adventures of the Author during Forty years of travel. With an Appendix, in which

The Papacy is shown from the Scriptures to be the great Anti-Christ; and the false and corrupt system is exposed.

BY R. R. MICHAUX,

LIBERTY, N. C.

CULLER, N. C.:

W. C. PHILLIPS, PRINTER.

1894.





AN
ACCOUNT
OF THE ASSASSINATION OF
LOYAL CITIZENS
OF
NORTH CAROLINA
FOR
HAVING SERVED IN THE UNION ARMY
WHICH TOOK PLACE AT KINGSTON
IN THE MONTHS
OF FEBRUARY AND MARCH 1864

BY RUSH C. HAWKINS

NEW YORK

MDCCCLXXXXVII





Hanover
OR THE
PERSECUTION OF THE LOWLY.

A Story of the Wilmington Massacre

BY JACK THORNE

Published by M. C. L. Hill

Price, = 50 Cents.

COPYRIGHTED.






[Illustration:

The Major's Hobby by Jack Lambert
]









TWO HUNDRED AND FIFTY COPIES OF “HOUSED ON THE THIRD FLOOR” PRINTED FOR PRIVATE DISTRIBUTION ONLY. TYPE IS GARAMOND MONOTYPE SET, WITH GARAMOND INITIALS. INTRODUCTORY AND ESSAY PAGES ON CORTLEA DECKLE EDGE, MADE BY THE HURLBUT PAPER COMPANY. ILLUSTRATIONS ON WARRENS LUSTRO BRILLIANT DULL. DESIGNED AND PRODUCED BY THE HORN-SHAFER COMPANY AT BALTIMORE, MARYLAND, IN MARCH, 1941.





































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