Chloroform bottle


Title
Chloroform bottle
Description
In July 1831, American physician Samuel Guthrie discovered chloroform. Three years later, the chemical was named and characterized by Jean-Baptiste Dumas. Chloroform’s anesthetic properties were first noted in 1847 by Marie-Jean-Pierre Flourens. If used incorrectly, chloroform would cause headaches, altered consciousness, convulsions, respiratory paralysis, dizziness, nausea, and vomiting. Even though ether eventually proved to be safer, chloroform was the more popular anesthetic for years because in contrast to ether, it smells pleasant, it was less expensive, and it was easier to administer.
Date
1847-1899
Original Format
medical equipment
Extent
Local Identifier
Country Doctor Museum
Subject(s)
Location of Original
Country Doctor Museum
Rights
This item has been made available by The Country Doctor Museum for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. For information regarding reproduction, please contact The Country Doctor Museum at hslcdm@ecu.edu;
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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