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4 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 71 Issue 6, June 2007
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Record #:
9012
Abstract:
Watts describes the Tar River Land Conservancy's efforts to preserve the delicate balance of nature in the Piedmont by protecting the Tar River's upper basin. Conservation easement is one of the primary approaches in preserving lands with conservation significance. In its first seven years of operation, the TRLC has helped landowners protect 7,850 acres and 425,000 stream feet, or just over eighty miles of river.
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Record #:
9014
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Abstract:
Edward Drinker Cope discovered the Roanoke bass in 1868. He named it Ambloplites cavifrons and published his findings in the Journal of the Academy of Science. Because the fish is not widely found and is restricted to a handful of small rivers, it has gone unstudied for the past 140 years. North Carolina Wildlife Resource Commission biologists Corey Oakley and Brian McRae are engaged in a five-year study of the Roanoke bass that will end in 2008. The study seeks to learn population sizes in the rivers, how the populations are faring, and what needs to be done to protect the fish.
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Record #:
9011
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Nightjars, also known as goatsuckers, are known for their loud, melodic cries that “jar” the night's stillness. Over eighty species of the bird occur worldwide. Of the eight species in North America, three live in North Carolina--the whip-poor-will, the chuck-will's-widow, and the common nighthawk.
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Record #:
9013
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Canoe enthusiasts can find many places in the state to dip a paddle; eastern North Carolina alone provides 1,200 miles of navigable waters. Canoeing, like many hobbies, can be expensive. Ingram describes eleven must-have items for around $200 for the frugal paddler.
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