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3 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 31 Issue 2, Feb 1967
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Record #:
8188
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Abstract:
Since its dedication in July 1963, over 300,000 people from all fifty states and thirty-four foreign countries have visited the Schiele Museum of Natural History in Gastonia. Over 5,000 natural history specimens are on exhibit, including mounted birds, animals, fish, and reptiles. Larger animals, rarely seen except in large metropolitan museums, include the buffalo, American elk, caribou, and Rocky Mountain goat. The movement for the museum was started in Gastonia in 1958, when Mr. and Mrs. R. M. Schiele offered their collections valued at over $100,000. Mr. Schiele is the former curator and artist-taxidermist of the Philadelphia museums and former ranger-naturalist of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.
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Record #:
8186
Author(s):
Abstract:
Waterfowl depend on water. They nest on water, raise their young there, and feed in or near water. Without suitable nesting and wintering sites, waterfowl will not survive. Between 1940 and 1964, over forty-five million acres of wetlands were drained throughout the country. Protection of wetlands is vital to waterfowl survival. A major goal of waterfowl management is to blunt the impact of man's activities on ducks and geese. Poole discusses what has been done in the past, what is being done today, and what wildlife agencies hope to do in the future, and why.
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Record #:
8187
Abstract:
The pygmy sunfish, Elassoma zonatum, is not as well-known as the typical sunfish most people are familiar with. It is among the smallest fishes in the world, reaching a maximum size of slightly over one inch. Three known species of the pygmy sunfish exist, with two of the species occurring in North Carolina. The habitat of this fish is the soft, acidic, coffee-colored waters of the southeastern part of the state. It has few natural enemies. The diet of the pygmy sunfish consists of small crustaceans.
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