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5 results for Washington the Magazine Vol. Issue , July-Aug 2016
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Record #:
26917
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Veteran Captain Richard Andrews describes the prize of late-summer fishing on the Pamlico—the giant red drum. As North Carolina’s state fish, the giant red drum are large; typically between 35 and 52 inches long and weigh one pound in weight per inch in length, which makes them difficult to catch.
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Record #:
26918
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There are many ways to enjoy the Pamlico River, whether it be fishing, boating, or just viewing the scenery from shore. However, there are also 5 different watersports options available to visitors and residents alike, including tubing, wakeboarding, kneeboarding, paddleboarding, and kayaking.
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Record #:
26915
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The Herring Club, a social club in Washington, North Carolina, is a fellowship group centered on socializing and fish fries. It began in the late 1940s with a group of volunteer firemen and still continues today. Although some of the traditions have shifted, the purpose of the group remains the same.
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Washington the Magazine (NoCar F264.W3 W37), Vol. Issue , July-Aug 2016, p26-29, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
26914
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Eastern North Carolina has a lot to offer tourists and locals. This article describes 4 day trip attractions that Washington, NC residents can visit. These include Historic New Bern/Tryon Palace, North Carolina Aquarium, Ocracoke Island, and Sylvan Heights Bird Park.
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Record #:
26916
Abstract:
In May 2016, Bath celebrated 300 years of seaport history. In 1716, England’s Lords Proprietors designated Bath as an official seaport, paving the way for hundreds of years of history. Although the town is no longer a busy port, it still celebrated its history with reenactments and costumed interpreters.
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