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4 results for The State Vol. 9 Issue 29, Dec 1941
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Record #:
15155
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Conder Gold Mine was located in Waxhaw in Union County. Union County mining traces back to the 19th-century when slaves mined for gold. Mine operations in 1941 turned out two gold bricks a month, with each brick weighing approximately 30 pounds valued at $9,000.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 9 Issue 29, Dec 1941, p7, il
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Record #:
18454
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hawksbill Mountain in Burke County takes its name from its peak where overhanging rocks project the striking likeness of a hawk's beak. At 4,000 feet the mountain is one of the few locations in the state's mountains where you can get a completely unobstructed view in every direction. Abernethy relates some of the interesting things visitors will find there.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 9 Issue 29, Dec 1941, p10-11, il
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Record #:
18452
Author(s):
Abstract:
Continuing his travels around the state, Goerch describes the things of interest he found in Craven County. He says \"from an historical standpoint, the county probably has more firsts, to its credit than any other county in the state,\" and he includes a list of them at the end of the article. The article includes small descriptions of a number of historic homes in the town of New Bern.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 9 Issue 29, Dec 1941, p1-420-23, il
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Record #:
18453
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the field of popular music, six big time bands got their start at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Kay Kyser, the late Hal Kemp, John Scott Trotter, Skinnay Ennis, Jan Garber, and Saxie Dowell. All formed their original bands at Chapel Hill, and they, with the exception of Kemp, are still going strong.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 9 Issue 29, Dec 1941, p8, 23
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