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8 results for The State Vol. 47 Issue 6, Nov 1979
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Record #:
9241
Abstract:
The 1960s saw a resurgence of interest in quilting, a tradition that has never faded from the Appalachian Mountains. The patchwork quilt is strictly a product of colonial America, and has spurred an interest in collecting quilts as a hobby. Not limited to the South, quilt enthusiasts can view collections all over the country.\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 6, Nov 1979, p12-14, il
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Record #:
9240
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In 1924, racing first came to North Carolina at the old Charlotte Speedway. A crowd of over 30,000 attended the inaugural Indy-style race, and for several years, the board track racing attracted many fans. Today, there are no board tracks left anywhere in the world, and the old Charlotte Speedway no longer exists.\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 6, Nov 1979, p11, il
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Record #:
9243
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Although home to a number of political figures, Washington also has a history of celebrities. Cecil B. and William B. DeMille both hail from this town, and author of the book SHOW BOAT, Edna Ferber, was inspired by the Washington show boat.\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 6, Nov 1979, p18-20, il, por
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Record #:
9242
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Knobby, Cleveland County's smaller version of Big Foot, is spotted every year in early December. Knobby is non-violent and there are many speculations as to what he really is. Recently, a movie company has decided to produce a film about the monster, bringing national recognition to Cleveland County.\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 6, Nov 1979, p16-18, il
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Record #:
9247
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Although allowed to fall into disrepair from the time of the Civil War until 1917, Stonewall Plantation near Rocky Mount was bought by the Nash Count Historical Association in 1974. Funded by the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources, the society has restored the building which was recently added to the National Register of Historic Places.\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 6, Nov 1979, p26, il
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Record #:
9246
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Although the mule population has declined in recent decades, their number is starting to slowly increase. Mules vary greatly in intelligence but are generally hard-working. After almost becoming extinct in post World War II America, mule day celebrations held around the country are fueling a new interest in these creatures.\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 6, Nov 1979, p22-24, 38, il
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Record #:
9245
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On February 9, 1848, Dr. Fabius Julius Haywood successfully used chloroform in an operation. He was the first doctor in the country to do so. In 1865, the Union Army seized his home and officers were quartered there. He successfully got his home back the following year.\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 6, Nov 1979, p21, il
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Record #:
9248
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This article is a first-hand recollection of the old Atlantic Hotel in Morehead City. The article covers visitors to the hotel as well as general history. The author includes a anecdote about a romance begun at the hotel.\r\n
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 6, Nov 1979, p27-30, il, por
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