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8 results for The State Vol. 46 Issue 4, Sept 1978
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Record #:
9031
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Abstract:
The Village of Yesteryear at the State Fair first appeared in 1951 led by Mary Cornwell. Each year, a group of mountain craftsman travel to the fair to showcase their handcrafts. The artists have received recognition at the Smithsonian Institute in Washington, D.C., and have been invited to national demonstrations held there. A former home economics teacher, Cornwell now serves at chairman of the Museum of North Carolina Handicrafts in Waynesville.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 4, Sept 1978, p12-13, il, por
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Record #:
9030
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Abstract:
In 1728, the dividing line between Virginia and North Carolina was drawn. The most famous member of the commission to establish the line was Colonel William Byrd of Virginia. Byrd, who was a self-proclaimed ladies man, wrote two books about the expeditions leading to the line's drawing. The books were frank and caustic, often admonishing settlers in both Virginia and North Carolina. Byrd died in 1744.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 4, Sept 1978, p10-11, 36, por, map
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Record #:
9033
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In the fall of 1900, Sarah and Retyre Couch and their two friends traveled by schooner wagon from the Sandhills to Greensboro. Because the roads between towns were not fully recovered after the war, the women often preferred walking to riding. The groups final exploration was of the Guilford Courthouse battleground. Sixteen days after they set out, the four returned home to Southern Pines.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 4, Sept 1978, p16-17, il
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Record #:
9032
Abstract:
Chicamacomico Coast Guard Station in Dare County was open for seventy years and closed in 1954. Throughout its time in operation, it rescued sailors from several ships caught in storms. Recently, the Chicamacomico Historical Association began raising funds to begin restoration on the station and convert it into a museum.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 4, Sept 1978, p14-15, 36, il, por
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Record #:
9034
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Owen re-tells a tale told by 78-year-old musician Thomas Burt during the North Carolina Folklife Festival at Eno State Park in Durham last July. Burt rarely performs publicly, and the story is about a guitar picker named Scrap Harris who makes an unfortunate deal with the devil.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 4, Sept 1978, p19-20, il
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Record #:
9037
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A. C. Lentz Saddlery in Mt. Pleasant has been operated by the Kendall family for seven generations. Because of increased environmental consciousness, people are working their land more often with horses than machinery, which has led to an increased need for horse collars. Although the demand for collars and saddles shifts every twenty years or so, the Kendalls say harnesses are always essential. Tools used to fashion the leather are antiques and are ordered from a company in Connecticut, which has supplied the saddlery since 1901.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 4, Sept 1978, p24-25, 36, il
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Record #:
9035
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Using a standard waffle iron, Abe Doumar created the first waffle ice cream cone at the St. Louis Exposition in 1904. After developing a four-iron waffle machine, Abe traveled to state fairs in North and South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. He opened stands at Ocean View Amusement Park in Chesapeake Bay which his brother, George, took over in 1920. George opened a drive-in restaurant in 1933 which his two sons still operate today. Despite the invention of mechanized cone makers, the Doumars continue to make cones by hand.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 4, Sept 1978, p20-21, 36, il, por
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Record #:
9036
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Russellborough, now part of the Brunswick Town State Historic Site, was home to governors Dobbs and Tryon from 1758 until 1770. The last resident was William Dry who saw the house burned by Lord Cornwallis and Sir Henry Clinton in 1776. Dry died in 1781 and was buried in St. Phillip's churchyard at Brunswick.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 4, Sept 1978, p22-23, il
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