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7 results for The State Vol. 46 Issue 1, June 1978
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Record #:
9250
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In the first half of the 20th-century, many families who were not affluent had to spend their summers at home rather than vacationing elsewhere. However, they often found much to do in their hometowns. Most towns had a Silver Cornet Band, a baseball team, and a trolley line. People threw parties at the trolley's terminus, and often visited family members who lived in rural areas. A continuation of this article appears in the July 1978 edition of THE STATE.\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 1, June 1978, p10-13, 73, il
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Record #:
9252
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Hot Springs in Madison County became a tourist attraction in 1778 when the Patton brothers of Asheville built a hotel big enough to house 1000 guests. The springs, rumored to have amazing healing powers, drew throngs of tourists. The original hotel burned in 1830 but was replaced the following year. This hotel burned in 1920 and was once more replaced by a hotel that burned in 1976. Since then, the springs have been less popular.\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 1, June 1978, p18-19, il
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Record #:
9249
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On November 23, 1877, the USS HURON sailed through North Carolina waters on its way to the West Indies. The ship was caught in a terrible storm and ran ashore in the middle of the night. Of the 132 crew members, only thirty-four survived. Wreckage of the HURON can still be seen on the Outer Banks near Nag's Head.\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 1, June 1978, p8-10, 62, il
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Record #:
9251
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Arnold Pope is one of the best caber tossers in the nation. He began weightlifting in high school and is currently a religion professor at Methodist College in Fayetteville. He has won the North Carolina Olympic-style lifting championships seventeen years in a row, and participates in the Scottish Games heptathlon each year. Arnold was the first American to win the caber toss in Scotland, and he credits much of his success to his wife, Barbara.\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 1, June 1978, p14-16, 76, il
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Record #:
9253
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Ed Adkins of Mount Airy has been making stained glass windows for churches and homes for over twenty-five years. Atkins draws his designs on heavy brown paper and traces individual glass shapes from his sketch. The pieces are then baked in a kiln and soldered together with lead.\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 1, June 1978, p20-21, 23, il
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Record #:
9255
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The Chattooga River was important for the “Under the Hill” Cherokees. William Bartram wrote about the river in 1776 as did botanist Arthur Devernon Huger much later. The river changes with the seasons, and the banks are lined with ancient pines and hemlocks as well as sapling maples and basswoods.\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 1, June 1978, p24-25, il
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Record #:
9254
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John T. Capps of Dunn founded the Bald-Headed Men of America (BHMA) three years ago. Membership has soared to over 3,500 and Dunn is now known as “the bald-headed capital of the world.” Capps speaks at conventions and meetings coast-to-coast, and uses humor to help further his idea that “bald is beautiful.”\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 1, June 1978, p22, 69, il, por
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