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3 results for The State Vol. 35 Issue 12, Nov 1967
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Record #:
10852
Abstract:
Before the advent of the modern drugstore, wild herbs, roots, and barks were harvested and used for medicinal purposes in North Carolina. Poison mandrake, witch hazel, and the bark of the wild cherry were \"must have\" items. Many of the harvested plants and roots have been found by modern pharmaceutical manufacturers to contain compounds that have been scientifically proven to aid in the treatment of disease and illness. In western North Carolina, the crude botanicals industry has created a booming business for traditional plant harvesters, who seek out the various herbs and roots and sell them to pharmaceutical companies at local buying stations.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 35 Issue 12, Nov 1967, p11-12, il
Full Text:
Record #:
10851
Author(s):
Abstract:
Throughout North Carolina's history, a day of \"Thanksgiving\" has been declared on various dates, sometimes twice in one year. Governor Arthur Dobbs issued the first state proclamation of Thanksgiving, setting aside June 7, 1758, \"as a day of fasting and supplication.\" 1758 actually saw two Thanksgivings, as Dobbs followed his original proclamation with another for the first Wednesday in December of that year. After multiple proclamations from various governors, the first Continental Congress, and Presidents Washington and Madison, President Abraham Lincoln set the modern standard when he established the last Thursday in November as Thanksgiving Day.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 35 Issue 12, Nov 1967, p9-10, il
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Record #:
10868
Author(s):
Abstract:
The new Cape Fear River Bridge at Wilmington, which is due for completion in 1969, will be the first lift span bridge ever to be constructed in North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 35 Issue 12, Nov 1967, p27, il
Full Text: