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3 results for The State Vol. 34 Issue 8, Sept 1966
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Record #:
10383
Abstract:
A rather inconspicuous man named Eli Foote is buried at Winton with two headstones from both sides of his family. Foote is the grandfather of famous author Harriet Beecher Stowe. Foote had traveled from New York to Hertford County to trade New England products in North Carolina markets. Eli and his brother Larry found strong markets for their products and decided to remain. Foote died in 1792 and was buried with a headstone from his New York family and his wife's North Carolina family.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 34 Issue 8, Sept 1966, p15,39, por
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Record #:
10382
Author(s):
Abstract:
Skinnay Ennis was a national singer from Salisbury, N.C. Ennis graduated from UNC in Chapel Hill in 1925 and participated with Hal Kemp's local band, Saxie Dowell, for twelve years. Ennis later left the band and formed his own, which opened in 1938 in Beverly Hills, California. The highlight of his career was serving as maestro for Bob Hope's NBC PEPSODENT radio program.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 34 Issue 8, Sept 1966, p13, por
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Record #:
12574
Author(s):
Abstract:
Native Americans of Cherokee decent are undergoing profound changes within North Carolina. An increase in employment off the reservation, coupled with the strengthening of industry on the reservation, is resulting in the decline of Native Americans being able to speak in their native tongue or write using the traditional alphabet. Modernization and exposure to life outside of the reservation is leading to an intensification of interracial marriages, or rather, individuals claiming to have Cherokee blood, thus entitling them to a share in the ownership of the reservation. In an attempt to curb the rising number of individuals professing Cherokee heritage, it is now required that individuals be at least 1/16th true Cherokee prior to acceptance into the Eastern Band.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 34 Issue 8, Sept 1966, p9-11, 35-36, il, por
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