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4 results for The State Vol. 29 Issue 20, Mar 1962
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Record #:
12711
Author(s):
Abstract:
The number one issue in the spring legislative primaries will be the sales tax on food. Although the issue is more pronounced in some counties than others, there is no other one issue of state-wide importance which even approaches it in interest. There is no liberal-conservative division in the food tax controversy, and there is no correlation between the controversial tax and the spirited primaries and election of two years ago.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 20, Mar 1962, p7-8, 22
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Record #:
12713
Author(s):
Abstract:
At the turn of the century, in \"Wootentown,\" North Carolina, former slaves gained notoriety for their brick-making abilities. Located near Washington, the village location was a primary source of excellent brick-making clay, allowing former slaves to practice their considerable skills. The methods used at that time required more supervision, yet a brickyard could be started with as little as $10,000, as compared to the $1,000,000 start-up costs for modern brickyards today.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 20, Mar 1962, p10
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Record #:
12712
Abstract:
The first ski slopes opened in western North Carolina, drawing huge crowds despite little outside publicity. Opened at Cataloochee Ranch near Waynesville, the Alexanders installed two runs fed by snow-making machines. So far, the ranch has installed no winter over-night accommodations, but a large, sturdy barn was transformed into a handsome lounge for skiers.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 20, Mar 1962, p9, 28, por
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Record #:
12770
Abstract:
The Southern Highland Handicraft Guild, Inc., in Asheville, North Carolina, is a non-profit organization created in 1928 to encourage commercial production by craftsmen in the highlands. Sales of Southern Appalachian handicrafts totaled about $5 million in 1959, and business has increased considerably in the last two years. Today, the guild operates six retail shops, and could easily increase its $365,000 annual sales if not for the already high demand placed on local craftsmen for their work.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 20, Mar 1962, p11, 31, il, por
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