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6 results for The State Vol. 28 Issue 11, Oct 1960
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Record #:
12814
Abstract:
Enhanced by the construction of a canal in 1787, the area surrounding Somerset, North Carolina became a lucrative location for plantations. Armed with the ability to move their wares, farmers were able to use the new canal to flood rice fields, float lumber, and move barreled produce. Interrupted by abolition, the plantations disbanded. Tenant farmers moved into the area, lasting through the early 19th-century at which point the Federal Government sold the property at auction.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 28 Issue 11, Oct 1960, p8-9, 27-28, il
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Record #:
12817
Abstract:
Focusing on some of the smaller towns in Washington County, this article mentions Roper, Mackeys, Creswell, and Spruill's Point. Roper is the focus of the piece, a small town named for the John L. Roper Company, established in 1890 as one of the largest lumber concerns in the South. The William Lumber Company of Mackeys is also mentioned as well as a few other industrial ventures within the aforementioned towns.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 28 Issue 11, Oct 1960, p17, il
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Record #:
12818
Abstract:
Several thousand acres are being cleared and drained in Hyde, Washington, Tyrell, and Beaufort Counties, for a new agricultural empire in North Carolina. The American Land Company, Lake Phelps Farms, Inc., the Three L Company, the MacArthurs of Chicago, the W.R. Grace Interests, and the Connecticut General Life Insurance Company, include some of the investors and land owners involved in the project.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 28 Issue 11, Oct 1960, p19, il, map
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Record #:
12816
Abstract:
Deemed an official port of delivery by the General Assembly in 1790, Plymouth, North Carolina served as the location for three battles during the Civil War. Postwar expansion served the city well, welcoming railways, paper mills, plywood plants, and a liquid aluminum plant.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 28 Issue 11, Oct 1960, p15-16, il, por
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Record #:
12815
Author(s):
Abstract:
Although settlers first came to North Carolina during the mid-17th-century, the area near Washington remained vacant until the early 1700s. Close to water, enhanced through the convenience of rivers, and sustained through industry, agriculture, and fisheries, residents of Washington have enjoyed a quiet history on the shores of the Pamlico.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 28 Issue 11, Oct 1960, p10-12, 23, 26, il, map
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Record #:
12819
Abstract:
The Surveyor General in the Southern Province of Carolina prior to moving to the Albemarle, John Culpepper was tried for treason and later acquitted due the lack of settled government in the colony. Culpepper's actions are historically known as the Culpepper Rebellion.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 28 Issue 11, Oct 1960, p31
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