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6 results for The State Vol. 26 Issue 2, June 1958
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Record #:
12625
Author(s):
Abstract:
In addition to the farming depression spreading throughout Selma, neighbors were discouraged when their single textile plant closed. Bringing hope back to Selma, Braxton Wilson, chairman of the Smithfield Chamber of Commerce Industrial Development Committee, purchased the plant, selling it to a furniture development company. In the process of selling the old textile plant, Wilson built and sold another plant to an electronics firm. Now, Selma has two plants where before there was only one -- then none.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 2, June 1958, p8
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Record #:
12623
Author(s):
Abstract:
With the discovery of the Gulf Stream moving off our coast only a few years ago, expeditions for sport-fishing have been at an all time high, with access to this mighty \"river\" made possible by the half dozen ports where there are good boats and guides at a modest cost. Until quite recently, few North Carolinians ever ventured out to the Stream, as most sportsmen accomplished their fishing 5 to 15 miles from the western edge of the its boundaries.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 2, June 1958, p24-38, map
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Record #:
12624
Author(s):
Abstract:
The skeletal frame of the ancient Neuse River Lighthouse, over a century and a half old, can still be seen by the mariner today as he plies the waters of the River and Pamlico Sound. Erected in 1802 and dismantled in 1931, the light atop the dome could be seen on a clear night 12 miles down the sound and up the river. Known as a \"screw-pile\" lighthouse, the main body of the structure sits on large piles driven into the river bottom. The main house structure has four floors, including a tower room housing the gas lamps.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 2, June 1958, p17, il
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Record #:
12622
Author(s):
Abstract:
The reason the modern fisherman has better catches than his father and grandfather is because the new fishing holes are scientifically planned, stocked, fertilized, and managed; whereas the old fishing hole was left to nature. Dotted over the map of North Carolina are more than 2,000 artificial fishing ponds, most constructed to obtain additional income through fishing fees, afford the landowner (sportsmen) a well-stocked fishing site, and to increase the property value of the land.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 2, June 1958, p11, il
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Record #:
12621
Abstract:
As the storm of 1913 swept through North Carolina, reports of damage poured in from all points. September 4th brought reports from Tarboro, New Bern, Washington, Greenville, and Beaufort to name but a few towns suffering damage from wind and flooding. Farmville reported the deaths of two citizens as gale force winds whipped through their home, and other towns report the damage to boats and agricultural crops.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 2, June 1958, p14
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Record #:
13433
Author(s):
Abstract:
This series was originally published in \"Heart of the Alleghanies\" in 1881, giving a picture of North Carolina resources as drawn by two travelers from the North. Ziegler and Crosscup document North Carolina from a climatical and botanical point of view in general, but keep their observations in this record of their series focused on agriculture. Observations include the growth of tobacco production, and the rise of tobacco producing havens such as Hickory and Shelby.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 2, June 1958, p12
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