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5 results for The State Vol. 22 Issue 23, Apr 1955
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Record #:
13359
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Abstract:
Contractors of steamships, dams, army camps, and industrial plants, J.A. Jones Construction Company, of Charlotte, North Carolina is most famous for receiving the largest single contract ever awarded a single firm. Totaling $460,000,000 for the gaseous diffusion plant at Oak Ridge's atomic energy layout, J.A. Jones' current projects include the world's largest earth filled dam in Yellowstone National Park as well as additional dams in North and South America and water supply systems in several cities.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 23, Apr 1955, p20-23, il
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Record #:
13358
Abstract:
Adding to the progress and development of the textile industry in North Carolina, American Enka Corporation has developed a permanently colored filament rayon for many textile uses. Named Jetspun, the fiber boasts a remarkable color-fast quality, great tensile strength, abrasion resistance, absorptivity, and low cost.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 23, Apr 1955, p17, il
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Record #:
15730
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Abstract:
Each Easter morning hundreds of Easter egg \"fighters\" gather near an abandoned school near Cherryville in Gaston County for the annual Sugar Hill Easter Egg Fight. It has been going on for at least seventy years, but no one knows how it started. Many think it was brought by early German immigrants to the Gaston area. In 1954, over 1,500 people showed up. The object of the game is this--contestants hold boiled, dyed eggs in their hands, with just the small end exposed; eggs are brought sharply together; the cracked egg goes to the winner.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 23, Apr 1955, p10-11, il
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Record #:
15732
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Abstract:
The Brown Mountain Lights in Burke County is one of the unexplained and unsolved mysteries that have occurred in North Carolina over the centuries. The lights are balls of fire which seem to rise over the top of the mountain. Brown lists several of the theories offered for their origin. His own theory is that the lights are from towns miles beyond the mountain tops, distorted by heat generated air turbulence rising from two great chasms below the line of sight of the lights.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 23, Apr 1955, p8-9, il
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Record #:
15731
Author(s):
Abstract:
In another excerpt from his 1848 book, Letters from the Alleghenies, Lanman reports his experiences on the day he returned to Asheville from his trip down the French Broad River. He witnessed a domestic quarrel between a young husband and wife and tells of an industrious Asheville landlady, who, after years of hardships, became successful.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 23, Apr 1955, p18
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