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5 results for The State Vol. 14 Issue 43, Mar 1947
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Record #:
14674
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Abstract:
During the Civil War, Confederates established an inland naval yard in Charlotte. In 1862, Union forces threatened to take over the naval base, known as Gosport yard, in Norfolk, Virginia. The yard was engaged in fashioning munitions and equipment for Confederate ships and was vital to the South's war effort. Several new locations for relocating the yard were scouted but eventually, based on recommendations from Captains W. D. Murdaugh and William Parker CSN, Charlotte was chosen for available labor, material, and a functioning railway. The Charlotte naval yard operated from 1862 until the last six months of the war, supplying the southern effort with shells, torpedoes, and shot.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 14 Issue 43, Mar 1947, p3, 36
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Record #:
14678
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Abstract:
John Wesley Jenkins was a Methodist Minister traveling the circuit during the late 1800s. As a devout Methodist, Jenkins envisioned an orphanage dedicated solely to aiding and housing children and widows of the Methodist faith. To realize his vision, Jenkins wrote letters to The Christian Advocate and The North Carolina Christian Advocate and finally, after appearing before a Methodist conference, convinced enough fellow church members to fund the project. The facility, called The Methodist Home was approved to by state legislature March 6, 1899 to be built in Raleigh. It opened November 29, 1900 and the first child admitted, Cassie Bright, on January 7, 1901.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 14 Issue 43, Mar 1947, p11
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Record #:
20784
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Kenyon describes three of Eastern North Carolina's most unusual plants--the Venus Fly Trap, the pitcher plant, and the bugle. One characteristic that links the plants is that all three capture and devour insects.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 14 Issue 43, Mar 1947, p5, il
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Record #:
20786
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Abstract:
Hodges is the Insurance Commissioner for North Carolina, and he gives some interesting figures and statistics for automobile accidents in North Carolina. For example, in 1946, there were 10,287 automobile accidents which resulted in 6.071 injuries and 1,028 deaths. Compared to 1945, this is an increase of 39 percent in injuries and 40 percent in the number killed.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 14 Issue 43, Mar 1947, p23
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Record #:
20785
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Abstract:
Lawrence describes the Raleigh he remembers as a boy growing up in the 1880s, together with some facts concerning other interesting eras.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 14 Issue 43, Mar 1947, p9, 34
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