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3 results for The State Vol. 11 Issue 18, Oct 1943
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Record #:
14898
Abstract:
In the 1940s, Gaston County reformed its historic image as one of the South's corn whiskey capitals by replacing distilleries with plants. The textile industry aided this endeavor and soon Gaston held the distinction \"combed yarn center of America.\" By 1943, Gaston County had 106 mills, 43 alone in Gastonia, the country seat. Giants of the textile industry included: Firestone Tire & Rubber Company (which manufactured fabric for tires), Cramer group, and Textiles, Inc. all located in Gastonia city limits. The industry touched other Gaston towns including: Cherryville, Mount Holly, Belmont, and Lowell.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 18, Oct 1943, p18-30, il
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Record #:
14896
Author(s):
Abstract:
Thomas Lanier Clingman born in Huntsville became an eminent resident and well-respected scholar within the state. He attended University of North Carolina and upon graduation in 1832 held the distinction of being first in every class he had ever attended. He studied law independently under Mr. W. A. Graham of Hillsboro. In 1840 he was elected to the North Carolina Senate followed by appointment in 1843 to the U.S. Congress. He and Thomas Bragg became U.S. Senators in 1857 and served until the Civil War. Clingman earned a respectable war record and was wounded in several engagements. Beyond his civic career, Clingman studied geology and meteorology.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 18, Oct 1943, p4-5, il
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Record #:
14897
Author(s):
Abstract:
Harvey's Point denotes an area between the Perquimans and Yeopim Rivers in Perquimans County. Harvey derives from the distinguished Harvey family who settled there in 1658. In 1663, the Harvey's built and incorporated the Belgrade Plantation. Remnants of the Belgrade Plantation could be seen in 1943, specifically the Ashland a Revolutionary War era two-story home.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 18, Oct 1943, p6, 34, il
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