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5 results for The State Vol. 1 Issue 48, Apr 1934
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Record #:
11530
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Abstract:
In this continuing series of articles on the various departments of North Carolina state government, Sadler discusses the Budget Bureau. The General Assembly created this department in 1925, and it has the responsibility of supervising all state expenditures. The Governor is the nominal head of the department, but the duties of the department are performed by an assistant director. Frank Dunlap of Wadesboro is the current Assistant Director. He is a former member of the General Assembly and Director of Personnel.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 1 Issue 48, Apr 1934, p11, 22, por
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Record #:
11527
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Abstract:
Francis Garrou rose from a penniless immigrant at age ten to head a large corporation in Valdese. Among his business interests are the Valdese Manufacturing Company, of which he is secretary and general manager, and the Waldensian Hosiery Mill, of which he is president. In 1932, he was elected to the North Carolina General Assembly from Burke County.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 1 Issue 48, Apr 1934, p5, 22, por
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Record #:
11531
Author(s):
Abstract:
In this continuing series of biographical sketches of members of the state legislature, Lucas discusses Robert Grady Johnson from Pender County. He is a three-term member of the General Assembly.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 1 Issue 48, Apr 1934, p19, por
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Record #:
11529
Abstract:
The Venus flytrap is one of the strangest plants in the world. It grows only in North Carolina's coastal region. It will swallow all kinds of things, but discards all those which it cannot digest.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 1 Issue 48, Apr 1934, p8, il
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Record #:
11528
Author(s):
Abstract:
Seay describes how Biltmore Industries grew from a small business to the largest hand weaving industry in the world.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 1 Issue 48, Apr 1934, p7, il
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