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5 results for Our State Vol. 79 Issue 10, Mar 2012
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Record #:
16203
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Photographer Emily Chaplin describes the DuPont State Forest. In the 1950s, the DuPont Corporation, a massive chemical company, bought 7,000 acres to build a plant in the southwestern part of the state. Years later the plant closed and the company sold the land to the state for a park. It has over eighty miles of trails, plus rivers with waterfalls and a lake at the forest center. Additional purchases have increased the park's size to 10,400 acres.
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Record #:
16202
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An accidental discovery by John Reed's son in 1799 Cabarrus County started the nation's first gold rush. Gold would be discovered in the following years in thirty-four of the state's one hundred counties. For the next fifty years, until the big gold strike in California in 1849, the state led the country in the production of gold.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 10, Mar 2012, p48-50, 52, 54, 56, 58-59, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
16204
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In 1945, the Sandburg family packed up their belongings and goats in Michigan and moved to a 245-acre farm, called Connemara, in Flat Rock. There he would produce some of his best work over the next twenty-two years. Dickey describes the farm and the Sandburg's life there.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 10, Mar 2012, p118-120, 122, 124, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
16201
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The little town of Calabash is as far southeast as you can go in the state, and it is known as a community with a lot of good seafood. The town is featured in Our State magazine's Tar Heel Town of the Month section.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 10, Mar 2012, p36-40, 42-44, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
16224
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During the Civil War, the Confederate army was lacking for many provisions and services, none as dire as the lack of medical personnel and supplies. There were only 8,000 Confederate doctors and only two ambulances per regiment of 2,000 troops. Of the medical staff, many lacked formal training and were unprepared to treat gunshot wounds or trauma.
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