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16 results for Our State Vol. 75 Issue 3, Aug 2007
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9565
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In this ongoing series about favorite Southern foods, Garner looks into the kitchen and discovers the fresh flavors and golden-brown crunch of fried fish. He discusses preparing several fish, such as trout and catfish. Garner lists several restaurants that prepare good fried fish, including Captain Charlie's Seafood Paradise (Swansboro); Brown Trout Mountain Grille (Lake Toxaway); Jack's Seafood Market (Raleigh); and Love's Fish Box (King's Mountain).
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9564
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In this continuing series on the best walks to take in North Carolina, Setzer describes a walk along the shoreline of Price Lake. The 2.3-mile trail is located on the Blue Ridge Parkway, at milepost 296.5, near Blowing Rock. The trail's grade is nearly level--a rarity for a mountain trail.
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9567
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Baseball coach Joe Ferebee won more games than any other coach in North Carolina history--694 coaching American Legion teams and 677 as head coach at Pfeiffer College. He also has a vast knowledge of baseball history. What his players remember him for is his guidance and wisdom.
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9568
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At one time there were 329 plantation estates reaching across rural North Carolina. Only a few, including China Grove Plantation in Arapahoe and Green River Plantation in Rutherfordton, would be preserved.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 3, Aug 2007, p70-74, 76, il Periodical Website
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9566
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Hillsborough, county seat of Orange County, is Our State magazine's featured Tar Heel town of the month.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 3, Aug 2007, p18-20, 22-23, il Periodical Website
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9574
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The Corolla Schoolhouse, one of many one-room schools that once dotted the Outer Banks, closed over fifty years ago. Through the work of local preservationists, Doug and Sharon Twiddy, the building was restored in 1999. It is now the Corolla Wild Horse Museum and the home base of the Corolla Wild Horse Fund, the nonprofit group that manages the herd.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 3, Aug 2007, p96-98, 100, 102, 104, il, por Periodical Website
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9573
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The United States Lifesaving Service, the forerunner of the U.S. Coast Guard, built twenty-nine lifesaving stations along North Carolina's coastline in the early 1870s. Some of these historic buildings have been restored as a museum in Rodanthe, a restaurant in Kitty Hawk, and a real estate office in Corolla.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 3, Aug 2007, p86-88, 90, 92-93, il Periodical Website
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9575
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Bullard describes two of North Carolina's historic homes--the Love House in Chapel Hill and The Cedars in Salisbury.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 3, Aug 2007, p106-108, 110, 112-113, il Periodical Website
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9597
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Owen Theatre, a Classical-Revival style brick building on Mars Hills College campus, began life as the Pleasant Hill Baptist Church in the 1880s. Today it is on the National Register of Historic Places and is home to the Southern Appalachian repertory Theatre. Milling discusses the transformation from church to theatre.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 3, Aug 2007, p122-124, 126, il, por Periodical Website
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9598
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With the decline of the textile industry in North Carolina, many historic buildings are left that can be restored for other uses. Tate discusses how Burlington and Charlotte are utilizing former textile buildings.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 3, Aug 2007, p128-130, 132-134, il Periodical Website
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9604
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West Asheville was an incorporated town until 1917, when it merged with Asheville. For most of its existence, it was a working class neighborhood, but it is now emerging into a combination of young families, budding entrepreneurs, immigrants, longtime residents, and a vibrant, artistic community. Richards discusses some of the attractions, including the West End Bakery and Café, Sunny Point Café and Bakery, Burgermeister's Kitchen and Tap, The Lazy Susan, and the Blue Barnhouse.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 3, Aug 2007, p174-176, 178-179, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
9599
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Construction of the main building at Peace College began in 1858, with a planned opening for classes in 1861. However, with the outbreak of the Civil War, education was suspended, and the structure served as a Confederate hospital until the end of the war. Union forces then used it for the Freedmen's Bureau until the college took over again.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 3, Aug 2007, p136-138, 140, 142-143, il Periodical Website
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9600
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Two retail centers, the Salisbury Emporium in Salisbury and the Olde Southport Village in Southport, utilize buildings from the early 20th-century. Silcox-Jarrett describes the restoration of the buildings and how their merchandise links buyers back to an earlier time.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 3, Aug 2007, p78-80, 82, 84-85, il Periodical Website
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9601
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Duncan recounts events in the life of Martha MacFarlane McGee Bell during the Revolutionary War.
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9602
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In the late 19th- and early 20-centuries, postcards were an inexpensive way to send messages to families and friends. Norris recounts some of the scenes of North Carolina that were portrayed on them.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 3, Aug 2007, p152-155, il Periodical Website
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