NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


11 results for Our State Vol. 75 Issue 2, July 2007
Currently viewing results 1 - 11
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
9078
Author(s):
Abstract:
In this continuing series on the best walks to take in North Carolina, Setzer describes a walk around the historic town of Edenton. The town, which was once the center of colonial commerce, offers impressive architectural scenery, including St. Paul's Episcopal Church, the state's second-oldest church; the Old Ice House; and the Dixon-Powell House. The length of the walk is about two miles round trip and a map is available at the Historic Edenton Visitor Center.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
9079
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Catawba County Historical Association has restored two of the town of Hickory's local architectural treasures--the 1887 Harper House and the 1912 Lyerly House. The process cost $2 million and took five years of restorations. The Harper House functions as a house museum dedicated to the interpretation of Hickory history and Victorian life in the South. The Lyerly House is a museum with rotating exhibits on the history of Hickory and the surrounding area.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 2, July 2007, p150-152, 154-157, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
9080
Author(s):
Abstract:
Martin discusses the work of Chapel Hill artist Elaine O'Neil, who combines patches of fabric to create textile collages of vibrant colors.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 2, July 2007, p168-170, 172, 174, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
9089
Author(s):
Abstract:
Alan Bundy left a job at Nortel, a high-tech industry in Raleigh, to manage a grove of pecan trees in Sampson County. His late father had planted them years before as a source of retirement income. Molinary describes how Goodness Grows in North Carolina, a program of the North Carolina Department of Agriculture that promotes state agriculture and its products, assisted him. The main goal of the program to help farmers and food producers survive. The business Bundy developed with help from Goodness Grows also includes a peach orchard and a variety of packaged nuts, candies, and sauces.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 2, July 2007, p144-146, 148-149, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
9084
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ocean piers have a long history in North Carolina. The first one was built at Wrightsville Beach in 1910, but was destroyed by fire ten years later. The oldest pier still in operation is Kure Beach Pier which was built in 1925. The number of piers peaked at 36 in 1980. In 2007, only twenty remain. Hurricanes caused the loss of some, but accelerated development on the barrier islands, especially Bogue Banks, is the main reason for closing piers. The price of beachfront property is soaring, and pier owners are selling to the developers. Barnes discusses a number of these vulnerable, wooden structures and why they hold such a special place in the memories of the people who visit them.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 2, July 2007, p36-38, 40, 42, il Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
9088
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1982, the East Carolina Chapter of the National Railway Historical Society became the new owners of a six-mile rail spur in Wake County. The society bought the line after the Southern Railway closed it down. Southern Railway assisted the society by selling the line at scrap value. The rail line was named The New Hope Valley Railway, and it runs from Bonsal to New Hill. The first trains ran on the line in 1906, and now a hundred years later they run for a different purpose--keeping alive North Carolina's railroading heritage.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 2, July 2007, p126-131, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
9083
Author(s):
Abstract:
Babe Ruth was in the twilight of his career when he came to Asheville with the New York Yankees to play exhibition games against the Asheville Tourists of the Class B Piedmont League on April 7 and 9, 1931. Huge crowds turned out to see him. Babe and the Yankees had come to Asheville twice before, but he had been unable to play. Rain washed the games out in 1926. Terrell recounts the 1925 visit when Babe's stomachache and reports of his death garnered more news than the games.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
9082
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lumberton, the county seat of Roberson County, is Our State magazine's Tar Heel town of the month. Early commerce in the town revolved around shipments of lumber. This was followed by turpentine and tobacco industries, and by the early 1900s the textile industry had made its way to Lumberton. Those industries have now declined, but because of its location on I-95, new industries have replaced them. Visitor attractions include the Luther Britt Park, the Black Water Grill, and Exploration Station.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 2, July 2007, p18-20, 22-23, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
9085
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1997, there were fourteen planetariums across the state. Yates describes one of the recent additions, the five-year-old Ingram Planetarium at Sunset Beach. The planetarium was the idea of the late Stuart Ingram and his wife, Louise. In 1991, he opened the Museum of Coastal Carolina at Ocean Isle Beach and ten years later acquired the funds to start a planetarium. The facility features a 40-foot dome and a 2000-square-foot exhibition hall.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
9087
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI) is located deep within the Pisgah National Forest near Rosman. Two towering radio telescopes are located there, as well as eight optical telescopes, two smaller radio telescopes, and over thirty buildings. Coffey describes the mountain astronomical center's activities, which include education, research, and public outreach.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
9081
Author(s):
Abstract:
Jackson describes three inns that are located along waterways where guests can watch the water flow slowly by and release the tensions of the world at the same time. They are the River House Country Inn and Restaurant (Grassy Creek); River Lodge Bed and Breakfast (Cullowhee); and Lois Jane's Riverview Inn (Southport).
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 2, July 2007, p176-178, 180-182, il Periodical Website
Full Text: