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9 results for Our State Vol. 72 Issue 2, July 2004
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Record #:
6733
Abstract:
At its peak North Carolina's rail system included over 5,200 miles. With the advent of the interstate highway system, bigger trucks to haul freight, more people driving, and better local roads, railroad routes declined and fell into disuse. Now through the efforts of North Carolina Rail-Trails(NCRT), organized in 1988, these railroad beds are getting a second lease on life as pathways for hikers, bicyclists, and horseback riders. Currently, there are twenty-eight rail-trail locations across the state either in operation, development, or in the planning stages.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 2, July 2004, p100-102, 104-106, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6728
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North Carolina refused to ratify the new Constitution in 1788, unless a list of rights for all citizens was added to it. To win over North Carolina and other states, James Madison sent twelve handwritten copies of the rights to the states; they were accepted. Today this list is known as the Bill of Rights. After the Civil War, the state's handwritten copy was stolen by a Union soldier and carried to Ohio. Johnson follows the document's trail from there until it was recovered in Philadelphia by the FBI in 2003.
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6727
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Concord, the county seat of Cabarrus County, takes its name from the harmonious resolution of a controversy over where to locate the courthouse. It is home to two of the state's top ten attractions: Concord Mills shopping mall and Lowe's Motor Speedway. Originally a farming community, Concord grew into a thriving center for textiles and banking. In the new century it is a town with a plan to bring people back to its downtown and surrounding historic district with an eclectic mix of restaurants, retailers, and entertainment-oriented businesses.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 2, July 2004, p18-20, 22, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
6732
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Latta Place, the home of Scotsman James Latta in Mecklenburg County, was a thriving cotton and corn plantation around 1800. Today, the 1,290-acre tract contains Latta's restored home and the Latta Plantation Nature Preserve, one of the country's most modern rehabilitation facilities for injured birds of prey. Hodge describes the preserve, house, and recreational things to do on a visit there.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 2, July 2004, p92-94, 96-97, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6730
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Wayne Erbson has a lifelong love of bluegrass and old-time music. This love brought him from California to North Carolina, where he eventually took a job teaching Appalachian music at Central Piedmont Community College. In the 1980s, he moved to Asheville, which has a vibrant old-time music community. There he founded Native Ground Music, a publishing company devoted to preserving Southern Appalachian heritage.
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Record #:
6734
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Murfreesboro's Watermelon Festival began in 1986 as a small half-day event for around 400 locals in the town of 2,500. Today it has expanded into a four-day extravaganza that attracts 40,000 people. Seldon describes what to do and see while attending the festival.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 2, July 2004, p112-114, 116, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6731
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Boating and fishing getaways are very popular in North Carolina, and the state has plenty of lakes to meet the needs of each. Describing lakes east of I-95, in the Piedmont, and in the western counties, Blackburn gives a small sampling of what the state's wide range of recreational lakes have to offer.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 2, July 2004, p62-64, 66, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6729
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Salamanders are populous all across the state. These creatures belong to the order Caudata, comprised of seven families in North America, and all found in North Carolina. Adams describes a number of them, including the two-toed amphiuma which, at four feet, is the state's largest salamander and one of the largest in the world.
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Record #:
6735
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Pittard recounts the history of Ridgeway which once proclaimed itself the \"Cantaloupe Capital of the World.\" In the early 1900s, German immigrants, after having failed at raising small fruits, such as dewberries and strawberries, turned to cantaloupes and found them perfect for the soil. In the early 1940s, 100 railcars of cantaloupes were shipped in season, and production often exceeded 80,000 crates. However, blight attacked the fields after World War II. Though the disease was brought under control, production never again reached pre-war levels.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 2, July 2004, p146-148, il Periodical Website
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