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9 results for Our State Vol. 70 Issue 11, Apr 2003
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5752
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Born in France in 1746, botanist Andre Michaux was sent to America by the French government in 1785 to collect seeds, trees, shrubs, and plants. In the process he roamed through 30 North Carolina counties, where he either discovered or described 300 plants. Yet, though he covered more territory than Daniel Boone and made many botanical discoveries, Michaux remains relatively unknown in this country.
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5751
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Randleman, located in northern Randolph County, is OUR STATE magazine's Tar Heel town of the month. The town has a rich heritage and has preserved a \"number of structures full of character and history.\" For years textiles drove the economy but have since declined. Now Randleman looks forward to the completion of the long-awaited Randleman Dam and Lake and the predicted economic boom to follow.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 70 Issue 11, Apr 2003, p18-20, 22-23, il Periodical Website
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5761
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At one time 1,600 different types of apples grew in North Carolina, but the number declined after the Civil War. In the late 1970s, Creighton Calhoun of Chatham County began a twenty-year search for old southern apples that date back before 1928. He collects cuttings of old varieties he finds to grow on his land. In the late 1990s, Horne Creek Living Historical Farm near Pinnacle, in collaboration with Calhoun, started planting historical apple trees. The farm is \"the only public collection of historical trees in the nation.\"
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 70 Issue 11, Apr 2003, p106-108, il Periodical Website
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5756
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Many North Carolinians love to compete in unusual contests. Two of the state's best-known ones are the National Hollerin' Convention in Spivey's Corner and the International Whistlers Convention in Louisburg. Tomlin describes some of North Carolina's lesser known, but still entertaining, unusual competitions. These include the Turkey Olympics in Raeford, Great Cardboard Box Derby at Beech Mountain, and collard-eating contest at Ayden's annual Collard festival.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 70 Issue 11, Apr 2003, p126-127, il Periodical Website
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5757
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The Louise Wells Cameron Art Museum in Wilmington, formerly St. John's Museum of Art, underwent a massive expansion recently and reopened in April 2002, with a new 42,000-square-foot, state-of-the-art facility that allows the museum to fully display its stored works. It is the only museum in the country whose \"primary purpose is collecting, archiving and displaying the art of North Carolina.\"
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 70 Issue 11, Apr 2003, p130-133, il Periodical Website
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5758
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One of the most popular horse shows in the Southeastern United States has been held since 1945 in the rural community of Oak Ridge in Guilford County. Tomlin describes the two-day event which has grown from an entry list of 17 classes to 200.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 70 Issue 11, Apr 2003, p136-138, il Periodical Website
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5763
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The Coker Arboretum at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is celebrating its 100th anniversary in 2003. It was created by a young botany professor, William C. Coker. Although only five acres in size, the arboretum is considered one of state's most beautiful places.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 70 Issue 11, Apr 2003, p74-76, 78, il Periodical Website
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5762
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Rowan County is OUR STATE magazine's featured county of the month. In 2003, the county is celebrating its \"sesquiduplicentennial\" or 250th anniversary. Westbrook discusses the rich history of the county, sights to see, including the North Carolina Transportation Museum, and planned celebration events.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 70 Issue 11, Apr 2003, p140-142, 144, il Periodical Website
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5764
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Westbrook discusses five women who are making a difference in North Carolina agriculture: Meg Scott Phipps, North Carolina Secretary of Agriculture; Deborah Grant, owner of Agriculture Program Services; Genell Pridgen and Sandra Garner, sheep farmers; and Debbie Roos, Chatham County extension agent.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 70 Issue 11, Apr 2003, p98-100, por Periodical Website
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