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16 results for North Carolina's Eastern Living Magazine Vol. 5 Issue 3, Spr 2014
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Record #:
21749
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Phillip and Karen Lynch Harley live in Hollister in Halifax County. She is a member of the Haliwa-Saponi tribe and he grew up in Maryland with the Picataway Native American tribe. Karen minored in art at the University of Maryland and later attended the prestigious Schuler School of Fine Arts in Baltimore. Phillip is a completely self-taught wood-carver and makes everything from wooden spoons, bowls, walking sticks, and people. Together they create works that keep their Native American heritage alive.
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North Carolina's Eastern Living Magazine (NoCar F 252.3 N82), Vol. 5 Issue 3, Spr 2014, p50-51,54-56, il, por
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21748
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Ernestine Hassell retired from nursing after thirty years working as a nurse at the Tyrrell County Health Department. She soon found that she had a natural talent for wood carving which she has been doing for the past decade. Among her carvings are wood spirits, village-style people, Christmas ornaments, and Santa Clauses she creates from driftwood and cypress knees found washed up along the Albemarle Sound shoreline. Hassell does all the painting for her wood crafts.
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Record #:
21745
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Cathy McInville in an artist in Conway, Northampton County, whose specialty is sculptures, painting, and stained glass windows. Conway Studio Works, which she owns, is divided into two parts--the front where her works are displayed and her work studio in back. She will make stained glass windows on commission.
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North Carolina's Eastern Living Magazine (NoCar F 252.3 N82), Vol. 5 Issue 3, Spr 2014, p19-22, 24-25, il
Record #:
21747
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The Inner Banks Artisan Center in downtown Washington provides space for artists and craftsmen to work on site. Stotesbury visits silk painter Jan Lamoreaux to discuss how she became interested in the art, what techniques are used, her finished products which reflect both antique and modern designs, and her newest art project--anodized jewelry.
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Record #:
21746
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Sheila Lee of the Bear Grass Community has been crafting for the past thirty-three year. She creates primitive-looking figures of all sizes that appear old and antique looking. The majority of them are Santa Clauses and other Christmas items. But she also makes other items for the various seasons and holidays. Green and Lee discuss how her creative process works.
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Record #:
21752
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Jim Messer has art degrees from both Virginia Commonwealth University and Florida State. He left a teaching job at Davidson College and moved to Hertford County in 2006 to help create the associate fine arts degree at Roanoke Chowan Community College. He teaches a number of classes including art history, art design, drawing, jewelry making, and pottery. The clay is local, being donated from the farm of Cedric Pierce. Messer describes the steps involved in processing the clay from the ground to the classroom.
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Record #:
21751
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Joan Sears, who grew up in the wilds of Hyde County, is a self-accomplished artist. She began painting at age five with pokeberry juices and brown paper. She later received an oil painting set and mastered oils by age seven. She is experienced in designing, carving and painting and works in watercolor, acrylic, and oil paints. Many of her canvasses are non-traditional, being wood salvaged from old buildings, like heart pine and handmade windows.
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North Carolina's Eastern Living Magazine (NoCar F 252.3 N82), Vol. 5 Issue 3, Spr 2014, p65-67, 72-73, il
Record #:
21750
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Lawrence and Cathy Carter purchased Yearning For Yarn, a yarn shop in Plymouth, in 2005. Cathy is also the shopkeeper. The store is stocked with unique, high quality yarn in a variety of colors and textures. The response from knitters and crafters has been good. They had been hoping for a shop since the last one closed--a place where they could go for specialty yarn and personal instruction and a place where they could sit, knit, and converse. Yearning For yard is all this--and more.
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Record #:
21761
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In 1968-69, when school desegregation in Hyde County threatened the loss of two African American schools, O. A. Peay in Swan Quarter and Davis in Engelhard, many ordinary people came together to lead civil rights protests, boycotts, and marches. Many were arrested and the KKK got involved. In one confrontation, the State Highway Patrol separated 100 armed African Americans and the Klan, but the KKK burned a cross and gunfire erupted between the two groups. No one was hurt. Parents boycotted the schools for one year, and classes were conducted in churches by teachers. After a year a settlement was reached.
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Record #:
21762
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White relates how the Craftsman Museum in Windsor came into being through the efforts of Mayor Jim Hoggard and the late local historian Harry Lewis Thompson. The museum is in the former Livery Stable, which is thought to have been built around 1890 to house horses and mules as well as sell them. Most of the artifacts there are from Thompson's collection.
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North Carolina's Eastern Living Magazine (NoCar F 252.3 N82), Vol. 5 Issue 3, Spr 2014, p118-119, 121-123, il
Record #:
21759
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Jerry Byrum of Bertie County has worked in woodwork a large part of his life, making furniture and gun cabinets. For the past ten years he has been creating pens and pencils. He describes how he makes them and the materials used, and Thadd's photographs illustrate the process. Cost of a pen ranges from $30 to $40, which, he indicates, is a problem with sales in the local area.
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Record #:
21760
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The authors visit the Main Street Eatery in Creswell and report their positive findings. Sharon and Billy Maitland from nearby Columbia purchased the former Davenport Market in 2004. After much discussion on how to use the property, Sharon's dream of a restaurant won out and it opened in December, 2012. The couple also owns the funeral home in Columbia.
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Record #:
21776
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The origin of the Albemarle's bell is unknown, although speculations are that it came from a church or school. After the war, it wound up in Worcester, Massachusetts in the possession of a Union chaplain. After his death it passed through a number of hands, and at one time it was in storage for forty years at the Worcester History Museum. The bell is now on loan to the Port O'Plymouth Museum and will be a focal point in the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Plymouth.
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21775
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On May 4, the Confederate ironclad CSS Albemarle engaged seven Union ships in Albemarle Sound. The Albemarle severely damaged two ships and the rest withdrew. The only real damage sustained by the ship was a smokestack riddled with holes. To mark the 150th anniversary of the battle, Wallace Abernathy and Walter White are building a replica of the smokestack which will be attached to the Albemarle's replica now docked in Plymouth.
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Record #:
21777
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\"The Legion of Honor was created by Napoleon in 1802 to acknowledge services rendered to France by persons of exceptional merit.\" On February 20, 2014, the French General Consul, on behalf of President Hollande, presented the prestigious medal in a Raleigh ceremony to fourteen World War II veterans. Among them were Carl Russell Britt of Conway and Joe Dickerson of Murfreesboro. Both men were in combat in France during the war.
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